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T he A lumni Maga zine of t he Asian Institute of Management

FOURT H QUA RT ER 2 012 Vol. 6 Issue 4

Leadership and Innovation @ AIM

Innovative Passions The Asian Century Has Begun Beyond Effective Leadership


EDITORIAL TEAM

FOURTH QUARTER 2012

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 4

Greg Atienza EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Susan Africa-Manikan ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Sherbet Katigbak-Manalili MANAGING EDITOR

Haji Zulkifly Baharom SENIOR OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT

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Karen Cabuyao EDITORIAL STAFF

Maritess Aniago-Espiritu Bea delos Reyes Jennifer Jalandoni Annaliza Alegre Amy Nerona Jun Javellana ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE STAFF

Eloisa Barbin Mariska Andreana Barretto Meghann Lee Isagani Eliezer Manikan Rose Cheryl Orbigo Carmela Ortigas Krizia Eleni Patrocinio

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CONTRIBUTORS

Chili Dogs DESIGN, ART DIRECTION & ILLUSTRATION

Jennifer Jalandoni Jovel Lorenzo Amy Nerona PHOTOGRAPHERS

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Lexmedia Digital PRINTING

ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Dr. Steven DeKrey

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PRESIDENT OF THE INSTITUTE

Dr. Ricardo Lim DEAN OF THE INSTITUTE

SPECIAL FEATURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 The Asian Century Has Begun Beyond Effective Leadership COVER STORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Leadership and Innovation @ AIM

Mahendra Pratap Singh CHAIRMAN, FEDERATION OF AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC.

GIVING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Eduardo Sison

SPOTLIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Eduardo N. Sison, MBM 1973: Simply Mr. Chairman Radha Paudel, MDM 2010: Giving Love in the Time of Conflict John Plaza, BMP 1995: The Mystery Man that Could Siddarth Wahedra, MBA 2012: Yes He Can Justin Garrido, ISEP 2011: Innovating Social Entrepreneurship through Crowdfunding

CHAIRMAN, AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION – PHILIPPINE CHAPTER

Marvee Celi-Bonoan VICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

The AIM Alumni Leadership Magazine (AIM Leader) is a quarterly publication of the Asian Institute of Management with editorial office at the Alumni Relations Office, Asian Institute of Management, 123 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City, 1260 Philippines Telephone No.: 892.4011 locals 331, 540 and 533 Telefax: 893.7410 | Email: aimalumni@aim.edu Copyright 2012, AIM Alumni Leadership Magazine. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any manner, in whole or in print, in English or other languages, without written permission is prohibited. ISSN 1908-1081

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SHOWCASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 6th AIM President’s Cup Central Banking for Every Juan and Maria Innovative Service Design Workbook: Five Step Process CLASS NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: JOVEL LORENZO ON THE COVER: (Clockwise) Dr. Steve DeKrey, Marius Swam, Pranav Chaturvedi, Jonah Avegail Gaerlan, Karolina Trofiniak, Theda Ockenga, and Siddharth Wadehra


Leader P R E S I D E N T ’ S

M E S S A G E

Greetings, alumni! Since I got on board last August, my wife Veronica and I have settled well into our beautiful new home country. AIM colleagues have been very warm and welcoming, and we appreciate all the support to make our move to the Philippines most comfortable. I have also had many wonderful opportunities to meet alumni through events and conferences here and around Asia. These happy occasions include the 6th President’s Cup golf tournament last October 12 where 109 alumni, faculty and guests—the largest attendance yet—took some time off from their busy schedules to welcome me. In Shanghai last October, I met alumni leaders Catherine Chen (MBM ’98), Jack Niu (MM ’98), and Peter Jiang (MM ’95), who gave me a warm welcome. I also had lunch with alumni in Bangkok on the sidelines of the Asian Forum on Corporate Social Responsibility, and in Manila, I met with the batches that will be honored in the 2013 Grand Homecoming. Last November 8, I spoke about Leadership Dimensions in Asia at the AIM Asian Business Forum in Jakarta organized by Ikatan AIM Alumni headed by Dennis Firmansjah (MM ’94), and met the dedicated FAIM Chapter Heads MP Singh (MBM ‘76, India), Haji Zulkifly Baharom (MM ‘89, Malaysia), and Ed Sison (MBM ‘73, Philippines) during the meeting of the Federation of AIM Alumni. The Triple A Club, led by Jing Lapus (MBM ’73) and Sonny Coloma (MBM ’78) honored me with a memorable reception, and the leaders of the AIM Alumni Leadership Foundation Inc., headed by Ofel Bisnar (MBM ’88) treated me to a Christmas lunch. Last December 15, I was in Mumbai for the Idea Exchange Conference, also well organized by the AIM Alumni Association India. In these casual yet significant meetings, I had the opportunity to discuss the future of AIM with its largest group of stakeholders. We are listening, and in a nutshell, these are the three areas which have resonated in my dialogues with alumni so far—(1) renew and strengthen our ties with Harvard; (2) improve the quality and diversity of students; and (3) using the campaign slogan of the AIM Alumni Leadership Foundation: Bring AIM Back to Greatness. The support and enthusiasm from the alumni community have been overwhelming. My first order of business was to look for people who will not only care but also do things that need to be done. And I am positive that I have found in the alumni people who care for AIM.

