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High School

2019-20 COURSE DESCRIPTION GUIDE


C HAPTER 1

Welcome


From the Principal:

Scheduling: • Sufficient enrollment is needed to offer a course. Not all courses are offered every year. • AISB aims to schedule students in their first choice courses, but this is not always possible.

CREDITS:

Thank you for carefully reviewing the Course Description Guide as you consider your choices for next year. This course guide provides useful information to help you choose challenging and engaging courses, while simultaneously allowing you to plan long term to meet your goals for university and beyond.    Academics are an important part of the holistic education we offer at AISB. We value a rigorous, relevant curriculum, and we also value the relationships that the students forge here through their participation in CAS, sport, and the arts. When deciding on your academic program, I encourage you to balance your selections to include courses you are most excited about, those that will help you get where you want to go, and with consideration of the impact your selection has on your school life in general. Choosing a program that is over-challenging can make you feel you have "no time" to participate in co-curricular activities, yet we believe that you do not have the time to miss them! Our co-curricular program is integral to your high school experience.   The vast majority of our graduates continue their educational careers in respected universities in North America, Asia, and Europe. Students who successfully complete our credit requirements for each subject, graduate with an AISB High School Diploma. Students are typically enrolled in eight academic courses; students in grades 11 and 12 are given the option of a study hall. These courses normally include:                       English                                            Mathematics                       World Languages                           Science                       Social Studies                                 Electives (The Arts, Physical Education, and Technology)   Community service (CAS) is also a graduation requirement, ensuring that the education you pursue challenges you academically and also helps you grow in character as a person.   In addition to the AISB Diploma, the International Baccalaureate Diploma is available to students in grades 11 and 12 who elect to pursue it. The IB diploma represents the most rigorous course of study available at AISB.   Each person's path may look a little different. What is most important is choosing courses that interest you because, even when challenging, we can often rise to the occasion if we are truly engaged. So, look not at what your friends are doing, but have a discussion with your family and your counselor and decide on which path you want to take. I wish you a great 2019-20 school year! Sincerely,
 Jeff Leppard
 High School Principal

• Please find information on required credits for graduation on page 3. • For further information on transfer or recovery credits, please speak to your counselor and refer to the High School Community Handbook.

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Suggested Progression of Courses for AISB Graduation The chart below shows the typical courses taken in each year of high school at AISB.

Grade 9 Must take 8 full courses

Grade 10 Must take 8 full courses

Grade 11 Must take 6 full courses

Grade 12 Must take 6 full courses

English REQUIRED CREDITS: 4

English 9

English 10 (Standard or Honors)

1 credit

1 credit

World Languages REQUIRED CREDITS: 3

1 credit

1 credit

1 credit

Required for IB DP

Social Studies REQUIRED CREDITS: 3

World History 9

Modern World History

1 credit

Required for IB DP

Science REQUIRED CREDITS: 3

Science 9: Matter and Energy

Science 10: Stability and Change

1 credit

Required for IB DP

Mathematics REQUIRED CREDITS: 3

Math 9 (Standard or Honors)

Math 10 (Integrated, Standard, 1 credit or Honors)

Required for IB DP

Arts REQUIRED CREDITS: 2

1 credit

1 credit

Elective

Elective

Physical Education REQUIRED CREDITS: 2

PE 9

PE 10

Elective

Elective

1 credit

As required to make 6 full courses. IB DP students take

As required to make 6 full courses. IB DP students take

TOK / IB Skills.

TOK / IB Skills.

Maximum of 1 + HL Extension time

Maximum of 1 + HL Extension time

Electives CREDITS AS NEEDED TO COMPLETE 24

1 credit

Study Hall

Not Permitted

Not Permitted

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Sample Pathways for Graduation Every student’s pathway is different. Consult with your counselor to make your own plan. EXAMPLE A

EXAMPLE B

EXAMPLE C

YOUR PLAN

Gr 9

1. English - English 9 2. WL - French 2 3. SS - World History 9 4. Science - Science 9 5. Math - Math 9S 6. Fine Arts - Band 7. PE - PE 9 8. Elective - Music Tech

1. English - English 9 2. WL - EAL 3. SS - World History 9 4. Science - Science 9 5. Math - Math 9H 6. Fine Arts - Intro to Theatre 7. PE - PE 9 8. Elective - Programming

1. English - English 9 2. WL - Spanish 2 3. SS - World History 9 4. Science - Science 9 5. Math - Math 9S 6. Fine Arts - Video Production 7. PE - PE 9 8. Elective - Rock Band

1. English - English 9 2. WL - ___________ 3. SS - World History 9 4. Science - Science 9 5. Math - ___________ 6. Fine Arts - ___________ 7. PE - PE 9 8. Elective - ___________

Gr 10

1. English - English 10 Honors 2. WL - French 3 3. SS - Modern World History 4. Science - Science 10 5. Math - Math 10S 6. Fine Arts - Advanced Music 7. PE - PE 10 8. Elective - Graphic Design and Yearbook

1. English - English 10 Standard 2. WL - Language A Tutor 3. SS - Modern World History 4. Science - Science 10 5. Math - Math 10H 6. Fine Arts - Video Production 7. PE - PE 10 8. Elective - Harvard Online Course

1. English - English 10 Standard 2. WL - Spanish 3 3. SS - Modern World History 4. Science - Science 10 5. Math - Math 10S 6. Fine Arts - Music Technology 7. PE - PE 10 8. Elective - Independent Study Video

1. English - ___________ 2. WL - ___________ 3. SS - ___________ 4. Science - Science 10 5. Math - ___________ 6. Fine Arts - ___________ 7. PE - PE 10 8. Elective - ___________

Gr 11

1. Group 1/English - IB Literature HL 2. Group 2/WL - IB French SL 3. Group 3/SS - IB Psychology HL 4. Group 4/Science - IB Biology SL 5. Group 5/Math - IB Math Analysis and Approaches SL 6. Group 6/Fine Arts - IB Music HL 7. IB Skills / TOK 8. HL Extension

1. Group 1/English - IB Lang and Lit SL 2. Group 1/Lang A - IB Korean SL 3. Group 3/SS - IB History SL 4. Group 4/Science - IB Chemistry HL 5. Group 5/Math - IB Math Analysis and Approaches HL 6. Group 4/Science - IB Computer Science HL 7. IB Skills / TOK 8. HL Extension / Lifetime Fitness

1. English - IB Lang and Lit SL Y1 2. WL - Spanish 4 3. SS - US History 4. Science - Systems Science 5. Math - IB Math Applications Y1 6. Elective - Stanford Online Course

1. English - ___________ 2. WL / Elective - ___________ 3. SS / Elective - ___________ 4. Science / Elective- ___________ 5. Math / Elective - ___________ 6. Fine Arts / Elective - ___________ 7. IB Skills/TOK / Elective - _________ 8. HL Extension / Elective - _________

Gr 12

1. Group 1/English - IB Literature HL 2. Group 2/WL - IB French SL 3. Group 3/SS - IB Psychology HL 4. Group 4/Science - IB Biology SL 5. Group 5/Math - IB Math Analysis and Approaches SL 6. Group 6/Fine Arts - IB Music HL 7. IB Skills / TOK 8. HL Extension

1. Group 1/English - IB Lang and Lit SL 2. Group 1/Lang A - IB Korean SL 3. Group 3/SS - IB History SL 4. Group 4/Science - IB Chemistry HL 5. Group 5/Math - IB Math Analysis and Approaches HL 6. Group 4/Science - IB Computer Science HL 7. IB Skills / TOK 8. HL Extension / Lifetime Fitness

1. English - IB Lang and Lit SL Y2 2. Elective - Stanford Online Course 3. Elective - Business Studies 4. Elective - Programming 5. Elective - Intro to Art 6. Elective - Lifetime Fitness

1. English - ___________ 2. WL / Elective - ___________ 3. SS / Elective - ___________ 4. Science / Elective- ___________ 5. Math / Elective - ___________ 6. Fine Arts / Elective - ___________ 7. IB Skills/TOK / Elective - _________ 8. HL Extension / Elective - _________

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IB Higher Level (HL) Pathways at AISB The chart below shows the recommended pathway to IB Higher Level courses. A grade of 5 or higher in the prerequisite class and grades of “Meeting� or higher in the Learning Identities are guidelines for success in HL courses.

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11-12

English (Group 1)

English 9

Honors English 10

IB HL English

World Language (Group 2)

Level 3 French, German, Spanish

Level 4 French, German, Spanish

IB HL French, German, Spanish

Social Studies (Group 3)

World History 9

Modern World History for HL History / Psychology Modern World History and Math 10S/10H for HL Econ

Science (Group 4)

Science 9: Matter and Energy

Science 10: Stability and Change

IB HL Biology, Chemistry, Physics

Math (Group 5)

Honors Math 9

Honors Math 10

IB HL Math

Arts (Group 6)

Introductory Studio Art Introductory Theatre Band, Rock Band, Music Technology

Advanced Studio Art Advanced Theatre Advanced Music

IB HL Art IB HL Theatre IB HL Music

IB HL History, Psychology IB HL Economics

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C HAPTER 2

English

“A word after a word after a word is power.” Margaret Atwood


English 9 Prerequisites: Grade 8 English Language Arts Required for students in Grade 9 Length: Yearlong Texts may include but are not limited to the following: • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee • Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare • a selection of short stories, poems, and non-fiction texts
 The English 9 course is designed for students to develop and refine the skills of literacy. Students write narrative, literary, expository, and informational pieces with an emphasis on analysis. They develop as writers by participating in the writing process including pre-writing, organizing, composing, revising, editing, and publishing. Interpersonal communication skills are developed in smaller learning groups as well as through formal public speaking, such as debating and dramatic oral recitations. A variety of literary genres  and visual texts are used to develop reading comprehension and analytical skills.  In addition to the literature studied in class, students read independent books throughout the year. Finally, students collect, evaluate, organize, document, and present information in an accepted format crediting sources used in research writing.  Students are assessed on their knowledge and understanding of texts, their appreciation of an author’s stylistic choices, their organization and development of arguments, and the clarity and register of their writing.

