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T he A lumni Maga zine of t he Asian Institute of Management

FLYING HIGH

S econd Qua r ter 2 012 Vol. 6 Issue 1

The AIM Scholars This page (from left): Le Nguyen Nhat Chinh, Kristeen Joi Lantican, Nguyen Tieu My, Isagani Lati Jr. and Katrina Gracia Macaraig


EDITORIAL TEAM

SECOND QUARTER 2012

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 1

Greg Atienza EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Susan Africa-Manikan ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Sherbet Katigbak-Manalili MANAGING EDITOR

Haji Zulkifly Baharom SENIOR OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT

Melissa de Sagun EDITORIAL STAFF

Maritess Aniago-Espiritu Jennifer Jalandoni Amy Nerona Bea delos Reyes Jun Javellana Anna Alegre

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ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE STAFF

Meghann Lee Isagani Eliezer Manikan Rose Cheryl Orbigo Kim Patrocinio Rose Quiambao Jerry Quibilan Mia Zamora

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CONTRIBUTORS

Chili Dogs DESIGN, ART DIRECTION

Jovel Lorenzo PHOTOGRAPHER

Fran Ng

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ILLUSTRATOR

Lexmedia Digital PRINTING

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Edilberto de Jesús PRESIDENT OF THE INSTITUTE

Ricardo Lim DEAN OF THE INSTITUTE

MP Singh CHAIRMAN, FEDERATION OF AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC.

28 NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Eustacio Orobia, Jr.

SPECIAL FEATURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

CHAIRMAN, AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION – PHILIPPINE CHAPTER

Asian Forum on Corporate Social Responsibility (AFCSR) 2011

Marvee Celi-Bonoan

COMMENCEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Management in a Globalized World

EXECUTIVE MANAGING DIRECTOR, SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Greg Atienza EXECUTIVE MANAGING DIRECTOR, ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE

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IN MEMORIAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Gaby Mendoza

The AIM Alumni Leadership Magazine (AIM Leader) is a quarterly publication of the Asian Institute of Management with editorial office at the Alumni Relations Office, Asian Institute of Management, 123 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City, 1260 Philippines Telephone No.: 892.4011 locals 331, 540 and 533 Telefax: 893.7410 | Email: aimalumni@aim.edu Copyright 2007, AIM Alumni Leadership Magazine. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any manner, in whole or in print, in English or other languages, without written permission is prohibited. ISSN 1908-1081

COVER STORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Flying High: The AIM Scholars

SPOTLIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Robert Kuan, MBM 1975: The Visionary Leader Malvan Hwang, MBM 1974: Making Dreams Come True

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SHOWCASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Bookshelf: AIM Launches Book on International Financial Institutions Bookshelf: Management: The Asian Way Travel: It’s more fun in the Philippines COVER ILLUSTRATION: FRAN NG


P R E S I D E N T ’ S

Leader

M E S S A G E

ALL INSTITUTIONS OF higher learning accept as part of their mission the obligation to build intellectual capital through research. International accreditation agencies have reinforced this demand for research output. In an issue focused on “Scholars,” it is appropriate to speak of AIM scholarship. But professional, practitioner-oriented institution like AIM, implementing this mandate calls for ensuring that the research output demonstrates both academic rigor and real-life relevance. Research at AIM cannot pursue the ivory-tower variety of scholarship. Recent international conferences convened by AIM’s research centers, which provide the major platform for faculty research, exemplify the Institute’s engagement in the critical operational issues confronted by managers in both the public and the private sectors. In September 2011, the AIM Policy Center, with the collaboration of UNICEF and Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS), brought to the Institute Cabinet-level officials and international experts for a discussion on “Pathways to High and Inclusive Growth.” The meeting addressed the global problem of the enlarging gap between the top 1% of the population and the rest of the society, a problem dramatized by the Occupy Wall Street Movement. Although the international media has focused coverage on the demonstrations in the developed countries, the problem is more acute and more urgent in emerging economies. The conference considered innovations, such as the conditional cash transfer mechanism to support social protection, propoor employment, and political participation, as well as good governance. Successfully implemented in Mexico, where it has been on-going since 1996, the scheme that remains contentious in the Philippines because of fears it would aggravate the problem of government graft and corruption. In October, the RVR Center for Corporate Social Responsibility brought back to Manila its annual Asian Forum on Corporate Social Responsibility (AFCSR) as the fitting venue to celebrate its 10th Anniversary. The event gathered over 500 delegates from 30 countries. The honored guest who delivered the closing address at the end of the two-day conference was His Excellency, Benigno S. Aquino III, President of the Republic of the Philippines. Some of the country’s biggest mining companies cohosted or participated in panels to discuss the issues facing the industry, including the perceived damage that extractive industries inflicted on the host communities and the physical environment. Business leaders from the Philippines honored the recipients of the 2011 AFCSR awards, which recognized Asian companies for outstanding, innovative projects and programs in corporate social responsibility. The other Centers also deal directly with the concerns of practicing managers, whether it is the issue of mobilizing

capital for emerging markets, which the Jose B. Fernandez Center for Business and Finance is exploring, or the delivery of health services to underserved communities that is the focus of the Zuellig Center for Asian Business Transformation. Operators of small and medium scale enterprises look to the Hills Program for Corporate Governance for assistance in developing systems to counter pressures to engage in corrupt practices. The Center for Bridging Leadership assists the executives of civilian and military agencies of government in the implementation of programs in areas of conflict. The Aspen Institute recognized AIM’s efforts to extend the range of its research and teaching activities beyond the business bottom-line. Its 2011-2012 edition of Beyond Grey Pinstripes, which monitors how business schools integrated social and environmental concerns in their curricula, ranked AIM 52nd among the Top 100 MBA programs in the world and first among business schools in Asia. As AIM strives to raise the volume and quality of its scholarly research output, it is also pursuing the goal of increasing the number of scholars in the classroom. The aim is to provide students from the Philippines and the ASEAN region with the ability to excel at AIM with the resources to enroll in its degree programs. We are fortunate in attracting the support of partners who appreciate how this objective can raise the level of intellectual engagement in the case room, as well as enhance the diversity of the student body. New partners stepped up to the plate in 2011. Lepanto Mines gave a grant of one million pesos towards a scholarship. Dato Timothy Ong, a member of the AIM Board of Governors, pledged a scholarship for the MDM. A number of new partners came from among the Alumni. Gabriel Paredes, MBM 1972, Malvan Hwang, MBM 1974, the Triple A Club headed by Jesli Lapus, MBM 1973 have all sponsored scholars in 2011. We expect to scale up the number of AIM students on scholarship with the launch of the AIM Alumni Leaders Foundation spearheaded by Napoleon L. Nazareno, Chair of the AIM Board of Trustees, which has set the ambitious target of raising Php 300 million over the next 5 years. We also moved in 2011 to re-establish a Student Loan Fund facility to cover tuition costs of Filipino degree student. We signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bank of the Philippine Islands, which has committed to provide the funds for the student loans. The funds will be ready for deployment for the MBA students enrolling in September 2012. With these plans on track, AIM is moving to ensure that more scholars can benefit from the efforts of the Institute to strengthen the research that will result in more relevant teaching to its students and more effective assistance to its constituencies in private and public enterprise.

Edilberto de Jesús PRESIDENT, ASIAN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT


M E S S A G E

F R O M

THE FEDERATION OF AIM Alumni (FAIM) worldwide is now celebrating its 34th year. Since 1978, when then AAAIM Chairman Jose Maria J. Fernandez, MBM 1973 instituted the federation, AIM alumni involvement blossomed with the increase of country chapters around the world. Currently, there are 26 active AIM alumni chapters in 14 countries—country and city chapters exist in Bangladesh, Canada (Toronto), China (Beijing, Shanghai, Kunming, Hong Kong and Taiwan), United Arab Emirates (Dubai), India (Mumbai, New Delhi and Bangalore), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia (Kuala Lumpur and Sabah), Nepal, Philippines (Manila, Baguio, Pampanga, Cebu and Davao), Singapore, Thailand, United States Of America (East Coast), and Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi). Winds of change are blowing in AIM. With our alumni’s invaluable counsel, internal issues are now being resolved by the community’s commitment to restore AIM’s standing as one among the business schools of choice in Asia. Management and faculty jointly are engaged in charting a new path forward with greater involvement of FAIM, whose role is being seen as more crucial than ever before if AIM has to emerge stronger from the past ‘crises’ like situations. Our new chairman of the Board of Governors and Trustees, Napoleon Nazareno, a leader of quiet resolve and himself an outstanding alumnus visualizes and clearly sees the benefits of greater alumni involvement in affairs—a la AIM! It is perhaps no coincidence that FAIM also went through a phase of relative inactivity and near bankruptcy in the years gone by. It took extraordinary efforts of our leaders of the Philippines Chapter under the able chairmanship of the late Datuk Annas to restore FAIM as a valid entity. FAIM has since emerged as a phoenix and I feel immensely privileged together with my team to be involved in redefining its role and contributions towards the cause of AIM and its future prosperity. 2011 saw a remarkable visibility of FAIM in supporting the many programs of the Institute, as we align our projects to assist in enrollment, placement, lifelong learning and fundraising. These were all aimed at strengthening FAIM and creating more visibility to AIM in respective countries. Allow me to appraise our AIM community of the various accomplishments successfully brought to fruition by our hardworking chapters:

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Mabuhay India MOU: March 30, 2011 A tie-up between Philippine flagship carrier Philippine Air Lines (PAL) and the AAI was formalized in Delhi on March 30, 2011 with the launch of a New Delhi-Manila/Manila-New Delhi non-stop flights. FAIM Chairman yours truly signed on as AAI President with FAIM Secretary General and AIM Alumni Relations Office Executive Managing Director Greg Atienza leading the partnership. This will enable our alumni from Delhi to garner fantastic discounts and allow families of students to visit their sons and daughters at AIM at an enticing price. Restoration and Reconstitution of Bangladesh Chapter: April 23-24, 2011 AIM Kelab’s President Haji Zulkifly Baharom’s initiatives from Malaysia and Anwar Chowdhury’s spirited efforts and dedication for the revival of the Bangladesh Chapter are indeed praiseworthy. Zul created a common platform for the Malaysian Chamber of Commerce and Bangladesh—with useful business exchanges. We met with eminent businessmen and created visibility for AIM. An example for other chapters to emulate, this activity is a veritable example of how local activities can graduate to bilateral relationships with country chapter counterparts as partners. Benchmarking Alumni Relations: August 2-5, 2011 In order to make sure that AIM services and programs for alumni are on par with the rest of the world, our tireless Secretary General Greg Atienza attended the Alumni Relations Institute conference by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) last August 2-5 in Singapore. To show that we mean business, FAIM wholeheartedly supported Greg’s back to the case room experience as he discovered, to his delight, that AIM ARO was performing as excellently as alumni relations offices in Insead and other outstanding business schools. Bravo Greg! Kunming Chapter assists MDM Marketing Efforts: August 20, 2011 Since a new FAIM chapter was established last November 2010 in China, the indefatigable alumni in Kunming have since aided our dear alma mater intensively—most recently with a roadshow held last August 20, 2011 that promoted the MDM program along with Associate Dean Mike Luz. The happy event produced 22 new recruits eager to take their Development lessons in Manila starting January of this year.


Asian Immersion Program and Alumni Meet in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: September 13, 2011 AIM Malaysian club’s President Zul believes in leading by example and by setting high standards. He motivates other members to participate in the chapter events. Greg and I were so happy to meet our impressive and top notch alumni in KL and see an impressive Hi Tea Alumni Meet in Royale Chulan Hotel that had AIM Dean Ricky Lim and WSGSB Associate Dean Jun Borromeo making a presentation on a combined FAIM/Faculty platform. It was like history in the making. The evening meet was just as impressive with a well-planned dinner function attended by students of different nationalities under AIM’s student exchange program with the leadership of Prof. Mau Bolante. The Asia Immersion theme was so appropriate and the dinner meet had a recall value! Well done Zul and his team! During that busy day, September 13, in lovely KL, FAIM also had a chance to have a FAIM Office Bearers Meeting at Royale Chulan Hotel. With Vice Chairman Dennis Firmansjah, FAIM has since emerged as a phoenix and I feel Haji Zulkifly Baharom, immensely privileged and Greg Atienza, we together with my agreed to actively supteam to be involved in port alumni fund-raising redefining its role and contributions towards by organizing a major the cause of AIM and its FAIM event. During the future prosperity. meeting, we agreed to sponsor RM1,000 for the FAIM Challenge Golf Tournament trophy which will was held on November 26, 2011 at the Civil Service Golf Club (KGPA) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. We also discussed the proposed increase in alumni fees which has been static since 1991. The increase in alumni fees will allow for greater visibility and more activities for FAIM and the alumni chapters. Job Fair and Alumni Networking in Singapore: September 14, 2011 AIM graduating students attended a job fair in Singapore ably organized by AIM’s Career Management Services. The students met with alumni during a dinner function which followed after. Singapore Chapter President Dr. Gan Cheong Eng and his team deserve compliments for their zeal and enthusiasm for having organized this unique meet, bringing in faculty Dean Ricky, Associate Dean Junbo and Placement Director Khairy Alonto on the platform, fully supported by FAIM.

Secretary General Greg Atienza planned and executed the proceedings flawlessly despite a sudden surge in the number of participants from 60 to 87. Greg and Gan demonstrated high level capability and tact to manage eventualities like this, with the unforeseen and unanticipated turn out of alumni and visiting students. FAIM Support for EMBA-PARA Group: September 25-28, 2011 In a snap visit to China and Korea by the AIM EMBA-PARA group consisting of Indonesian students, Jack Niu (Beijing), Johnny Jeong and Sugar Han (Seoul) displayed impeccable support for the school by rallying the alumni to accommodate the students in their respective country’s companies to promote learning and sharing of experiences. A well deserved round of applause for Jack, Johnny and Sugar for coming to the rescue! With their continuous support, AIM study tours across the region will definitely be excellently organized. Conference in Mumbai: December 17, 2011 Fostering continuous learning in the business community in Mumbai, the AIM Alumni Association India (AAI), held its annual event, IdeaXchange 2011 with the theme “Can corruption be tolerated if it has created greater common good?” last December 17, 2011 at the Grand Hyatt in Kalina, Mumbai. The successful event had eminent guest speakers who were renowned personalities in India such as Mani Shankar Aiyer, Ram Jethmalani, Anu Aga, Sameer Arora and Tarun Tejpal. AIM alumnus, Shankar Sharma was the host and moderator for this event. With the alumni’s current leadership, led primarily by our indefatigable alumnus chairman Napoleon Nazareno, we are most certain that AIM will achieve new heights in 2012, as we continue to assist in building unity in a common platform, all aimed to helping our beloved school continue its leadership in management education in the region in the next few years. I enjoin our alumni chapters to continue to improve the visibility you created for AIM, and harness the collective quest in you to explore the unexplored and to undertake activities for the glory of our school. It is time to give back to AIM, in whatever measures possible, and I thank all who have been exerting their tireless and much appreciated efforts in attaining our goals.

MP Singh, MBM 1976 PRESIDENT, FAIM


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F R O M

T H E

E D I T O R - I N - C H I E F

AS AIM MARKS ANOTHER milestone this February 2012, celebrating its 44th Founding Anniversary through week-long celebrations at the campus, we are grateful as we look back at the ever increasing engagement of the alumni during the year that has passed. With over 39,000 graduates in 77 countries at present, our alumni have become a driving force to excellence and leadership, propelling engagement, networking and fundraising in 2011. The leader and proponent of this driving force is the new chairman of the Board of Governors and Trustees, Napoleon Nazareno, MBM1973, who led the launch of the AIM Alumni Leadership Foundation, Inc. (AALFI) during the 1st AIM Alumni Assembly in November 2011. Envisioned to provide another avenue for substantial alumni gifts for the Institute, the AALFI would be the fund-generation arm to supplement We are entering a new AIM’s infrastructure phase in alumni relations development, scholarship as we have reached a fund, faculty development remarkable tipping point and internationalization where alumni leaders have come forward to thrusts. This invaluable actively heed the call to project was organized transform the school, with the support of the and propel its growth in Alumni Association of the next five years. AIM, Philippine Chapter (AAAIM) Chairman Eustacio Orobia, Jr., MBM 1971, AAAIM Development Committee Head Augusto Serafica, MBM 1991, Chairman of the Council of Former AAAIM Chairmen Ramon de Vera, MBM 1973, President of the Triple A Club Jesli Lapus, MBM 1973, FAIM Chairman MP Singh, MBM 1976 and members of the Board of Trustees of AIM Ricardo Pascua, MBM 1971 and Roberto Garcia, MBM 1973. With a goal of raising PHP 300,000,000 in alumni donations in a span of five years, the amount is targeted to support the AIM 5-year plan to boost the Institute’s leadership as the number one management school in the region. To move this goal forward and to provide transparency in information dissemination, the AAAIM and ARO organized a series of Consultative Assemblies involving active alumni leaders, many of whom participated in the 1st AIM Alumni Assembly. The result of these consultations will be compiled and shared

with the AIM community, to further sustain the goals of development, research, and internationalization, and support the AIM five-year plan approved by the AIM Board of Governors and Trustees. We are grateful to all the exceptional alumni leaders who have supported us in this unique endeavor. Never before have we experienced their enthusiasm in sharing their industry expertise, in providing their invaluable time and counsel in a “back to the caseroom experience” by dissecting “The AIM Case.” We especially thank Exequiel Villacorta, MBM 1972, who assisted us in facilitating and providing an agenda for the assembly. The Federation of AIM Alumni (FAIM), through the dedicated leadership of M.P. Singh has also demonstrated his driving force in energizing the alumni chapters around the world. There now exists 26 active AIM alumni chapters in 14 countries with the recent re-establishment of AIM Alumni Bangladesh Chapter. In a message to FAIM chapter heads in 2011, M.P. eruditely acknowledged the alumni’s “commitment to restore AIM’s standing as one among the business schools of choice in Asia,” and appreciatively notes the greater involvement from alumni and the crucial role of FAIM, management and faculty in charting a new path forward for our beloved Institute. The year 2011 also marked a significant increase in the much appreciated gifts given by the alumni to AIM. The Institute is grateful for the significant donations of Malvan Hwang, MBM 1974; Gabriel Paredes, MBM 1972; the Triple A Club headed by Jesli Lapus, MBM 1973, Robert Kuan, MBM 1975, and Art Macapagal, MBM 1971; Joselito Yabut, MBM 1979; Philip Huang, MBM 1977; Jocelyn Maloles-Keehn, MBM 1985 for the AIM Alumni Fund for Scholarships; and to the Class of MBM 1990 led by Alex Sembrano for the reestablishment of the AIM Student Loan Fund. We are entering a new phase in alumni relations as we have reached a remarkable tipping point where alumni leaders have come forward to actively heed the call to transform the school, and propel its growth in the next five years. We invite all graduates in the Philippines and overseas to step up to the plate, to stand up to be counted, and be a part of the significant and crucial history that is taking place at AIM. NOW is the time to be engaged. We enjoin you to be a part of it.