In response to my dialogues with the graduates, I am happy to tell you that this is what we have done so far. We are actively reviving our partnership with Harvard. Last December 4, AIM hosted Prof. Ranjay Gulati, unit head for Organizational Behavior of the Harvard Business School (HBS), for a lecture entitled Leading Resilient Family Corporations. This was closely followed by another lecture by Harvard Professor James Robinson, who spoke on Institutions and Economic Development last December 7. I also had meetings with the deans of HBS and Darden who are receptive to having closer relationships with us. These positive developments will definitely augur well for AIM’s future partnerships with these schools. To improve student quality and the AIM brand, we are adopting two bold moves. First, the Board of Trustees approved the reduction in the next MBA intake to only a single section of only 65-70 students with the best skill sets. Second, the board agreed to raise the MBA tuition fees to make up for the revenue loss. The MBA tuition in 2013 will be set at $31,000. At its quality level, AIM is well underpriced with the current MBA tuition of $24,000. Increasing our tuition will definitely be a reflection of our status in the region. To ensure the success of these plans, we will be relying on alumni support to provide scholarships. This will encourage top candidates and lessen the market imThe support and pact. We will be initiating enthusiasm from the a fundraising campaign alumni community have to increase donations, and been overwhelming. we have brought in our My first order of business was to look for new VP for Institutional people who will not only Advancement, Marianne care but also do things Quebral, to assist us. that need to be done. Bringing AIM back to And I am positive that I greatness is in your hands. have found in the alumni people who care for AIM. Asia is becoming the most competitive market in the world for graduate management education, and AIM needs to evolve and innovate to regain our leadership role. We have the ingredients, we have the will, and I have presented to you the way. I am truly honored to be installed as AIM’s ninth president, and together with the alumni, I look forward to building its future with your partnership. Together, let’s put AIM at the Top 5 in five years, in time for our school’s golden anniversary. Happy New Year!

Dr. Steve DeKrey PRESIDENT, ASIAN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT


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A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

F R O M

Your gift to AIM, no matter how small, will make a difference not only to a deserving scholar, but also for the future of our school.

T H E

E D I T O R - I N - C H I E F

The last quarter of 2012 saw a remarkable resurgence of the AIM alumni community around the world. Buoyed by the optimism of a new leadership under Dr. Steve DeKrey, AIM graduates have made their influential presence felt in the U.S. West Coast, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, China, England and India. In no other period of AIM’s history has the alumni been as reinvigorated as it is today. The period also witnessed many triumphs for our students and graduates whom we feature in this issue. In the Spotlight section, we focus on Siddharth Wadehra, MBA 2012 whose essay won for him the Peter Drucker Challenge 2012 with his piece “Reinventing Work, Reinventing the Organization”; Justin Garrido, ISEP 200, whose “Social Project PH” won the Melbourne University Entrepreneurship Challenge in May 2012; and Radha Paudel, MDM 2010, who was chosen as one of 2012’s Women PeaceMakers of the University of San Diego Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice. We are also pleased to feature a unique donor in the person of John Plaza, a graduate of the Basic Management Program who, for many years has been quietly, admirably and modestly supporting the AIM Alumni Fund for Scholarships. And of course, we are honored to do a piece on the Chairman of the AIM Alumni Association, Philippine Chapter, Ed Sison, MBM 1973. In his many meetings with alumni across Asia, AIM President Steve DeKrey has displayed leadership and innovation as he is determined to bring our school to the “Top Five in Five Years”. With his new vision of becoming “Asia’s Source for Global Leadership, Talent, Insights, and Wisdom”, the board has already taken bold steps in making sure that these goals are achieved to improve the AIM brand and results on quality criteria as assessed by global rankings. These measures are further elaborated by articles in this issue, and we hope for your support in making sure that these wonderful plans for our school’s future will succeed. It is crucial at this time in our history, for you, my dear fellow alumni to step up to the challenge. You have been witness to how AIM has vastly changed your life, improved your professional careers and provided life changing lessons in leadership and management. To achieve the greatness that we are aspiring for, I invite you to help us by reaching deep into your pockets to help our scholarship program. Your gift to AIM, no matter how small, will make a difference not only to a deserving scholar, but also for the future of our school. It’s time to pay forward. Together, let us bring AIM back to greatness!