The English 10 course emphasizes critical thinking skills, analysis, formal essay writing, and group discussions. Students write reflective, expository, narrative, and literary texts with an emphasis on literary analysis.  They develop their writing skills by analyzing and critiquing peer and professional writing, and applying revision strategies to their own writing. Students apply reading strategies such as predicting, making inferences, and connecting prior knowledge to comprehend, critique, and analyze a variety of texts. They develop their oral skills through small-group activities, structured class discussion, and formal oral presentations.  Oral and written assignments require them to apply a research process that includes collecting, evaluating, organizing, documenting, and presenting information through a variety of sources. Composition is taught in conjunction with the writing process. Lastly, both their oral and written vocabulary is expanded through a structured vocabulary program and the study of words encountered in the texts. Students are assessed on their knowledge and understanding of texts, their appreciation of an author’s stylistic choices, their organization and development of arguments, and the clarity and register of their writing.

English 10 Standard Prerequisites: English 9 Open to: Grade 10 Length: Yearlong Texts may include but are not limited to the following: • The Cellist of Sarajevo by Stephen Galloway • The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger • Dead Poets’ Society film • Macbeth by William Shakespeare • a selection of Coming of Age short stories • a selection of poems and non-fiction texts


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English 10 Honors Prerequisites: English 9 Guidelines for success: Grade of 5 or higher in English 9 or Teacher Recommendation Open to: Grade 10 Length: Yearlong

IB Language and Literature English Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2

Texts may include but are not limited to the following: • The Cellist of Sarajevo by Stephen Galloway • The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger • Dead Poets’ Society film • Macbeth by William Shakespeare • a selection of “Coming of Age” short stories. • a selection of poems, non-fiction texts, and novels

Prerequisites: English 10 Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in English 10 Honors and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher Recommendation. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.)

In the same way as the English 10 course, English 10 Honors emphasizes critical thinking skills, analysis, formal essay writing, and group discussions. However, the Honors course moves at a more rapid pace. Thus, the course is geared towards above-average readers, competent writers, and well-motivated, independent learners. Teaching focuses less on grammar and paragraph structure and more on demonstrating an awareness of how writers use literary techniques and devices to convey meaning. Students enrolling in English 10 Honors are those who already confidently anticipate enrolling in Higher level IB English.  The course focuses on close readings of stylistic texts while helping students develop a deeper understanding of the effects of the literary elements. Students write reflective, expository, persuasive, narrative, and literary texts with an emphasis on analysis.  They develop their oral skills through planning, organizing and presenting formal oral presentations in small groups and individually.   Oral and written assignments require them to apply a research process that includes collecting, evaluating, organizing, documenting and presenting information.  Lastly, both their oral and written vocabulary is expanded through text-based words, as well as a structured vocabulary program. Students are assessed on their knowledge and understanding of texts, their appreciation of an author’s stylistic choices, their organization and development of arguments, and the clarity and register of their writing.

Note: This updated description applies to the class of 2021 and beyond. To review the course description for the class of 2020 and prior, please see the Course Description Guide 2018-19. In the Language and Literature course, students will be expected to read a breadth of nonliterary texts. Teachers will make sure that at least six different text types are covered in the course as a whole. In connection with literary works, HL students will read six works. Of these six works, • a minimum of two should be written originally in the language studied by authors on the reading list; • a minimum of two should be works in translation written by authors on the reading list; • two can be chosen freely. There will be a minimum of two literary works for each of the parts of the course. Works will be selected to cover three major literary genres, three periods and three places. SL students, for their part, read four works. Of these four works, • a minimum of one should be written originally in the language studied by an author on the reading list; • a minimum of one should be a work in translation written by an author on the reading list; • two can be chosen freely by the teacher. There will be a minimum of one literary work for each of the parts. Works will be selected to cover two major literary genres, two periods and two places. 


While it is not a requirement, students intending to pursue English at the Higher Level in the IB Diploma Program are encouraged to take English 10 Honors.

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IB Literature English Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: English 10 Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in English 10 Honors and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher Recommendation. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Note: This updated description applies to the class of 2021 and beyond. To review the course description for the class of 2020 and prior, please see the Course Description Guide 2018-19. The course is divided into three parts common to language A: literature, language A: language and literature and literature and performance. The parts of the course allow students to explore different aspects of language, literature and performance: • Readers, writers and texts aims to introduce students to the notion and purpose of literature and the ways in which texts can be read, interpreted and responded to. • Time and space draws attention to the fact that texts are not isolated entities, but are connected to space and time. • Intertextuality: connecting texts focuses on the connections between and among diverse texts, traditions, creators and ideas. In the Literature course, HL students will read thirteen works. Of these thirteen works, • a minimum of five should be written originally in the language studied by authors on the reading list; • a minimum of four should be works in translation written by authors on the reading list; • four can be chosen freely by the teacher.
 There will be a minimum of three works for each of the parts. Works will be selected to cover four major literary genres, three periods and four places. SL students will read nine works. Of these nine works, • a minimum of four should be written originally in the language studied by authors on the reading list; • a minimum of three should be works in translation written by authors on the reading list; • two can be chosen freely by the teacher. There will be a minimum of two works in each part. Works will be selected to cover three major literary genres, three periods and three places.

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Typical Pathways for English:

IB LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE STANDARD LEVEL

IB LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE HIGHER LEVEL

IB LITERATURE STANDARD LEVEL

IB LITERATURE HIGHER LEVEL

Gr 9

Grade 9 English

Grade 9 English

Grade 9 English

Grade 9 English

Gr 10

Grade 10 English - Standard

Grade 10 English - Honors

Grade 10 English - Standard

Grade 10 English - Honors

Gr 11

IB Language and Literature - SL Y1

IB Language and Literature - HL Y1

IB Literature - SL Y1

IB Literature - HL Y1

Gr 12

IB Language and Literature - SL Y2

IB Language and Literature - HL Y2

IB Literature - SL Y2

IB Literature - HL Y2

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C HAPTER 3

World Languages

“A different language is a different vision of life.” –Federico Fellini


Level I French, German, Spanish Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 9-12 (NB: Grade 8 students may also be enrolled.) Length: Yearlong Textbook: • French: Valette and Valette. Discovering French Bleu. McDougal Littell, 2004. • German: German I - Deutsch echt einfach A1, Klett 2016 • Spanish: McDougal Littell. Avancemos 1. McDougal Littell, 2006.
 The objective of the Level I World Language course is to introduce students to the basics of the language and the cultures that speak it. It assumes that the students have minimal or no prior knowledge of the language and culture. We will address all four areas of language development: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. Students will focus on communicating about their immediate world and daily life activities, read material on familiar topics, and write short, directed compositions. Instruction is given primarily in the target language and in a variety of contexts to encourage fluency and meet the needs of students.

Level II French, German, Spanish Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the Level I or Grade 8 Novice class in the same language Open to : Grades 9-12 (NB: Grade 8 students may also be enrolled.) Length: Yearlong Textbook: • French: Valette and Valette. Discovering French Blanc. McDougal Littell, 2004. • German: Prima plus A2.1, Cornelsen 2015 • Spanish: McDougal Littell. Avancemos 2. McDougal Littell, 2006.
 The objective of the Level II World Language course is to further develop students’ fluency and refine their understanding of grammar in the target language. We will address all four areas of language development: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. In addition to communicating about their daily lives, students will also explore other topics of relevance, read material on familiar themes, and write longer compositions. Instruction is given primarily in the target language and in a variety of contexts to encourage fluency and meet the needs of students with a diversity of skill levels.

Level III French, German, Spanish Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the Level II or Grade 8 Intermediate High class in the same language Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Textbook: • French: Valette and Valette. Discovering French Rouge. McDougal Littell, 2004 and selected authentic materials • German: Prima plus A2.2, Cornelsen 2015 and selected authentic materials • Spanish: McDougal Littell. Avancemos 3. McDougal Littell, 2006 and selected authentic materials
 The objective of the Level III World Language course is to further develop students’ fluency and refine their understanding of grammar in the target language. Students are called upon to demonstrate increased aptitude in the skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students continue to read and respond verbally and in writing to a wide range of written and audiovisual products of the target culture(s) as found in literature, newspapers, magazines, films, Internet sites and applications, or other authentic sources used by speakers of the target language. Students will write well-organized compositions on age-appropriate topics of interest as well as create and present posters, videos, multimedia presentations, or reports about age appropriate personal or cultural themes. There is also a focus on the literature and contemporary culture of the target language. Instruction is given primarily in the target language and in a variety of contexts to encourage fluency and meet the needs of students.

Level IV French, German, Spanish Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the Level III class in the same language Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Textbook: • French: Valette and Valette. Discovering French Rouge. McDougal Littell, 2004, selected IB texts, and other authentic materials • German: Prima plus B1, Cornelsen 2018 and selected authentic materials • Spanish: Selected IB texts and other authentic materials


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The goal of the Level IV World Language course is for students to acquire both written and oral fluency and to prepare for the HL IB Language B course. Students will exchange and discuss opinions with fluid use of the target language on a variety of topics as well as write organized compositions, journal entries, and reports. Students will present information, concepts, and ideas to listeners and/or readers on a variety of topics in the language studied. Extensive experience in using the language is combined with the examination of the practices and perspectives of the contemporary target culture through the media of newspapers, magazines, literature, film, and Internet sites. Instruction is given primarily in the target language and in a variety of contexts to encourage fluency and meet the needs of students.

IB Ab Initio (French, German, Spanish) Standard Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Little or no previous knowledge of the target language. Note: Students who have successfully studied the equivalent of two years of the target language are not eligible for the Ab Initio class in that language unless extraordinary circumstances apply. Exceptions to this can be made by the High School Principal. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: • French: Espaces, Second Edition . Vista Higher Learning, 2011. • German: Langenscheidt. Optimal A1. Klett (Ernst), 2004, selected IB texts, and other authentic materials • Spanish: Blanco. Vistas: Introducción a La Lengua Espanola, 4th Ed. Vista Higher Learning, 2012, selected IB texts, and other authentic materials


IB Language B (French, German, Spanish) Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Minimum three years of study in the target language Guidelines for success: • SL: Successful completion of Level III in the target language or Teacher recommendation • HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Level IV in the target language and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbooks: • French: Abrioux et. al., Le Monde en Français, CUP, 2018, selected IB texts, a selection of literary texts (poems, short stories, plays, novels), and other authentic materials • German: Sprache und Presse magazines, selected IB texts, and other authentic materials • Spanish: Thacker & Bianchi. Spanish B for the IB Diploma. Hodder Education, 2102, selected IB textss and other authentic materials


The range of purposes and situations for using language in the language B courses extends well beyond those for Language Ab Initio. The main focus of the Language B course is on language acquisition and intercultural understanding. Language skills will be developed through the study and use of a wide range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts that are related to the culture(s) concerned. The Language B course is divided into five themes: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organization, and sharing the planet. Finally, two works of literature are studied at HL only. Higher and standard levels are differentiated by the depth of syllabus coverage, the required study of literature at HL, and the level of difficulty and requirements of the assessment tasks and criteria.

