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2014-2015


MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD

1

MESSAGE FROM THE SCHOOL DIRECTOR

2

MESSAGE FROM THE TREASURER

3

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

4

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

5

VISION, MISSION AND CORE BELIEFS

6

GOALS

7

GOAL 1

8-11

GOAL 2

12-13

GOAL 3

14-15

GOAL 4

16-17

GOAL 5

18-19

GOAL 6

20

QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE

21-29

INTERESTING FACTS

30-32

UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES CHOSEN BY GRADUATED SENIORS

33-34


MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD On behalf of the Board of Directors, I am pleased to present our 2014-15 Annual Report. The last school year was one of challenges, but also full of so many successes. Teaching and empowering students are at the heart of what AISJ does. As a Board of Directors, we take great pleasure in celebrating the accomplishments of AISJ’s class of 2015. The 2014-15 graduates had an average IB score of 33 against a worldwide average of 30. This is once again, an excellent result for a non-selective school. Our graduates are now pursuing their dreams at top colleges and universities around the world. A major accomplishment of the 2014-15 school year was AISJ being reaccredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools for a further seven years. The accreditation was given without any “conditions” attached, the equivalent of an almost perfect score! We recognize that striving for excellence is a constant state that AISJ should always be in, however it was a wonderful moment to acknowledge the outstanding learning that is happening at AISJ. The reaccreditation is a confirmation of AISJ’s vision, mission, goals, and objectives. We would like congratulate our School Director, Dr. Andy Page-Smith, the administrators, faculty, staff, students, and parents for their herculean efforts to ensure that the reaccreditation process was successful. The reaccreditation success is even more noteworthy when considering that we started the 2014-15 academic year without 45 faculty members. The new immigration laws of South Africa created a huge challenge that showed what AISJ is truly made of; dedicated employees who united to guarantee that the effects of the visa “crisis” on students was minimized as much as physically possible. Another important accomplishment to report was the conclusion of the fourth year of our Facilities Master Plan. This achievement produced the beautiful Weinberg Center on the Pretoria Campus, and the Arts Center on the Johannesburg Campus. We are also pleased to report that our magnificent theater is more than half way to completion, and is scheduled to open in March 2016. Over the last year, the Board has remained focused on securing AISJ’s future financial sustainability, gaining a better understanding of what it means to be a “top-tier” school, and documenting our best practices, all of which culminated in a Governance Handbook. Our Handbook will help to ensure the continued success of the Board, regardless of any turnover of Directors, which is an inevitability in a truly international school. As we strive to be a high-performing Board, we are focused on providing several training opportunities for our Directors. Lastly, we saw another hard year’s work on our strategic goals which, with continued efforts during the 2015-16 academic year, will enable us to embark on a process to create a new strategic plan with a strong focus on learning. This process will take most of the 2015-16 academic year as we strive to include the voices of all stakeholders. The AISJ community’s input will be crucial, and we hope you will all participate where possible. We appreciate your continued support, and encourage feedback and participation in all Board events. Cherice Siebert Chair of the AISJ Board of Directors

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MESSAGE FROM THE SCHOOL DIRECTOR Last year I described the 2013-14 school year as a stellar year, and now, I would like to describe 2014-15 as one of considerable consolidation against a backdrop of significant challenges. The year started with 45 of our teachers out of the country patiently waiting for work visas and only one of our principals present. Late changes to visa processes and requirements resulted in new and returning teachers locked out of the country. Those who could return started the school year in as many different situations as possible to temporarily fill the missing spaces. This incredibly challenging process continued until October when the last of our new teachers arrived. Compounding on this availability of staff was an emerging international health issue centered on an Ebola outbreak in West Africa as well as a sudden decrease in student enrolment, a new phenomenon for AISJ, seemingly fueled by the visa situation but also South Africa’s flagging economy. Against this backdrop our community banded together and an incredibly hard working faculty and staff allowed AISJ to consolidate its progress from previous years. We made considerable progress on our strategic initiatives - particularly around our core ‘business’ of teaching and learning. We also took great strides in teacher development and reaching consistent teaching standards. Despite a very diverse group of graduates we maintained our IB goal of a passing grade of 33 or above and graduates received outstanding college placement results across the world. The vast majority of our students gained entry into their university of choice which included an impressive array of top-rated schools. In 2014-15 I visited over 30 universities around the world to investigate options for our students but to also share the work we are doing and thus, promote AISJ. Universities welcomed AISJ with overwhelming reception and interest, which was very encouraging. The sense of recognition and acknowledgement became a theme for the year. In October we went through our school accreditation process with Middle States Association of Schools and Colleges (MSA), receiving an outstanding report commending us on our “laser like focus on learning”. This report, compiled by a visiting team of six educators from around the world, was based on a 12 month, 380 page self–study. MSA awarded the accreditation without stipulations and gave AISJ multiple commendations, acting then, as a tangible validation of our four year self-improvement journey. AISJ has come a long way in recent years, and while its progress is often identified and illustrated by its very intensive facilities development, it is, however, the growth in the teaching and learning area which has gained considerable attention from other international schools around the world. In 2014-15 the number of external educators who visited our school to learn from us doubled. While celebrating the achievements of 2014-15 and the consolidation of our programs and status internationally, it would be greatly remiss of me not to highlight those who made that happen. The challenges of the past year were worn by the faculty and staff who displayed considerable commitment and dedication in the face of much adversity. I also wish to thank a committed and supportive Board of Directors who worked tirelessly to further professionalize the Board and who continue to plan for the long-term future of AISJ. Finally I would like to thank the students and parents who believed in us, showed considerable patience, and demonstrated a renewed sense of school spirit that ensured a highly successful year. Thank you for your continued support. Andy