Greg Atienza EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, AIM ALUMNI LEADERSHIP MAGAZINE EXECUTIVE MANAGING DIRECTOR, ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE SECRETARY GENERAL, FEDERATION OF AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS, INC.

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DR. STEVEN DEKREY INSTALLED AS 9TH AIM PRESIDENT

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HE INVESTITURE ceremonies of Dr. Steven J. DeKrey as president of the Asian Institute of Management were held at the New World Hotel in Makati City on December 9, 2012. Dr. DeKrey assumed office as the ninth AIM president on August 20, 2012. Prior to joining AIM, he served as the senior associate dean, director of masters programs, and adjunct professor of management at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) School of Business and Management.

I swear to dedicate myself towards the betterment of the AIM community of stakeholders—our faculty and staff, our students and alumni, our social investors.

He obtained his PhD in School and Sport Psychology from the University of Iowa (1982), his MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University (1985), his MS in School Psychology (1977) from the University of Wisconsin, and BA degree in Psychology (1975, cum laude) from Bemidji State. Present during the investiture ceremonies were Chairman Napoleon Nazareno, who handed over the AIM mace to Dr. DeKrey; outgoing president Edilberto de Jesus, who turned over the AIM charter and president's medallion to Dr. DeKrey; Dean

and Senior VP Ricardo Lim; and Deans Horacio M. Borromeo Jr. (W. SyCip Graduate School of Business), Juan Miguel M. Luz (Center for Development Management), and Grace Ugut (Executive Education and Lifelong Learning Center). Upon accepting the AIM mace, which symbolizes the authority of the presidency, Dr. DeKrey pledged “to uphold the noble sense of purpose of the Asian Institute of Management as a center of excellence in human resource development and training in Asia. I swear to dedicate myself towards the better-

ment of the AIM community of stakeholders—our faculty and staff, our students and alumni, our social investors—so that together we shall continue to enrich our intellectual capital and ensure that its beneficial consequences are enjoyed by successor generations.” President DeKrey’s investiture coincided with the 2012 Commencement Exercises for the graduates of the Master in Business Administration (MBA), Master in Management (MM), Master in Development Management (MDM), and Executive MBA.


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

Asia’s Source for Global Leadership Talent, Global Insights, and Global Wisdom Delivered by AIM President Steven J. DeKrey during his Investiture and the 2012 Graduation Ceremonies last December 9, 2012 AIM IS A VERY SPECIAL institution, and I am very proud and honored to be installed as its ninth president and to participate in my first graduation ceremony. I am familiar with the history of this fine institution, and I am delighted to participate in building its future. I first learned about AIM in the early ‘80s when I was working for Northwestern and Wharton in setting up the Sasin Graduate Institute of Management in Bangkok. During my annual three-week stay in Bangkok over a five-year period, I discovered that AIM was the inspiration and role model for Sasin. Started in 1983, Sasin had observed the success of AIM and wanted to emulate it in Thailand. AIM was the first true, multiple-school partnership between universities here— Ateneo and La Salle—and overseas, Harvard, to provide management education for Asia. Back in those days, Asia was powered by the four Asian tigers: Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan. These economies advanced from developing to developed economies over a period of 30 years. And they are still advancing. When investors talk about the tiger economies in Asia, several now reference the Philippines. When they talk of China plus one for manufacturing, the one is often considered the Philippines. While perhaps this country has been a tiger cub in the past few years like many in this room, it is clear that, given the new administration and government priorities, the Philippines is once again on the move. The Philippines is

becoming a tiger, just like our graduates. This country has again become a great place for a top business school, which is why we are all so enthusiastic about AIM’s future. The vision we have for AIM is for the institute to be Asia’s source. Source for what, you may ask. AIM is becoming Asia’s Source for Global Leadership Talent, Global Insights, and Global Wisdom. We have the ingredients; we have the will. Now we need the way. I am delighted to tell you all that it is happening. We are working on strategies that will solidify our path to become Asia’s source. Moreover, I am very happy to announce that, on this day, AIM has officially produced 40,000 alumni—a milestone we are all proud of!