IB Ab Initio is a language acquisition course designed to provide students with the necessary skills and intercultural understanding to enable them to communicate successfully in an environment where the language studied is spoken. The AB Initio course is divided into five themes: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organization, and sharing the planet. Each theme has a list of topics that provide the students with opportunities to practice and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive, and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations. The Ab Initio course is available at SL only.

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IB Language A Literature Standard Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Near native fluency, including academic language for use in literary analysis in the target language and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) The Standard Level Language A course is “self taught”, meaning students work with an approved tutor in the target language who supports the student through the course in conjunction with an experienced Language A teacher from the school. This course is intended for students who wish to continue the academic study of literature in their mother tongue. The course is automatically available in 55 languages and available by special request and may be studied in any language with a sufficiently developed written literature. The course introduces students to the analysis of literary texts and is the course through which the IB’s policy of mother-tongue entitlement is delivered. The course is organized into four parts, each focussed on a group of literary works. Together, the four parts of the course add up to a comprehensive exploration of literature from a variety of cultures, genres and periods. Students learn to appreciate the artistry of literature, and develop the ability to reflect critically on their reading, presenting literary analysis powerfully through both oral and written communication. The school must ensure that undertaking the language at this level is a viable task for the candidate, taking into consideration factors such as the student’s motivation, capacity as an independent learner, previous academic experience in the study of literature and his/her present and future needs. Assessment is the same as in IB English Literature, with some different procedural steps and a different reading list of works, depending on the language. Interested students should contact their counselor to learn more about this option.

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Typical Pathways for World Language:

LANGUAGE B - AB INITIO STANDARD LEVEL ONLY

LANGUAGE B STANDARD LEVEL

LANGUAGE B HIGHER LEVEL

LANGUAGE A (HOME LANGUAGE) STANDARD LEVEL

NON-IB

Level 1 or 2

Gr 9

English as an Additional Language or Other Language

Level 2

Level 3

English as an Additional Language, Other Language, or Language A Tutor

Gr 10

EAL, Other Language, or Level 1

Level 3

Level 4

Language A Tutor

Level 2 or 3

Gr 11

Ab Initio Year 1

Standard Level Year 1

Higher Level Year 1

Language A SL Year 1

Level 3 or 4

Gr 12

Ab Initio Year 2

Standard Level Year 2

Higher Level Year 2

Language A SL Year 2

Elective

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C HAPTER 4

Social Studies

"History is a relentless master.  It has no present, only the past rushing into the future.  To try to hold fast is to be swept aside." John F. Kennedy


World History 9

Business Studies

Prerequisite: Grade 8 Social Studies Required for students in Grade 9 Length: Yearlong Textbook: World History: The Human Experience. Glencoe/McGill, 1999. Various other texts and other media are used throughout the course.

Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong Textbook: Borrington, Karen and Stimpson, Peter. IGCSE Business Studies. Hodder Arnold, 2006.

This course will focus on the foundations of modern western civilization by examining the events of the Renaissance, Reformation, Empires of Asia and the Americas, the Age of Exploration, and the Age of Revolution, including the Enlightenment, Scientific Revolution, and French Revolution. The course will conclude with the rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte and the Congress of Vienna.

The main aim of the course is to provide students with an understanding of contemporary business principles and practices. In terms of content, students will examine the basic qualities of business organizations, external influences on business activity, financial issues, production methods, the key aspects of marketing, and the role of human resource management. The skills focus will be analysis of business situations, decision making, and the presentation of information in a variety of situations – on an individual basis and as a member of a group. When possible, we will look at case studies, undertake simulations and problem solving exercises. Students will be encouraged to use Internet sources to increase their knowledge and understanding of business concepts and practices.

Throughout each unit, several key themes will be explored, including but not limited to, religion, art, science, government, and economics. The development of fundamental learning skills, which relate to historical achievements and issues, as well as relevant current events will be taught. In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop and practice communication techniques and research skills with an emphasis on evaluating primary and secondary sources.

IB Economics Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2

Modern World History Prerequisite: World History 9 Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong Textbook: We will use a variety of materials including historical novels, textbooks, historical film, and selected primary and secondary sources throughout our study. Modern World History is designed to explore some of the major issues that face our world today: the costs and benefits of industrialization, the reasons and effects of imperialism, human rights and civil rights, and conflict and peace. Throughout the study of historical events and eras, we will develop an understanding of concepts that we will then overlay onto modern world situations. Throughout the course students will work to develop the skills needed to conduct thoughtful, historical study, especially those of writing and analysis. Attention will be given to understanding and evaluating various historical interpretations of history and using the information to develop a strong argument.

Prerequisites: Completion of a Grade 10 Social Studies Course Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in a Grade 10 Social Studies Course and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation. Concurrent enrollment in Math Analysis SL or HL is required for HL Economics. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: Blink, Jocelyn and Dorton, Ian. IB Economics Course Book: 2nd Edition: Oxford IB Diploma Program. Oxford University Press, 2012. A variety of sources and media are also used in the course. The main focus of any introductory course in Economics is to achieve an understanding of how individuals and societies organize themselves to use scarce resources to achieve economic goals. The course will examine four main areas of study: Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, International Trade, and Development. Students will gain an awareness of the key ideas and views in each topic and will be encouraged to examine economic events critically. Links between economic theory and economic realities will be a constant aim of the

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course. The course includes both internal and external assessments. For the internally assessed component of the course, the students will complete a portfolio of commentaries on recent economic articles. In terms of skills, students will develop their abilities to define, apply, analyze, and evaluate economic theories and economic events and developments in the world around them. They will be able to express economic concepts through the use of graphs and explanations. They will also spend a considerable amount of time reading articles and analyzing and evaluating the economic actions contained in the articles. Considering how important economics is to the interconnected global world, students will leave this course with a more informed perspective on many of the key issues and problems facing the world today.

IB History Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Completion of two History or Social Studies courses Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in a Grade 10 History Course and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: Various texts The aim of this course is to explain trends and developments in history as well as evaluate and understand the themes of continuity and change through time and individual historical events. The course curriculum is concerned with individuals and societies in the political, social, and economic context. The class seeks to promote the acquisition and understanding of historical knowledge in breadth and in depth, and from different cultures. It fosters an appreciation of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods, and interpretations. Students are encouraged to reflect on the role of the historian, and all students are expected to gain an understanding of and respect for people and events in cultures different from their own. A lasting interest in history is also a desired piece of the course. In order to achieve the above, students will study aspects of twentieth century history including the events and impact of the two World Wars, the events of the inter-war years, the rise of Communism and the Soviet Union, the development of Fascism as a political force in

interwar Europe, the reasons for and the events of the Cold War and its impact on nations throughout the world (including Central Europe and Hungary), and the rise and rule of singleparty state rulers including Mussolini, Stalin, Hitler, Mao Zedong, and Fidel Castro. While forays are made beyond Europe’s borders, this is primarily a European history course. IB Psychology Standard and Higher Level, YearS 1&2 Prerequisites: Completion of two History or Social Studies courses
 Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in a Grade 10 History Course and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbooks: Various texts The IB Psychology course is designed to allow for in-depth analysis, evaluation and consolidation of learning. The overall aim of the course is to give students a deeper understanding of the nature and scope of psychology. Students undertaking the course can expect to develop an understanding of how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied. This will allow them to have a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behavior. The holistic approach reflected in the curriculum, which sees biological, cognitive and sociocultural analysis being taught in an integrated way ensures that students are able to develop an understanding of what all humans share, as well as the immense diversity of influences on human behavior and mental processes. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are also key considerations of the IB psychology course.

IB Environmental Systems and Societies Standard Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Science 10 and a Grade 10 Social Studies Course or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong. (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Credit Earned: IB ESS students will earn one (1.0) AISB science credit for each successfully completed year. Textbook: Pearson IB Environmental Systems and Societies. Pearson Baccalaureate. 2015.

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The prime intent of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies – one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Students’ attention can be constantly drawn to their own relationship with their environment and the significance of choices and decisions that they make in their own lives. It is intended that students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, rather than a purely journalistic appreciation of environmental issues. The teaching approach therefore needs to be conducive to students evaluating the scientific, ethical, and socio-political aspects of issues. This is an IB transdisciplinary subject, so students taking this course will satisfy the requirements for both Group 3 (Individuals and Societies) and Group 4 (Experimental Sciences) of the IB hexagon, allowing them to choose another subject from any of the 6 groups to complete the sixth subject for the IB Diploma. For the AISB Diploma, this course is deemed a Science course. Taking this course for 1 year will provide you with an AISB science credit.

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Typical Pathways for Social Studies:

Gr 9

Gr 10

Gr 11

Gr 12

IB HISTORY - STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVELS

IB ECONOMICS STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVELS

IB PSYCHOLOGY STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVELS

IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS & SOCIETIES STANDARD LEVEL ONLY

NON-IB

World History 9

World History 9

World History 9

World History 9

World History 9

Modern World History

Business Studies Modern World History

Modern World History

Business Studies Modern World History (and Science 10)

Modern World History Business Studies

IB History SL/HL Y1

IB Economics SL/HL Y1 (HL requires concurrent enrollment in SL/HL Math Analysis)

IB Psychology SL/HL Y1

IB ESS SL Y1

Modern World History Business Studies

IB History SL/HL Y2

IB Economics SL/HL Y2 (HL requires concurrent enrollment in SL/HL Math Analysis)

IB Psychology SL/HL Y2

IB ESS SL Y2

Elective

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C HAPTER 5

Science

"Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less." Marie Curie


Integrated SCIENCE 9: MATTER & ENERGY

Systems Science: Earth, Space, and the Environment

Prerequisites: Grade 8 Science Required for students in Grade 9 Length: Yearlong Textbook: Various resources

Prerequisites: Science 9 and Science 10 (or concurrent) Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong Textbook: Spaulding, N and Namowitz, S. Earth Science. McDougal Littell, 2003.