Greg Atienza, MBM 1983 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, AIM ALUMNI LEADERSHIP MAGAZINE EXECUTIVE MANAGING DIRECTOR, ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE SECRETARY GENERAL, FEDERATION OF AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS, INC.


A IM L eader Magazine | Second Quar ter 2012

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AIM MBA Ranked

No.1 in Asia THE ASIAN INSTITUTE OF Management (AIM) has demonstrated significant leadership in preparing the next generation of business leaders equipped with the vision and knowledge necessary to integrate corporate profitability with social value, according to the Aspen Institute’s 2011-2012 edition of Beyond Grey Pinstripes, a ranking survey of business schools. AIM has ranked No. 52 on a list of the Top 100 MBA programs worldwide and No. 1 among Asian business schools. While many MBA rankings exist, only Beyond Grey Pinstripes looks beyond reputation and test scores to measure something much more important—how well schools are preparing their students for the environmental, social, and ethical complexities of modernday business. “AIM is honored to be included among the top-ranked schools in the world,” said AIM president Edilberto de Jesús. “Since its establishment in 1968, AIM has sought to promote the sustainable development of Asian societies by developing leaders and managers who are not only innovative entrepreneurs and expert professionals, but who are also conscious of their social responsibilities.”

This year, 149 business schools from 22 countries participated in a year-long effort to map the landscape of teaching and research on issues pertaining to business and society. “In all scoring categories used to determine the ranking, business schools have raised the bar,” said Judith Samuelson, executive director of the Aspen Institute Business and Society Program, which conducted the Beyond Grey Pinstripes survey. “There are more courses with content on social, ethical, and environmental issues, more courses about the role of business as a positive agent for change, more exposure of students to this content, and more research published by faculty on relevant topics.” “Asia is complex,” AIM Dean Ricardo Lim said. “Asia’s economies are growing rapidly, yet poverty and inequality are becoming more pronounced. AIM’s MBA focuses on responsible decisions. MBA students examine social and environmental impact, not just profit. This is what the Aspen Institute has commended.” This ranking marked the first opportunity since the global economic downturn to comprehensively measure the extent to which MBA programs have altered the content of their courses and whether faculty are pursuing research that questioned assumptions about the role of business in society.

Celebrating Gaby Mendoza “In our classroom, our primary function is to create an atmosphere that will encourage our students to think more boldly, to talk freely, and to act judiciously. We must pique their curiosity. Quicken their memory. Provoke their imagination. Challenge their reason. Prick their pride. Build up their self-respect. Make available to them the opportunity to exercise initiative in class and out. Give them room to grow. Chances to make mistakes. Ultimately, the responsibility to shape their own development.” —Prof. Gabino Mendoza ON JANUARY 31, 2012, the AIM community remembered Prof. Gaby Mendoza at a memorial service titled Celebrating Gaby Mendoza: The Teacher. Prof. Mendoza was dean of AIM from 1973 to 1986 and president from 1978 to 1986. A faculty member asked Prof. Mendoza once long ago how he wanted to be remembered. Prof. Mendoza paused a while, and he said, "That I was a teacher.” Thus the event title Celebrating the Teacher. Members of the AIM Board of Trustees, faculty, alumni, staff, and Prof. Mendoza’s family and friends graced the memorial service. Bishop Federico Escaler, Fr. Bert Ampil, and Fr. Antonio Samson presided over the Requiem Mass.

Sharing their memories of Prof. Mendoza as eulogists were AIM President Edilberto de Jesús; Prof. Titos Ortigas; Prof. Toby Canto; former professor Leni Panganiban; former Minister of Public Highways, Senator, and AIM Governor Vicente Paterno; and Prof. Mendoza’s former classmate and student, Fr. Ampil. President de Jesús announced that AIM alumni have also joined in paying tribute to their teacher. The alumni have come forward to establish the Prof. Gaby Mendoza Scholarship Fund. Renny Yeo Ah Kiang, MM ‘81 from Singapore and a Triple A winner, has pledged US$10,000. Joe Tam, MM 1980, the alumni chapter head in Hong Kong, has pledged PhP 1 million. In addition, Kelab AIM Malaysia is establishing the Prof. Gaby Mendoza Management Lecture, which has been approved by the Mendoza family. President de Jesús and Dean Ricky Lim also presented a tribute from AIM to the Mendoza family. The tribute comprises mementos from Prof. Mendoza’s office, a compilation of messages from the AIM community, and a compilation of articles, papers, and cases written by Prof. Mendoza. The compilation of messages from the AIM community and the commemorative video can be viewed online at www.aim.edu.


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ing to work in their brand new cars. Imagine Putrajaya, a whole new city being built and planned to showcase how far a country has come in such a short time. We spent the majority of the trip meeting with the institutions that helped drive the country forward, from government agencies to corporations. We had the privilege to meet with the individuals who were in key positions of these institutions and were allowed to ask questions as to how such feats were accomplished and what their future plans were. It is not every day that one finds himself talking to the CEO of a billion-dollar corporation such as Maybank. In contrast to this we also got to spend time seeing how the average Malaysian lives, complete with a tour of where one family grows their geese. Poverty seems more or less eradicated, at least in Kuala Lumpur where a “poor” family, and I use the term by Thomas Earll Huang, MBA 2011 lightly, can afford two cars. I picked AIM as the school I that I would come across. It was wanted to get my master’s degree country and its triumphs has a from because of its case method; not until I saw the country with huge difference when actually a technique that is supposed my own eyes that I could truly visiting since one is inevitably to be more real-life than other appreciate everything that was detached from something he or teaching methods. The Asian written about it. Throughout she has not seen first-hand. Immersion Program, as an extenI had never been to Malaysia the trip we could see the signs sion of that methodology, grants of progress around us—infrabefore I joined this year’s Asian structure being expanded upon, students the opportunity to see Immersion Program and the and experience for one’s self what skyscrapers sprouting from the only exposure I had with the other people only read about. country was through the articles ground, countless people rush-

AIM Asian Immersion Program Malaysia AS AIM STUDENTS, WE have read countless pages on successful economic policies adopted by developing countries as well as corporate success stories within those countries. When it came to progress within the ASEAN, Malaysia was one of the countries that was often mentioned. Reading about a

PRESIDENT AQUINO HONORS AIM PROF. ARROYO AS TOYM ON DECEMBER 7, 2011, President Benigno Aquino III commended seven individuals for winning The Outstanding Young Men (TOYM) in a ceremony held at the Malacanang Palace. The 2011 TOYM Awardees are: Maria Antonia (Maoi) Gregorio Arroyo, Raul V. Destura, Sherwin T. Gatchalian, Paulino Salvador Leachon, Gerard Joseph Salonga, Edgar “Injap” Sia II, and Antonio “Tony” Tiu. As the youngest and only female 2011 TOYM awardee, Maoi Arroyo is recognized for establishing Hybridigm Consulting, the first biotechnology consulting firm in the Philippines. Her firm developed policies for the government, facilitated over $4 million in biotech

investments, and trained over 15,862 aspiring entrepreneurs. “Hybridigm consulting is committed to making sure that biotechnology like Raul Destura’s Dengue Diagnostic kit is given to an investor in the private sector, developed and sold to consumers,” says Maoi Arroyo. “We want to help scientists and businessmen profit together. We want to harness Philippine biodiversity and Filipino ingenuity to serve the world.” Maoi Arroyo is also an adjunct faculty of AIM. Her course focuses on Innovation, Strategy, and Consulting. She also teaches entrepreneurship and leadership. For more than half-a-

century, the TOYM Awards has established itself as one of the nation’s most prestigious awards. Its purpose is to recognize individuals who have not only exemplified excellence and leadership in their respective fields, but also challenge themselves to be agents of transformation. Prof. Arroyo joins an esteemed group of past TOYM winners from the AIM family, including former AIM President Mr. Roberto de Ocampo, Executive Director of the AIM Gov. Jose B. Fernandez Jr. Center for Banking and Finance; Philip Ella Juico (MBM 1973); Tony Tan Caktiong (TMP 1983); and Rex Bernardo (MDM 2001).


A IM L eader Magazine | Second Quar ter 2012

AIM CONFERS FIRST WASHINGTON SYCIP DISTINGUISHED MANAGEMENT LEADER AWARD ON DECEMBER 11, 2011, the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) honored Philippine Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert F. del Rosario as the first recipient of the Washington SyCip Distinguished Management Leader Award during AIM’s 2011 Commencement Exercises. Secretary del Rosario was recognized for his exemplary leadership of organizations in both the private and public sectors, to which he embodied the leadership qualities of Mr. SyCip in his career. He also delivered the Commencement Address to the graduates of

AIM degree programs. Secretary del Rosario received the plaque from AIM Chairman Napoleon L. Nazareno. Also on hand to present the award were AIM President Edilberto de Jesús and AIM Dean Ricardo Lim. Mr. SyCip, chairman emeritus of the AIM Board of Trustees and one of AIM’s founding fathers, carved a permanent place in the history of the Institute as he successfully mobilized support for an Asian Institute of Management. The Washington SyCip Distinguished Management Leader Award is a tribute to his lifelong support to AIM and a celebration of Mr. SyCip’s 90th birthday.

PHOTO BY MR. BENJAMIN REMO, DFA-PISU

Mr. SyCip with MM 2011B students

MM 2011B students together with MM Program Director Prof. Enrico Angtuaco plant trees as a tribute to Mr. Washington SyCip’s 90th birthday

Nazareno, del Rasario, and de Jesús

AIM Founding Father Washington SyCip meets with students IN HONOR OF MR. WASHINGTON SyCip’s 90th birthday, Asian Institute of Management (AIM) Master in Management 2011 section B (MM 2011B) students planted trees at the Washington SyCip park last September 2, 2011, to commemorate his instrumental contribution in setting up AIM. Later that day, Mr. SyCip paid a visit to the students to watch a short video presentation about the tree planting activity and to give a talk about leadership. Mr. SyCip’s talk was a departure from the usual leadership messages. He shared success stories of Asian countries such as China, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan that have moved on to reduce poverty. He raised huge questions concerning the needs of an emerging market. What are the needs of an emerging market —democracy or reduction of poverty? What are the first priorities of peoplepolitical freedom or reducing the gap between high and low earners? What kind of leadership do we need, should it be the same as the United States? Is election good or bad if candidates need to raise campaign money to become popular and win? Are Western models of governance the best? Through the talk, Mr. SyCip shared invaluable knowledge and wisdom all at once. The event concluded with a question-and- answer session and cocktails.

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A L U M N I PHOTO VIA KAPUSO ONLINE

GMA Network appoints AIM alumnus Felipe S. Yalong as the new Executive Vice President

GMA Network, Inc. is proud to announce the appointment of Felipe S. Yalong as the Company’s new Executive Vice President. Mr. Yalong will continue to be GMA’s Chief Financial Officer and Group Head of its Corporate Services Group. Mr. Yalong has been instrumental over the past few years in helping to develop and expand GMA’s revenues and profits, which also led to a successful IPO in 2007. Mr. Yalong received his bachelor’s degree from Philippine School of Business Administration and completed the Management Development Program at the Asian Institute of Management.

AIM alumnus joins Ortigas Group as President and CEO Last year, Asian Institute of Management Master in Business Management 1987 graduate Rowell Recinto joined Ortigas and Co.

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as Chief Operating Officer (COO), leaving the United States early to come back home to the Philippines with an offer he could not resist. At present, he is OCLP (Ortigas & Co. Ltd. Partnership ) Holdings Inc. President and CEO. Recinto says he is grateful the opportunities with OCLP. With up and coming projects, OCLP will likely have an IPO in the near future. He says going public is set to benefit more Filipinos riding the Ortigas’ group growth.

Commenting on FINEX’s theme for 2012, “FINEX: Moving the Philippines Towards Global Competitiveness”, Opulencia believes that “the organization is in a unique position to help build on positive outlook of the country and to contribute to make meaningful improvements in our country’s level of competitiveness.” (Source: http://www.mb.com. ph/articles/346943/finex-electsopulencia-new-president)

Ramon G. Opulencia, MBM 1983, New FINEX President

Outplacement Solutions Provider RiseSmart Wins 2011 Red Herring Global Top 100 Award

Ayala Corporation managing director and treasurer Ramon G. Opulencia has been elected as president of the Financial Executives Institute of the Philippines (FINEX) for 2012. FINEX is the premiere organization of top finance executives dedicated to the advancement of financial knowledge and expertise in the country. Now on its 43rd year, FINEX has 660 members comprising of CEOs, COOs, CFOs and finance professionals representing the top corporations in the Philippines. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree at the De La Salle University in 1978 and took his Masteral in Business Management at the Asian Institute of Management graduating with Distinction in 1983. He completed the Advanced Management Program at the Harvard Business School in May 2005. Opulencia is a well-known advocate of innovations in the domestic capital markets, having contributed to the development of a deeper retail investor base and longer tenors through pioneering and awardwinning deals for Ayala Corporation. He is also a prominent resource speaker in the region and his work has received notice in publications such as the Finance Asia, Euromoney, Eurofinance, and The Asset. Opulencia is also a member of the board of directors of BPI Family Bank and treasurer of Ayala Foundation. He was formerly a member of the Market Governance Board of the Philippine Dealing and Exchange Corporation and the Philippine Interpretations Committee of the Financial Report Standards Council representing the private sector.

RiseSmart, the leading provider of next-generation outplacement solutions, has been named to the Red Herring Global Top 100, which recognizes the leading private companies in North America, Europe and Asia. RiseSmart is among just 47 U.S. companies on the Global Top 100 list. Sanjay Sathe, an AIM alumnus (MBM 1988) is the founder and CEO of RiseSmart. The honor comes on the heels of the company’s selection as a Red Herring North America Top 100 winner in June. The Global Top 100 finalists, representing past Red Herring Asia, Europe and North America award winners, were judged on a range of metrics, including technology innovation, financial performance, growth criterion, management’s execution standards, and potential globalization of the strategy and market share improvement. “Choosing the best out of the previous two years was by no means a small feat,” said Alex Vieux, chairman of Red Herring. “After rigorous

contemplation and discussion, we narrowed down our list from 1,100 potential companies to 100 winners. It was an extremely difficult process. RiseSmart should be extremely proud of its achievement, the competition for the Top 100 was fierce. The Global Top 100 are truly the best of the best.” Red Herring’s Global Top 100 list has become a mark of distinction for identifying promising companies and entrepreneurs. Red Herring editors wereamong the first to recognize that companies such as Google, Skype, Baidu, Salesforce.com, YouTube, eBay and others would change the way we live and work. RiseSmart is transforming the outplacement industry with Transition Concierge, which uses the power of technology to provide companies with a cost-effective and results-driven outplacement solution. With a unique blend of proprietary job-matching software and high-touch human interaction, Transition Concierge delivers personalized job leads paired with one-on-one assistance from trained Transition Specialists during all phases of the job search process. The company currently boasts a time-to-placement ratio twotimes faster than the national average. “Reception of this Global Top 100 award along with the new additions of senior executives from legacy outplacement firms proves yet again that our innovative, technology-based platform is the preferred business model in the outplacement industry,” said Sanjay Sathe, founder and CEO of RiseSmart. “This award is a special honor, and I look forward to continuing to achieve significant recognition for our accomplishments through awards similar to the Red Herring Global Top 100.” Winners were announced December 7, 2011, at the Red Herring Global forum in Los Angeles, where finalists were invited to present their winningstrategies at a special awards ceremony. For more information on RiseSmart, visit www.risesmart.com.