Our role at AIM is to inspire you to keep learning and evolve into the responsible leaders we all dream you can be. Each of you is your own case study. Write a good one. After today, I will no longer be an intern president but a formally installed and enthusiastically engaged leader for AIM. The opportunity to seize head-on the challenges and exciting ride ahead for AIM is one reason why I accepted this position. I am proud to be here, and dedicated to making AIM the best it can be. My honeymoon period is over. Graduates, this same attitude should be yours. You may have heard about a talk by my friend from Harvard, Professor Gulati. In the beginning of his

Chairman Nazareno hands over the mace, the symbol of authority of the presidency of the Institute, to Dr. DeKrey (top); Outgoing President DJ de Jesus puts the President’s Medallion on Dr. DeKrey to signify the transfer of authority and its attendant duties and responsibilities to his successor.

talk, he spoke of the success of MBA graduates. In his research, he found that just one of three top-school, MBA graduates achieve significant success in their careers. The key is not the school but the person. Those who embrace the multitude of talents needed for significant leadership roles as they progress in their careers are the most likely to have significant success. Lifelong learning is the goal, and reflecting on life’s lessons is the way. So, graduates, I hope that most of you will rise to the top third of graduates as you grow in your careers. Our role at AIM is to inspire you to keep learning and evolve into the responsible leaders we all dream you can be. Each of you is your own case study. Write a good one. While you’re writing your case study, stay connected with your AIM classmates—the same people who stayed up late

with you agonizing over Written Analysis of a Case, the same people who were by your side at field work and practiced with you for presentations, and the same people who cheered you on with a can of beer or a piece of turkey at the Zen Garden. I hope you will also keep in touch with your AIM professors and program staff—the same people who terrified you with a cold call in the caseroom, the same people who drilled you in your defense, the same people who ran after you to attend class and submit requirements, but also the same people who cared enough to help you graduate. That’s why you’re here—our brand new alumni, my first class. Years from now, I hope you will be able to tell your AIM professors, friends, and staff, “I’ve written an excellent case study—my own story— and I couldn’t have done it without AIM.”

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AFCSR 2012 in Bangkok, Highlights Innovations to Create Significant Impacts for Businesses and Societies across Asia This year’s forum had the theme, “Innovative Approaches to Create Value for Business and Society.” This year’s AFCSR provided the guiding framework for managers and executives to implement corporate social responsibility (CSR) projects that would create value for a company’s internal and external stakeholders. “Through the years, we’ve observed that innovations have been applied to companies’ CSR strategies, with many of these innovations focusing on products and technologies that would benefit rural poor communities,” H.E. Anand Panyarachun, former Prime Minister of Thailand notes Prof. Felipe B. Alfonso, Conference Director of the AFCSR 2012. “We need to also Corporate Social ResponsibilTHE ASIAN FORUM FOR focus on how we could innovate ity (AIM-RVR CSR Center) and Corporate Social ResponsibilIntel Corporation, the forum was supply chain processes and proity (AFCSR) 2012 was held at mote greater engagement among attended by over 500 delegates the Shangri-La Hotel, Bangkok, from business, government, the all our stakeholders, in order to Thailand last October 25, 2012. academe, civil society, multilat- energize the organization and Co-hosted by the Asian Instipromote goodwill among all eral organizations, and media tute of Management—Ramon those concerned. throughout Asia. V. del Rosario, Sr. Center for

ASIAN CSR AWARDS 2012 FIVE COMPANIES FROM SINGAPORE, Thailand, India, and the Philippines received the 10th AIM Asian CSR Awards last October 27, 2012. The Asian CSR Awards are a featured event in the Asian Forum on Corporate Social Responsibility (AFCSR), which brought together 572 delegates from 30 countries, representing various sectors of society, including businesses, governments, NGOs/civil society, multilateral organizations, and the academe. AIM’s Asian CSR Awards Program recognizes Asian companies for embodying the principles of corporate responsibility in their business philosophy and operations. Companies that have received the award continuously innovate and implement sustainable approaches toward becoming socially responsible. Thailand’s Deputy Prime Minister Kittiratt Na-Ranong graced the awarding ceremonies as the Guest of Honor and presented the trophies to the winners.