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MESSAGE FROM THE TREASURER It has been a privilege to be a part of the AISJ school community since 2013. This is my second year serving on both the Board of Directors and the Finance Committee. As the Board Treasurer, I am pleased to work closely with highly capable members of the Finance Committee and AISJ management to carry out the Committee’s fiduciary responsibilities, and to ensure the financial health of AISJ. We have a wide range of opportunities to continue to strengthen our school, however, we face an array of challenges. In order to leverage our opportunities, we have made critical investments and have realized key improvements. We also continue to carefully address the external and internal challenges we face in our operating context. Important investments have been made, including in the following areas: • • • •

Continued investment in high caliber academic and administrative staff, hired both internationally and locally Ongoing strengthening of Teaching and Learning to enhance academic quality and delivery, as well as to provide professional development opportunities for faculty Additional learning support resources to reinforce our goals for inclusion Completion of the Arts Courtyard complex in Johannesburg, as well as the Weinberg Center in Pretoria, and ongoing construction of the theater in Johannesburg.

• Targeted investments to ensure that our students have access to the latest technology. We have navigated challenges, including in the following areas: • • • •

A challenging political and macroeconomic environment in South Africa with nominal GDP growth and declining foreign direct investment The South African Rand that is at an all-time low against the US Dollar A slowdown of enrollment growth at AISJ compared to recent years South African visa requirements which have increased the cost of recruiting and retaining international staff.

In light of enrolment levels being flatter than in recent years, the Finance Committee will review and revise our long-term financial plan, considering potential trade-offs. Our financial plan will support our financial objectives, and will be guided by the overall vision, mission and strategic priorities of the school for coming years. Our independent auditors have completed the audit for the 2014-15 academic year. We have received an unqualified opinion. For your information, the full audit report is available on the AISJ website. We are confident about the financial sustainability of the organization to go forward with an ambitious strategic plan for the future. Esther Benjamin

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STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015 2015 R Revenue Other (Income) Expenses Operating Expenses Staff Cost Surplus from Operations Interest Received Finance Costs Total Comprehensive Income for the Year

2014 R

352 557 333 3 839 117 (88 523 022) (233 187 929) 34 685 499 5 928 567 (3 876 960) 36 737 106

312 106 318 3 590 564 (70 860 499) (184 971 585) 59 864 798 5 385 428 (4 426 523) 60 823 703

REVENUE

2015 10,2%

EXPENSES

2015

2014 10,2%

0,3%

0,5%

3,4% 2,5% 4,3% 1,1% 1,5%

0%

0% 7,6%

6,6% 6,2%

7,8%

81.9%

2014

Tuition Fees Transport Fees Meal Fees Capital Fees Income Entrance Fees

81.4%

1,3% 1,6%

3,6% 3% 3,5% 6,9% 5,7%

1,8%

72,7%

2,1%

72,8%

Administrative and School Wide Support Building and Grounds Maintenance and Security Depreciation Instructional Support Material Staff Cost Student Activities Teaching and Learning Technology Transportation

04


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION FOR YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015

Assets Non-Current Assets Property, Plant and Equipment Current Assets Trade and other Receivables Cash and Cash Equivalents Total Current Assets Total Assets

2015 R

2014 R

338 914 306

254 374 597

ASSETS 2015 4%

16 070 112 82 266 373 98 336 485 437 250 791

15 720 520 128 015 616 143 736 136 398 110 733

282 479 084

245 741 978

13% 19%

77%

6%

Reserves and Liabilities Reserves Retained Income

2014 4%

Non-Current Liabilities Finance Lease Liabilities Long-Term Loans Total Non-Current Liabilities

103 264 31 911 331 32 014 595

33 513 281 33 513 281

13% 64%

11%

32%

3%

19%

2%

05

Current Liabilities Trade and other Payables Income received in Advance Finance Lease Liabilities Short Term Loan Total Current Liabilities Total Equity and Liabilities

2%

11 305 548 104 352 185 77 819 7 021 560 122 757 112 437 250 791

13 445 347 98 675 127 6 735 000 118 855 474 398 110 733

Property, Plant and Equipment Trade and other Receivables Operational Reserves Bank Balances and Short-Term Deposits Capital Development Fund


VISION MISSION CORE BELIEFS

“Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed, and courageously make a difference” We are a diverse, international community providing a balanced and nurturing learning program that fosters personal growth, provides meaningful opportunities for achievement, and promotes positive contributions to society. We believe that...

