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The scout covers exposed body parts such as the face, back of the neck, and hands with grease paint, mud or other materials to reduce sun reflection. Camouflage for equipment can be improvised from garnishing or sandbags to prevent sun reflection. In snowy terrain, white overgarments are worn. The helmet cover outline should be distorted.

4002. CAMOUFLAGE Camouflage is the use of concealment and disguise to minimize the possibility of detection and/or identification of troops, material, equipment, and installations. The purpose of camouflage is to provide concealment of military objects from enemy observation. Camouflage is also used to conceal an object by making it look like something else. A scout’s mission usually requires individual and equipment camouflage. If natural camouflage is not adequate, the position is camouflaged. In using camouflage, remember that objects are identified by their form (outline), shadow, texture, and color. The principal purpose of camouflage in the field is to prevent direct observation and recognition.

MCWP 3-11.3

A small, thin bush in the shadow of a large bush makes a good observation point. Lone trees, rocks, fence corners, and outstanding landmarks are easily picked up by the enemy as obvious observation posts. If camouflage clothing is not available, other available clothing can be attached in irregular splotches of appropriate colors. Exposed skin reflects light and attracts the enemy’s attention. Even very dark skin will reflect light because of its natural oil. The buddy system is recom-mended when applying camouflage. Standard Marine Corps issue camouflage face paint sticks are two toned: l

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Loam and light green for light-skinned troops, in all but snow regions. Sand and light green for dark-skinned troops. Loam and white for troops in snow-covered terrain.

Shiny areas (forehead, cheekbones, nose, and chin) are painted with a dark color. Shadow areas (around the eyes, under the nose, and under the chin) are painted

Individual Camouflage Successful individual camouflage involves the ability to recognize and take advantage of all forms of natural and artificial concealment available (vegetation, soil, debris, etc.) and knowledge of the proper use of artificial camouflage materials.

Aids to Individual Camouflage A scout must recognize the terrain’s dominant color and pattern and must change the appearance of clothing and equipment accordingly in order to blend and not contrast with the terrain (see fig. 4-2). The helmet is camouflaged by breaking up its shape, smooth surface, and shadow. Use of a helmet cover works best. In the absence of a helmet cover, mud can be irregularly blotched on the helmet to disguise its form and dull the surface. A helmet cover may be improvised from irregularly colored cloth or burlap to blend with the background. Foliage can be draped to prevent the visor of the helmet from casting a dark shadow across the face. Foliage should not stick up like plumes because any head movement will give away the position.

Figure 4-2. Avoid Contrasting Backgrounds.

US Marine Corps - Scouting and Patrolling MCWP 3-11.3  

MCWP 3-11.3 U.S. Marine Corps PCN 143 000075 00 17 April 2000

US Marine Corps - Scouting and Patrolling MCWP 3-11.3  

MCWP 3-11.3 U.S. Marine Corps PCN 143 000075 00 17 April 2000

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