Architect Joel N. Luna, vice president of the Innovation and Design Group of Ayala Land Inc. in the Philip“This is not my first AFCSR. In the pines, accepted the Asian CSR Award past 10 times, I attended four of them for the Environment and Value Chain as participant,” revealed Khun Kittiratt Management category. in his speech. “CSR reflects the shared The award recognizes how goal of the government and private a company manages its value chain sector to improve the lives of people. in order to optimize its social and “Sustainable growth and environmental footprint. development is what we all want. It Ayala Land has implemented is important to pursue CSR and good innovative approaches to sustainabilgovernance together,” he emphasized, ity in its land development activities, adding, “Who cares wins,” in reference especially by providing opportunities to the value that CSR brings for both for everyone, regardless of social business and society. class, to live in a more sustainable The awards recipients accepted environment. Ayala Land impletheir trophies from Khun Kittiratt; ments sustainable construction and MR Pridiyathorn Devakula, member development practices, as well as a of the AIM Board of Governors and solid waste management program and former Deputy Prime Minister of an energy efficiency program, through Thailand; Dr. Steven DeKrey, AIM conservation practices, innovative president; Mr. Ramon del Rosario Jr., technologies, and investments. PHINMA chairman; and Ms. Suzanne Ayala Land has established the first Fallender, director of CSR Strategy eco-city in the Philippines, adopting and Communications of Intel USA. environmental and social development principles. It has also successfully integrated conservation and biodiversity protection programs with its land development projects.

“Improving supply chain processes reduces waste and improves the quality of products, apart from boosting the growth of small and medium enterprises,” he continued. “Meanwhile, engaging multiple stakeholders allow us to forge and enhance partnerships, including developing joint programs that would allow us to build shared value. “What sets the AFCSR apart from other similar initiatives is that the discussions are founded on a robust academic framework, with like-minded practitioners regularly coming together to find ways in which we could scale up and replicate impactful projects for stakeholders,” Alfonso added. The event was graced by H.E. Anand Panyarachun, former Prime Minister of Thailand and Chairman of the Board of Siam Commercial Bank. In his speech, Khun Anand remarked on the increased importance of CSR Mr. Vasireddy Vijay Vardhan, operations manager of the ITC Social Investments Programme of ITC Limited from India, received the Asian CSR Award for the Governance and Society category. The award recognizes a company’s capacity to manage its relationships with society through initiatives in education, employment, access to technology, income generation, health, and social investment, as well as its ability to adhere to transparency and accountability standards. ITC Limited has a solid Triple Bottom Line strategy and has been able to design its Social Investments Programs with innovative models that simultaneously create shareholder value and embed social and environmental benefits in its multiple value chains. This has enabled the company to build sustainable livelihood and promote economic growth in rural communities. Dr. Chandramogan Anamirtham, president and general manager of HGST Philippines Corp., accepted the Asian CSR Award for the Labor and Employee Engagement category. The award recognizes how


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

as a result of incidences such as the 1997 financial crisis, the 2007 global economic crisis, and the Occupy Wall Street movement. “Today’s consumers are demanding that companies consider their impact on society as much as their own business interests,” he remarked. “We are now living in a world that knows no borders. As we become even more connected, we can see that globalization is having a profound impact on corporate social responsibility.” Khun Anand also shared the experience of Thailand in CSR. “We can proudly call ourselves a developed middleincome developing economy, and we can arguably serve as a model for aspiring economies in the Greater Mekong Sub-region and beyond,” he said. “With respect to CSR, Thailand is not immune to rising expectations and the need to be even more socially conscious and civicminded. The new generation of employees expects their employers to address social and environmental issues—to be responsible corporate citizens,

to use renewable energy, and even to offer a lifestyle in terms of working hours and income to meet family needs and increasing consumption.” AFCSR 2012 also made available the AIM-RVR CSR Center’s latest researches and publications, including: the second edition of the Center’s manual for practitioners, “Towards Strategic CSR; Aligning CSR with the Business and Embedding CSR into the Organization”; “Corporate Social Responsibility in Mining for APEC Economies”, a trainers’ guidebook; “Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives for Large Firms”, a study commissioned by GIZ, Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the Philippines’ Department of Trade and Industry; research reports entitled, “Corporate Social Responsibility in Southeast Asia: An Eight Country Analysis” and “Exploring Strategic CSR: Sustaining and Strengthening Corporate Social Responsibility”; and the Center’s latest research outputs, the occasional