• Honesty and integrity are fundamental • Inspired teaching and learning are essential for exemplary achievement and growth • A strong community is built through participation, communication, collaboration and mutual respect • Contributing positively to society is our responsibility • Respect for diversity encourages open‐mindedness and empathy • A culture of continuous improvement and accountability is critical to success • Creativity, adaptability and innovation empower us to thrive in a changing world

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GOALS

07

1

To deliver a rich and balanced learning program for all students that provides meaningful opportunities for achievement and personal growth.

2

To ensure that students' learning experiences are integrated through meaningful connections across the curriculum and delivered through an inquiry approach.

3

To meet the individual academic, social and emotional needs of each student through integrated systems and quality differentiated teaching.

4

To build a strong sense of belonging to a community, within, around and outside of the school.

5

To ensure that the school has the financial capacity and means to deliver and maintain a high quality international education.

6

To provide the facilities that enable us to deliver a rich and balanced learning program appropriate to the education of international students.


All students will achieve a high level of academic success.

Spring MAP Reading Test Results : Grade 3-8

2014-15 was our second year of full implementation for Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) with Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. We completed two rounds of testing, firstly in October and then again in April. This year we made some changes to the grade levels tested. We decided not to test grade 9 based on evidence that we were getting minimal value out of the grade 9 data as the number of schools using MAP worldwide at grade 9 is small compared to other grade levels. Additionally, we have found that many of our 9th graders were either out performing or were not engaged in the test taking process.

Spring MAP Language Usage Test Results: Grade 3-8

The accompanying graphs show that AISJ students perform well comparatively to International and USA students. AISJ is currently in the top 40% of international schools compared to 32% last year. Contributing factors could include that we withdrew grade 9 students from all testing sessions last year and typically they have performed very well in previous years compared to students in lower grades. We are also exploring other factors such as lower performing cohorts of students in certain grades.

Spring MAP General Mathematics Test Results: Grade 3-8

“To deliver a rich and balanced learning program for all students that provides meaningful opportunities for achievement and personal growth.�

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Spring MAP General Science Test Results: Grade 3-8

We have set a target mean point score of 33 points for students entering the IB Diploma Programme (IBDP) by May 2016. Our May 2015 mean point score met this expectation of 33 points. The worldwide IBDP mean point score will be available by the end of October at which time we will amend the accompanying graph. Mean Point Score AISJ and World

Over the last eight years, the number of IB Diploma candidates has risen considerably with 53 students participating in the IB Diploma Programme in 2014-15. Of those entered, 87% achieved the IB Diploma, compared to the worldwide average of 79%. Number of AISJ IBDP Candidates The school will offer a wide variety of arts activities for all age groups and abilities in which all students are expected to engage. New courses have been introduced in the High School that will allow a greater number of students to participate actively in a greater range of artistic and athletic pursuits. Additionally, the number of co-curricular activities on offer K-12 has been increased to accommodate a wider range of student interests.

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“To deliver a rich and balanced learning program for all students that provides meaningful opportunities for achievement and personal growth.�


Variety of JHB ES Activities

Variety of JHB MS Activities

Variety of JHB HS Activities

Variety of Pretoria ES Activities

“To deliver a rich and balanced learning program for all students that provides meaningful opportunities for achievement and personal growth.�

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Variety of Pretoria MS Activities

Each student is engaged in and understands the culture of meaningful service. As of May 2015, approximately 90% of students were actively engaged in service activities as determined in the curriculum units at every grade level. In 2015-16, we trialed the Service Learning rubrics to gather baseline data and measure students’ understanding of service culture Pre-K-12. Feedback was collected from teachers and students and the rubrics were edited. This year the rubrics will be integrated with the curriculum units and in student portfolios to document students developing understanding of service learning.

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“To deliver a rich and balanced learning program for all students that provides meaningful opportunities for achievement and personal growth.�


Students will be conceptual, independent, and connected The school website continues to develop and improve. In 2014-15 student, teacher and parent focus groups were learners.

undertaken with the goal of increasing ease of use, and In 2014-15, we established the benchmark of 80% of communication with the wider community while students who met the success criteria based on the initial maintaining a strong focus on student learning. trial of the Learner Practice Rubrics. We extended the trial with sample groups in the High School and the terms As a result, the Izindaba has been improved and Conceptual, Connected and Independent were explored divisional expectations around communication with in depth by teams of teachers and students. We aligned parents and students clarified. the rubrics with the existing transdisciplinary and Machines Purchased (by Year) dispositional standards and were able to reconcile the gaps and overlaps.

Operational Expenses (OPEX) and Capital Expenses (CAPEX)

Due to the complexity of the tool and terminology, we were unable to widen the trial beyond High School. In 2015-16, we will introduce the learner practice rubrics to Middle School and Elementary School and develop age appropriate views of the concepts. With the introduction of slates into Kindergarten, the personalized learning program at AISJ is in full swing. Students from grade one to grade twelve each have their own device and in the lower years devices are shared at ratios considered to be most beneficial to teaching and learning.