Datin Paduka Seri Rosmah Joins Council of Patrons of the Asian University for Women (AUM) AIM Distinguished Alumna and Honorary Life Member of the Kelab Aim Malaysia, YABhg Datin Paduka Seri Rosmah Mansor, BMP 1982, wife of Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Najib Tun Abdul Razak,


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has joined the eminent Council of Patrons of the Asian University for Women (AUM). AUM is an international university in Chittagong, port city of Bangladesh. It is being established as a leading institution of higher learning for women who will be skilled as innovative professionals and service oriented leaders. It will promote intellectual understanding and sustainable human and economic development in Asia and throughout the world. AUW is now part of United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI), a global alliance of institute of higher education and research. Her involvement in the AUW will contribute to the strengthening of co-operation between AUW and the Institutions in Malaysia. Introduction of 10 fellowship named after her will actively advocate for women’s empowerment and education in general and the cause of AUW in particular. Each fellowship carries US$12,000 scholarship that will cover the cost, board and tuition for one year. She will focus on AUW’s outreach South-east Asia and Middle East, and to this end, she will co-host with AUW Chancellor Cherie Blair a major conference on women education and empowerment that is being planned in mid-2012 in Kuala Lumpur. Under the initiatives, leadership and patronage the Distinguished AIM Alumna, the AUW will move ahead towards accomplishing its objectives and ensuring greater welfare of the women folk. Earlier this year, Datin Paduka Seri Rosmah was named the Worldwide Patron of International

fellowship program created by Limkokwing University of Creative Technology Putrajaya to bridge cultural differences, foster goodwill and be the inspiration to bring peace to the world. Concurrently, she was also conferred the Honorary Degree of ‘Doctor of Innovation in Human Capacity Development’. The University Technology MARA Malaysia also conferred her with the Honorary Doctorate in Education. by Haji Zulkifly Baharom, President KELAB AIM Malaysia

IMF Deputy Managing Director Naoyuki Shinohara speaks at AIM

AIM Holds Forum with IMF Deputy Managing Director THE AIM GOV. JOSE B. Fernandez Jr. Center for Banking and Finance, in coordination with the Philippine Representative Office of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), held a forum at AIM last November 4, 2011. The guest speaker was IMF Deputy Managing Director Naoyuki Shinohara, who gave a lecture on “Asia-Pacific Regional Economic Outlook: Navigating an Uncertain Global Environment.” According to Mr. Shinohara, the global economy is in a dangerous phase, with a weaker outlook for growth and rising risks. Negative feedback loops between the real economy and the financial sector have arisen. Moreover, unemployment in advanced economies remains very high. The perspective is a little different in Asia, but Asia is also vulnerable to the developments

in other regions, especially through the trade channel. Emerging Asia is not immune from a risk of financial contagion, either. Mr. Shinohara’s conclusions emphasized key policy challenges against the current background of heightened global uncertainty. He said: • “The Eurozone leaders have taken steps toward addressing the crisis in their countries, but important details that still need to be elaborated, and implementation will be key. Until then the risks of adverse feedback loops from deteriorating global economic and financial conditions will remain very real. Policymakers must build on recent positive progress in Europe to decisively forestall a downward spiral of unsustainable debt dynamics, dysfunctional financial markets, falling demand, and rising unemployment.

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At the same time, in the US, important policy steps are needed to repair household balance sheet, which is key to that country’s full economic recovery. • “The main challenges for Asian policymakers going forward are to support activity in a fragile global setting, while ensuring that growth is of the right ‘quality.’ The renewed weakness in advanced countries highlights the need to rebalance to reduce vulnerability. Policies to do so will also lead to more equitable growth. • “In the near term, against the backdrop of unusual uncertainty, a pause in the pace of tightening may be warranted in countries where inflation and, more generally, overhearing pressures are under control. Allowing stronger exchange rates would give more room

AIM president Edilberto de Jesús gives Mr. Shinohara a token of appreciation

to monetary policy to pause, as it would help contain remaining inflationary pressures, but would also help rebalancing growth by sustaining domestic demand.” The forum was attended by executives from the business and government sectors as well as economic-oriented NGOs and management associations.

ERRATUM The editors wish to rectify the following as published in the AIMLeader Double Issue 2011-2012 Vol. 5 Issue 5: Ms. Rose Cheryl Orbigo’s byline was inadvertently omitted in the issue’s cover story, “The Chairman Among Us.” In the article “FAIM: A History of AIM Alumni Solidarity” (Pages 62-63), Herminio B. Coloma, MBM 1978 should have been credited as being FAIM Chairman for the period of 1987-1988. We apologize if these errors have caused any inconvenience. Kindly send an email to aimalumni@aim.edu for your feedback. Thank you.


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AIM Launches New Evening Executive MBA (Evening EMBA) program

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HE NEW EVEning EMBA is a 21-month, part-time program designed for experienced, working professionals who want to expand their managerial competence and leadership capabilities. The inaugural class begins in Manila in January 2012. Students will attend two classes and one learning team session every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday evening from 6:00 to 9:30 pm at the AIM Campus in Makati. Students also go on an international study tour to learn foreign business practices and meet local business leaders. “We are excited to offer this new format for executives who have the ability and drive to make a real difference in

business, and the character to be the kind of colleague people enjoy working with,” AIM associate dean Dr. Grace Ugut said during the program Open House. “The program will allow working professionals to balance work and personal life without interrupting their careers.” AIM launched the program on 10 October in an Open House attended by business executives, entrepreneurs, doctors, lawyers, and other professionals. Forty rising executives from various industries will be accepted to the inaugural class. They will go through three modules: (1) Leading the Enterprise: The Language and Context of Business, (2) Creating and Sustaining Competitive

Advantage, and (3) Leading in Emerging Markets. Between each of the three modules, participants will complete a week-long, full-time course called Leadership Residence.

“AIM’s newest offering gives students a great platform for growth by learning while working.” In the International Study Tour, students will learn about the culture, politics, and economics of a country like India, Indonesia, etc. Participants will meet business leaders and visit companies to

gain first-hand perspectives on how business is conducted. AIM’s new Evening MBA program complements its four full-time master’s degree programs. “AIM’s newest offering gives students a great platform for growth by learning while working,” AIM dean Dr. Ricky Lim said. “The program is about the power of ideas: enhance what you know and how you perform.” If you are a working professional with 10 years of work experience and/or six years of managerial experience, the Evening EMBA may be your career tipping point. For inquiries on the Evening MBA, please contact Ms. Anika Paciente at 892 4011 to 25 ext. 166, or email apaciente@aim.edu.

AIM updates communication system with SMART PLDT AND SMART President Napoleon Nazareno presents a ceremonial mock SIM card to AIM President Dr. Edilberto De Jesus to formalize a partnership between Smart Communications, Inc. (Smart) and the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) on the use of the Infoboard service. Developed by Smart, the Infoboard is a Web-based communication service that will allow students and faculty of AIM to receive important school announcements, advisories, and other information via SMS on their mobile phones. This includes weather updates and

user-specific information such as grades, and class schedules, among others. AIM Students and faculty will also be able to send comments, feedback, and suggestions, using the Infoboard. The partnership reflects AIM’s need for fast, convenient and cost-efficient mobile communications to reach its students, most of who are foreign nationals and rely on fixed and mobile Internet for their communication needs. Also in photo are (from left) Smart Chief Wireless Adviser Orlando Vea and AIM Dean Dr. Ricardo Lim.


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AIM Announces New Core Faculty Members AIM RECENTLY WELCOMED ON campus two new members of the core faculty. Prof. Savita Shankar joined the faculty of the AIM Center for Development Management in December 2011. She completed her Doctor of Philosophy (Public Policy) at the National University of Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy in June 2011. In her dissertation, she analyzed the role of microfinance programs in promoting financial inclusion in India. She also has an MBA from the University of Delhi. Before joining AIM, Prof. Shankar taught at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy from 2007 to 2011 and was adjunct professor at the Institute for Financial Management and Research in Chennai, India, from 2003 to 2006. Prior to teaching, she had 10 years’ work experience in corporate banking. She started as a management trainee and became manager at the Export Import Bank of India (1993-2000), and then served as assistant vice president/ chief manager of Corporate Banking at ICICI Bank, Chennai (2000-2003). Prof. Shankar has several publications. Her forthcoming publication is a chapter in an edited volume to be

published by Routledge. The chapter is entitled “Matching Finance with Client Needs: Some pointers from a field study.” Prof. Gulliver Go joined the core faculty of the W. SyCip Graduate School of Business this month. He has been teaching at AIM as an adjunct professor since 2000. From 2009 to 2011, he served as the Business Cluster head at Enderun Colleges, where he managed the BS Business Administration adjunct faculty and assisted in developing corporate partnerships. Before joining AIM full-time, Prof. Go was an independent consultant for Satori Consultancy Inc. and the Business Development director of Summit Internet Investments. He also served as an investment analyst (20002001) at AIM. Prof. Go will continue to oversee the Written Analysis of Case course in the MBA, this time as lead faculty. He will take over Asian Business Systems and implement the Alumni Hour, where a senior alumnus gives a talk on a key topic in the MBA curriculum every week. Prof. Go earned his MBA, With Distinction, from AIM.

THE ASIAN INSTITUTE of Management (AIM) and Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA), under Yale Professor Dean Karlan and AIM professors Ron Chua and Mau Bolante, recently launched a new course called SME Consulting. AIM students consult with SME business owners/managers in Metro Manila, assessing the business performance and submitting recommendations and action plans to address business issues. As part of the course, students would meet SME business owners/managers in a full range of industries, including retail, services, manufacturing, real estate, finance and consulting,

trading and wholesale. They were divided into treatment groups with two AIM student consultants per SME. They also conducted a workshop that presented specialized topics related to best practices for SMEs which also served as a networking opportunity with the SME community in the area. “The SME consulting course is designed to prepare students to succeed in effective business problem solving ,” Dean Ricardo Lim said. “SMEs are the backbone of the economy. Now is the time for us to proactively encourage the next generation to pursue business careers.” Read more about the course in IPA’s website (http://www.povertyaction.org/project/0448)

policy recommendations based on the WHO framework for strengthening health systems. Other topics that were discussed include: the six building blocks of health systems strengthening (Dr. Bien Nillos, LSBCM alumnus and public health expert), fragmentations in the health care system and proposed solutions (Dr. Kenneth HartiganGo, Executive Director of AIM from La Salle Bacolod, as well as ZCABT), the basic principles of sokey leaders from local hospitals, cial health insurance (Dr. Bryan the provincial health office, DOH Lim, AIM ZCABT Project Majestic CHD and PhilHealth. team leader), understanding how Dr. Alberto Romualdez, former the PhilHealth premium works for Secretary of Health and founder of you (PhilHealth Bacolod officer), the Universal Health Care (UHC) and the Aquino health agenda study group, opened the summit (Dr. Ma. Sophia Pulmones of the with a discussion of the country’s region 6 DOH CHD). present health situation and then Congressman Anthony Golez, outlining the UHC study group’s who served as a reactor to the

sessions, articulated the current initiatives of the lower house to support UHC and the implications of the reforms to the city of Bacolod. Other reactors include Dr. Balintawak Gareza (LSBCM research expert) and Dr. Melvin Ibanez (Board Member of the 5th district of Negros Occidental). The AIM ZCABT conducts regular road shows with different sectors with the aim of progressing the Aquino administration’s agenda for Universal Health Care in the Philippines by highlighting the integral role of health financing in health sector reform. This Health Financing Summit is the 4th of the series. Previous summits were held in Cebu, Davao and Tarlac in partnership with the academe, medical societies, NGOs and LGUs.

Health Financing Summit in Bacolod THE FIRST STUDENT-LED AIM Dr. Stephen Zuellig Center for Business and Transformation (AIM ZCABT) Health Financing Summit was held in Bacolod City last November 12, 2011, in partnership with TAMBAL, the student formation committee of the La Salle Bacolod College of Medicine. In attendance were medical and nursing students

AIM and Yale Professors Collaborate


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Asian Forum on Corporate Social Responsibility (AFCSR) 2011 Strategic CSR: Creating Shared Value CELEBRATING ITS 10TH ANNIVERSARY, the Asian Forum on Corporate Social Responsibility (AFCSR) held a successful two-day conference at the Edsa ShangriLa Hotel last October 18 and 19. With the theme, Strategic CSR: Creating Shared Value, the conference participants included 582 delegates from 31 countries representing 218 organizations. The 10th anniversary marked a period not so much of reflection on the past decade but a time of revitalization for the next. The practice of CSR is diverse not only in the Philippines and in the region, but globally. Starting with the 2011 AFCSR, AIM through its faculty and through the RVR Center’s academic-oriented executives and its proven research staff will exercise greater thought leadership in both the process and content of the two-day conference. RVR Center research will generate new and relevant practitioner-oriented monographs for the AFCR’s plenary and group sessions. This year’s AFCSR was supported by an overriding framework and five core topics namely: assessment and formulation of the firm and its internal and external operating environment—culture, capabilities, industry structure, etc.; implementation that focuses on the advantages and disadvantages

of efforts to sustain company CSR strategy; monitoring and evaluation, embedding and encouraging CSR and moving forward and a new framework that positions CSR within the companies’ value chain in relation to the roles and responsibilities of both internal and external shareholders and stakeholders with regard to company CSR practices. There were over 582 delegates from 31 countries representing 218 organizations who graced the event and utilized a variety of modes including longer Q & A sessions, panel discussions, workshops, and a plenary-debate, which focused on whether Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) should be legislated. In addition, breakout sessions were categorized under four special interest tracks to allow delegates to choose the session suitable to their organizations— CSR in a global environment, partnering and collaborating, heavy footprint, and practical challenges. Moreover, his Excellency Benigno S. Aquino III, President of the Republic of the Philippines, joined Asian business leaders in honoring the winners of the 2011 Asian CSR Awards during the gala dinner ceremonies. The AFCSR awarded companies operating in Asia for their outstanding, innovative, and world-class projects and programs in

corporate social responsibility. For this year’s AFCSR, a total of 175 corporate social responsibility projects submitted by 129 organizations from across the Asian region vied for the prestige awards in four categories: health enhancement, environmental excellence, poverty alleviation and education improvement. This year’s awardees were: Pfizer (Thailand), for the Health Enhancement award for their project that provided micro loans, economic empowerment and integrated HIV prevention services for people living with AIDS. Link Management company of Hong Kong won the environment award for a project revitalizing an old city market. The poverty alleviation award went to Citi Pakistan for a microfinance project and Double A (1991) of Thailand for a project helping poor people and rural schools earn extra income by planting a fast-growing variety of tree. While Abbot (Singapore) won the Education Award for a project on science education. The Intel-AIM Corporate Responsibility Award (IACRA) was awarded to Shangrila Tanjung Ari and Spa, Malaysia, not for a specific CSR project, but for how it has integrated, embedded and sustained CSR in its core organization.


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HANK YOU ALL FOR very kindly inviting me to speak before you this morning. It’s a great honor to be addressing the graduates of the Asian Institute of Management. I should tell you that there was a moment, in my distant youth, when I dreamed of studying at AIM. I had all the time in the world then, but no money. Then I found myself with no time. So being here with you today is indeed delightful and a matter of great satisfaction. Your invitation to me also mentioned that I had been chosen to receive the first Washington SyCip Distinguished Management Leadership Award. It might seem precipitate of me to thank you for the award— which I deeply value and appreciate—even before I’ve formally received the honor. But I do want to use this opportunity to say a few things about the man the award was named after, because he exemplifies the kind of business leader we need to steer our ship in these rough and uncertain seas of globalization. I happen to have served as our country’s Ambassador to Washington, but I will be the first to say—and I’m sure that Joey Cuisia would wholeheartedly agree, if he were here—that no better lifetime ambassador of goodwill and business has bridged the Philippines and the United States than Mr. Washington SyCip. Although he became an American citizen because of a wartime exigency, Mr. SyCip has arguably been more Filipino than many Filipinos, and remains a sterling example of how nations and peoples can work together for their mutual prosperity. The AIM is proof positive that such bridges work. It does seem to make sense that I should be with you today because the Asian Institute of Management is as international an institution as we can have in this country. It brings together the best minds from the region, and has drawn on what we’ve learned from the West and from our own local experiences to craft creative, modern solutions to Asian problems. Those solutions—and your expertise and commitment—will be in great demand as we strive for more equitable growth and sustainable development to generate the wealth that will reduce if not eradicate mass poverty. Clearly, deep internal reforms are needed to achieve this, and the administration of President Aquino is resolved to do the best it can to set the moral, political, and economic foundations for long-term growth and development. This involves a more aggressive approach to fighting corruption,

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to poverty alleviation, and to investment promotion, among other priorities. The demands on our country’s leaders are intense. We’ve already lost too much time, wasted too many opportunities, dealt with too many distractions. These internal factors and imperatives will be difficult enough to manage. What complicates the situation are the realities and challenges of globalization, which require us to seek the most favorable terms possible in our international economic engagement and economic diplomacy overseas. Managing Globalization In our foreign economic relations, therefore, we have two major points of focus. First, increasing Philippine access to markets, foreign investment and technology transfer. Second, working with other countries to establish rules, norms and guidance to ensure fairness and balance in international trade and the global economy.