Mr. Tan Tong Hai, chief operating officer of StarHub Ltd from Singapore, accepted the Intel-AIM Corporate Responsibility Award (IACRA)

a company manages employee relationships and ensures their welfare and protection. HGST Philippines Corporation strives to address environmental, social, and economic sustainability issues. It does this by implementing programs for employee care, development, empowerment, and engagement with the business, with the local com-

munity, and with society at large. HGST has implemented a CSR Starts at Home Program, which addresses employees’ needs and concerns for personal and professional development. The needs covered by the program include family welfare, education, and housing. The program has lifted employee morale, which has then led to increased employee engagement and productivity.

papers entitled, “Developing an Integrated BOP Strategy” and “Social Innovation: Business Invention and Social Solutions”. For Dr. Steven J. DeKrey, President of the Asian Institute of Management (AIM), the AFCSR dovetails into AIM’s mission of developing leaders and managers that would serve as Asia’s source of global talent, insight, and wisdom. “AIM has consistently built the managerial skills needed for both the business and the development sectors. The imperative in this decade is to combine the skill sets, so that managers in Asia can resolve issues and address opportunities in both sectors. AIM managers now and in the future will seamlessly straddle both the private and public sectors and quickly address the needs of both stakeholders,” he said. “Another imperative in this decade is to fill the gap for responsible managers, who are both ethically aware and environmentally conscious,” he continues. “CSR bridges this need, and the AIM-RVR CSR Center can provide value-adding

thought leadership that will help to build the next generation of managers.” As the research center at the forefront of CSR, the AIM-RVR CSR Center provides tools and resources to aid practitioners in going beyond the sharing of best practices, implementing incremental improvements, operating business as usual, and exploring sustainability. AFCSR is just one way for the research center to demonstrate its thought leadership. AIM-RVR CSR Center also engages in Executive Conversations in CSR and recognizes companies that have implemented strategic CSR initiatives through the Asian CSR Awards. “We’ve been working to advocate for CSR to be strategic and embedded in a company’s operations and values,” shares Alfonso. “We have seen how it has evolved through the years, gaining widespread acceptance among companies, and we’re now looking forward in elevating the practice of CSR, in order to create lasting and sustainable positive impacts for communities throughout Asia.”

Mr. Mayta Chanchamcharat, chief business officer of Pruksa Real Estate PLC. from Thailand, received the Asian CSR Award for the Product Responsibility and Consumer Rights category. The award recognizes a company’s initiatives on fair marketing, product labeling, protection of consumer’s health and safety, sustainable consumption, compliance, consumer service, and awareness. Pruksa Real Estate PLC’s CSR strategy takes into account people, process, and product. Particularly for its products, Pruksa Real Estate PLC pays close attention to the procurement of raw materials, the utilization of construction technology, and the acquisition of materials from suppliers. The company aims to manufacture more environment-friendly products and implement efficiency throughout their processes, from addressing customer needs to product development, construction, sales, and after-sales home maintenance. Mr. Tan Tong Hai, chief operating officer of StarHub Ltd from Singapore, accepted the Intel-AIM Corporate Responsibility Award (IACRA).

IACRA is the grand prize of the AIM Asian CSR Awards. It is given to an organization that has taken on a fully embedded approach to CSR across all four focus areas. At the heart of StarHub’s business strategy are its people, as it serves customers by building a committed and motivated workforce. The company implements human resource policies that promote safe and healthy working conditions, fair employment, teamwork, learning and development, and career growth and performance awards to attract, retain, and grow talent. As a leading telecommunications operator in Singapore, the company runs data centers, and base stations consume significant amounts of energy that produce greenhouse gas emissions. This then creates an imperative for StarHub’s two-pronged environmental approach. The first is reducing the relative consumption of energy, fuel, and water, and minimizing waste. The second is increasing the use of renewable energy, as well as implementing initiatives for water and resource conservation and recycling of waste.