Internet Bandwidth 2015/16

We continue to increase the available bandwidth on both campuses having double it again this year. Installation of fibre optics to both campuses was negotiated in 2014-15 and is currently underway.

“To ensure that students' learning experiences are integrated through meaningful connections across the curriculum and delivered through an inquiry approach.�

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The curriculum will be inquiry-based, demand connections across subject areas and build on previous learning. During 2014 -15, we re-introduced the Rubicon Atlas Curriculum Mapping Database to secure our documentation, and to map, electronically, the curriculum standards, benchmarks and units used school-wide. Rubicon ensures that we are able to track consistency of format, allows us to easily track and organize units developed using a common format. Rubicon also allows us to archive old units, import new, maintain and review current units, store unit resources, and view – for reference – ‘like’ units from other Rubicon schools. The accompanying graph shows that as of May 2015, the percentage of curriculum units collected had reached the targeted goal of 100%, compared to 83% collected in the previous year. UbD Units Developed

The bellow graph illustrates that we have met our target ahead of schedule and the results are very positive. Teachers complete a self-assessment based on the Professional Teaching Rubric scoring themselves from ‘Beginning’ to ‘Leading’ with a common understanding that the top of the scale is very aspirational. This is then moderated by principals. In order to illustrate progress, we convert these descriptors to numbers with ‘Applying’ given the numerical value of 3. Teachers who have been at AISJ for three years or more rate themselves at a much higher average than new teachers due to their deeper understanding of the practices within the rubrics. Inquiry & Integration at “Applying Level” by May 2017

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“To ensure that students' learning experiences are integrated through meaningful connections across the curriculum and delivered through an inquiry approach.”


Our admission process will ensure that the students we accept have the potencial to achieve success at AISJ. The Admissions Policy that was revised and accepted by the Board of Directors in 2013-14, is now posted on the Admissions website. Teachers will deliver a purposefully differentiated curriculum. A co-teaching pilot project was introduced to elementary and middle school faculty on both campuses. The purpose of the co-teaching pilot project was to establish a school-wide expectation for collaboration and co-teaching between general education and learning support teachers, and to provide support for all teachers so that co-teaching models, which align to AISJ Teaching Rubrics, will be implemented within an effective, flexible grouping classroom, grades K-8. All PK-8 learning support teachers and eleven classroom teachers participated in the pilot. In total, there were four faculty presentations, two focus group sessions, and twenty-five co-teaching pair meetings. During 2014-15, intensive professional development on differentiation in the classroom, was offered on both campuses, including one Learning Institute and one Weekend Workshop. Eithne Gallagher, a consultant and authority in the field of English Language Learners visited for one week, and offered the highly attended Week-end Workshop. During the week, each grade level team, from PreK – grade 8 on both campuses, met with the consultant for at least one sixty-minute session.

This has been met and curriculum units continue to be tracked to review the quality and degree to which differentiation is embedded within the unit through Rubicon Atlas. The accompanying graph illustrates that the results are very positive and that we have met our target ahead of schedule. Teacher Differentiation and Assessment at “ Applying Level”

Teachers complete a self-assessment based on the Professional Teaching Rubric scoring themselves from ‘Beginning’ to ‘Leading’ with a common understanding that the top of the scale is very aspirational. This is then moderated by principals. In order to illustrate progress, we convert these descriptors to numbers with ‘Applying’ given the numerical value of 3. Teachers who have been at AISJ for three years or more rate themselves at a much higher average than new teachers due to their deeper understanding of the practices within the rubrics.

“To meet the individual academic and social and emotional needs of each student through coherent PK-12 systems and quality differentiated teaching.”

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Individual students will reach their full academic potential. The PK-12 Learning Support Handbook was completed and approved by the Leadership Team in May 2015. All students who receive Learning Support services have a written Individualized Learning Plan (ILP) and an annual ILP meeting. The ILP is based upon academic formal and informal assessment. Students are assessed annually on a norm-referenced standardized test, and students’ academic progress is monitored is measured using a standardized assessment at least three times a year. Student progress and completion of goals is entered into each student’s ILP mid-year and end-of-year. Students who are English Language Learners are administered an English language proficiency assessment (WIDA). A student’s level of proficiency helps to determine entrance and exit services. Confidential files exist for all students receiving Learning Supporting a consistent format for all divisions. Entrance and exit criteria for English Language Learners and students who have learning differences have been determined and documented. Data on student's average growth based on their ILP's will be reported on in the next Annual Report. All students will be socially and emotionally healthy. The existing transdisciplinary and dispositional standards have been aligned with the rubrics to reconcile the gaps and overlaps. The four dispositional standards have been highlighted in student friendly posters and will be introduced to students and explored in depth throughout 2015-16. These will be referred to as C.O.R.E

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In 2014 – 15, a Child Protection taskforce made up of teachers, administrators and board members explored issues related to child protection and bullying and a draft policy was developed in 2014. The Child Protection Policy was passed by the Board, and in 2014 – 15, a comprehensive handbook detailing the procedures was implemented. Training sessions were presented to all staff at AISJ. Grade 6-12 Students who believe their social and emotional needs are met