Management in a Globalized World By the Hon. Albert F. del Rosario, Secretary of Foreign Affairs

Towards this end, the Philippines remains active with partners in building the 21st Century regional architecture for Southeast Asia through ASEAN and for the AsiaPacific within APEC and other initiatives. The Philippines and its regional partners have launched the ASEAN Free Trade Area (AFTA) and envision a regional community by 2015. Within the broader region, the Philippines has been active in the East Asia Summit and APEC. Our objectives have been to strengthen market-oriented dynamism and integration that are the wellsprings of Asia’s recent economic ascent. President Aquino has lent his personal leadership to jumpstart our country’s economic diplomacy abroad. In his foreign visits, he has always sought to strengthen bilateral economic ties, to open markets for Philippine exports, to encourage foreign investment and to enhance development cooperation. At the recent APEC and ASEAN Summits, for example, President Aquino showed leadership in seeking to cut the red tape that ham-

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pers business flows and an ASEAN rice pool that will buttress the region’s food security. Globalization’s Challenges Despite its progress, Asia still has a long way to go on many fronts. We must continue to address the demands of sustainable development, climate change, pollution, food security, global migration, massive urbanization in megacities, inclusive and equitable growth, social justice and quality of life issues, and already in some places, aging societies. For this reason, the Philippines is also deeply concerned with social issues. As with economic matters, many of these social issues can best be tackled through international and regional cooperation. One of our special concerns is the protection and promotion of the rights and welfare of all Filipinos overseas. We are in the midst of implementing our new overseas Filipino law and are consulting with many foreign countries to validate or establish protection mechanisms. As you can appreciate, there’s a lot on our plate. There’s not a corner of the world without its particular challenges and opportunities—to which we may add, there’s not a corner of the world without a Filipino—and so we have to be alert and adept at securing the interests of our nation and people wherever it may be necessary. But the basic aims of any foreign policy-maintaining the peace and promoting prosperity-cannot be the responsibility of governments alone. The private sector has a vital role to play as well, and naturally so, because it has vital interests at stake. The Private Sector and Public Policy This is why modern business schools like AIM train their students not just to mind their enterprises but also their societies. Increasingly we have seen how good corporate citizenship and good business go well together, raising profits while improving public welfare. But you can also contribute to national development in more direct ways, beyond wealth creation and social amelioration. You can take a stronger role in shaping and implementing public policy, particularly as it pertains to ensuring a healthy climate for business and investment, and raising the moral standard in both public and private governance. The fight against pernicious corruption is one of these areas of engagement. A private sector input here would be invaluable. The private sector can be more responsive to government efforts to introduce new standards to improve accountability, transparency and efficiency.


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Along these lines, the private sector can help with the Open Government Partnership, an international multi-sectoral initiative the Philippines joined earlier this year, or the PH-US Partnership for Growth program, which focuses on good governance, that was concluded here in Manila during the visit of US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton last month. The private sector can also help in managing the complex problems of climate change. Clean technology, greening of the economy, utilization of new sources of power, improving the energy efficiency of buildings and factories, pollution management, the conservation of natural resources and agricultural modernization would all benefit from informed and committed business participation. And, of course, partnership with the private sector in economic diplomacy is also critical. Governments need access to expertise on diversifying and modernizing the country’s potential in exports and services. Private sector advice on what is needed for greater foreign investment, both direct and portfolio, and for capital market development can be decisive. The same is true for tourism development. Private sector participation can also facilitate the task of designing publicprivate partnerships for the development of infrastructure, power and energy projects and even perhaps for the provision of services in areas like health. The Call of Public Service There is yet another way by which people with your exceptional expertise can help society at large, and create an impact beyond your immediate spheres. That is to heed the call of public service, whenever and wherever that may happen. Governments are constantly in need of professional managers and technocrats who can impose discipline and promote efficiency in the bureaucracy, and who can infuse public policy with vision and dynamism, balanced by street smarts and pragmatism. But again, expertise without values can only make things worse. No fancy diploma or degree can substitute for integrity, honor, discipline, and hard work. Too often have we seen dictators and despots served by the best, the brightest—and the most corruptible. Again we have only to turn to the example of Mr. Washington SyCip to see how valuable one’s personal integrity and one’s commitment to ideals higher than profitmaking can be. Very early in his career, Mr. SyCip resolved that his firm would be run differently from many others, and that

whatever he expected of others, he would first apply to himself. The resultant success of SGV is a testament to Mr. SyCip’s unimpeachable integrity. More than once in his long career-as you’ll read in his biography-he had to choose between doing what was professionally right and what was politically expedient. That you have named this award after him shows that Mr. SyCip practiced accountancy of the highest order-he held himself accountable to himself, to his people, and to God. Today, after decades of service in the private sector, Mr. SyCip continues to serve the Filipino through a host of personal advocacies-in public education, public health, and microfinance. I, too, have been engaged for quite some time now in business, in many kinds of enterprise. I might have stayed there for the rest of my life, but then the call to serve came, and I could not refuse.

But again, expertise without values can only make things worse. No fancy diploma or degree can substitute for integrity, honor, discipline, and hard work. In the Foreign Service When I arrived in Washington, D.C., I had to face a very steep learning curve to enhance ties in all fields between our two countries. This meant developing good working relationships in Washington, D.C., and around the country. We strengthened a congressional caucus for the Philippines on Capitol Hill. We expanded joint military and security endeavors to fight terror. We increased assistance to support our national development and peace process. I was able to maximize the use of our excellent human resources in the Philippine Foreign Service. I brought the Embassy in Washington, D.C., together with our Consulates General in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Hawaii together as a larger single-country diplomatic team. Reaching out to the large and capable Filipino-American community was another

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priority. We collaborated on many issues, including the Filipino Veterans of World War II. I was happy again to accept a new appointment as Secretary of Foreign Affairs under the present Administration. Again, as was the case in the United States, I had to learn the job quickly. Speedy action was required to help Filipinos affected by the Arab Spring, to contain tensions in the South China Sea, and to craft the new Administration’s approach to foreign policy. Fortunately, I found a strong institutional culture, seasoned senior officials, and a hardworking corps of men and women in the Department of Foreign Affairs. In this increasingly globalized world of ours, attention to foreign relations is essential for the national interest. In this regard, the DFA plays the pivotal role for the Philippines as the agency in charge of implementing the nation’s foreign policy. The coverage of this role is vast, but we organize our effort on the basis of three foreign policy pillars, namely: building our national security; enhancing economic diplomacy; and protecting Filipinos overseas. A Simple Faith Again I invite the members of the private sector to help us in our mission by contributing their expertise, their insights, their connections, and their resources to the promotion of our national interests. Indeed we may have our problems-tell me which country does not. But we also have vast and unique opportunities for growth, a bright and vibrant citizenry, and, today, a government firmly committed to reform for the common good. At the beginning and at the end of every working day, I remember that my tenure at the DFA rests on a simple faith: I believe in the Philippines, and I believe in the Filipino. Let me close by quoting what my successor in Washington, Ambassador Jose Cuisia, said when he was asked what he thought Mr. SyCip’s strongest virtue was. “Love of country,” Joey said. “Even though he’s an American citizen, it’s very clear to us how much he loves this country. He has always tried to see how he can help the Philippines. Whenever he’s abroad, he always sees how he can promote the good image of the Philippines. And that’s why he’s such a big asset to the Philippines. He’s more Filipino than most Filipinos I know.” May we all be worthy of that example. This speech was delivered during the AIM Graduation Ceremonies last December 11, 2011, when Sec. Del Rosario was honoured with the Washington SyCip Distinguished Management Leader Award for 2011.


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The AIM Scholars

Words by Rose Cheryl Orbigo, BMP 2005 and Krizia Eleni Patrocinio Photography by Jovel Lorenzo


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Kristeen Joi Lantican, MBA 2012 KRISTEEN WAS THE BREADWINNER in her family prior to taking up her MBA. An Economics graduate of the University of the Philippines Los Baños, she used to be a project development officer for Avida Land Corp. Encouraged by her aunt, who is a college dean and her role model, and inspired by her philosophy “make a choice and don’t look back,” Kristeen applied to AIM to realize her plan of pursuing graduate studies by age 25. “My sponsor told me he was glad that I didn’t let go of my dream even if I knew I couldn’t afford it. He told me to keep on dreaming.” AIM is tough, but Kristeen is “doing fine.” She appreciates most the subjects Macroeconomics and Managing Costs and Profits. During down time, she dines with friends and classmates.

Someday I hope that I can pay it forward. “It’s like everybody here is really smart,” she observed. “I feel that I have to strive harder to keep up. But I enjoy hearing all the opinions in class, especially during case discussions.” Studying hard is the only way she can thank her sponsor at the moment. “However, someday I hope that I can pay it forward.” After graduation, Kristeen plans to return to the real estate industry. “But I plan to be an entrepreneur as well,” she added.

Gabby & Marianne Paredes Scholar During the signing ceremony of Chibuom Corporation for a full scholarship grant, Gabby Paredes, MBM 1972 shared that “This is my giving back to AIM. We believe in the value of education and what it can do for a deserving student: how it can change your life and how you contibute to society eventually.” Kristeen Joi Lantican is the lucky recipient of the Gabby and Marianne Paredes Scholarship.

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Isagani Lati Jr., MBA 2012 GANI IS THE YOUNGEST CHILD IN a simple family. His mother runs a small store selling fresh meat, fish, and vegetables. His father was a long-time elected barangay (village) official before passing away in 2008 due to diabetes. “Although they wanted to go to college, they were unable to do so because of poverty,” Gani narrated. “Even so, they were able to raise me and my siblings in the best possible way through hard work and perseverance, and without stepping on other people’s shoes.” As a result, Gani’s brother became a policeman, and his sister now has her own small business. Gani himself completed the BS Accountancy program of San Beda College and landed in the third spot on the CPA board exam. He worked in various capacities for nine years in the Philippines and abroad. His two most recent posts were assistant manager at Manila Doctors Hospital and associate director at the auditing firm SGV & Co. Believing that learning is a continuous process and that his professional life could be improved, Gani decided to study at AIM because of its international recognition and because“its graduates are undeniably considered the movers and shakers of the business world.”

Because of Gani’s credentials, achievements, and personal background, he was conferred the W. SyCip GSB Best and Brightest scholarship. “The professors in AIM saw in me the potential to contribute to the AIM community,” he explained. “My family, especially my mother, was very proud of the recognition. It was an achievement not only for me but also for my family.

“It is the interactive experience with people of different cultural and professional backgrounds that has provided me with a lot of insights.” “The first three months of the program was really tough, like everything was on fast forward,” he recalled. “You have to absorb every lesson at the shortest possible time. I struggled a little with subjects like Quantitative Analysis and Economics. But it was worthwhile because I learned a lot of new concepts and points of view from my professors and classmates… It’s understandable that I like finance subjects because I have a finance background. But the subject that interests me most is Managing People in Organizations because it deals with leadership skills that every manager should have. “My classmates are highly competitive,” he described. “They are so competitive that I have to raise my standards to keep up. As the Best and Brightest Scholar, I am expected to perform… The level of competitiveness during class discussions and learning team meetings helps me learn a lot of insights about the cases. It is the interactive experience with people of different cultural and professional backgrounds that has provided me with a lot of insights.” When his case pack is closed, Gani prefers to watch TV, walk, or hang out with friends. “Any activity that drives continued on page 42 >>

W. SyCip GSB Best and Brightest Scholar AIM’s W. SyCip GSB Best and Brightest scholarship grant offers the top undergraduate students with high GMAT/AIMAT scores, and solid work background MBA or MM full tuition scholarship, economy air fare from and to the students’ home country, lodging at the AIM dormitory, and a monthly stipend. Mr. Washington SyCip, one of the founders of the Institute is the generous funder of this program.


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Angela Sanchez, MBA 2012 GETTING AN MBA HAS BEEN A long-time dream for Gel, who comes from a humble family and who studied Commerce at the Ateneo de Davao University. She was a software consultant with Push Technologies International and a junior accountant with Aboitiz Power before getting into AIM. “I like learning,” said Gel, who considers taking an MBA a personal challenge. “I learned about AIM way back in college from my finance professor. She shared to me what AIM is like… Curiosity led me to wanting to get into the institution. My desire to get an MBA made me search for the best schools. Choosing AIM was no sweat. This is one of the best schools in Asia. I get to stay in my own country and at

the same time see diversity in culture.” Knowing she could not afford the program fees, Gel applied for scholarship and got in. “I am lucky to have a supportive family. My parents have tried their best to inculcate core values in us… The decision to come to AIM was not easy, and their support helped me go on. “Now I realized I’m getting more than what I wanted,” she confessed. “It became a challenge of what I can make after acquiring this learning, what change I can make in society when I get back… I consider myself an average student. However, I have undying enthusiasm to learn… Reminiscing the classes in Casemanship still excites me. I appreciate Macroeconomics a

“I do hope though that I will get to meet him [Malvan Hwang] soon and personally thank him. I will again tell this to him: He makes dreams come true.” lot, too; it has been really helpful in understanding current events.” To Gel, AIM professors are “amazing.” “I find myself in awe in almost every class. They all compel us to think, to search for answers, to be eager to learn more. These professors are masters of their craft.” Diversity in the students’ culture, work experience, and personalities has made the classes livelier. “Understanding personality and cultural differences has made us more sensitive to each other,” Gel observed. “This will be very helpful, especially when we join the workforce again. We can never choose what kind of persons we have to deal with. Also, learning from the experiences of my classmates has given me more ideas on practices in their fields. Aside from that, I learned to count from one to 20 in Hindi.” Gel has not yet met her sponsor, Malvan Hwang. “I was able to send him a card,” she noted. “I do hope though that I will get to meet him soon and personally thank him. I will again tell

this to him: He makes dreams come true. Should I be given the same chance to change someone’s life for the better, I’d do the same by giving education to less fortunate families.” With her simple background, Gel finds happiness in simple things. “Sleeping comes first on the list,” she said nonchalantly. “Next will be calling my family, then talking to friends and eating.” After graduation, Gel wants to hold a position in strategy, risk management, or project management. “AIM has given me many choices,” she said. “I hope AIM continues to develop more leaders who make conscientious decisions for the development of their country.” Malvan Hwang Scholar In July 2010, Malvan Hwang, MBM 1974 came back to visit AIM after 36 years. He was also on a personal mission- to give back to AIM what AIM had given him- a scholarship grant. His donation of US $30,000 specified that his scholarship should be granted to a deserving Filipina. Angela Sanchez is the grateful recipient of his scholarship.


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Story Jonah Avegail Gaerlan, MBA 2012

“I hold the conviction that with AIM, perhaps I, too, could become someone remarkable and influential one day.”

WHEN AVY WAS YOUNG, HER PARENTS separated, but she still considers her childhood happy. “I believe it made me value the essential things in life at an early age. Thus, I do not believe in misconceptions about ‘broken homes,’ and I would very much like to erase the stigma attached to it.” Another consequence of the separation is Avy’s admiration of her mother. “[She] single-handedly raised a whole family and made it feel like the toughest of times can come and go like a breeze. She made me into who I am today and taught me the most important things I needed to know about life.” A graduate of Hospitality and Tourism Management from St. Louis University, Baguio City, Avy worked for the Provincial Government of La Union’s Information and Tourism Office before studying at AIM. “We were in charge of La Union’s tourism operations and marketing, organizing major events, creating press releases and correspondence for the governor, and performing other administrative functions,” she explained. “I had wanted to pursue higher studies to broaden my knowledge and improve my future prospects,” she said. “After I read testimonies of alumni in the AIM ad in Baguio Midland Courier, my first impression of the school was that it is an enabler of success. It trains people to become competent in facing the world’s challenges and to go beyond what most people are capable of achieving… I chose AIM because of its tradition of excellence that enabled it to produce distinguished top continued on page 42>>

Triple A Club Scholars With Jesli Lapus, MBM 1973 as President, the Triple A Club, whose members represent the most outstanding alumni of the Institute, granted its first scholarship to Ariel de la Cruz in 2006. Jonah Avegail Gaerlan and Katrina Gracia Macaraig are the fortunate recipients of their scholarship for this year.


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Katrina Gracia Macaraig, MBA 2012 KATHY HOLDS A BUSINESS Management degree from the Ateneo de Manila University. After three years as a trade marketing manager at Unilever Philippines, she considered herself “prepared to take on more challenging roles and responsibilities.” “Specifically, I envisioned myself as a successful general manager and social entrepreneur… I believed that it was necessary for me to further reinforce my strengths and improve on my weaknesses by acquiring a master’s degree at AIM. “I chose AIM because it has been known for training future Asian managers and leaders using the case method, which involves analytical, logical, and communication skills development,” she said. “Furthermore, the successful career paths and valuable contribution to society of most of AIM’s graduates encouraged me to choose AIM versus other business schools. For me, AIM is simply one of the best Asian business schools.” Nevertheless, everyone in Kathy’s family was surprised when she divulged her plan to resign from her job. “They knew it was a big risk to let go of a stable career, but all of them knew that the lifetime benefits of getting into AIM are richer. When I broke the news that I passed, they were happy for me, but when I got the scholarship, they were just excited. “I believe I was able to get the scholarship not only because I showed exemplary performance in my undergraduate school and in Unilever, but also because I have a relentless drive to succeed in all the endeavors I embark on, with cognizance of my responsibilities to society. I have always believed that life’s journey is not just about how much I have enriched myself, but it is also how much value addition I have provided to everybody else―classmates, co-workers, professors, etc.”

Three months into the MBA program, Kathy has adjusted to the everyday rigor. “I have learned to set my priorities and improve my time management skill.” Kathy likes studying Marketing Management, Cost Accounting, Managing Costs and Profits, and Managing People in Organizations. “I always learn something new from AIM professors,” she noted. “Despite their solid work experience on the subjects, they have remained open and warm in receiving questions, challenges, and criticisms, which makes case discussions much more exciting.” The diversity in her classmates’ culture, work experience, and insights has enabled Kathy to go beyond her traditional way of thinking and doing. “This learning process happens even in the dormitory lobby and hallway. It’s learning something new every day, everywhere.” When the pressure and school demands are great, Kathy escapes by engaging in light conversations with friends, listening to music, catching the latest movie, or simply munching French fries. After graduating, Kathy would like to become a general manager in a multinational corporation and to start her own business. Her role models would be her father, Jovencio, and her

“I have always believed that life’s journey is not just about how much I have enriched myself, but it is also how much value addition I have provided to everybody else.” mentor, Jesli Lapus (MBM ’73) of the Triple A Club. “Their journeys in life have made me realize that real success is never earned overnight, but it is earned through hard work and patience,” she shared. “They have continuously shown me, in different circumstances, that the real meaning of life is reaching out to others even in the most miniscule manner.” Because of this, Kathy also intends to continue the vision the Triple A Club has for its scholars―that of contributing to AIM and to society. “I plan to partner with them in sending more scholars to AIM.”