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AIM Brings Harvard Business School Professor to Lecture on Leading Resilient Family Corporations

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IM RECENTLY HOSTED Prof. Ranjay Gulati, the Jaime and Josefina Tiampo Professor of Business Administration and unit head for Organizational Behavior of the Harvard Business School (HBS), an expert on leadership, strategy, and organizational behavior, last December 4 for a lecture entitled Leading a Resilient Family Corporation, held at AIM’s Meralco Caseroom. Prof. Gulati’s talk is the first in a series of lectures under the Basant and Sarala Birla Professorial Chair on Asian Family Corporations, which seeks to broaden AIM’s wealth of knowledge on issues and challenges such as succession, collaboration, financing and investment, social entrepreneurship, and supply chain management, in the context of family corporations. At the lecture, Prof. Gulati discussed leadership as one of the key areas family corporations need to work on to foster innovation within the organization and adapt to the changing times. He also discussed the four leadership styles commonly observed in organizations— command and control, dead-end, self-functioning, and freedom within a framework—which change depending on the amount of direction and support provided for subordinates. Command and control is usually practiced in manufacturing companies, where products must meet specific standards. Companies that provide great support with less direction are called “self-functioning units,” while those who provide neither are called dead-ends. However,

the ideal leadership style is what Prof. Gulati calls “freedom within a framework,” which allows managers, executives, and even owners to provide adequate support and direction for their subordinates while staying true to the core values and nature of the business. Prof. Gulati’s lectures were complemented with case studies that illustrated how a family-run corporation worked with a newly installed CEO to distill core values, institute new practices, and move away from its current brand position, amid a period of economic downturn. He also talked about three concepts: motivators, hygiene factors, and hidden commitments, which are important in transitioning to

people’s behavior, will you do it just by lecturing them? No one changes unless you identify hidden commitments.” Meanwhile, motivators are the factors that encourage people to avail of a product or a service, while hygiene factors are those that may not be as crucial, but whose absence could demotivate people. According to Prof. Gulati, factors once considered as motivators, and are now hygiene new practices or philosophies, factors can help uncover an orand in consumer research. ganization’s hidden commitments. “Behind all our behavior The HBS professor also disare our hidden commitments. cussed the emerging concept of For example, if you want to lose customer service. In this day and weight, you would go on a diet age, organizations must move beand exercise. But what happens? yond the usual line of consumer Instead, you eat out at restauresearch and focus on the bigger picture, on shifts in culture that could potentially influence their consumers’ decisions. “Never look “If you are a leader and you want to change people’s at your customers through the behavior, will you do it just lens of your product,” he advised. by lecturing them? No one He added that curiosity changes unless you identify and humility are crucial to hidden commitments.” anticipating shifts in the market rants, or eat more often, or eat and being a more consumerjunk food. What happens is that centric organization. you may have a hidden commitAfter the lecture, Prof. Gulati ment to enjoying the company of also met with AIM’s MBA stuyour friends, or enjoying food,” dents to talk to them about career said Prof. Gulati. “If you are a and life, and what they can look leader and you want to change forward to as MBA graduates. For President Steve DeKrey, the lecture is an opportunity to collaborate with one of the world’s leading business schools and to provide Asian family corporations with wisdom and insight to help their businesses take advantage of the region’s growth. “AIM has always enjoyed a special relationship with Harvard, as they have been a key partner in establishing the school. We hope to continue working with them in our future endeavors,” said DeKrey. “Likewise, we recognize the importance of supporting family corporations, as these organizations have driven business, growth, and development in Asia. It is important that future generations would be better equipped for changes in the market, as well as in their relationships with their stakeholders.”


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IMF HEAD ENGAGES WITH THE YOUTH AT AIM

New Core Faculty Joins AIM THE ASIAN INSTITUTE Of Management welcomes Prof. Gillian Ann Stevens, PhD as a new core faculty member of the Institute. Gill will be teaching across various programs in GSB and EXCELL. Prof. Stevens has several years experience working in a higher education culture. She was Lead Consultant/ Senior Management Consultant at the Sunley Management Centre, the corporate management centre of the University of Northampton Business School in the United Kingdom. Her responsibilities included business development, course leader role for client programs, designing, delivering, managing and evaluating tailored client programs and interventions, and contributing to applied research projects. Prior to joining the University, she was Development Training Manager for Norsk Data Ltd Newbury. As a consultant and free lance trainer, her clients included Tata Consultancy Services, Park Resorts, Wartsila UK Ltd, HM Treasury, Carlsberg UK Ltd, Northampton Borough Council, Dorset Country Council, Rydon Construction, Medical Research Council, and Hewlett Packard. Prof. Stevens is an expert in Occupational Testing and is a qualified Workplace Mediator and Workplace Coach. Prof. Stevens has an MSc in Management Development, from Roffey Park, and a PhD in Management Education from the University of Bristol.