No Data

No Data

*Please note the climate survey data for 14-15 used a 4. point to avoid a neutral option. In previous climate surveys the neutral choice was interpreted positively and thus inflated the numbers

All students will transition seamlessly between divisions and grade levels regardless of their needs. In 2014-15, qualitative and quantitative data on teachers’ knowledge and clear articulation of intended learning was collected and measured in a number of ways. This included a review of scope and sequences that document the key learning outcomes across all subjects and grades, a review of the data from the Curriculum Knowledge and Understanding Teacher Practice Rubrics and through discussions in the end of year meetings with principals and teachers.

“To meet the individual academic and social and emotional needs of each student through coherent PK-12 systems and quality differentiated teaching.”

The accompanying graphs shows that 71% of grade 6-12 respondents on the 2014-15 climate survey agree or strongly agree that their transition between divisions was smooth and seamless. Our projected target is that by May 2016, 85% of grade 6-12 respondents will believe that their transition between divisions was smooth and seamless. The percentage has dropped from the 2013-14 report. Contributing factors could include the visa situation which had a negative impact on a number of students and teachers who weren't able to get into the country for the start of the school year. Grade 6-12 Students who believe their divisional transition was smooth and seamless

*Please note the climate survey data for 14-15 used a 4. point to avoid a neutral option. In previous climate surveys the neutral choice was interpreted positively and thus inflated the numbers


Parents will feel they belong to, are supported by and can contribute to the AISJ community. The objective which aims to see 85% of AISJ parents feeling they belong to, are supported by and can contribute to the AISJ community by 2016 is well on the way to being achieved. Our climate survey was adjusted to allow more appropriate questions to gain this data. The results suggest 82.23% believe they feel they belong to, are supported by, and can contribute to AISJ community as of May 2015. Parents Attending AISJ Events

“To build a strong sense of belonging to a community, within, around and outside of the school.�

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AISJ will play an active role in the community in which we live. Integration of our local community into our curriculum is documented and tracked in units through Atlas Rubicon. As of May 2014, approximately 90% of our students were actively engaged in service activities as determined by the curriculum units at each grade level. Opportunities for engaging with the community are documented in the Service Learning Handbook available on the school portal. The handbook includes comprehensive information on the diverse range of service activities to suit students’ interests and skills that are available after school and/or at weekends. As of May 2014, approximately 90% of our students were actively engaged in service activities as determined by the curriculum units at each grade level. 100% of AISJ's partnerships with community groups will be sustainable and fully articulated by May 2015. We have a wide range of community partners that include animal welfare, community groups, and health and wellbeing. The process as to how community partnerships are initiated, formed and sustained is documented in the Service Learning Handbook. Criteria are used to evaluate our service partnerships for sustainability and each service activity is closely monitored to ensure that it is valid, relevant and benefits student learning. As of May 2015, approximately 90% of are partnerships are sustainable based on the evaluation criteria.

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“To build a strong sense of belonging to a community, within, around and outside of the school.�


AISJ will have the financial capacity to sustain existing programs and develop new programs that meet the learning needs of our students. 2014-15 was the first year of implementation of the Faculty Grant Program. The goal of the program is to improve student learning by encouraging teachers to conduct classroom research on innovative instructional strategies in their classrooms. A total fund of 10,000 USD is available annually with a maximum budget of 3000 USD per project. Three faculty members submitted proposals in May 2015 with a view to conducting action research in the 2015-16 school year and supervisors have been assigned. Scholarship Program

Instructional Resource Spending

AISJ will remain highly competitive in the teacher job market, to attract and retain faculty.

Faculty Growth and Retention

Data collected on international teachers. Measuring instruments for data will change. While this objective has been difficult to accurately measure the Board of Director's agreed to amend the measure to align ourselves against other leading international schools in reference to salaries for overseas hired teachers. We remain in line with this group although our competitiveness in total package will need to be carefully monitored over the next few years. Local Salaries remain well above the target set to retain & recruit local teachers and in line with our targets.

“To ensure that the school has the financial capacity and means to deliver and sustain a high quality international education.�

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AISJ will continue to increase the capacity of our teachers. In preparing the 2014-15 report it has been identified that this has been under reported in the previous years. This is significantly above our goal and in line with leading international schools. Teaching and Learning Spending - Total

Teaching and Learning Spending - Coaches

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“To ensure that the school has the financial capacity and means to deliver and sustain a high quality international education.�


AISJ facilities will be well maintained. This goal was met in 2013-14 and it is pleasing to note that high results remain on par for 2014-15. Extensive work is being undertaken on a strategic facilities maintenance plan which will be completed by April 2016. This plan will guide future maintenance priorities and spending.