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The Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation Scholarship Dr. Ching Chih Chen, an esteemed member of the AIM Board of Governors from 2007 to 2009, and Chairman of the Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation, donated US$180,000.00 over three years to AIM in support of potential students who will participate in furthering the human resource development of Vietnam in the field of management. Dr. Chen was educated at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA and also heads Wan Hai Shipping Lines, headquartered in Taiwan and with 125 offices all over the world. The annual donation of US$60,000.00 provided students with full scholarships, support their living expenses, and fund the airfare to and from Vietnam. Through the Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation, which was named in memory of Dr. Chen’s father, the Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation Scholarship provided deserving students from Vietnam the opportunity to receive a Master in Business Administration (MBA), Master in Management (MM), and/or Master in Development Management (MDM) degree in AIM. Since 2009, there have been 10 recipients of the Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation Scholarship: Nguyen Thi Phuong Uyen (MBA 2010), Dao Le Tram Anh (MBA 2010), Tran Cong Bang (MDM 2010), Tran Bich Thuy (MDM 2010), Nguyen Tieu My (MBA 2011), Le Nguyen Nhat Chinh (MBA 2011), Nguyen Thi Thu Trang (MDM 2011), Tran Thi Minh Hue (MBA 2012), Ngo Thi Thanh Van (MDM 2012) and Phan Thanh Ngoc (MDM 2012).

Trang Thi Thu Nguyen, MDM 2012 AS A YOUNG GIRL GROWING UP IN ONE of the rural coastal areas of Vietnam, Trang Thi Thu Nguyen saw the importance of having a certain level of authority. She realized there was a need for power and influence to be able to address the problems of the disadvantaged sectors of society and to make changes in their lives. This inspired her to strive to be someone with power and influence, so she can make changes from the grassroots level upwards. She admired and respected people who have big dreams, who are unafraid to challenge the tough world, and passionately pursued their dreams until they reached them. Trang recognized that for her to enable change, wield influence and obtain power, she needed to study and work hard. “My ultimate goal was to work for the betterment of humanity in my own small ways,” she revealed. She went on to finish her Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Information Technology at the University of Natural Science in Vietnam. After graduation she worked as an Application Developer and IT technical trainer for Scancom Ltd Co. After two years, she moved to InvestConsultGroup as Deputy Manager of Center of Information & Market Research. She was enjoying her job responsibilities but her interest in social service never wavered. She then decided to join Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI), a public non-profit organization, and worked as a Development Planning Manager. She was responsible for organizing business-matching and cooperation programs to promote trade co-operation between Vietnamese enterprises and overseas enterprises. “I am conscientious in studying and looking for solutions in the issues that Vietnamese enterprises have been facing unsatisfactorily, particularly in human resource development and business management. I am interested in projects relating to enterprises because their positive changes can considerably impact social and economic issues, especially poverty. I am motivated to help poor people continued on page 42>>

Knowing that AIM is one of the best in Asia, I wanted to study here as it is the lifetime opportunity for me.


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Hue Thi Minh Tran, MBA 2012 “STAY HUNGRY. STAY FOOLISH.” This line, made famous by the late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc., perfectly describes this scholar’s attitude towards the rigors of studying Masters in Business Administration in AIM. Hue Thi Minh Tran walks the halls with an air of springy enthusiasm and effervescent geniality. Despite the number of cases she had to read every day, not to mention lack of sleep, she relishes each discovery she makes and new information she grasps in and out of the caseroom. Her passion towards learning stems from her personal commitment to improve the society and engage in activities that ensures sustainable development in the community. She brightens when she talks about her experience while in AIM. “The harder I tried to understand the concepts, the more excited I became. I often start with the question: Why do I have to study this subject? What are the key messages/key points I have to remember in this exercise?” she shared. She told us that her previous professional experiences in Vietnam also helped her appreciate the course work. “I often reflect on the things I was doing in Vietnam whenever I study to make sense of the concepts I was trying to understand. Then I would try to continued on page 43>>

“Makati is like New York in my eyes and AIM is like Havard (though I haven’t been there) but very Asia. Filipinos were nice people with warm smiles, and AIM had good facilities and very professional environment.”


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Nguyen Tieu My, MBA 2012 “I AM THE FIRST IN MY FAMILY TO get the chance to have a degree in Masters in Business Administration,” shared Nguyen Tieu My. May, as she likes to be called, was granted a full scholarship by the Chen Yung Memorial Foundation, courtesy of Dr. Ching Chih Chen, Chairman of Wan Hai Lines and former Member of AIM Board of Trustees. Prior to studying at AIM, she worked as a Senior Marketing Executive at Berjaya Group of Companies. She finished her Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in English Linguistics and Literatures at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities. As a child, she wanted to become a philanthropist in the United States of America. Growing up, she idolized current US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who was a strong proponent of promoting women empowerment in the United States and elsewhere. Having the opportunity to become exposed to global affairs motivated May to apply to AIM. “I want to improve my management skills and expose myself to business practices of the international continued on page 43>>

“I believe that the lessons taught at AIM will develop and sustain Asia. I recommend for more potential candidates to study in AIM as it is good for Vietnam’s development.”


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“This scholarship from the Chen Yung Memorial Foundation, through Dr. Ching Chih Chen, brought my family the most meaningful gift.”

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Le Nguyen Nhat Chinh, MBA 2012 LE NGUYEN NHATCHINH WAS RAISED BY HER PARENTS to value her education. Her parents taught her to appreciate the power of learning. “This scholarship from the Chen Yung Memorial Foundation, through Dr. Ching Chih Chen, brought my family the most meaningful gift,” Chinh Le, as she preferred to be called, revealed. “My mother inspires me. She taught me to always think ahead, to keep moving and to do my best in everything.” “I planned to pursue an MBA after working for some years after finishing my university [degree]. Recognizing that I need more knowledge for my future career, I knew that an MBA course would not only teach me more advanced technical abilities but also provide in depth of leadership and management skills that I definitely need in order to work in management levels in the future.” Prior to taking her MBA at AIM, Chinh Le worked as a Brand Manager for Dumex infant formula milk. Dumex is an infants’ and children’s nutrition company under Groupe Danone, a company headquartered in France. She earned her Bachelor’s degree at the International Business Management/ Economics University, at Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. “I pursued my application to AIM because I was really impressed upon hearing about the case method and real life application,” she revealed. “My brother told me about AIM’s ‘tough learning experience’ and ‘Asian context management style’. True enough, when I started with the MBA program, I told myself, ‘What a terrible life’! The extremely tight and hectic study and examination schedule overwhelmed me.” Despite a challenging start, Chinh Le found herself enjoying the MBA program workload as soon as she became adjusted to its pace. “I learned a lot from both my professors and my international friends. I enjoyed subjects relating to marketing: like marketing management, brand equity management, advertising and sales promotion management, and strategic management. I also took an interest in my quantitative subjects. Thankfully, all my professors are respectful and humorous, and made me learn the coursework better.” “My classmates were smart, cute and full of mischief. The most valuable thing I learned from them is their ‘can do’ attitude, especially from my Indian friends. Whenever they need to do anything, they will never give up and try their best to do, even though the chance is only 1%. I also enjoyed the diversification of nationalities in my class. It gave me a chance to understand cultural differences, and be better in dealing with each group of people,” she shared. Chinh Le revealed that her friends in AIM helped make her life more enjoyable while studying. “I have a group of close friends that often hang out together. We share our passions and we encourage each other in pursuing our own goals in life. We enjoy watching movies and swimming in our free time.” All the rigors of studying in AIM and the lessons she learned along the way made her hopeful about her future. “I am looking forward to start my own business after graduation. I already have something in mind and I am firming my own business model at the moment.” “I believe that the most meaningful way to thank Dr. Chen and the Chen Yung Memorial Foundation is to show how far I will be able to move in my professional and personal life, and how I will give back to help younger students in my country.” For someone whose philosophy in life is “One life, Live it”, Chinh Le is definitely living life to the fullest.


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In Memoriam

GABY MENDOZA 1931 - 2011


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THE AIM COMMUNITY MOURNS THE PASSING OF PROFESSOR Emeritus Gabino A. Mendoza on December 22, 2011. Prof. Mendoza was the first faculty member and COO during the founding of AIM in 1968. He was president of the Institute from 1978 to 1986, dean of the Institute from 1973 to 1986, and dean of faculty from 1968 to 1972. Prof. Mendoza taught general management (strategy formulation and implementation), marketing, and finance in the MBA, Master in Management, and Executive MBA programs, and initiated the course on development of enterprise. He was the chairman of the board of Allied Metals and directortreasurer of Foodmach, Inc. He was also a director of several companies, among them Philippine Investment Management Consultants (PHINMA), NCR (Philippines), Basic Advertising, Executive Digest Inc., Prosoft Ltd., Options Publishing Services, Audience Research Asia, and TQM Asia. In the past several years, he served as a general management consultant to such companies as San Miguel Corporation; Ayala Land; Delbros Inc.; First Holdings, Inc.; Phelps Dodge Philippines; Sime Darby (Philippines); Basic/Foote, Cone and Belding, Inc.; Makati Medical Center; Caltex Pacific Indonesia; Federal Auto Holdings Bhd. (Malaysia); World Executive’s Digest; and Canadian International Development Agency. Prof. Mendoza obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree (valedictorian) from the Ateneo de Manila University (1953) and an MBA (With Distinction) from Harvard Business School (1966). He was the 1975 Eisenhower Fellow from the Philippines and was a Fellow of the International Academy of Management. He was also a member of the visiting committee of the Lahore Business School in Pakistan. With the passing of Prof. Mendoza, AIM has lost one of its legendary professors. AIM extends its deepest condolences to the family and loved ones of Prof. Mendoza.

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In Memoriam

Remembering Gaby

Selections from memories of the AIM family Gaby was a giant in the history of the AIM—a scholar, a teacher, a passionate advocate, and a true leader and visionary. I know that his role in the AIM’s development will always be recalled by faculty and board members, past and present, with fondness and admiration. I personally deem it a great privilege to have known him and to have been associated with him over many years. Brian Scott A wonderful and great man, who steered AIM through very difficult times. Can’t forget how you lived and died for AIM. Prof. Rico Angtuaco Gaby’s legacy was his teaching philosophy. He truly believed that the teacher’s most important job was to “teach students, not subjects.” The goal he sought to achieve in almost every class of his over four decades of teaching at AIM, was to get students to think independently, act decisively, and communicate convincingly. Gaby resisted the temptation of giving his solution despite student objections, even if he knew the answers well. His wisdom showed in the hard questions he would ask of students’ answers. He always tried to teach this way—whatever the program, course, or case he was assigned, even when it hurt his student ratings. Gaby became known as the “pure” case method teacher, a valuable but rare and vanishing breed. In today’s flat, hot, and chaotic world where current best theories or frameworks and experts’ solutions no longer work as they did before, AIM needs to produce more graduates who can ask hard questions about traditional answers. Gaby’s legacy glows bright in the minds and hearts of AIM graduates whose lives he has touched. His legacy will live on for as long as alumni will strive to teach others the philosophy and values he lived by. Prof. Toby Canto An era has passed. I don’t think there will ever be anyone with such a deep abid-

ing love of AIM as Gaby had. He had many children, and surely AIM is one of them. I asked him once long ago how he wanted to be remembered. He paused a while and then he said “that I was a teacher”. Prof. Vickie Licuanan He was more than a great management guru. In fact, many of us took great pleasure sitting in his classes. Beyond the caserooms setting, most of us had an admirable relationship with him—he influenced our thinking, our culture and our philosophy. What was so striking about Gaby was that he was so gung-ho and yet so magnanimous. He gave credit to every student who can flourish both intellectually and professionally. He shared his ideas and his advice freely and respectfully. Our philosophy of Asian management is deeply rooted in Gaby’s teaching legacy! Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989 President KELAB AIM Malaysia I remember he taught one or two times in the MM program in 1993-1994, and his teaching on strategy really opened our mind. His smile through his serious face always brought us total encouragement during his class. Dani Firmansjah, MM 1994 Chairman, Indonesia Alumni Chapter He was the Dean and Professor par excellence! Indefatigable and charismatic, Gaby was passionately involved in affairs a la AIM until perhaps his last moments! Gaby will be remembered as one of the pillars of AIM, especially in its formative years. MP Singh, MBM 1976 Chairman, Federation of AIM Alumni Associations (FAIM) Gaby was my teacher who taught so much to me and everyone in the class of 1972. He was not just a great teacher but truly a GURU. There is no other tribute I can pay. He was not the routine professor who answered questions but one who questioned our answers; not one who just polished us

for the outer world but taught us to shape our inner world. He was a teacher who gave us knowledge and boosted our ego but also a ‘guru’ who took away our ‘knowledge’ and punctured our ego (to make ego-less). He not merely instructed us but as a ‘guru’ constructed us—one who not only reached our mind but also touched our soul. I touch his feet and pray His Soul rest in peace. Ramesh Gelli, MBM 1972 Triple A Awardee Hyderabad, India We greatly respected Prof Gaby for his sharpness in enquiry and his continuous loyalty to AIM in all these years. Gan Cheong Eng, MBM 1982 Triple A Awardee President, AIM Alumni in Singapore (AIMAS) Prof. Gaby is among the best of the best leadership educators in Asia and even the world. Prof. Gaby is in the same league as Peter Drucker, Phil Crosby and other World class management professors! I entered AIM an Engineer and left AIM a year later an entrepreneur—Prof. Gaby was one of the main Professors who contributed substantially to the change in me. His passing is a great loss to AIM and to us all. Renny Yeo, MM 1981 High Distinction Triple A Awardee He was one of the most inspirational teachers in my life, and he made a lasting impact on many of us. In fact, I remember that we used to prepare for his classes with greater effort—and with desire to participate and perform well. Through his teaching, he instilled in us to always ask the following questions: 1. What business are you in? 2. What business should you be in? These were very important learnings, and I continue to benefit from his teachings. I am deeply saddened by his passing away. V. Bhaskar, MBM 2000


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“Is that true?” The perennial question asked of us, the question that always confronted us whenever we issued a declarative statement in our General Management class under Professor Gaby Mendoza. A question so simple yet so powerful that it challenges us to think critically of whatever it is we intend to say and simply be responsible for all the statements that we issue. This was the mental discipline instilled in us and inspired by Professor Gaby Mendoza, a professor who undoubtedly exuded strictness and still somehow managed to show compassion and understanding of the plight of a regular MBM student like me back in the day. This balance so beautifully struck by Professor Mendoza is what everyone will miss. Jeriel Enriquez, MBM 1998 A powerful intellect, a kindly manner, the ability to communicate and to inspire— the perfect combination for a man in his position. I remember him with affection and respect. Martin Fowler, MM 1979 Gaby was my teacher who taught so much to me and everyone in the class of 1972. He was not just a great teacher but truly a GURU. There is no other tribute I can pay. He was not one who answered questions but one who questioned our answers; not one who just polished us for the outer world, but taught us to shape our inner world. He was a teacher who gave us knowledge and boosted our ego, but also a ‘guru’ who took away our ‘knowledge’ and punctured our ego (make us ego-less). He not merely instructed us, but as a ‘guru’ constructed us—one who not only reached our mind, but also touched our soul. I touch his feet and pray his soul rest in peace. Ramesh Gelli, MBM 1972 Triple A Awardee Hyderabad, India I still remember his smile with a warm heart. When I was new to AIM, I was a little scared, as my English was quite poor and I didn’t have enough experiences. However, he was there to make a Korean student feel relaxed and concentrated on study. I will always remember him as one of the nice Filipinos I met in my life. TaeSook “Sugar” Han, MBM 1984 Here was a Teacher-Statesman, who taught us the art of self-introspection and not taking anything at face value! In today’s world these are very important teachings.

Whenever you made a point, he used to say, “Are you sure?” And we were always in a quandary. He taught us how to understand the dynamics of life very subtly. Nikhil Kamath, MBM 1998 CP : BS… BS… BS :) So. What? ... Silence. A pair of eyes speaking volumes, mildly mocking you, mildly nudging you, mildly encouraging you to survive, mildly encouraging you to rebel, mildly encouraging you to punch, mildly encouraging you to jump to defense, mildly chipping away at your grandiose ego yet OVERWHELMINGLY giving you a feel that “dude, this is gooood,” this is what “standing your own” means, giving you healthy doses of confidence, equal measures of arrogance and humility… all in those splitting seconds when you can CP. Is medium the message? Is this madness? Yes... and more... There was method and magic in his madness. Welcome to the world of Gaby’s sphere of influence. I am proud to say he had butchered me in CP and, while doing so, he managed to stimulate so many brain waves, so many thoughts, so many instincts that my mind was never the same again! Gaby was an experience. Gaby will be missed. Yash Makharia, MBA 2008 He was easily the greatest teacher that I have had the privilege to learn with, and I know I speak for legions of students and his colleagues in voicing this opinion. He was a very bright lighthouse in helping me to find direction in my journey through life, and I know that I speak for many others. He is part of AIM’s Great Tradition, and the school has very high standards to live up to. Nishikant Mukerji, MM 1987 It’s unthinkable to remember AIM without Gabby. He was my mentor and advisor. I can’t think of any professor who had impacted me more. Much of what I am and achieved is due to his guidance. Amit Mukherjee, MM 1987 In my years in AIM (2000-2002) aside from everything else that has been and will be told about him, one word stands out, and that is WHY. That is the question that he would always pose to the students every time we would offer our recommendation or our opinion on a case. Why?