Grade 9 Science: Matter and Energy is a required course aligned with the NGSS. The course emphasizes an inquiry approach to science utilizing modeling, practical investigations and student driven inquiry. Grade 9 science covers the fundamental concepts of matter and energy applied across the Earth, physical and biological sciences. Understanding the structure of and interactions between matter and the role energy has in changing or sustaining matter is essential. All life and earth processes have their foundation in matter and how it interacts, is constructed, and is altered. Energy plays a unique role in the understanding of matter. The addition or removal of energy from a system can change the physical motion of matter and in the right conditions, rearrange how matter is configured through the breaking and forming of bonds. The bundling of the life, Earth, and physical science NGSS proficiency expectations for this course lays a foundation for deeply understanding the driving principles that allow matter to exist and function as it does in the universe.

This course provides the opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding about the relationships between the structure, processes, and resources on Earth and other solar bodies. A systems science approach will be taken to the course where interactions and relationships between and within Earth and space systems are studied. Emphasis is placed on laboratory and field experiences. Units of study include: the Space Systems, The History of Earth, Earth’s Systems, Weather and Climate, Matter and Energy in Ecosystems, Interdependence in Ecosystems, and Human Impacts. In addition to environmental biology topics, basic physics and chemistry concepts will be emphasized in the course. This course requires the student to learn independently as well as cooperatively. This course is designed to meet the NGSS Earth and Space Science Disciplinary Core Ideas and the Science and Engineering practices. This class fulfills AISB graduation requirements as a third experimental science credit.

Integrated Science 10: Stability & Change Prerequisites: Integrated Science 9 Required for students in Grade 10 Length: Yearlong Textbooks: Various resources
 Grade 10 Science: Stability and Change is a required course aligned with the NGSS. In this course students will explore natural phenomena and current events in order to develop a deeper understanding of the driving forces behind change on our planet.  Using an inquiry approach, students will develop and use models, design and conduct investigations, and analyze data, in order to examine the evolution of life and our planet.  Topics of study will begin with fundamental chemical systems and their relationship to the cellular systems that support life. This will transition into an examination of genetics and its importance in natural selection and the evolution of species on our planet.  Finally, students will explore a variety of Earth’s ecosystems with a special focus on human impact. By the end of this course, students can expect to have developed a variety of investigative skills and a level of scientific literacy that will help them better understand the our planet’s living systems.

IB Environmental Systems and Societies Standard Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Science 10 and a Grade 10 Social Studies Courses or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong. (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: Pearson IB Environmental Systems and Societies. Pearson Baccalaureate. 2015. The prime intent of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies – one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Students’ attention is drawn to their own relationship with their environment and the significance of choices and decisions that they make in their own lives. It is intended that students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, rather than a purely journalistic appreciation of environmental issues. The teaching approach therefore is conducive to students evaluating the scientific, ethical, and socio-political aspects of issues. The ESS course is an IB transdisciplinary subject, so students taking this course will satisfy the requirements for both Group 3 (Individuals and Societies) and Group 4 (Experimental Sciences) of the IB hexagon, allowing them to choose another subject from any of the 6

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groups to complete the sixth subject for the IB Diploma. Students receive 0.5 credits for Science and 0.5 credits for Social Studies for each year of the 2-year course. For the AISB Diploma, this course is deemed a Science course. Taking this course for 1 year will provide you with one AISB science credit.

regards to conceptual understanding and workload. The higher level course investigates each topic in much more detail, as in a first year university level biology course, whereas the standard level surveys the topics at a typical high school level. The higher level course also involves the additional topic of plant science, and there are 20 more lab hours required in the HL course. This course is an excellent course of study for students interested in pursuing the study of medicine, pharmacology, microbiology, bioengineering, or environmental sciences at the university level. IB Chemistry Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Science 10 Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Science 10 and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation. Concurrent enrollment in Math Analysis SL or HL is required for HL Chemistry. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: Pearson IB Chemistry. 2nd ed. Pearson Baccalaureate. 2014. (eText)

IB Biology Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Science 10 Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Science 10 and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbooks: Pearson IB Biology. 2nd Ed. Pearson Baccalaureate. 2014. This advanced level course introduces the principles and concepts of biology (the study of life and living organisms) with an emphasis on basic biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism and energy transformations, genetics, ecology, biodiversity, evolution, classification, plants (HL), and animal physiology. Despite its rigor, the course is primarily a survey course, covering all of the major themes and sub-disciplines of biology. Students may take the course for one year (non-IB) or two years of higher or standard level IB. The higher level is a significantly more demanding course than the standard level, both in

Chemistry is the study of matter and its changes. The chemical and physical changes matter undergoes as well as the energy involved in these changes will be considered in this course. Students will learn how to answer general questions about everyday observations with detailed explanations of what is happening at the molecular level. How are diamonds and charcoal different although they are made of the same element? Why do some things become hot and some become cold when they react? Why does salt dissolve in water? Chemistry is also closely related to biological systems and their functions, and these topics will be studied. IB Chemistry will cover a broad range of topics, with the understanding acquired in one topic being applied to the next. The course will focus on building an understanding of the concepts, presenting clear explanations, and problem solving as well as on laboratory investigations. Students may take this course for one year (non-IB) or two years at the IB higher or standard level. The SL and HL courses cover the same topics; however, the HL course is more demanding in terms of material and depth of coverage. The HL course also requires additional lab hours and investigations. The course has a strong laboratory component of which students must keep a written account. This course is an excellent course of study for students interested in pursuing medicine, biology or the physical sciences at the university level.

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IB Physics Standard and Higher Level, YearS 1&2 Prerequisites: Science 10 Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Science 10 and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation. Concurrent enrollment in Math Analysis SL or HL is required for SL and HL Physics. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: Pearson IB Physics. 2nd ed. Pearson Baccalaureate. 2014. (eText) Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, as it seeks to explain the universe itself. Classical physics, which includes Newtonian mechanics, electromagnetism and thermodynamics explains the universe in different ways. For example, Newtonian mechanics allows determining of the position and the velocity of a particle. Electromagnetism describes the behavior of the electric charge and shows the relationship between light and electricity. Thermodynamics shows the relationship between heat energy and other types of energy. At the end of the 19th century, it was found that classical physics failed to explain certain aspects of the universe, such as the nature of the atom. Modern physics, which includes topics such as quantum physics and relativity, was introduced. To understand the various concepts in physics, both models and hands on practical laboratory work are used. Mathematical equations are used to describe and deepen understanding of physics. The objective of the

course is for students to learn the concepts and principles of physics. Students will also develop critical thinking and problem solving skills in the application of the concepts in laboratory activities. Students may take this course for one year (non-IB) or two years at the IB higher or standard level. The SL and HL courses cover the same topics; however, the HL course is more demanding in terms of material and depth of coverage. The HL course also requires additional lab hours and investigations. Physics is an experimental science, and students will be required to maintain a record of their laboratory work. This course is an excellent course of study for students interested in pursuing engineering or the physical sciences at the university level. IB Computer Science Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2 Guidelines for success in SL: Concurrent enrollment in Math Analysis SL or HL -ORCompletion of a Programming course and concurrent enrollment in any IB Math course. Guidelines for success in HL: Completion of a Programming course and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation. Concurrent enrollment in Math Analysis SL or HL is required for HL Computer Science. Open to: Grades 11 - 12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Credit Earned: Typically, students must complete both years of IB Computer Science in order to earn one (1.0) AISB elective credit and one (1.0) science credit. With counselor and principal approval, the course may be pursued for science credit only. The course, underpinned by conceptual thinking, draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge, and enables and empowers innovation, exploration, and the acquisition of further knowledge. It is aimed at preparing students for the IB Computer science HL / SL assessment. Students at SL and HL in Computer Science study a common core consisting of four topics (system fundamentals; computer organization; networks; and computational thinking, problemsolving and programming), object-oriented programming, and one piece of internally assessed work, which includes a computational solution. The HL course has three additional elements: three further topics (abstract data structures, resource management, control), additional and more demanding content for object-oriented programming, and an additional externally assessed component based on a pre-seen case study on an organization or scenario.

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Typical Pathways for Science:

Gr 9

Gr 10

Gr 11

Gr 12

IB BIOLOGY STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVELS

IB CHEMISTRY STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVELS

IB PHYSICS STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVELS

IB COMPUTER SCIENCE STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVELS

IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS & SOCIETIES - STANDARD LEVEL ONLY

NON-IB

Science 9

Science 9

Science 9

Science 9

Science 9

Science 9

Science 10

Science 10 (and a Programming course)

Science 10 (and a Social Studies course)

Science 10 Systems Science

IB Biology SL/HL Y1

IB Physics SL/HL Y1 IB Chemistry SL/HL Y1 (both require (HL requires concurrent concurrent enrollment enrollment in SL/HL in SL/HL Math Math Analysis) Analysis)

IB Computer Science SL/HL Y1 (HL requires concurrent enrollment in SL/HL Math Analysis)

IB ESS SL Y1

Systems Science

IB Biology SL/HL Y2

IB Chemistry SL/HL IB Physics SL/HL Y2 Y2 (both require (HL requires concurrent concurrent enrollment enrollment in SL/HL in SL/HL Math Math Analysis) Analysis)

IB Computer Science SL/HL Y2 (HL requires concurrent enrollment in SL/HL Math Analysis)

IB ESS SL Y2

Elective

Science 10

Science 10

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C HAPTER 6

Mathematics

“Mathematics has beauty and romance. It's not a boring place to be, the mathematical world. It's an extraordinary place; it's worth spending time there.� Marcus du Sautoy


Grade 9 Standard Mathematics

Grade 10 Integrated Mathematics

Prerequisites: Grade 8 Math Guidelines for success: Teacher recommendation Open to: Grade 9 Length: Yearlong Textbook: Various sources

Prerequisites: Grade 9 Math Guidelines for success: Successful completion of Math 9I or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grade 10 Length: Yearlong Textbook: Black, Keith, Vollmar, Pamela, Haese, Michael, Haese, Robert, Haese, Sandra, and Humphries, Mark. Mathematics for the International School Student (Pre-DP Studies). Haese & Harris, 2008. Note: This course will no longer be offered after 2019-20.