Respondents who are comfortable with the progress in redevelopment of the school facilities

Respondents who believe that the grounds and facilities are well-maintained, safe and inviting *Please note the climate survey data for 14-15 used a 4. point to avoid a neutral option. In previous climate surveys the neutral choice was interpreted positively and thus inflated the numbers

*Please note the climate survey data for 14-15 used a 4. point to avoid a neutral option. In previous climate surveys the neutral choice was interpreted positively and thus inflated the numbers

AISJ will continue to review and implement current facility master plans for both campuses. In 2014-15 Flansburgh architects of Boston in the USA, who developed our initial masterplans, updated facility master plans for both campuses. These revised plans were approved by the board of directors in January 2015. The time-frame for future facilities development has been impacted by a flattening of growth in student enrolment and is under continuing review.

“To provide the facilities that enable us to deliver a rich and balanced learning program appropriate to the education of international students.�

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QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE STRATEGIC PLAN PROGRESS

21


Achieved or On Track

Requiring more attention

Serious Concern

GOAL ONE: To deliver a rich and balanced learning program for all students that provides meaningful opportunities for achievement and personal growth a. All students will achieve a high level of academic success.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

Our Measures of Academic Progress results will be among the top 30% of international schools by May 2016.

We are currently in the top 40% which is lower than anticipated mainly due to test and demographic changes.

Our average International Baccalaureate Diploma Program score will be 33 by May 2016.

Achieved. Our 2014 IB results average score is 34. The world average is 29.77.

Average student growth will meet or exceed the mean growth rate, according to the MAP data, by May 2015.

Achieved according to the latest MAP data.

80% of students will strongly agree or agree that they enjoy their learning experience at AISJ by May 2014

2015 Climate Survey Results: 93% of students in Grade 6-12 strongly agree or agree that they enjoy their learning experience at AISJ. It was reached in May 2015 although dropped off slightly in 2015.

b. The school will offer a wide variety of arts activities for all age groups and abilities in which all students are expected to engage.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

The number of activities on offer will be in the top ^20% of AISA ‘dashboard’ schools by May 2015.

Achieved. While it has proven impossible to collect this data, incidental data collection supports our observation.

100% of students will be involved in arts related activities or electives by May 2016.

It may prove difficult to reach 100% in the final two years of HS but new courses have been introduced in the HS that will allow a greater number of students to participate actively in a greater range of artistic and athletic pursuits.

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c. The school will offer a wide variety of athletic activities for all age groups and abilities in which all students are expected to engage.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

The number of activities on offer will be in the top ^20% of AISA ‘dashboard’ schools by May 2015.

Achieved. While it has proven impossible to collect this data, we are confident we meet this target as with the arts.

100% of students will be involved in athletics related activities or electives by May 2016.

It may prove difficult to reach 100% in the final two years of HS but new courses have been introduced in the HS that will allow a greater number of students to participate actively in a greater range of artistic and athletic pursuits.

d. Each student is engaged in and understands the culture of meaningful service.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

All students actively engage in service learning every year as a part of the curriculum by May 2015.

We are confident we will achieve this by 2016. Approx. 95% of students engaged in service activities and the 5% accounts for transience.

All students will understand service culture by May 2015.

Rubrics are being implemented this year and we are confident we will achieve this by 2016.

GOAL TWO: To ensure that students’ learning experiences are integrated through meaning ful connections across the curriculum and delivered through an inquiry approach. a. Students will be conceptual, independent, and connected learners.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

80% of our students will be conceptual, independent, and connected learners by May 2017.

In progress. HS is moving ahead. We have delayed with ES and MS due to the complexity of the tool and terminology but will develop rubrics in 2015-16.

All students will possess, or have access to, age appropriate individual computing devices by May 2014.

Achieved.

All students will have full access to age appropriate global resources via the internet by May 2015.

Achieved.

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Achieved or On Track

Requiring more attention

Serious Concern


b. The curriculum will be inquiry-based, demand connections across subject areas and build on previous learning.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

A complete scope and sequence matrix will detail connections across subject areas by May 2014.

Achieved.

100% of units will be in the Understanding by Design (UbD) format, with inquiry embedded, by May 2015.

Achieved.

All teachers will reach a level of applying according to the inquiry and integration rubrics by May 2016.

Achieved. From 2.8 to 3.0 for Inquiry and 3.2 to 3.3 for integration

GOAL THREE: To meet the individual academic and social-and-emotional needs of each student through coherent PK-12 systems and quality differentiated teaching. a. Our admissions process will ensure that the students we accept have the potential to achieve success at AISJ.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

All admissions processes and criteria will be clearly defined by December 2013: • Criteria for success. • Entrance and exit process and criteria. • Understanding of our capacity to meet the needs of students to inform our admissions decisions.

Achieved

95% of students admitted meet the success criteria by May 2015.

Success criteria implemented.

b. Teachers will deliver a purposefully differentiated curriculum.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

All unit plans will show evidence of differentiation in the assessment and learning-plan stages by May 2015.

Achieved

All teachers will reach a level of applying or above on the differentiation and assessment rubrics by May 2015.

Achieved. The overall level has increased from 3.1 to 3.2 for differentiation and from 2.9 to 3.0 for assessment from 2014 to 2015. The target of the ‘Applying’ level is equivalent to level 3.