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Why do you think? Why should it work? Why do you think they thought that way? And so on and so forth. If you have not satisfied his questioning and the endless WHY’s, then he will grill you until either you give up or he feels you have sufficiently answered his WHY’s. Usually, the student follows the former rather than the latter. He will be sorely missed. Sam B. Ortiz, MBM 2002 For me, he was AIM. Synonymous. Pauline Paguia, MBM 1972 The Asian Way will not be in vain. Thank you for this legacy! Daniel Saracin, MBM 1983 Prof. Gaby shall remain the most charismatic person and shall forever remain in my memory as far as my AIM days are concerned. He frightened all of us on our first day and thereafter made us creative in our approach to Marketing Management. His unimpressed swipe of the arm would signal the death of many a passionate CP, and his incessant questioning made many of us clarify our arguments better. All of us (MBA 2008 Batch A, the Last of the Mohicans, would forever remember his last session of the semester when he ended the CP within 20 minutes to explain the theory of marketing so eloquently. We have a copy of the recording of that speech, and it remains a very powerful testimony of a man whose knowledge and abilities extended way beyond the textbooks. He was a true practitioner and foremost torch-bearer of the AIM spirit. I shall miss you, Prof, and you remain, for me, the best time spent in AIM. Basant Venugopal, MBA 2008 I can say without any hesitation that MM Class of 1981 had been blessed with the intellectual prowess and ingenuity of Professor Gaby. The “mental torture” that we got from him had prepared us a lot to attain greater heights in our respective professions. Surely, we will miss him, but his legacy shall remain in us. Eriberto Villagarcia, MM 1981 Prof. Gabby Mendoza is indeed iconic at AIM in strategic management with his countless intonations of a few key words triggering learning among MBM candidates. We are fortunate to have experienced his style and substance of teaching at AIM. Michael Yap, MBM 1997


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Spotlight

“I may not have been the one who did the dirty work, I may not have had the expertise, but I had the vision that challenged everyone to move towards a better, more unified organization.�


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ROBERT KUAN, MBM 1975

The Visionary Leader Robert Fung Kuan, MBM 1975, founded Chowking Food Corporation and served as its President from 1985 to March 2000. Mr. Kuan was Chairman of the Board of Trustees of St. Luke’s Medical Center until September 2011, when he elected to give way to a new Chairman and revert back to being a trustee. He is presently busy in preparations for his term as Governor of Rotary District 3830 in 2013-2014. A recipient of numerous awards and citations in the field of business, such as the Business Leadership Award from the Aurelio Periquet, Jr. Foundation, TOFIL Award in the field of Business and Entrepreneurship in 2003, and the AIM Alumni Achievement Award (Triple A) in 1980, among many others, Mr. Kuan actively pays forward to the Institute by generously supporting the Triple A Scholarship Fund. “Son, here is 20,000 pesos. With it, I want you to go to AIM and take a Master’s Degree.” This iconic gesture in 1973 by Robert Kuan’s father, providing him with the then princely sum for his graduate studies, would unwittingly ignite the path towards Kuan’s spectacular career, scaling unexpected heights in business, marketing, entrepreneurship and servant leadership. Little did he know then that fortuitous events in his life would stir his passion for stretching enterprises with his uncanny vision, and enable him to perform extraordinary feats in the competitive world of business. The path to AIM was froth with trepidations from a young lad, obedient to his father’s obstinate plans for his son’s future. As a fresh graduate from the University of the Philippines armed with a degree in Business Administration, Kuan had gladly accepted a job in Makati Supermarket, charged with the zeal and energy of youth—as a warehouse checker. Using the landmark grocery as a learning laboratory, Robert voraciously absorbed the lessons in the workplace—the operations of the retail business, the reasoning behind each item’s pricing, little knowing that one day, these precious lessons would serve him in good stead when he established his own company. Quickly rising from the ranks, Kuan was just warming up his seat as assistant store manager when the bequest from his father swept him from his comfort zone and brought him into the case rooms of the Asian Institute of Management.

“It was not an alluring proposition” says Kuan. “The prospect of returning to the student’s life—spending sleepless nights studying, reading and rereading, the idea of once again having to take exams, the whole idea was not appealing to me at all.” ‘An unremarkable student’ is how the ever modest Kuan describes himself at AIM. “I got through AIM through time management” he says. “I would quickly leaf through studies in the evening and go to sleep, and in the morning, I could participate in discussions.” Robert also fondly recalls the practice of pool dunking, which he was not wont to participate in. “We would just lock our doors whenever it started,” he laughs. However, an unexpected trial came to test the young Kuan’s days at the AIM campus. His beloved father had been diagnosed with lung cancer and was given only six months to live. “I really had to concentrate on my studies. My thoughts would always drift back to my father, and it was very, very difficult to focus.” Buffeted mentally with his studies and pained with his father’s illness, Kuan relentlessly continued the path that his father paved for him in AIM. In January 1974, barely six months after Kuan started his classes in AIM, his father passed away. This provided an additional impetus for Robert to excel and finish his course. In 1975, he did his father proud by tucking a Master in Business Management degree under his sleeve. Forging Ahead “My father never went to business school,” Kuan says, “yet he was aware of one of the most important business rules—that a leader must care for his employees, such that he earns their respect and loyalty.” For Kuan, management essentially means putting together the right people, each with knowledge in different disciplines, in order to achieve one’s mission. As such, each employee is uniquely valuable, and each one must be treated with care and respect. “How do you make them feel important to you? It’s the small things you do for them. Make it so that they will willingly go the extra mile for you, without feeling oppressed,” Kuan shares. A leader must think ahead and act in the interest of his subordinates. A leader must also have a vision—this, for Kuan, was the first lesson in visioning that he acquired from AIM, when a professor told him to be honest to himself, and ask the following questions “The Visionary Leader” continued on page 36 >>

Words by Isagani Eliezer Manikan | Photo by Jovel Lorenzo


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Spotlight

MALVAN HWANG, MBM 1974

MAKING DREAMS COME TRUE

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OW ELSE CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE FEELING AFTER GETTING A CALL THAT you got a scholarship in AIM? I had an early Christmas gift; I had a dream come true! The next thing you want to know is who will be sponsoring the scholarship. Malvan Hwang—never met him at all. Nonetheless, I felt sky high gladness. Following that, I wondered how I will be able to thank him for giving me this opportunity. Thanks to the Student Services and the Alumni Relations Office, I’m now able to thank and communicate with Mr. Hwang. I also ask him advice on AIM survival—class participation, taking advantage of strengths and improving on weaknesses. Mr. Hwang is a graduate of MBM class of ’74. He joined AIM two years after graduating from National Cheng-chi University in Taiwan. He recalled, “I did not even have any dollar in my pocket when I decided to go to AIM.” But along with a scholarship and some help from his friends, Mr. Hwang was able to finance his tuition. Also, to add to his living allowance and tuition, Mr. Hwang shares: “I sold instant coffee and Christmas Cards to the students. I also sold gas heaters and stoves to the faculty in installments. I even published a book for a professor and sold it.” He really was a businessman from the start. As he said, “businessmen are born” and in AIM he gained the ability to work under great pressure and learned the ability to do business internationally. Mr. Hwang was most impressed with his professor in Public Financial Strategy, to whom he attributes the mantra: “To simplify the complicated problem, find the key point and settle it.” Since I have not met my generous sponsor yet, I wanted to see how he had looked like some time ago. So I asked for the library’s files and found that he was a classmate of Prof. Rico Angtuaco. Happily, Prof. Angtuaco reminisced, “Malvan came to every class prepared.” Although the English language posted a challenge for him, he was still able to participate well in class and his knowledge in manufacturing made him a valuable contributor in can groups. “He is a funny guy, always wearing a smile and easy to get along with,” Prof. Angtuaco recalled. “He was particularly skillful in table tennis. He also joined my group whenever we played ‘pelota’ in the 6th floor along the corridors of the dormitory”. Mr. Hwang had experience in finance, marketing and manufacturing. Currently he runs his own stainless fittings export company. Thankful of attaining success because of being granted an opportunity to study at AIM, Mr. Hwang wants to offer the same chance to others. Last 2010, he visited Manila to meet with his classmates and award a scholarship. On asking him for advice to current MBA students, he says, “Don’t waste your youth. Work harder.” For this Spotlight feature, AIMLeader invited Malvan Hwang’s scholar, Angela Sanchez, to do a piece on her generous sponsor.

Words by Angela Sanchez, MBA 2012 | Illustration by Fran Ng


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“Don’t waste your youth. Work harder.”


36 >> “The Visionary Leader” continued from page 33 —what do you think you have now that may affect your future life? What about any liabilities or weaknesses that you need to address? Most importantly, how do you want to see yourself a few years from now? “Those questions led to my visioning in all the businesses I have led in my life,” says Kuan. Life after AIM proved to be an adventure in scaling the heights of his career, eventually establishing one of his very own. Lured by an enticing offer from his former company, Makati Supermarket, to come back with a salary three times his last pay, Kuan chose instead to bravely test new grounds with his newly acquired AIM education as assistant general manager of Ever Emporium, a supermarket in the heart of Manila. However good his new job was, Kuan felt an insatiable calling that would harness the entrepreneurial spirit carved deep in his heart. Six months after starting in Ever Emporium, Kuan left to steer the reins of Ling Nam, a restaurant owned by his mother’s family that served Chinese noodles and delicacies. With Ling Nam’s expansion as the subject of Kuan’s thesis in AIM, he was excited to test the plans he so carefully laid out on paper. After 25 years of operations, the family had been content with the restaurant’s one and only store in the heart of Chinatown. However, his enthusiasm convinced them to finally explore the possibilities of opening more branches, and in 1983, eight years after Kuan took the helm of the family business, Ling Nam had become as famous as the delectable noodles and siopao that it served. However, as is often the case with family corporations, personalities, ideas, and working attitudes clashed, forcing Kuan to make a painful choice: To stay with the company that he had worked so hard to expand, or to close the Ling Nam chapter in his life and start afresh. The answer came in the wise words of the legendary Henry Sy, Sr., the father of SM Shoemart, whom Kuan sought counsel from. Torn between staying with the family business or letting go, Kuan followed the encouragement of Sy to go out and venture into new realms. Thus, the fabled Chowking was born. Building a Giant With a wealth of experiences from Ling Nam, Kuan toyed with the idea of having a fast food style Chinese restaurant, combining the concepts of the traditional Chinese noodle house with the accessibility of a burger stand. Challenged by the tumultuous times of

the early eighties brought about by Ninoy Aquino’s assassination, Kuan steadfastly believed that food will always be on any individual’s agenda, no matter the political situation in any country. In 1985, Chowking found its first home at the ground floor of an arcade in what is now SM Makati at the heart of the busy commercial district. Dedicated to seeing his new “baby” grow, Kuan spent his time sitting at the restaurant, listening to customer’s comments, offering seats to senior citizens, even helping with tasks in the backroom. Putting value in his people, Kuan made sure that his staff would grow with the company, instilling a familial culture that exists in Chowking to this day. “I told my employees, ‘Ten years from now, I do not want to see you at the job you currently have. I have hired you as cashiers, cooks, waiters... I want you to grow. I’d like to see you rise up to be supervisors, store managers and trainers, because I will not be satisfied with just one restaurant. I have a vision —that one day, Chowking will be all over the country—and the key to achieving this goal is you.’” Indeed, it was this vision that led to the spread of Chowking throughout the Philippines. Initiating a franchise system that would invite more entrepreneurs to latch onto Chowking’s success, the restaurant bloomed all over the Philippines, even stretching to boundaries overseas— in California and Dubai, where large Filipino communities thrived. By 1999, Chowking had become a giant in the fast food industry, with more than a hundred branches in the Philippines, plus 3 in Dubai and 3 in the USA. “When I began Chowking, I never thought that one day, I’d have to sell it,” says Kuan. But he firmly believed that entrepreneurs should realize their limits and should know when to let go. He had achieved his own vision, and was ready to search for new adventures, now coupled with a secret passion to serve. Servant Leadership “There were around 155 branches before I decided to sell the chain,” says Kuan. It was the turn of the new millennium when he decided to sell Chowking to another fast food giant, Jollibee. The year 2000 would provide Kuan with a new era in inspiring others to lead and to serve. His dream of imparting visionary leadership to others virtually fell on Kuan’s lap when the chairmanship of St. Luke’s Medical Center (SLMC) was offered to him in 1996, after Atty.

William Quasha, chairman for 21 years, passed away. Kuan had been involved with the medical institution as a member of the board as trustee since 1989. Hewing closely to its mission of providing free medical services to the poor since it was established more than 100 years ago, St. Luke’s expanded its philanthropy to fund the building of churches and assisting churchrun medical centers technically and financially. These duties gave Kuan the much needed fulfillment he longed for after his immense achievements with for-profit establishments. With his new position, Kuan was eager to transform and envision a sustainable future for the hospital. “With the board of St. Luke’s Hospital, we held strategic planning sessions and asked ourselves where we wanted St. Luke’s to be ten or twenty years into the future? With that vision in mind, we set about transforming St. Luke’s into the world-class medical center it is today.” A thorough and powerful transformation, for, as the accreditation committee admits, St. Luke’s sets the standards for their accreditation methods. “We had disciplined ourselves to a point that our people were no longer satisfied with what was on hand, but continuously strove to seek excellence,” Kuan smiles. He also focused on the improvement of existing facilities, convinced that improving a company’s technology and equipment can lead to astounding results. “Don’t just ‘wow’ your competitors. Amaze them, dazzle them,” he grins. Under his stewardship, Kuan led the transformation of SLMC by building upon Quasha’s legacy. The St. Luke’s Medical Center which stands proudly in the heart of the Global City is one of Kuan’s most remarkable legacies as its chairman. With its world class facilities, state of the art technology, highly skilled medical professionals and customer care excellence, it has become a premier medical institution in the region today. The knowledge and acceptance of the reality that change is inevitable is steeped in visionaries like Robert Kuan. Moving forward to fulfill new goals and after serving as an exemplary and distinguished chairman, Kuan stepped down as chairman in September 2011. It was an understatement to say that the staff at St. Luke’s were surprised when he announced that he would no longer seek the chairman’s position. “They probably thought to themselves, ‘what is he doing?’” he grins. At the board re-election of St. Luke’s, Kuan simply stood up and said, “My work here is done,” believing them more than capable of carrying on the work he had

started many years ago. “A visionary leader does not just look to the future. He also sees present issues, such as the problem of succession.” The Charismatic Leader What is the secret to Robert Kuan’s Midas touch and maverick spirit? “There is really no simple formula to success”, he says, “but one thing that will help is to enjoy your work, so much so that you no longer look upon it as work.” That was Kuan’s mindset as he enjoyed checking merchandise in the warehouse of Makati Supermarket, looking for new locations for Ling Nam, sitting down in Chowking branches listening to customers, and attending board meetings in St. Luke’s. “I don’t see myself going to work. I enjoy what I do, I love listening to people,” he smiles. “Keep your people inspired, motivate and respect them, and they will do their best without being asked.” This, for Robert Kuan, is the key to a strong organization. As a leader, he is very charismatic—he tries to have everyone participate, he tries his best to be an inspirational leader, and always tries to bring out the best in his people. “Today, as I look back at all that I did, it was under my leadership that it flourished” Kuan says. “I may not have been the one who did the dirty work, I may not have had the expertise, but I had the vision, the vision that challenged everyone to move towards a better, more unified organization.” So what is next for Robert Kuan? “District governor” he laughs. After much prodding and persuasion, Kuan, a member of the Rotary Club of Makati, finally agreed to file his candidacy for district governor of Rotary District 3830 for 2013-2014. Remarkably, his is the distinction of being the only candidate for governor in District 3830 to run unopposed. To young, fresh, and hopeful graduates, Kuan has this advice: “Always zero in on your vision, whether it is your own personal aspiration, or for the institution you are a part of. Knowing what you want is just as important as being determined to get what you want. Do not be a driver who takes every exit on the highway because he does not know exactly where he wants to go. “Also, ask yourself, have I accomplished the purpose of my existence? Can you find God’s purpose for you? I myself never realized I would one day be part of a hospital. Perhaps, everything is providential, so just take things as they come—the more you cling to things, the more you will lose your grasp on them. God willing, you will be able to achieve your goals.”


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AIM Launches Book on International Financial Institutions

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FFICIAL DEVElopment assistance is critical to promoting longterm economic development and welfare, especially in the smaller economies of Asia. The three premier international financial institutions (IFIs) in Asia, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, and Asian Development Bank (ADB), have made significant contributions to development, but have also attracted their share of criticism. The Asian Institute of Management’s (AIM) new book, International Financial Institutions and Development in Asia, provides a comprehensive coverage of the three IFIs

and an analysis of Asia’s development and challenges. It is the first of its kind to conveniently gather information on the three IFIs in Asia in one publication. Authored by Prof. Nihal Amerasinghe, PhD, of the AIM Center for Development Management (CDM), the publication gives an in-depth coverage of the organizational structure, financial resources, operational procedures, financial and knowledge

“We have observed that, with a good policy environment andgood governance, development finance can work.”