The goal of this course is to help students develop their abilities to explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, and communicate their ideas clearly. Students will review and extend their understanding of fundamental algebra, geometry and statistical concepts. Primary course topics include number and operations, statistics, equations and graphing (linear and quadratic), polynomials, geometry and trigonometry, and probability. A graphic calculator is required for this course, although non-calculator techniques will be taught and assessed.

Grade 9 Honors Mathematics Prerequisites: Grade 8 Math Guidelines for success: Grade of 5 or higher in Math 8 and Teacher recommendation Open to: Grade 9 Length: Yearlong Textbook: Various resources This course is designed for students with a strong interest in studying mathematics at a high level. The goal of this course is to cover the Grade 9 Standard Mathematics syllabus in a more sophisticated way. The objectives of this course are to review and master the fundamental concepts and to introduce many advanced topics in algebra, analytic geometry, and trigonometry. The course will fully explore the patterns, functions, and algebraic relations of linear and quadratic functions with applications as well as the geometric concepts of triangle trigonometry and statistics. A graphic calculator is required for this course, although noncalculator techniques will be taught and assessed.

The goal of this course is to build on the foundations which have been laid in the Grade 9 Integrated course. Students will develop their abilities to explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, and communicate their ideas clearly. Students will review and extend their understanding of fundamental algebra, geometry, and statistical concepts, along with exploring functions beyond linear and quadratics, with a focus on the use of technology as a tool. The emphasis of the course is on building a conceptual understanding of mathematics by showing the connections among the different branches of mathematics through real-life applications and exploratory activities. A graphic calculator is required for this course.

Grade 10 Standard Mathematics Prerequisites: Grade 9 Math Guidelines for success: Successful completion of Math 9S or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grade 10 Length: Yearlong Textbook: Larson, Ron. Algebra 2. Evanston, IL, McDougal Littell, 2001. The objectives of this course are to review and master the fundamental concepts and introduce many advanced topics in algebra, functions, and trigonometry. This course is designed to go at a faster pace than the Grade 10 Integrated Mathematics course and includes additional topics. Primary course topics include equations and inequalities, statistics and probability, polynomials, trigonometry, radicals, exponentials, and logarithms. A graphic calculator is required for this course, although non-calculator techniques will be taught and assessed.

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Grade 10 Honors Mathematics Prerequisites: Grade 9 Math Guidelines for success: Successful completion of Math 9H or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grade 10 Length: Yearlong Textbook: Brown, Richard G., and Andrew M. Gleason. Advanced Mathematics: Precalculus with Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. Evanston, IL, McDougal Littell, 2003. This course is designed for students with a strong interest in studying mathematics at a high level. In addition to covering the 10S syllabus, additional topics will be taught in order to prepare students for IB HL Mathematics. The course will explore equations and inequalities, statistics and probability, polynomials and functions, trigonometry, radicals, exponentials, and logarithms. A graphic calculator is required for this course, although non-calculator techniques will be taught and assessed.

IB Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation, Standard Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Grade 10 Math Guidelines for success: Teacher recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) This course is appropriate for students who are interested in developing their mathematics for describing our world and solving practical problems. They will also be interested in harnessing the power of technology alongside exploring mathematical models.

Calculus. The exploration will seek to test investigative, problem-solving and modelling skills. Approximately 30 hours of the course will be dedicated toward teaching mathematical exploration and for completion of the culminating task for the course.

IB Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches, Standard Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Grade 10 Math Guidelines for success: Successful completion of Math 10S/10H or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) This course is appropriate for students who enjoy developing their mathematics to become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments and develop strong skills in mathematical thinking.  They are likely also fascinated by exploring real and abstract applications of these ideas, with and without the use of technology. Students who take Math AA will be those who enjoy the thrill of mathematical problem solving and generalization.  It is aimed at students who will go on to study subjects with substantial mathematics content such as engineering, physical sciences, economics or mathematics itself.   The course will center on 5 core topics and a mathematical exploration.  The topics are Number and Algebra, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, Statistics and Probability and Calculus.  The exploration will seek to test investigative, problem-solving and modelling skills. Approximately 30 hours of the course will be dedicated toward teaching mathematical exploration and for completion of the culminating task for the course.

IB Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches, HIGHER Level, Years 1&2

Students who take this course will likely enjoy mathematics when seen in a practical context. It is aimed at students who will go on to study subjects such as social sciences, natural sciences, statistics, business, some economics, psychology, and design, for example.

Prerequisites: Grade 10 Math Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Math 10H and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.)

The course will center on 5 core topics and a mathematical exploration. The topics are Number and Algebra, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, Statistics and probability and

This course is appropriate for students who enjoy developing their mathematics to become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments and develop strong skills in

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mathematical thinking.  They are likely also fascinated by exploring real and abstract applications of these ideas, with and without the use of technology. Students who take Math AA will be those who enjoy the thrill of mathematical problem solving and generalization.  It is aimed at students who will go on to study subjects with substantial mathematics content such as engineering, physical sciences, economics or mathematics itself.   The course will center on 5 core topics and a mathematical exploration.  The topics are Number and Algebra, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, Statistics and Probability and Calculus.  The exploration will seek to test investigative, problem-solving and modelling skills. Approximately 30 hours of the course will be dedicated toward teaching mathematical exploration and for completion of the culminating task for the course.

IB OPTIONS For the Class of 2020 ONLY: IB Mathematics Studies Standard Level, Years 1&2 (Seniors only) Prerequisites: Grade 10 Math Guidelines for success: Teacher recommendation Open to: Grade 12 students graduating in 2020 (This class will be discontinued by the IB.) Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: Blythe, Peter, Fensom, Jim, Forrest, Jane, and de Tokman, Paula. IB Mathematical Studies: Standard Level. Oxford, OSC, 2012. This course follows a similar syllabus as the Standard Level Mathematics class but with an emphasis on statistical application and technology. Topics include Numbers and Algebra, Descriptive Statistics, Statistical Applications, Geometry and Trigonometry, Mathematical Models, Logic, Sets and Probability, and Introductory Differential Calculus. Math Studies provides a mathematical course for those students pursuing non-mathematical fields. A mathematics project as an Internal Assessment (IA) is required. A graphic calculator is required for this course.

IB Mathematics Standard Level, Years 1 & 2 (Seniors only) Prerequisites: Grade 10 Math Guidelines for success: Successful completion of Math 10S/10H or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grade 12 students graduating in 2020 (This class will be discontinued by the IB.) Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: Blythe, Peter, Fensom, Jim, Forrest, Jane, and de Tokman, Paula. Mathematical Studies Standard Level. Oxford OSC, 2012. This course provides a wide range of advanced mathematical topics. It is a two-year program aimed at preparing students for the IB Mathematics Standard Level external exam. The course will offer an in-depth review and extension of algebraic and trigonometric concepts. Topics covered include: Algebra, Functions and Equations, Circular functions and trigonometry, Vectors, Statistics and Probability, and Calculus. A mathematical exploration as an Internal Assessment (IA) is required. A graphic calculator is required for this course, although noncalculator techniques will be taught and assessed.

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IB Mathematics Higher Level, Years 1&2 (Seniors only) Prerequisites: Grade 10 Math Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Math 10H and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher recommendation Open to: Grade 12 students graduating in 2020 (This class will be discontinued by the IB.) Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) Textbook: • Harcet, Josip, and Lorraine Heinrichs. IB Mathematics Higher Level Course Book: Oxford IB Diploma Programme. Oxford OSC, 2012. • Wazir, Ibrahim and Garry, Tim. Higher Level Mathematics: IB Diploma. Pearson, 2012. This course provides a wide range of advanced mathematics topics. It is aimed at preparing students for further study in advanced mathematics. The course is open to motivated students with a strong background in mathematics. It is hoped the course will help instill a lifelong interest in and appreciation of mathematics, and that students will carry on with mathematics in future studies. The course will include Algebra, Functions and Equations, Circular functions and trigonometry, Vectors, Statistics and Probability, and Calculus. One topic is selected as a focus for the course and is studied a more depth. A mathematical exploration as an Internal Assessment (IA) is required. A graphic calculator is required for this course, although non-calculator techniques will be taught and assessed.

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Typical Pathways for Math (for the Class of 2021 and beyond):

MATHEMATICS APPLICATIONS AND INTERPRETATION STANDARD LEVEL ONLY

MATHEMATICS ANALYSIS AND APPROACHES - STANDARD LEVEL

MATHEMATICS ANALYSIS AND APPROACHES - HIGHER LEVEL

Gr 9

Grade 9 Math - Standard

Grade 9 Math - Standard or Honors

Grade 9 Math - Honors

Gr 10

Grade 10 Math - Standard

Grade 10 Math - Standard or Honors

Grade 10 Math - Honors

Gr 11

Math Applications and Interpretation SL Y1

Math Analysis and Approaches SL Y1

Math Analysis and Approaches HL Y1

Gr 12

Math Applications and Interpretation SL Y2

Math Analysis and Approaches SL Y2

Math Analysis and Approaches HL Y2

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C HAPTER 7

Arts Visual and Performing Arts

"Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." Pablo Picasso


Introduction to Studio Art Prerequisite: None Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong This course is designed to introduce the students to the elements and principles of art. It is a hands-on course that emphasizes explorations, developmental skills, experience, and imagination in order to produce original, personally expressive works. Students gain an understanding of the process of making art through projects involving portraiture, figures, printmaking and a self-designed projects, all with a connection to art history. Students will maintain an investigation workbook of concepts, sketches, visual and artist research, and reflections as a planning tool in the creative process.   In the second semester, students will explore two-dimensional and three-dimensional studio projects. Students will continue to develop their processes of making art through units involving linear perspective, sculpture, and a self-designed project all with a connection to art history.  Students will understand the choices of media, composition, format, concept, and style and make informed decisions in order to create personally expressive works of art. Digital Art & Photography Advanced Studio Art Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong This course is designed as a preparation for students interested in taking IB Art, and is also open to non-IB artists interested in continuing their artistic development. Advanced Studio Art consists of 2 compulsory parts: Studio and Investigation. Students will produce a cohesive body of self-directed studio work that is well supported by the workbook through a process of research, discovery, and creativity, while making cultural, social, and historical connections. Students’ ideas, progress, research, analysis, experiments, and failures will be recorded in their workbooks and will culminate in a cohesive, connected body of work that will be analyzed, revised, critiqued and presented. This approach enables students to be more structured and creative in their studio work and in their development as an artist in preparation for the IB.

