Issuu on Google+

Chris Mullen  SSA

www.ssa.org.uk


Structure of Presentation 1.

Innovation and competitiveness in the naval sector 

2. Internationalisation opportunities 


1. Innovation and competitiveness  y European Maritime Strategy y Current Innovative Projects y Two Example Projects 


European Maritime Strategy


European Maritime Strategy The objectives of the pillars will be met through so called  Exploitation Outcomes, which in turn will be met by current  and future research.


European Maritime Strategy Waterborne project – Exploitation Outcomes Low Risk Ship Low Energy, Low Emissions Ship Autonomous Ship Sustainable Recreational Craft Future Ship Designs for Short Sea Operation The European Cruise Ship Seven Day Ship Design World Leading Shipbuilding (e.g. flexible production processes,  minimal retooling) 9. Offshore Energy Operations in Extreme Conditions 10. Intelligent Integrated Transport Network 11. Intermodal Waterways 12. Accelerated Sustainable Port Development 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.


Current Innovative projects 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

FLAGSHIP RISPECT AUXNAVALIA BESST COPATCH CRUISE GATEWAY CLEAN NORTH SEA SHIPPING (CNSS) TARGETS ECO‐REFITEC THROUGHLIFE


Current Work – Example  Projects 1.

THROUGHLIFE  www.throughlife.eu ¾ Innovative design strategies and assessment tools for improved  efficiency and environmental performance over the life cycle of ship ¾ New business models for used products (ships, parts of ships,  components), especially to extend the life span of these products  instead of scrapping them ¾ Concepts and ideas for innovative joint life cycle services involving  new building and repair yards as well as ship owners and operators ¾ Efficient and environmentally friendly techniques and materials for  ship production, operation and end‐of life ¾ Condition monitoring and assessment combining information from  all life cycle phases and stake holders using state‐of‐the‐art  information and communication technologies ¾ Strategies and tools for predictive, condition and risk based  maintenance and repair


Current Work – Example  Projects 1.

eco‐REFITec http://eco‐refitec.eu ¾ Shipyards opportunities and challenges regarding “greening”  existing fleet  ¾ Development of eco‐innovation retrofitting practices and data base.  ¾ Design tools for evaluation and management of eco‐innovation  retrofit processes and life‐cycle analysis  ¾ Shipyard management of eco‐innovative retrofitting process.  Validation and implementation of eco retrofitting processes in  small & medium size shipyards  ¾ Life cycle cost impact of “retrofitting” of existing vessels. Validation  and implementation 


2. Internationalisation Maritime Opportunities : y Artic Resources y From India y From Russia y From Brazil y Offshore Wind Power y Ship Recycling y Green Shipping y LNG as fuel


Artic Resources


Artic Resources 2008 the US Geological Survey estimates: y 90 billion barrels of oil y 1,670 trillion cubic feet of natural gas y 44 billion barrels natural gas liquids


Artic Resources Issues: y No‐one owns the Artic region y Russia, Norway, Canada and Denmark (via Greenland)  are trying to lay claim to certain territories in the  Arctic region y Environmental concerns y Lack of experience in Artic drilling


Maritime Industry in India  y India has a large but disorganised ship repair market 

with an estimated value of $500 million  y The overall shipbuilding market in India is projected  to be around $20 billion by 2020 


Maritime Industry in India  Principals for doing business in India : y Be pro‐active and aggressive in pursuing business  opportunities y Take a strategic, long term view y Carry out basic research and systematically gain  information on doing business in India y Seek specialist advice from the relevant trade  associations and authorities y Appoint a carefully selected, reputable agent in India


Maritime Industry in India  Principals for doing business in India [continued]: y Ensure all necessary Indian government and other  approvals have been obtained y Be prepared to transfer the latest technology, design,  quality, manufacturing and operating y techniques and principles y Install quality systems from the start y Investigate in detail the availability of local raw  materials