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products, criticisms faced, challenges, and opportunities of the institutions. A distinct feature of the book is the study of the three IFIs in the context of their role in evolving Asia. At the book launch held at the AIM campus on December 2, 2011, Prof. Amerasinghe gave an overview of the publication, while Mr. Rajat Nag, ADB Managing Director General, and Mr. Roberto de Ocampo, executive director of the AIM Gov. Jose B. Fernandez Jr. Center for Banking and Finance, delivered testimonials and responses. AIM president Edilberto de Jesús, gave the welcome remarks. Prof. Amerasinghe traced the origin of the book to almost a decade ago, when he taught his first AIM course, International Financial Institutions and Development in Asia, to Master in Development Management (MDM) students. Directing the course gave him an opportunity to collect his materials and experiences working at the ADB for more than 20 years. “The book being launched today is the product of 10 years of teaching and research at AIM, my hands-on experience at the ADB, and close association with other IFIs for more than two decades,” explained Prof. Amerasinghe. The book has three parts: Development Finance in Asia, International Financial Institutions, and The Development Challenge. “To promote growth and equality in Asia, which is the major challenge, the IFIs and their developing countries must work in close partnership,” added Prof. Amerasinghe. “We have observed that, with a good policy environment and good governance, development finance can work.” Prof. Amerasinghe is a former development banker and international civil servant with extensive experience in development management in

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Asia and the Pacific. He is the lead faculty in Economics, Project Management, and IFIs for the MDM program. Prior to joining AIM, he was Director General of the Agriculture and Social Sectors Department at the ADB. He held senior positions at the ADB from 1979 to 2002. Before this, he served as advisor and consultant to several developing countries in the AsiaPacific region. He was also an academician at the Australian National University and the University of Sri Lanka. He holds a PhD in Economics and MS in Environmental Management from the University of London, and an MA in Economics

Prof. Amerasinghe presents a copy of the book to Mr. Roberto de Ocampo (left), executive director of the AIM Gov. Jose B. Fernandez Jr. Center for Banking and Finance, and Mr. Rajat Nag (second from left), ADB Managing Director General.

and Social Studies from the University of Manchester. For inquiries on purchasing the book, please contact Ms. Eden Aquino at eaquino@aim. edu or +632 8924011 ext. 354.


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NE W S

S P EC I A L F E AT URE

C OMMENC EMEN T

C O V ER S T OR Y

S P O T L IGH T

Management: The Asian Way

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On December 13, 2011, AIM launched the second edition of Prof. Gabino Mendoza’s book, Management: The Asian Way. His daughter, Rina, graced the event and represented her father. The book is a collection of Prof. Mendoza’s monthly articles published in the World Executive’s Digest from 1983 to 1990. It is the first AIM publication to be made available for tablet computers. INTRODUCTION By Gabino A. Mendoza Professor Emeritus Asian Institute of Management April 2008 This is not a scholarly book. It did not arise out of painstaking academic research. I did not formulate a hypothesis and seek to validate it by means of extensive surveys, exhaustive library research, and sophisticated analyses.

professional manager, business consultant, and teacher of management. After about five years of writing for WED, some friends and well-wishers pointed out that I had enough material to fill a modestsized book. Much of it, they added, roughly revolved around the subject of how management was being thought of and done in Asia. They urged me to get it organized and published. Because I am as susceptible to flattery as the next man, I succumbed to the temptation. Besides, some of the ideas in it may help some of the managers for whom the essays and lectures were originally written. This second edition of my book includes the articles from the first edition of Management: The Asian Way. A few have been revised, others, rearranged. I have added more articles as I continued to watch, listen, read and carry on discussions about management in general and managing the Asian way in particular. Trying to describe Asian Management is like staring into a kaleidoscope. Even as you gaze at it, look into it, concentrate on it, it changes on you. One moment, it seems as familiar, as conventional, and as pedestrian as the traditional management technology developed in and practiced by the West, and taught in the best of its schools. The next moment, the colors shift, the shades deepen; the view is transformed into something as strange and wondrous to the non-Asian as Kublai Khan’s Xanadu, “where Alph, the sacred river, ran through caverns measureless to man, down to a sunless sea.”

In the blink of an eye, you have before you something inscrutably unfamiliar, a management technology shaped by precepts of the immortal, Confucius, enlivened by prescriptions of the strategist Sun Tzu and the samurai Musashi, and driven by values and age-old attitudes rooted deep in the Asian soul. Up to the seventies, management theory and practice the world over were dominated by Americans and Europeans: Frederick Taylor and Henri Fayol, Henry Ford and Alfred Sloan, Jr., Elton Mayo, Herzberg, Maslow, and Rather, this is book that grew like McGregor, P.M.S. Blackett and Russell Ackoff, zacate, the wild grass that used to proliferChandler, Andrews, and Ansoff, to name but ate in Makati, unplanned, haphazard. It just a few of the “fathers” of modern management. accumulated. It accreted regularly from the In Asia, as elsewhere, their managemonthly column that I wrote for the World Executive’s Digest (WED). It burgeoned sporadi- ment technology was accepted as the only way large purposive organizations could be cally from the occasional formal lecture that efficiently and effectively run. It had proven I was invited to read in different managerial its efficacy and its power in the 1940’s, during fora. It arose from my ruminations on and reactions to the ideas, events, and people that World War II when America had transformed I ran across in my indiscriminate omnivorous itself into the “arsenal of democracy” and after the war when the American multinareading and my day-to-day experiences as a


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tionals lorded it over the markets of the world. And so, when most of Asia’s leading companies adopted Western management technology, we bought the whole bolt. For well nigh fifty years, we have squirmed and fidgeted, like little boys in new suits, trying to fit our well-rounded Asian souls and sensibilities into the straight lines and sharp angles of the Western mind. It has been, pretty much, an uncomfortable fit. In the seventies, the world gradually realized that a different way of managing organizations was possible. The Japanese, by taking some of the West’s ideas and reshaping them to fit their needs, their resources, their realities, their logic, their values, their traditions, had forged a new technology of management. Konosuke Matsushita and Taiichi Ohno of Toyota, Soichiro Honda and Masaru Ibuka of Sony, the outstanding managers of Mitsui, Mitsubishi, Sumitomo, and the Dai Ichi Group whose names are legion, had “invented” a Japanese way of managing complex manpower and material resources that gave them a competitive edge over the rest of the developed industrialized world. They very swiftly proved out the power of the Japanese Way by successfully invading the markets of the West and flooding them with goods that were higher in quality and lower in cost than anything the Americans and the Europeans could produce. The Japanese Way of managing has become the standard, the exemplar, the paradigm for the front-running firms of the fast growing countries of the Asian Pacific Rim. Its technology has been earnestly emulated by the Chaebuls of Korea and the export champions of Taiwan, by the Hongs of Hong Kong and the squeaky-clean, super-efficient companies of Singapore, and even, by the exportoriented hopefuls of Thailand and Malaysia, of Indonesia and the Philippines. Our Asian

Trying to describe Asian Management is like staring into a kaleidoscope. Even as you gaze at it, look into it, concentrate on it, it changes on you. companies have found it easy to adopt and to adapt the Japanese Way because it is founded on the thought processes, patterns of feeling, value systems congruent with ours. Like the Japanese, we are children of an ancient civilization, which is infused by Confucian patterns of thought, a mind set that gives primacy to family that esteems and extols paternal

benevolence and filial piety. Confucius said, “Where there is agreement between father and son, the family will prosper.” Akio Morita of Sony echoes this thought, “... we think of a company as a family. The workers and the management are in the same boat. It is a fate- sharing body.” He describes the shared feelings that animate the firm as, “a sense of mission, a sense of participation, and a sense of achievement”. The most successful Asian managers— Matsushita of Japan, Kim Woo Chong of Korea’s Daewoo Group, T.S. Lin of Taiwan’s Tatung, Washington SyCip of the Philippines’ SGV Group, Khun Bancha Lamsam of Thai Farmers’ Bank, Tun Ismail bin Mohammed Ali of Malaysia’s PNB, Soedarpo Sastrosatomo of Indonesia’s premier shipping line, to name but a meager sample from a universe of thousands—think and feel as Morita does. They have integrated the essence of kinship and family-centeredness into the culture of their organizations. They demand loyalty, obedience, respect, trust, and diligence from their workers. They give loyalty in return. They spare no effort to ensure that all the needs of their people are adequately met. In short, they lead their men as a father would his family. This, basically, is the secret of their success. An ancient Asian saying wryly observes that “Success has many fathers; failure is an orphan”. As we have seen, Asian management is of multiple paternities, from both the West as well as from the East. But none have been more influential than the Ancestor from antiquity who shaped the Asian’s soul. FOREWORD By Ricky Lim Dean, Asian Institute of Management November 2011 Gaby Mendoza was legendary. He could start an AIM case class by standing up front and in those incorrect days, light a cigarette and wait ten minutes without a word. It was sheer agony, until some brave soul would start the case. Gaby would push his students with “Whys?” and “Why nots?” to get them to think. He said not declarative statements, but asked provocative questions. Gaby also happened to be a first-class writer. Gaby wrote these articles for the World Executive Digest from 1983 through 1990. You might think that in 20 years, the art and science of management might have progressed beyond Gaby’s imagination. Indeed, some musings (“The Challenge of

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the Computer”) seem quaint, predating the Web and Google and iPhones. This edition of Management: The Asian Way is in digital form, compacted in three megabytes: even in 1990 one could not imagine carrying 2,000 Gaby-sized books in a six-ounce Smartphone. But some old philosopher said, plus ça change, plus ça la meme chose. The more things change, the more they stay the same. In “The Essence of Business,” Gaby talks about the collapsing LBO Company

Gaby illuminates in ways as fresh today as they were 20 years ago. Gaby illuminates in ways as fresh today as they were 20 years ago. Drexel Burnham Lambert, circa 1988. He laments that businesses like Drexel are shell games, like the Wizard of Oz—all magic and sound, no real value, and no light. Fast forward to 2008. Drexel and junk bonds are replaced by Lehman Brothers and CDOs. (The 2008 impact was, of course, worse.) The same goes for Gaby’s thoughts on entrepreneurship and strategy making and managerial decision making. Gaby illuminates in ways as fresh today as they were 20 years ago. Plus ça la meme chose. What is constant about management is that it cycles itself. Gaby articulates the cycle of management practice of Genghis Khan, Pope Leo, Churchill, Korean magnates, Lee Kuan Yew, Charles Handy, and Ansoff. Always he provokes: “This is not just Cory’s failure. This is a failure of all...Filipinos.” Always he focuses on management, on Asian management in particular, his life crusade. Never is he boring. What is also refreshing is Gaby’s clarity. Gaby writes as if he eats steaks with plain salt and pepper—no fancy sauces, no nouvelle arrangements: just unembellished, unadorned, hard-nosed, common-sensed truths. Finally, there are the questions: “Why is it so difficult for us to learn what we already know?” he asks. This is consistent Gaby, in writing as in case class, what thousands of AIM MBA graduates will remember him by. How we need more provocative questioners like him. Management: The Asian Way is available on Amazon for Kindle or +632 8924011 ext. 354.


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NE W S

S P EC I A L F E AT URE

C OMMENC EMEN T

by Jerry Quibilan, MM 1976

C O V ER S T OR Y

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sion at 4:00 a.m. the day before. That was the first event of the Ati-atihan festivities. It was then followed by the street dancing, popularly known as “sadsad”, which was accompanied by drumbeats and the melodic sounds of lyres. This portion of the celebration lasted until the first hour of Sunday and continued after the concelebrated mass at the St. John the Baptist Cathedral. In his Homily, the local festivals that we have attended. Upon Bishop of Kalibo called on the devotees of learning that we have not yet been to Ati-ati- Sto. Niño to emulate the Child Jesus. han, he encouraged us to consider it because It was indeed a beautiful and different according to him it is the best experience experience—a good one, to add to those that he and his wife have ever had. unforgettable ones that we have had, like in In Kalibo, we stayed at the only hotel the Panagbenga, Black Nazarene, Penafranlocated along main street where the tradicia, Sinulog, Dinagyang, Masskara, Buglasan tional Sunday afternoon procession of the in Dumaguete, Pahiyas in Lucban, Quezon, Ati tribes and devotees, bearing the image of Parada ng Lechon in Balayan, Batangas and the Sto. Nino, pass on their way to St. John others that we have gone to before. the Baptist Cathedral. It was such a pleasant surprise that, in addition to the above men- Jerry A Quibilan is an active traveler in and around the Philippines and abroad with his wife and MM classmate, tioned procession which took six hours, we Linda. The editorial team of the AIM Leader is fortunate also experienced viewing the Marian proces- to regularly receive a taste of his many travels.

It’s more fun in the Philippines FOR MANY YEARS, MY WIFE AND I have dreamed of going to Kalibo, Aklan for the Ati-atihan Festival, the mother of all Philippine festivals. The dream has finally come true! After having seen most of the other wellknown festivals in the Philippines, the desire to experience, once and for all, the Ati-Atihan event was further strengthened by the suggestion that we do so by a friend from Baguio City, who invited at The Manor during our visit to the City of Pines for the Panagbenga Festival 2011 last February. While enjoying our wine, instead of coffee as earlier suggested by our host, we exchanged experiences about the

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42 scholarship because I showed that I was determined to brave AIM’s rigors despite the odds—despite being young and short of experience and funds. Not many people can look at a daunting prospect at hand and have the guts to go the whole mile, take responsibility, and see things through to the end… My family is delighted about my scholarship.” A few months into the program, Avy found “a lot of the subjects challenging, especially since I have little business and finance background. I have been managing fine though, with perseverance and a good support system. Among the subjects we’ve taken up so far, Macroeconomics >> “Isagani Lantin, MBA 2012” is hands-down my favorite… Our continued from page 20 professors are the best. They have an me away from doing things that cause uncanny way of thinking and piecing stress is a relaxing activity for me. together class discussions such that “I promise to live up to the standevery session with them is an enriching ards of AIM after graduation because learning experience. I value the education AIM provides,” “Never before have I been in continued Gani, who dreams of becom- a room full of more brilliant and ing an entrepreneur and business exhardworking people than in an AIM case ecutive. “I plan to express my gratitude room,” she continued. “I learn from to my sponsor [Washington SyCip] by my classmates not only the substance continuing the tradition of providing of the discussion at hand but also the scholarships to deserving aspirants stories behind the perspectives from who want to pursue their master’s which they’re coming. I believe the degree in AIM. In return, these aspirants good mix of diversity is one of the best shall contribute to the well-being of things you can get at AIM. society by being responsible leaders ““I shall thank my sponsor, the in their own organizations and keeping Triple A Club, by making good on my the tradition of providing scholarships scholarship and hopefully living up to in AIM… I want my alma mater to be a their legacy. I would heartily support platform for future leaders here and future scholars,” she promised. abroad by maintaining its commitment Once she gets her MBA diploma, to excellence.” Avy intends to return to the familiar field of marketing, communications, and PR, but in institutions promoting Cover Story development, sustainability, and multicultural understanding. Moreover, she can then allot more time to her hobbies. “I engage in physical activities such as basketball, jogging, boxing, and aikido to ease away stress. I constantly find myself going on random walks. On weekends when I have little to do, I pick some place on the map I haven’t been to yet, then I explore and try to find my way around. Contemplating in a little spot of nature is my favorite way to relax, and discovering new things is what keeps my spirit alive.” Moments of contemplation have led Avy to believe that life may not be fair, but one must “take the worst and >> “Jonah Avegail Gaerlan, use it to make you stronger, and take MBA 2012” cont. from page 22 the best to carry with you every day.” executives through the years. I hold the “Things that happen in your life do so conviction that with AIM, perhaps I, too, for a reason—to make you learn, realize could become someone remarkable and something, and lead you to where you influential one day.” should be,” she stated. “It isn’t because Avy entered AIM in September 2011 of a pre-arranged and irreconcilable with the help of a scholarship from the fate; it is so that you yourself can Triple A Club. “I would think I got the determine your destiny.” 20

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Isagani Lati Jr., MBA 2012 GANI IS THE YOUNGEST CHILD IN a simple family. His mother runs a small store selling fresh meat, fish, and vegetables. His father was a long-time elected barangay (village) official before passing away in 2008 due to diabetes. “Although they wanted to go to college, they were unable to do so because of poverty,” Gani narrated. “Even so, they were able to raise me and my siblings in the best possible way through hard work and perseverance, and without stepping on other people’s shoes.” As a result, Gani’s brother became a policeman, and his sister now has her own small business. Gani himself completed the BS Accountancy program of San Beda College and landed in the third spot on the CPA board exam. He worked in various capacities for nine years in the Philippines and abroad. His two most recent posts were assistant manager at Manila Doctors Hospital and associate director at the auditing firm SGV & Co. Believing that learning is a continuous process and that his professional life could be improved, Gani decided to study at AIM because of its international recognition and because“its graduates are undeniably considered the movers and shakers of the business world.”

Because of Gani’s credentials, achievements, and personal background, he was conferred the W. SyCip GSB Best and Brightest scholarship. “The professors in AIM saw in me the potential to contribute to the AIM community,” he explained. “My family, especially my mother, was very proud of the recognition. It was an achievement not only for me but also for my family.

“It is the interactive experience with people of different cultural and professional backgrounds that has provided me with a lot of insights.”