Prerequisite: None Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Note: Each student will have access to a digital SLR camera, the photography studio, and appropriate software during class time. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the basic principles of digital photography, enabling them to work confidently and creatively in this medium. Students learn to use a digital SLR camera in both aperture and shutter priority mode. They take photographs in a variety of genres and learn how to edit and manage their images using appropriate software. Students also learn how to combine images to create digital works of art using Adobe Photoshop. In the final trimester, the students pursue their own particular interests in the medium. Through a series of individual projects, they can choose to focus on photography, digital art or a combination of the two.

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Graphic Design and Yearbook

Independent Study: Studio Art

Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that students should have successfully completed the Digital Art and Photography course at AISB. Alternatively, they could demonstrate strong technology and artistic skills. Students also need to show initiative and the ability to work independently. Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong

Prerequisite: Advanced Studio Art, Teacher Recommendation, and a pre-approved work plan Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong

This course is in two parts. In the first semester, the students are introduced to the basic principles of graphic design and complete a series of assignments that develop their design skills using Adobe InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop. In the second semester, they produce the AISB yearbook. This involves working independently on documenting activities around the school as well as collaborating on concept development, design and layout to put together a student produced and unique story of the school year.

In advance of enrolling in this course, students must create project plans developed with teacher approval. In the Independent Study: Studio Art course, students continue to develop the application of studio materials and compositions to personal art projects using the design cycle. Advanced and motivated students will apply concepts and techniques learned in Advanced Studio in order to create at least six independent projects that investigate the connection of artists and artworks to their developing studio practices. This course is designed as a preparation for students interested in taking IB Art, and is also open to non-IB artists interested in continuing their artistic development. 

Independent Study: Advanced Digital Photography Prerequisite: Digital Photography, Teacher Recommendation, and a pre-approved work plan Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong The aims of Digital Photography Independent Study course are to continue to develop the principles of digital photography, enabling students to work confidently and creatively in this medium. Advanced and motivated photography students will apply concepts and techniques learned in Digital Photography in order to create three independent projects that investigate advanced techniques connected to master photographers and require sophisticated editing. Students will store, edit, manage, present, and critique digital photographs using appropriate methodology, culminating in a digital portfolio.

IB Visual ArtS Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Minimum of one year of HS Studio Art or Teacher Recommendation Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Advanced Studio Art and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher Recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.)

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The IB Visual Arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. Students will develop a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of design and apply these as well as creative thinking and expression to their own experimental studio works. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to further study of visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.  At the end of 2 years, the students will prepare an exhibition of their studio works and discuss their research work undertaken during this development process. The aims of the visual arts course at SL and HL are to enable students to: • Examine and compare the work of artists from different cultural contexts and understand how these contexts inform practice (Comparative Study) • Make art through a process of investigation, thinking critically and experimenting with techniques and apply identified techniques to their own developing work (Process Portfolio)   • Select and present resolved works for exhibition and explain the ways in which the works are connected and how artistic judgments impact the overall presentation. (Exhibition) • HL and SL are differentiated by the amount of final works for submission.

their HL Extension period. With proper planning and reflection, these hours can also count as IB CAS Activity hours. Please see the CAS Coordinator for details on this option.

Rock Band Prerequisites: None Open to : Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Rock Band covers many important aspects of modern popular music from both practical and theoretical standpoints. The course is designed for experienced musicians, but accommodations can be made for novices. Students will rehearse together, tracking their progress and contributing ideas on how to improve performances, and they will put on several concerts throughout the year. Students will also learn the necessary music theory that will allow them to analyze popular music, and they can then use their discoveries to analyze and improve upon their own compositions. Additionally, students will learn how to set up for a concert or a rehearsal, mix live sound, promote their band and their music, and they will learn the historical context of the rise of rock music. This course may be repeated for credit with teacher approval. This course can serve as a foundational course for IB Music. Recommendation: Students enrolled are encouraged to take private music lessons.

Band

Music Technology

Prerequisites: None Open to : Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong, and IB Diploma students may enroll as part of CAS Band

Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong

Band is a performance-based course for students who wish to pursue playing instrumental music. The main focus is on musicianship, technique, and musical performance. Students play concert band arrangements in a variety of styles as members of the full large ensemble. They also perform as members of a smaller ensemble such as brass quintet, woodwind quartet, or percussion group. Public performances are several times per year. In addition, attendance at professional concerts and performances is encouraged, and students often attend as a group. Due to the nature of the subject, students should take band for a full year. This course may be repeated for credit with teacher approval. This course can serve as a foundational course for IB Music. IB Diploma students may also participate in the class during

The Music Technology course is designed to allow students to understand and create modern electronic music in a variety of styles. Students will learn the fundamentals of music theory as it applies to modern popular music, as they simultaneously learn the technical side of composition using high-end composition software, Ableton Live. Topics covered include drum programming, chord theory, audio effects and MIDI effects, automation, and sampling/ repurposing audio. This course may be repeated, but students will be expected to work more independently and at a more focused and higher level of musical sophistication. This course can serve as a foundational course for IB Music.

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Advanced Music Study Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong This course is intended as preparation for students who may be interested in taking IB Music but it is also open to non-IB music students interested in studying music from a variety of perspectives. Some of the projects will be in alignment with the IB Music Year 1 curriculum and will involve aspects of the composition, performance, and critical analysis of music. Students will create, participate in, and reflect upon music from their own background and those of others. Students study musical perception and actively listen to a wide range of music from different parts of the world, musical cultures, and time periods encompassing jazz/pop, western art music, and world music. Composition may be for traditional instruments, voices, and/or music technology and may be in whichever style students may be attracted to. Through the Advanced Music Study course, students develop their knowledge and potential as musicians, both personally and collaboratively. Recommendation: Students may find it valuable to be a HS Band member or to take Music Technology while taking Advanced Music Study.

Independent Study: Music Performance Prerequisite: Approval based on audition Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong This course is for students who study music privately outside of school at an advanced and committed level. It is designed for students interested in taking IB Music in the future and also open to non-IB musicians interested in continuing their musical development. While students will study with a teacher of their choosing outside of school, the regular school class time of three meetings per week is used for independent practice and to discuss progress and plan repertoire with their course teacher. As aspiring musicians it is essential that students play publicly, and therefore, an in-school public performance will be given each semester. Inclass preparatory performances receive feedback and the public recital is used as a summative assessment for this course. The criteria for this assessment are shared with the application process and are part of the course contract.

Prerequisites: Minimum of one year of HS Music/Band or Teacher Recommendation Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Advanced Music and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher Recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) The IB Music course is a comprehensive study of music, including opportunities for performance, composition, and arranging. Newly added to the curriculum are composition and performance using music technology. Traditional music history and theory are covered in order to prepare students for an in-depth analysis of music from a variety of genres including classical, world, jazz, and pop. Students who choose performance may use the HS Band as their ensemble. Students who select composition may use traditional methods and/or music technology as their medium.

Introduction to THEATRE Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Intro to Theatre is an intensive course rooted in ensemble building that explores drama as a tool for self-expression and analysis of social and personal issues, while encouraging the appreciation of theatre as an art form. Each semester the course will focus on a particular theater genre/style at the discretion of the teacher. Possible genres include: Devising Theatre, Oral Interpretation, Scene work, mime, improvisational theatre, theatre sports and study of the Stanislavsky System. Performance is a mandatory part of this course and will be assessed.

Advanced TheatrE Prerequisites: Introduction to Theatre or Teacher Recommendation Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong This advanced theater course builds upon the building blocks from the intro course and moves the students towards a more focused “performance based” program. Scene-study, monologues, directing and world theater will be covered in this course. Early work from the IB

IB Music Standard and Higher Level, Years 1 & 2

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Theater syllabus will be introduced as well. Performance is a mandatory part of this course and will be assessed. monologues, directing and world theater will be covered in this course. Early work from the IB Theater syllabus will be introduced as well. Performance is a mandatory part of this course and will be assessed.

IB Theatre Standard and Higher Level, Years 1&2 Prerequisites: Minimum of one year of HS Theatre or Teacher Recommendation Guidelines for success in HL: Grade of 5 or higher in Advanced Theatre and a grade of “Meeting” or higher in the Learning Identities or Teacher Recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (Note: All IB courses are taken for 2 years to obtain IB credit.) The IB Theatre course is a multifaceted theatre-making course of study. It gives students the opportunity to make theatre as creators, designers, directors, and performers and emphasizes the importance of working both individually and collaboratively as part of an ensemble. It offers the opportunity to engage actively in the creative process, transforming ideas into action as inquisitive and productive artists. Students experience the course from contrasting artistic perspectives. They learn to apply research and theory to inform and to contextualize their work. The course encourages students to appreciate that through the processes of researching, creating, preparing, presenting, and critically reflecting on theatre — as participants and audience members — they gain a richer understanding of themselves, their community, and the world. The aims of the theatre course at SL and HL are to enable students to: • explore theatre in a variety of contexts and understand how these contexts inform practice (theatre in context) • understand and engage in the processes of transforming ideas into action (theatre processes) • develop and apply theatre production, presentation and performance skills, working both independently and collaboratively (presenting theatre) For HL only: • understand and appreciate the relationship between theory and practice (theatre in context, theatre processes, presenting theatre). 