Maritime Industry in Russia y Traditionally Russia has built naval vessels almost 

exclusively y Consequently Russia has almost no commercial  shipbuilding capability and is looking to build up it’s  industry y Machinery and equipment on board existing Russian  fleet is 20‐30 years 0ld y USC estimates a requirement for 1400+ commercial  vessels in the period to 2020


Maritime Industry in Russia Vessel Type

Quantity

Icebreakers (Nuclear + Conventional)

24

Research vessels

27

Offshore Platform‐mounted nuclear power plants

7

LNG Carriers

25

Exploration and drilling rigs

54

Supply/Auxiliary vessels

90

Tankers (> 70,000dwt), bulkers, multi‐purpose Passenger and freight ro‐ro vessels

230 30

Fishing vessels

180

River vessels, mixed river/sea, industrial ships, Russian Federal  Supervision Service vessels

750


Maritime Industry in Russia Leisure boat industry in Russia y Imported leisure craft was had a value of US$ 189m  (2008) y In 2010 the share of Russian buyers for yachts was 25% y Entry to the market via a distributor or by appointing a  sales representative


Maritime Industry in Russia Challenges with working in Russia y Country spans 11 time zones y Logistics infrastructure can be underdeveloped y Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) can be issue


Maritime Industry in Brasil


Maritime Industry in Brasil y Many companies are increasing their presence in 

Brazil to take advantage of it’s growing offshore  industry y Brazil lacks a ship repair infrastructure which will be a  problem in coming years given the increasing number  of vessels operating there y Marine Equipment comprises about 40% of total ship  price


Maritime Industry in Brasil Non‐existent local production ¾ Submersible cargo pumps  ¾ Large propellers / variable pitch ¾ Main and Auxiliary engines (H.F.O.) ¾ Integrated navigation bridges ¾ Azimuth propulsion systems  ¾ Radar systems  ¾ Oil spill recovery  ¾ Tank cleaning systems  ¾ Vertical steam turbines  ¾ Voyage data recorders


Maritime Industry in Brasil Brazil Ship orders compared with World ship orders Ship Type Oil Tankers Gas Carriers Chemical Carriers Bulk Carriers Containers Passenger Offshore

World  1594 164 754 3387 672 343 1006

Brazil 56 12 0 2 5 0 154

Share 3.5% 7.2% 0% 0.05% 0.72% 0% 15.31%


Maritime Industry in Brasil


Offshore Wind Power y UK government has stated a need for 33GW of 

installed power by 2020 y UK government have set aside £60m for  establishing world class offshore manufacturing  infrastructure for offshore wind energy at port sites  in England (Scotland, Wales & N. Ireland have  separate agreements)


Offshore Wind Power y Lack of turbine installation vessels y Lack of skilled personnel y Lack of infrastructure (grid connection points) y Offshore blades will be larger – transportation 

issues y Limited availability of turbine components


Ship Recycling y International Convention for the Safe and 

Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships likely to  come into force between 2012‐2015 y Demand for EU flag ship to be recycled in Europe  y A ageing EU fleet (fishing) inland waterway y Tremendous opportunity in recycling Oil Rigs y Lloyd’s Register publication “Guide to the Inventory of 

Hazardous Materials (GreenPassport)” available free of  charge from the website


Green Shipping y Gas emissions (SOx, NOx, CO2 and particulate matter) y Ship waste disposal y Bilge water treatment y Black waste water treatment y Grey waste water treatment y Ballast water treatment y Underwater coatings y European Marine Equipment Council (EMEC) can be 

found in “The Green Ship Technology Book” 


LNG as fuel y Ship owners are reluctant to invest in LNG 

based ships without a reasonable  infrastructure in place y LNG suppliers are reluctant to invest in this  without a secure demand for LNG y However it is an obvious choice for emissions  reduction: estimated 94 % less SOx, 83 % less  Nox, 34% less CO2 compared with standard  VLCC


AA SSA