“The first three months of the program was really tough, like everything was on fast forward,” he recalled. “You have to absorb every lesson at the shortest possible time. I struggled a little with subjects like Quantitative Analysis and Economics. But it was worthwhile because I learned a lot of new concepts and points of view from my professors and classmates… It’s understandable that I like finance subjects because I have a finance background. But the subject that interests me most is Managing People in Organizations because it deals with leadership skills that every manager should have. “My classmates are highly competitive,” he described. “They are so competitive that I have to raise my standards to keep up. As the Best and Brightest Scholar, I am expected to perform… The level of competitiveness during class discussions and learning team meetings helps me learn a lot of insights about the cases. It is the interactive experience with people of different cultural and professional backgrounds that has provided me with a lot of insights.” When his case pack is closed, Gani prefers to watch TV, walk, or hang out with friends. “Any activity that drives continued on page 42 >>

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The Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation Scholarship Dr. Ching Chih Chen, an esteemed member of the AIM Board of Governors from 2007 to 2009, and Chairman of the Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation, donated US$180,000.00 over three years to AIM in support of potential students who will participate in furthering the human resource development of Vietnam in the field of management. Dr. Chen was educated at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA and also heads Wan Hai Shipping Lines, headquartered in Taiwan and with 125 offices all over the world. The annual donation of US$60,000.00 provided students with full scholarships, support their living expenses, and fund the airfare to and from Vietnam. Through the Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation, which was named in memory of Dr. Chen’s father, the Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation Scholarship provided deserving students from Vietnam the opportunity to receive a Master in Business Administration (MBA), Master in Management (MM), and/or Master in Development Management (MDM) degree in AIM. Since 2009, there have been 10 recipients of the Chen-Yung Memorial Foundation Scholarship: Nguyen Thi Phuong Uyen (MBA 2010), Dao Le Tram Anh (MBA 2010), Tran Cong Bang (MDM 2010), Tran Bich Thuy (MDM 2010), Nguyen Tieu My (MBA 2011), Le Nguyen Nhat Chinh (MBA 2011), Nguyen Thi Thu Trang (MDM 2011), Tran Thi Minh Hue (MBA 2012), Ngo Thi Thanh Van (MDM 2012) and Phan Thanh Ngoc (MDM 2012).

Trang Thi Thu Nguyen, MDM 2012 AS A YOUNG GIRL GROWING UP IN ONE of the rural coastal areas of Vietnam, Trang Thi Thu Nguyen saw the importance of having a certain level of authority. She realized there was a need for power and influence to be able to address the problems of the disadvantaged sectors of society and to make changes in their lives. This inspired her to strive to be someone with power and influence, so she can make changes from the grassroots level upwards. She admired and respected people who have big dreams, who are unafraid to challenge the tough world, and passionately pursued their dreams until they reached them. Trang recognized that for her to enable change, wield influence and obtain power, she needed to study and work hard. “My ultimate goal was to work for the betterment of humanity in my own small ways,” she revealed. She went on to finish her Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Information Technology at the University of Natural Science in Vietnam. After graduation she worked as an Application Developer and IT technical trainer for Scancom Ltd Co. After two years, she moved to InvestConsultGroup as Deputy Manager of Center of Information & Market Research. She was enjoying her job responsibilities but her interest in social service never wavered. She then decided to join Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI), a public non-profit organization, and worked as a Development Planning Manager. She was responsible for organizing business-matching and cooperation programs to promote trade co-operation between Vietnamese enterprises and overseas enterprises. “I am conscientious in studying and looking for solutions in the issues that Vietnamese enterprises have been facing unsatisfactorily, particularly in human resource development and business management. I am interested in projects relating to enterprises because their positive changes can considerably impact social and economic issues, especially poverty. I am motivated to help poor people continued on page 42>>

W. SyCip GSB Best and Brightest Scholar

AIM’s W. SyCip GSB Best and Brightest scholarship grant offers the top undergraduate students with high GMAT/AIMAT scores, and solid work background MBA or MM full tuition scholarship, economy air fare from and to the students’ home country, lodging at the AIM dormitory, and a monthly stipend. Mr. Washington SyCip, one of the founders of the Institute is the generous funder of this program.

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Jonah Avegail Gaerlan, MBA 2012

“I hold the conviction that with AIM, perhaps I, too, could become someone remarkable and influential one day.”

WHEN AVY WAS YOUNG, HER PARENTS separated, but she still considers her childhood happy. “I believe it made me value the essential things in life at an early age. Thus, I do not believe in misconceptions about ‘broken homes,’ and I would very much like to erase the stigma attached to it.” Another consequence of the separation is Avy’s admiration of her mother. “[She] single-handedly raised a whole family and made it feel like the toughest of times can come and go like a breeze. She made me into who I am today and taught me the most important things I needed to know about life.” A graduate of Hospitality and Tourism Management from St. Louis University, Baguio City, Avy worked for the Provincial Government of La Union’s Information and Tourism Office before studying at AIM. “We were in charge of La Union’s tourism operations and marketing, organizing major events, creating press releases and correspondence for the governor, and performing other administrative functions,” she explained. “I had wanted to pursue higher studies to broaden my knowledge and improve my future prospects,” she said. “After I read testimonies of alumni in the AIM ad in Baguio Midland Courier, my first impression of the school was that it is an enabler of success. It trains people to become competent in facing the world’s challenges and to go beyond what most people are capable of achieving… I chose AIM because of its tradition of excellence that enabled it to produce distinguished top continued on page 42>>

Triple A Club Scholars

With Jesli Lapus, MBM 1973 as President, the Triple A Club, whose members represent the most outstanding alumni of the Institute, granted its first scholarship to Ariel de la Cruz in 2006. Jonah Avegail Gaerlan and Katrina Gracia Macaraig are the fortunate recipients of their scholarship for this year.

Knowing that AIM is one of the best in Asia, I wanted to study here as it is the lifetime opportunity for me.

>> “Trang Thi Thu Nguyen, MDM 2012” cont. from page 24

in coastal areas, the place I lived for a long time,” she shared. When the opportunity to study in AIM presented itself, Trang unhesitatingly grabbed it. “My unique blend of experiences in professional development, strong commitment, and clear ultimate goal for my future career path and potential contribution gave me confidence to pursue my application to the Masters in Development Management (MDM) program. I wanted to enhance my academic qualification, build networks, and strengthen my career path. Knowing that AIM is one of the best in Asia, I wanted to study here as it is the lifetime opportunity for me. I learned of AIM’s reputation through my friends who are AIM alumni,” she admitted. After a series of interviews, she was accepted into the MDM program and received full scholarship from the Chen Yung Memorial Foundation, courtesy of Dr. Ching-Chih Chen, Chairman of Wan Hai Lines and former Member of the AIM Board of Trustees. “When I arrived at AIM, I thought the experience was going to be like in any other university, where you have a lot of free time to study or do other things on your own, but it was completely different. AIM is fully an academicoriented school where students are required to do all the academic work, either in CAN groups and individually. I realized that the key to success here is to work smartly and diligently. If you cannot manage workflow and stress in a small laboratory environment like AIM, you cannot succeed in the tough world,” she disclosed. “Studying in AIM is very challenging. It tests your aptitude and ability and pushes you to make full use of your potential. Most of my subjects are very useful. I like Base of Pyramid, Business Economics, Macro-Micro Economics, PPDM, Regional Integration Asia, System

Thinking, and Strategic Management best. These courses provided me with effective tools, as well as shaped my mindset in the way I analyze a problem. I learned how to use techniques such as looking at problems as a whole or as inter-dependent links, or thinking out of box, or seeing the opportunities in threats, etc.,” she proudly stated. “My class consists of students from different countries coming from varying professional backgrounds. They are friendly and unique in their own ways. I learned a lot from being with them, listening to their experiences, working with them and drawing insights from their learning. Likewise, I learned so much from all of my professors. They are all qualified and well experienced and they know their subjects well. Most importantly they understand the students.” Trang further divulged that studying in AIM made her a better individual. “The rigor and pressure I went through while studying made me a better and stronger person, and I feel I am ready to face any challenges [that I would face] in my life. I believe I am in a better position to take up any kind of career.” “The biggest benefits I gained from AIM are the following: gaining better insight on development environment issues, acquiring a deeper knowledge of what I can do to bring benefits of my service to enterprises and to society, and last but not least, learning the essential skills in development and business management, especially in areas where I am concerned about. Core subjects are extremely attached to my future career in planning training courses or international cooperation projects. AIM gave me the tools to create firm connections between organizations and enterprises, as well as lessons on how to open a network to create public value at the same time maximize the sustainable public good.” She revealed that during her free time, she joins community and volunteer activities. “I do this to keep my heart warm and contribute to social good. Every year, I travel as a backpacker to remote areas to talk with people, to see beautiful landscapes, to learn diverse cultures, to see how small the world is and to gain personal maturity and appreciation for our world. In AIM, I do some exercises like jogging, playing badminton and swimming. I also listen to music to relax my mind, keep myself refreshed, and energized. I also like to read books to give food to my mind.” When asked about her future plans, Trang shared that she would like to continue working in VCCI or in any like-minded NGOs. “My concern in strengthening the role of enterprises in solving social and economic problems


A IM L eader Magazine | Second Quar ter 2012

will remain as my main motivation. I will develop programs for training and international cooperation. These programs will help in developing my country’s human resource, increase empowerment, and nurture social responsibility of enterprises. The expected result is for enterprises to create small changes in their system. These changes will work as pressure points to eventually trigger and cascade larger social transformation. In a long-term perspective, this will contribute to sustainable growth and development of Vietnam. The public value will be created and public good will be maximized through strong networks of our organization and enterprises.” A far cry from the young girl who only dreamed of change, Trang emerged from AIM with a deep-seated purpose and clear outline of how to reach her goals. “By the time that I gain enough experience as well as sufficient capital, I would like to start my own business as a social entrepreneur. I see myself working passionately, being an inspiration and giving determination to effect positive changes in the social issues that my country faces. I expect to play an intermediary role to help Vietnam to overcome the obstacles it confronts and then attempt to implement solutions and projects successfully. My potential contribution to my country is promising,” she stated. “The only way I can thank Dr. Ching Chih Chen is to be the best in whatever work I take up in the future,” she disclosed. She goes on to share this piece of leadership insight: “In the age of globalization, a leader will be a designer who will come up with new things, who possesses critical thinking, creativity, team work and self-learning.”

new knowledge, especially those on management and organization development, is crucial to elevating my working performance to a new level.” Prior to studying in AIM, she was with the Center for Community Empowerment (CECEM), a leading capacity building organization in Vietnam. The company offers services on project management, community development, training and communication methodologies, organizational development, etc. She also contributed to develop HanoiGrapevine.com, a bilingual website updating the public about arts and cultural events in Vietnam. She finished Bachelor of Arts with a degree in International Business & Economics at the Foreign Trade University in Vietnam. “I decided to apply for a scholarship in AIM because the school is famous for teaching management frameworks, with very active and participatory methodologies (casebased method as in Havard business school) and excellent professors with experience in consulting for government and businesses”, she revealed. “My colleague, who studied MDM before, shared about student life in AIM, which inspired me even more to apply. After being interviewed by Prof. Junbo Borromeo, I became more inspired and firmly believed that AIM is a good learning environment for me.” She was consequently accepted into the Masters in Business Administration program and received a full scholarship from the Chen Yung Memorial Foundation, courtesy of Dr. Ching-Chih Chen, Chairman of Wan Hai Lines and former Member of the AIM Board of Trustees. When she set foot in the Philippines for the first time, she admitted that Makati captivated her. “Makati is like New York in my eyes and AIM is like Havard (though I haven’t been there) but very Asia. Filipinos were nice people with warm smiles, and AIM had good facilities and very professional environment. I was a bit amazed to see many Indian students here. I love this place! I affirmed again that my decision to come here to study is right!” she exclaimed. She remembers how she was intimidated during the first weeks of classes. ”At first I was scared of taking Quantitative Analysis (QA) and Language of Business (LOB). They are all about numbers which I am not good at”, she reasoned. “When I realized >> “Hue Thi Minh Tran, MBA 2012” that QA is applied a lot in marketing, continued from page 25 and the task of understanding financial statements in LOB is integral for think of best ways to apply whatever managing a company, I liked them lessons I learnt to reality: in my daily better. I became more confident in life, as well as my work. Mastering A IM L eader Magazine | Second Quar ter 2012

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Hue Thi Minh Tran, MBA 2012

“STAY HUNGRY. STAY FOOLISH.” This line, made famous by the late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc., perfectly describes this scholar’s attitude towards the rigors of studying Masters in Business Administration in AIM. Hue Thi Minh Tran walks the halls with an air of springy enthusiasm and effervescent geniality. Despite the number of cases she had to read every day, not to mention lack of sleep, she relishes each discovery she makes and new information she grasps in and out of the caseroom. Her passion towards learning stems from her personal commitment to improve the society and engage in activities that ensures sustainable development in the community. She brightens when she talks about her experience while in AIM. “The harder I tried to understand the concepts, the more excited I became. I often start with the question: Why do I have to study this subject? What are the key messages/key points I have to remember in this exercise?” she shared. She told us that her previous professional experiences in Vietnam also helped her appreciate the course work. “I often reflect on the things I was doing in Vietnam whenever I study to make sense of the concepts I was trying to understand. Then I would try to continued on page 43>>

“Makati is like New York in my eyes and AIM is like Havard (though I haven’t been there) but very Asia. Filipinos were nice people with warm smiles, and AIM had good facilities and very professional environment.”

sharing what I learned during class discussions, and more versed with interpreting the concept in the book in a way that is more understandable. I also learned to check with the professors and classmates.” Hue credits her professors, as well as her classmates, for her enthusiasm towards her studies. “I appreciate that my professors are great, experienced and professional. They are excellent facilitators who helped me improve my thinking process. I am now able to dig deeper and get better at getting insights when I am doing my case analysis. All of them had different teaching methods that enabled me to have a better understanding of my subjects.” As a trainer and facilitator herself, she also learned techniques from the processes and methodologies that her professors use. “I believe it is more effective when professors share insights from their consultancy experience, rather than relying on books or theories when they expound certain topics.” She says her classmates also help her cope with the pressures better. “We call our Cohort the Outliner. My classmates are very cool! They are warm and funny. Most of them are smart and experienced, but modest and open to share in class. Many are helpful and organize tutor classes.” She is thankful for her the opportunity to have a Masters degree. She says it will enable her to realize her dream of becoming a famous expert and sought-after consultant in the development field. She is hopeful for a chance to meet Dr. Ching Chih Chen and share with him the things she learned and her plans for the future. She shares that when she goes back to her country, she will do what she can to contribute to the development of Vietnam. “I actually want to document and write several cases from Vietnam that can be used in AIM for discussions. I’m still grappling with ideas, but I hope I have a chance and support to do it.” Meanwhile, she looks forward to finishing her degree and getting married after graduation. Her support system from her family, as well as constant encouragement from her boyfriend, keeps her from being homesick. “I do not worry about my family because my parents are very optimistic and they care about each other. My boyfriend inspires me to do well in my studies. Overall I am thankful for this opportunity and happy to be in AIM. I am very hopeful and very excited about the future ahead of me”, she finished.

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Nguyen Tieu My, MBA 2012 “I AM THE FIRST IN MY FAMILY TO get the chance to have a degree in Masters in Business Administration,” shared Nguyen Tieu My. May, as she likes to be called, was granted a full scholarship by the Chen Yung Memorial Foundation, courtesy of Dr. Ching Chih Chen, Chairman of Wan Hai Lines and former Member of AIM Board of Trustees. Prior to studying at AIM, she worked as a Senior Marketing Executive at Berjaya Group of Companies. She finished her Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in English Linguistics and Literatures at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities. As a child, she wanted to become a philanthropist in the United States of America. Growing up, she idolized current US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who was a strong proponent of promoting women empowerment in the United States and elsewhere. Having the opportunity to become exposed to global affairs motivated May to apply to AIM. “I want to improve my management skills and expose myself to business practices of the international continued on page 43>>

“I believe that the lessons taught at AIM will develop and sustain Asia. I recommend for more potential candidates to study in AIM as it is good for Vietnam’s development.”

>> “Nguyen Tieu My, MBA 2012” continued from page 26

community. My former boss is an MM alumnus, who told my career opportunities will be significantly expanded after studying in AIM,” she disclosed. During her first weeks at AIM, she already felt the rigor of competition among the students. This motivated her to push further and study harder. She counts Marketing Management, Business Economics and Management Communication as her favorite subjects. She shared that she learned much during her stint at AIM. “My classmates are very fast, aggressive, and competitive. I was impressed with their English communication skills, and this motivated me to speak more actively during class. I also learned to use logic and structured thinking, and the value of time management.” She further revealed that she coped with the rigors of the course through her willingness to learn and capability to work under pressure. “My professors were all knowledgeable, disciplined and thoughtful. I am very grateful for the exposure that I get and the knowledge that I learn to be able to achieve my goals of working in education consultancy or a media agency. Thanks to my professors, I learned many management concepts I can apply to my future career, improve my communication skills, and adapt to pressure well,” she proudly stated. This early, May strongly recommends for Vietnamese students to study at AIM. “I believe that the lessons taught at AIM will develop and sustain Asia. I recommend for more potential candidates to study in AIM as it is good for Vietnam’s development. I am willing to be active in the alumni network and help promote AIM to Vietnam,” she guaranteed. May believes that showing potential candidates how AIM improves lives of its students, and encouraging them t study in AIM, can show her sponsor how truly grateful she is for the opportunity to study at AIM. “If not for Dr. Ching-Chih Chen’s generosity, I would not be able to have a better and brighter future,” she revealed.


This page (from left): Hue Thi Minh Tran, Trang Thi Thu Nguyen, Jonah Avegail Gaerlan and Angela Sanchez


AIM Leader Second Quarter 2012