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Typical Pathways for Fine Arts:

VISUAL ARTS PATH

Gr 9

Introduction to Studio Art Digital Arts and Photography Graphic Design and Yearbook

Gr 10

Intro or Advanced Studio Art Digital Arts and Photography Graphic Design and Yearbook Independent Study: Studio Art or Advanced Digital Photography

Gr 11

IB Visual Arts (SL/HL) Intro or Advanced Studio Art Digital Arts and Photography Graphic Design and Yearbook Independent Study: Studio Art or Advanced Digital Photography

Gr 12

IB Visual Arts (SL/HL) Intro or Advanced Studio Art Digital Arts and Photography Graphic Design and Yearbook Independent Study: Studio Art or Advanced Digital Photography

THEATRE PATH

MUSIC PATH

OPEN PATH

Introduction to Theatre

Band Rock Band Music Technology

Band, Rock Band, Music Tech, Intro Theatre, Intro Art, Digital Arts and Photography, Graphic Design and Yearbook, Video Production

Intro or Advanced Theatre

Advanced Music Band, Rock Band, Music Tech Independent Study: Music Performance

Band, Rock Band, Music Tech, Adv Music, Intro/Adv Theatre, Intro/ Adv Art, Digital Arts and Photography, Graphic Design and Yearbook, Video Production, Independent Study Courses

IB Theatre (SL/HL) Intro or Advanced Theatre

IB Music (SL/HL) Band, Rock Band, Music Tech Advanced Music Independent Study: Music Performance

Band, Rock Band, Music Tech, Adv Music, Intro/Adv Theatre, Intro/ Adv Art, Digital Arts and Photography, Graphic Design and Yearbook, Video Production, Independent Study Courses

IB Theatre (SL/HL) Intro or Advanced Theatre

IB Music (SL/HL) Band, Rock Band, Music Tech Advanced Music Independent Study: Music Performance

Band, Rock Band, Music Tech, Adv Music, Intro/Adv Theatre, Intro/ Adv Art, Digital Arts and Photography, Graphic Design and Yearbook, Video Production, Independent Study Courses


C HAPTER 8

Information Technology & Media Arts “It is important to remember that educational software, like textbooks, is only one tool in the learning process. Neither can be a substitute for well-trained teachers, leadership, and parental involvement.� Keith Krueger


Video Production

Independent Study: Video Production

Prerequisites: Photography is recommended Open to: grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Arts Credit: Yes

Prerequisites: Teacher Recommendation Open to: Grades 10-12 Length: Yearlong Arts Credit: Yes

Digital Video is now used in broadcasting, websites, documentaries and feature films. This project-based course offers an introduction to this exciting technology and the process of video production. In pursuit of projects students will develop important skills in analysis, planning, and communication. Students will work in small groups to create their own short entertainment videos and news reports. Time-based problem solving is at the core of every exercise as students learn about camera handling, composition, found lighting, audio, and post-production editing. Special effects using green screen, animations, and video compositing are explored. Software in this course includes: FinalCut X, Motion, Compressor, Photoshop.

This independent study course allows students to complete video tutorial assignments as they develop powerful skills in video production. Using these skills, students then create authentic videos for contests and clients. This course may be taken for an Arts credit.

Programming Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Arts Credit: No iPhone app development and fun projects with software robots are some of the programming activities in this hands-on course. Students learn and practices key concepts for object oriented programming. This includes development of classes, objects, methods, properties, events, loops, arrays and services. Planning, documentation and pseudo-code is practiced. This course is a pre-requisite for HL IB Computer Science.

Design Technology Prerequisites: None Open to: grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Arts Credit: No Design links innovation and creativity and provides a structured process based on wellestablished principles to resolve authentic problems. The Design Technology class focuses on using the design process to develop and create solutions to fill a variety of needs. Students design solutions and products in a variety of domains including graphic design, and computer aided design (CAD) for the creation of tangible products. Students use CAD software to rapidly prototype, design, and make/build their ideas. They have the opportunity to use many different types of tools, including computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines like 3D printers and routers. Important goals of this course are to learn how to design solutions, be creative, work with your hands, problem-solve, and experience using today’s leading design tools and processes.

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C HAPTER 9

Online Learning Options

"We need to bring learning to people instead of people to learning." Elliot Masie


Online LEARNING Options Prerequisites: Dependent upon course; Principal and counselor approval required Open to: Grades 10-12; Grade 9 with permission Length: Semester or Yearlong Graded as: Pass/Fail AISB aims to offer its students a wide variety of possibilities for learning. As a part of its focus on Learning for the Future, the school is pleased to provide time within a student’s schedule and give credit for external / online courses, or other accredited high school classes, under the following circumstances: • An equivalent course is not offered at AISB • A student’s graduation status is not dependent upon the outcome of the course • All extra fees associated with the course are paid by the parents and not by AISB • These courses are rigorous and must be taken as electives within a student’s academic schedule, and not in addition to an otherwise busy schedule. • Courses chosen must be comparable in length to the AISB scheduled term(s). One semester at AISB, for example, is 18 weeks, so a student may choose one course for 18 weeks or multiple courses that span 16-18 weeks. Students who wish to take online courses should exhibit strong Learning Identities and the characteristics of an independent learner. Students should speak with their counselor to see how this might fit into their academic program and must complete an Online Course Proposal to be submitted with their course requests. AISB aims to schedule students enrolled in an online course in a supervised class to provide structure and promote success. If this class is not available within a student’s schedule, he/she will work independently and check in with a learning coach regularly to set goals and review progress.

Stanford University Online Coursera (www.coursera.org/stanford): • Game Theory • Introduction to Logic • Writing in Sciences

AP Courses AP courses can be taken from several online sites, most of which are free. AISB is certified by the College Board to administer AP exams; with prior notification AISB can arrange the final exam for AP courses. Courses can be found at www.edx.org. Students should speak with their counselor to see how this might fit into their academic program and must complete an Online Course Proposal to be submitted with their course requests.

IB Courses Online IB Course Offerings at http://www.pamojaeducation.com/ cost approximately $995 USD per year, and the courses are two years long. AISB will accept the courses listed below. Students should speak with their counselor to see how this might fit into their academic program and must complete an Online Course Proposal to be submitted with their course requests. • Mandarin ab initio • Business Management • Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) • Philosophy SL • Film SL

Students may take courses of interest from these approved providers. Courses are continually updated by the universities. Some examples are listed here, and you can find the most current options at the URLs listed below. edX Online www.edx.org (Includes schools such as Harvard, MIT, Sorbonne, and Oxford) • C550s Web Programming with Python and JavaScript • Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies • Science and Cooking • China Studies • Artificial Intelligence • Topics in Performance Studies

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Possibilities for Elective Credits: There are many possibilities for elective credits at AISB. Some examples are listed below (elective credits are shown in purple). Most elective classes are from the Arts, Information Technology, and Online courses. Any course can count as an elective credit, however, if a student has already fulfilled the requirement. For example, an extra science or world language course would be considered electives as well. It is important to review the credit requirements to ensure completion of each area.

POSSIBLE COURSES

Gr 9

Gr 10-12

Band, Rock Band, Music Tech, Intro Theatre, Intro Art, Digital Arts and Photography, Graphic Design and Yearbook, Video Production, Programming, Design Technology, Online Course Options with permission, another World Language course, etc.

Band, Rock Band, Music Tech, Adv Music, Intro/Adv Theatre, Intro/Adv Art, Digital Arts and Photography, Graphic Design and Yearbook, Video Production, Programming, Design Technology, Independent Study Courses, Online Course Options, AP Courses online, US History, Business Studies, Systems Science, any other course for which the requirements have been filled.

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C HAPTER 10

Physical Education

"Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity." John F. Kennedy


Physical Education 9

Lifetime Fitness

Prerequisites: None Required for students in Grade 9 Length: Yearlong

Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong or Semester

In grade nine, students complete the transition from modified versions of movement forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities. They demonstrate the ability to use basic skills, strategies, and tactics. Students demonstrate more specialized knowledge in identifying and applying key movement concepts and principles. They assess their skill performance and develop a personal physical activity program aimed at improvement. They apply their understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity and demonstrate independence in making choices. Students learn elements of fair play and ethical behavior in physical activity settings. 

Lifetime Fitness provides students with the opportunity to participate in physical activities for specific purposes. Options for offering specialized-movement courses can be configured by semester or on a full-year basis. Students will select areas of concentration to study. Examples of possible choices are: Aerobics , aquatics, cycling, dance, individual sports, lifelong activities, outdoor pursuits, Pilates, self-defense, team sports, weight management, weight training/conditioning.

Wellness Physical Education 10 Prerequisites: None Required for students in Grade 10 Length: Yearlong Students in grade ten are proficient in fundamental movement skills and skill combinations and are competent in self-selected physical activities that they are likely to participate in throughout life. They understand and apply key movement and fitness principles and concepts for all activities in which they demonstrate competence. Students work to be good leaders and good followers, to respect others, and to anticipate and avoid unsafe physical activity situations. They develop the ability to understand and anticipate how physical activity interests and abilities change across a lifetime. Students demonstrate competency in lifelong physical activities in which they are interested. They will plan, implement, self-assess, and modify a personal fitness plan. Students are preparing to lead a physically active lifestyle.

Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Drop in, Yearlong The AISB Wellness class is an opportunity for students to avail themselves of the fitness facilities during the school day when they don't have class. The AISB Wellness class runs concurrently with the Lifetime Fitness class on a drop-in basis. Students who choose to attend, either during free HL Extension time or Study Hall, can perform individual workouts in their own area of interest or receive direction from the Lifetime Fitness teacher. There is a vast amount of research demonstrating the physical and mental benefits of exercise, including stress reduction, increased brain function, and improved cardio vascular function. As an added benefit, with proper planning and reflection, the time spent in the Wellness class can also be used as an IB CAS Activity under the Action category. Students should talk to the CAS Coordinator for more details on this option.