Achieved or On Track

Requiring more attention

Serious Concern

24


c. Individual students will reach their full academic potential.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

^80% of individual student's growth will meet or exceed the average growth rate according to MAP, or as specified in their individual learning plans, by May 2015.

80% of student's growth meets or exceeds the average MAP growth rate. Individual Learning Plans (ILP’s) are in use to measure the growth of students who receive Learning Support services. Data on students with ILP’s will be included as of 2015-16.

All students can articulate their growth/progress through a portfolio and student-led conferences by May 2016.

Portfolios are being used in ES and MS and essential agreements have been developed. A timeline for implementing portfolios in HS will be developed in 2015-16.

d. All students will be socially and emotionally healthy.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

All unit plans will have social-and-emotional learning embedded by May 2016.

On track. CORE -the four dispositional standards highlighted in student friendly posters and will be embedded into curriculum during 2015-16.

70% of students will be satisfied with the level of support they are offered at AISJ by May 2014.

While our results are approaching out targets we remain concerned that these results vary greatly amongst different age groups and we will explore this in more detail in 2015-16.

^80% of parents will be satisfied with the level of assistance their child receives at AISJ by May 2014.

While our results are approaching out targets we remain concerned that these results vary greatly amongst different age groups and we will explore this in more detail in 2015-16.

e. All students will transition seamlessly between divisions and grade levels regardless of their needs.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

All learner support systems will be refined to ensure coherence and consistency within and across departments and divisions by May 2014.

Achieved. Our support systems continue to be refined.

All teachers know and can clearly articulate key intended learning from one subject/grade to another by May 2014.

We use three methods to collect this data through curriculum mapping, teacher rubrics and goal setting.

All students will have a portfolio to define their continuum of learning throughout their time at AISJ by May 2016.

On track.

85% of students will indicate satisfactory or above on the student climate survey by May 2016.

2015 Climate Survey Results: 71% of students in Grade 6-12 strongly agree or agree that their transition between divisions and grades was seamlessly regardless of their needs. HS – 63%, MS – 78%, ES - 57% Contributing factors could include the visa situation which had a negative impact on a number of students and teachers who were not able to get into the country for the start of the school year.

25

Achieved or On Track

Requiring more attention

Serious Concern


GOAL FOUR: to build a strong sense of belonging and contributing to a community, within, around, and beyond the school. a. AISJ will develop a cohesive and vibrant school spirit where staff and students feel they belong.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

School spirit, as measured by the School Spirit Index, will increase by ^%10 by May 2015.

NOTES Achieved

b. Parents will feel they belong to, are supported by, and can contribute to the AISJ community.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

^85% of parents will feel supported by AISJ by May 2016.

The 2014 climate survey results 82.23% indicate we are on track.

The number of AISJ parents attending ^two or more school events and initiatives will increase by ^20% May 2016.

Achieved

c. AISJ will understand and play an active role in the community in which we live.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

The curriculum at each grade level will draw from the community in which we live by May 2015.

Community links within curriculum is being tracked by Atlas Rubicon (the curriculum mapping tool).

100% of AISJ's partnerships with community groups will be sustainable and fully articulated by May 2015.

On track. The sustainability of all service partnerships is monitored using the criteria.

Achieved or On Track

Requiring more attention

Serious Concern

26


GOAL FIVE: To ensure that the school has the financial capacity and means to deliver and sustain a high quality international education. a. All students will achieve a high level of academic success.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

A faculty grant program to fund action research will be developed by May 2014.

Achieved. Three action research projects are currently underway.

At least 3.5% of annual expenses will be committed to providing resources for teaching and learning by 2014.

Achieved. Annual expenses meet the stated requirements.

0.25% of annual expenses (up to a cumulative reserve amount of ^2 million Rand) will be committed to a strategic program development fund, devoted to new initiatives, by May 2016.

Deferred due to flattening enrolment.

0.25% of annual expenses will be committed to maintaining the scholarship program.

Achieved. Budget has been allocated and is available.

b. AISJ will remain highly competitive in the teacher job market, to attract and retain faculty.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

The overseas hire teacher package will be among the top 10% of accredited international schools by May 2014.

Achieved. We will be adjusting the benchmark due to a re-selection of comparable schools and newly developed indexing tools but initial benchmarking indicates we are well positioned.

The local hire teacher package will be among the top 5% of South African independent schools by May 2014.

Achieved.

c. AISJ will continue to increase the capacity of our teachers.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

At least 3% of annual expenses will go to support on-going teacher professional learning by May 2015.

27

Achieved or On Track

NOTES Achieved. Annual expenses meet the stated requirements. (In preparing this report we have discovered that we have been calculating this figure incorrectly and that the actual number should have been almost double that which was reported.)

Requiring more attention

Serious Concern


d. AISJ will sustain a long term financial plan.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

AISJ's reserve and investment policies will secure the long term sustainability of the school and meet acceptable country risk profile by May 2014.

Achieved March 2014.