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Typical Progression for Physical Education:

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Gr 9

Physical Education 9

Gr 10

Physical Education 10

Gr 11

Lifetime Fitness Wellness Drop In

Gr 12

Lifetime Fitness Wellness Drop In

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C HAPTER 11

Learning Support

“Instruction does much, but encouragement everything." Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


English as an Additional Language (EAL)

EAL Support

Prerequisites: Students must meet AISB English proficiency entrance criteria Open to: Grade 9-10 Length: Yearlong Credit Type: Either “Elective” or “World Language”, depending on the full student schedule Graded as: Pass/Fail

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong Credit Type: None

Textbooks may include: • For Your Information, Blanchard and Root • Consider the Issues, Numrich. Longman • Introductory Course for the TOEFL Test, Phillips. Longman • IGCSE English as a Second Language Focus on Writing, Alison Digger. Cambridge • English an International Approach Rachel Redford. Oxford • Keystone Series, Pearson Longman • Word Journeys Academic English Vocabulary, Jamestown Education
 This course enables English language learners to operate to their full potential both academically and socially within the international school setting. There is a strong emphasis on literacy skills and extending strategies for coping with content-area curriculum. The EAL teachers aim to provide a learning environment that will facilitate the students’ adjustment to the language and culture of the school, and aid the confident development of English proficiency. Students are taught English through academic content with exposure to rich oral and written language. The course is specifically targeted to meet the needs of intermediate level students of English. All students are initially tested and their progress assessed regularly using the WIDA Model Assessment as well as a range of teacher-made assessments aligned to WIDA standards and benchmarks. Our philosophy is to monitor and support all students as needed. This course may be repeated for credit, with teacher permission. In the first semester, new EAL students to the high school have an option to be assessed on a pass/fail basis for some of their subjects. Specific criteria are identified for success, thus giving the student time to further develop his/her language skills. This option requires the approval of the EAL teacher, subject teacher, parents, and administration. Students interested in this option should consult their EAL teacher.

The EAL Support class is designed for students who have recently attended the EAL program. It is offered during the HL Extension Block and represents a dedicated time when students who are still developing their academic English proficiency can receive targeted support from an English language specialist who is also familiar with the IB program. In previous years IB students found the following helpful. It is important to note that the list is not exhaustive: • Talking through the planning for written assignments • Editing and proofing • Writing college essays • Writing motivational letters • Writing personal statements for UCAS • Preparing for TOEFL/IELTS • Practicing for oral presentations • Reading and discussing assigned literature • Deconstructing IB exam questions • Analyzing teacher feedback to make further revisions


Learning Support Services (LSS) Prerequisites: Teacher Approval Open to: grades 9-12 Length: Semester Credit Type: Elective Graded as: Pass/Fail Students who meet the requirements of Learning Support Services may enroll in this class. This course does not give additional homework; rather it supports students in successfully completing the assignments of their other classes and in extending effective organizational and study skills. Under certain conditions this course may replace the world language credit requirement or be taken as an elective course. Please see the guidance counselor for these conditions. This course is graded on a pass-fail basis. The course may be repeated for credit, with teacher permission.

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IB Skills

Study Hall

Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 11-12; Required for all IB Diploma Candidates or for non-diploma students who have an IB course with a score of 3 or below Length: Semester Credit Type: None

Prerequisites: None Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Semester Credit Type: None

IB Skills provides support for students throughout the full IB program, providing assistance with time-management and organization, as well as their written expression. Students are given an opportunity to hone their writing skills through personal writing, receiving feedback on how to strengthen their voice, organization, and clarity of expression, as well as being introduced to the essentials of completing a successful Extended Essay (EE). Students also have time to work independently on their other subjects, either individually, with a classmate, or with the teacher’s assistance. In the first semester of grade 11, IB Diploma Candidates will transfer from IB Skills into Theory of Knowledge (TOK). (See details of TOK in the “IB Core Requirements” section.)

Non-IB Diploma students in grades 11-12 may sign up for one block (semester or yearlong) of Study Hall. AISB has high academic standards; study hall is a time for students to complete school work, study, or (if possible) meet with teachers to help meet these standards and decrease after-school workload expectations. The school designates multiple locations where students may work, and students are expected to be in one of these locations. Study hall is a privilege for students. If a student is not using this time wisely, the school reserves the right to reschedule a student. Study Hall seats are limited and are granted on a space-available basis. Priority is given to students enrolled in at least one IB course.

After students complete their TOK class in grade 12, they return to IB Skills, which serves as a support as they begin their review for IB Exams. Students can have further instruction, practice, and feedback on their written assessments in preparation for their IB Exams. They may work independently on their subjects, either individually, with a classmate, or with the teacher’s assistance.

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C HAPTER 12

IB Core Requirements

"The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual’s own reason and critical analysis." Tenzin Gyatso


Extended Essay (EE) Prerequisites: IB Diploma candidate Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (end of grade 11, beginning of grade 12) “The extended essay of some 4,000 words offers the opportunity for IB students to investigate a topic of special interest, usually one of the student’s six Diploma Programme subjects, and acquaints them with the independent research and writing skills expected at university. It is intended to promote high-level research and writing skills, intellectual discovery and creativity—resulting in approximately 40 hours of work. It provides students with an opportunity to engage in personal research on a topic of choice, under the guidance of a supervisor. The extended essay provides practical preparation for undergraduate research and an opportunity for students to investigate a topic of special interest to them. Through the research process for the extended essay, students develop skills in formulating an appropriate research question, engaging in a personal exploration of the topic, communicating ideas and developing an argument. Participation in this process develops the capacity to analyze, synthesize and evaluate knowledge” (IB Organization). IB Organization. “What Is the Extended Essay?” International Baccalaureate®, www.ibo.org/ programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/extended-essay/what-is-the-extendedessay/. Accessed 26 Nov 2018.

simulations, examples, writing, and presenting. Throughout the course we investigate the following four questions: What is knowledge? How is knowledge acquired? To what extent is it possible for a given subject or entity to be known? How do we know what we know? For nonIB students, under certain circumstances and with the Principal’s permission, the TOK course may count as a Social Studies credit for graduation.

Creativity, Action, and Service (CAS) Required for all AISB students. Open to: Grades 9-12 Length: Yearlong Satisfactory completion of CAS is an annual requirement for all students at AISB. This may be accomplished through completion of AISB requirements, or by completion of requirements for the IB Diploma. See further information in the next section.   “Creativity, action, service is at the heart of the Diploma Programme, involving students in a range of activities that take place alongside their academic studies throughout the IB Diploma Programme. The component’s three strands, often interwoven with particular activities, are characterized as follows: • Creativity—arts and other experiences that involve creative thinking • Action—physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the IB Diploma Programme • Service—an unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student" ("IB Core Requirements")

IB Theory of Knowledge (TOK) Prerequisites: IB Diploma candidate. Also open to non-IB students with IB Coordinator and Teacher recommendation. Open to: Grades 11-12 Length: Yearlong (end of grade 11, beginning of grade 12) Textbooks: Various texts

"IB Core Requirements." The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. www.ibo.org/ globalassets/publications/recognition/core_2011.pdf. Accessed 8 Dec. 2016.

The purpose of the course is to stimulate critical reflection on the knowledge and experience of students both inside and outside the classroom. The course is philosophical in the sense that it is meant to encourage students to acquire a critical awareness of what they and others know through analyzing concepts and arguments. We explore various ways of knowing and investigate knowledge claims. We reflect through discussion-based lessons, questions,

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AISB CAS Requirements for All Students

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.” Mahatma Gandhi


AISB CAS Requirements Satisfactory completion of CAS is an annual requirement for all students at AISB. This may be accomplished through completion of AISB requirements, or by completion of requirements for the IB Diploma. Students must complete a minimum of 60 hours of activities in a minimum of two areas of Creative, Action, or Service per year. These may take place in-school or out of school. Hours for in-school activities are monitored by the student’s Advisor and the CAS Coordinator and may be found on the AISB CAS webpage (https://sites.google.com/a/ aisb.hu/aisb-cas/home). Students are responsible for tracking their own hours for out of school activities and are required to submit a CAS Plan to their Advisor at the beginning of the school year detailing what activities they plan to participate in during that year. At the end of each semester, students will have a CAS Interview with their Advisor to answer reflective questions about their work on CAS over the past term. The Advisor evaluates these interviews, and a comment on the student’s progression is included in the semester report card. IB Diploma CAS Requirements (Grades 11-12) 1. Satisfactory completion of all 7 CAS Learning Objectives 2. A balance of Creative, Action, and Service activities 3. Regular commitment to CAS over minimum 18 months of the program 4.Regular documentation and reflection of CAS activities in student online portfolio 5. Regular meetings with CAS Advisor 6. Completion of a CAS Project More information about IB CAS requirements can be found on the CAS webpage, or from the CAS Coordinator.

CAS: Process and Procedures

CAS Category 2 offerings are coordinated/facilitated by AISB but not supervised daily. Each activity has predefined Student Expectations. A student is expected to make regular progress towards meeting these expectations and meet with the activity coordinator approximately once a week. Some examples of Category 2 CAS offerings include: • Teacher Aid: Volunteer time and support to work with elementary and/or middle AISB students in literacy development or tutoring students (both during and after school). • World Language Teacher Aid: Volunteer time as teacher aides to assist in the elementary / middle school foreign language classrooms to provide assistance to younger students. • Athletic Intramurals: Work as both planners and organizers for a lunchtime intramural league. • AISB Video Yearbook: Work towards designing and creating the elements of a video yearbook and dynamic content for an AISB website. Elements include student / teacher interviews, documenting special events, and daily life. • Global Issues Network: Work independently or in groups to research and propose solutions to issues that will require a global solution. Be part of this growing movement worldwide of students and adults aiming to solve these issues. • Independent Project: Follow one’s passions to develop an independent CAS project that is meaningful and addresses a tangible need. The Independent Project must be structured by the student creating an Expectations sheet that is similar in nature to other CAS offerings. The CAS Coordinator must pre-approve the Expectations sheet to validate the activity as fulfilling the CAS Learning Outcomes. There are additional CAS opportunities available for students that are offered during/after the school day (Category 1) but do not require the student to sign-up as a "class" in a weekly schedule. Samples of these types of activities are included on the CAS website. These CAS activities will require lunch and/or after-school meetings. In most cases, there will be afterschool or weekend obligations. Please consult with the CAS Coordinator to learn more about the structure and outcomes of the activity.

CAS hours, both for AISB and IB requirements, may be earned the following ways: • Category 1: Participation in an AISB club, service programs, activity or sport. These may meet after school, at lunch, or on weekends. • Category 2: An independent, semester-long CAS course during the school day that does not receive academic credit. In this way students can work towards completing their CAS requirement, but no AISB credit is given. • Category 3: An activity or event that takes place outside of AISB on the student’s own time.

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