AISJ will fully fund a long term facilities maintenance plan by May 2015.

On track. Funds made available.

AISJ’s long-term financial plan will be reviewed annually.

Achieved and on going.

GOAL SIX: To provide the facilities that enable us to deliver a rich and balanced learning program appropriate to the education of international students. a. AISJ facilities will be well maintained.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

95% of the community believes that the grounds and facilities are well maintained, safe and inviting.

2015 Climate Survey Results: Grade 6-12 Students: 92%, Grade 3-5 Students: 61%, Parents: 100%, Faculty: 98%. We will need to review whether the student benchmark is too high.

AISJ will institute an annual maintenance and safety audit by 2015.

Achieved.

AISJ will develop a long-term facilities maintenance plan by May 2015.

Work is in progress and timeline extended to allow for a more detailed plan.

Achieved or On Track

Requiring more attention

Serious Concern

28


b. AISJ will continue to review and implement the current facility master plans for both campuses.

OBJECTIVE

INDICATOR

NOTES

80% of the community strongly agree or agree that the school is making satisfactory progress in the redevelopment of its facilities.

2015 Climate Survey Results: Parents: 95%, Faculty: 97%

AISJ will develop a technology facilities plan by May 2014.

Achieved.

AISJ will develop a new five year facilities master plan by May 2015.

Completed in January 2015.

AISJ will develop an environmental awareness/impact plan by May 2015.

Achieved in May 2014.

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Achieved or On Track

Requiring more attention

Serious Concern


INTERESTING FACTS

Student Population New Families 2015-16: 158 - 13% New Students 2015-16: 274 - 23%

Total Student Enrolment Growth

Student Nationalities

30


INTERESTING FACTS

Home Language - HS Students

Instructional Staff Growth

Instructional Staff (inclusing administrators, teachers and teaching partners) Growth 191 to 215 = 12.56%

31


INTERESTING FACTS

Faculty Nationalities

Operational Staff Growth

Operational Staff Growth 175 to 176 = 0.57%

32


UNIVERSITIES

33

AMDA College & Conservatory of the Performing Arts American University (4) Amherst College Ball State University Boston University (2) Brandeis University Brigham Young University Brown University Bryn Mawr College California College of the Arts (San Francisco) California Polytechnic State University Carnegie Mellon University College of William and Mary Columbia University Dartmouth College Drake University Drexel University Duke University Emerson College Flagler College Florida Institute of Technology Florida State University (2) George Mason University Georgetown University Grinell University Indiana University at Bloomington Ithaca College James Madison University Lawrence University Loyola University Chicago Michigan State University

Michigan Technological University Morehouse College New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology New York University (4) New York Film Academy Northeastern University (8) Ohio Wesleyan University Old Dominion University Pace University, New York Palm Beach State College Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pepperdine University Pratt Institute Purdue University (2) Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (2) Ringling College of Art and Design Rochester Institute of Technology Southern Virginia University Stony Brook University (2) The New School The University of Georgia The University of Tampa (3) University of Maryland University of Massachusetts University of Arkansas University of California University of California at Berkeley University of Cincinnati University of Colorado at Boulder (3) University of Connecticut University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

United States

University of Kentucky University of Massachusetts Amherst University of Maine University of Miami University of Michigan (4) University of Missouri University of North Florida University of Northern Colorado University of Ohio University of Oregon University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Southern California University of Southern California University of Tennessee, Chattanooga University of the Pacific University of Virginia University of Washington University of Western Washington University State Naval Academy Vassar College Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Warren Wilson College Webber International University Wellesley College (2) Westminster College Wheaton College IL Willamette University Worcester Polytechnic Institute


UNIVERSITIES UNITED KINGDOM Brighton and Sussex Medical School Coventry University European Business School, London Heriot-Watt University, Scotland Hull York Medical School Keele University King's College London Kingston University London Metropolitan University Middlesex University Oxford Brookes University Southampton The American International Univeresity in London The Robert Gordon University, Scotland University College London University of Birmingham University of Edinburgh, Scotland University of Exeter (3) University of Glasgow, Scotland University of Maine University of Manchester (2) University of Manchester Institute of Science & Technology University of Northampton University of St. Andrews, Scotland University of Warwick (2) University of York

CANADA Carleton University (2) Concordia University - Montreal McGill University (3) Queen’s University Simon Fraser University St. Francis Xavier University University of British Columbia (3) University of Ottawa University of Toronto (2) University of Winnipeg Western Ontario University NETHERLANDS Delft University of Technology Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam Hogeschool van Amsterdam, University of Applied Sciences The Hague University Universiteit Maastricht (3) University of Groningen Webster University

World

AUSTRALIA Macquarie University GERMANY Heidelburg University INDIA University of Delhi ITALY John Cabot University LATVIA Vilnius University POLAND Politechnicka Warszawska PORTUGAL Universidade Catolica Lisboa

SOUTH AFRICA Monash South Africa (2) Rhodes University University of Cape Town (2) University of Pretoria (2) University of Witwatersrand

34


2014-15 Annual Report  
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