“TRAVEL THE WORLD. Be a citizen of the world. Know what each country needs.” This was the advice of Madame Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to more than 400 students, mostly from AIM and top universities in Metro Manila, at the AIM Campus last November 16. Forbes magazine named Mme. Lagarde the eighth most powerful woman in the world. Titled Youth Talk, the event was a result of Mme. Lagarde’s desire to meet the youth in the countries she visits. At AIM, she discussed Policy Challenges in the World of Interconnections. Addressing the young people in the audience, Mme. Lagarde said that, with the “superfast connectivity” and “massive development in the last decade,” people should be able to draw benefits from global interconnectedness. “It’s all about change, and it’s all about life,” she stressed. The IMF chief cited the potential of Asia and said that advanced economies can learn from the countries in the region. “Emerging Asia’s share of world GDP grew from 10% to 30% in three decades. Half a billion people were lifted from poverty as a result. After the 1998 financial crisis, Asia embraced change. It emerged stronger, less vulnerable, more resilient. It’s Asia that kept the global growth going in the last few years, providing twothirds of global growth.” She added that by 2032, Asia will have overtaken the US and Europe combined, with GDP as the source of growth. “The 21st century will belong to you,” she declared. The Philippines, being part of Asia, is reflective of the region’s growth, Mme. Lagarde pointed out. “We in IMF have been partners with the Philippines for 40-plus years. In 2006, the Philippines stopped being a net debtor of the IMF. This year, it became a net creditor. It is an example of how the economic will is changing.” She attributed

the country’s performance to “better policies” and “structural changes” common to resilient emerging markets. In sustaining growth, she underscored the importance of inclusion, integration, and better governance. This is the first time AIM welcomed a sitting Managing Director of the IMF. Last year, AIM hosted a forum for IMF Deputy Managing Director Naoyuki Shinohara. Mme. Lagarde lauded AIM for hosting her engagement with the youth. “It’s one of the best

“It’s Asia that kept the global growth going in the last few years, providing two-thirds of global growth.”

institutes not just in the Philippines but in the region. It prepares you to take the challenges of the world,” she noted. Being a lawyer, she looked at AIM’s mission. “Professional, entrepreneurial, and socially responsible leaders and managers—those words are very important to me. Those are qualities most needed in today’s world,” she quipped. “To have those three virtues identified with leadership and management is appropriate.” The IMF chief was in the country as part of her Southeast Asian visit. In the Philippines, aside from visiting AIM, she also had engagements with key government officials and members of the press. PHOTO: IMF.ORG


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that those accepted have the best social, emotional, and intellectual capacities and are attractive to our recruiters.” The institution is also looking at increasing student diversity by attracting students from key Asian cities other than Manila, such as Bangkok, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Ho Chih Minh, Hong Kong, and Shanghai, as well as Western cities. This measure is part of AIM’s initiatives to compete with top business schools in Asia, including those located in developed cities such Hong Kong and Singapore. “We’ve discovered that only two out of three of our graduates are employed three months after graduation,” notes Dr. DeKrey. “We want to significantly improve on this key success criterion and enhance the employability of our graduates by admitting only our top candidates.” AIM is also set to make changes in the MBA curriculum to enhance the learning experience for its September 2013 batch of students. “AIM has been known as the ‘Harvard-established school of the East’ because of the key role Harvard Business School played in our founding. We continue to use classroom methods from Harvard, such as the case study method,” DeKrey continues. “By ensuring that our enrolled students meet the highest of standards, we can also assure an improved quality of class discussions, benefitting all classmates.” The case study method is a participant-centered method of learning, wherein real-life business situations are simulated in the classroom with input from students. Coupled with these high quality changes is a substantial tuition increase. “Our tuition should reflect

our stature as a leading Asian institution of graduate business studies,” he says. “Our current tuition is underpriced for the standard of education that students receive. At US$24,000, it is well below the regional standard of US$45,000. We will be targeting this Asian average for the 2015 intake, with a phase-in period of three years. For the September 2013 intake, the tuition is set at US$31,000.” However, this does not mean an increased financial burden on incoming MBA students at AIM. “We will be offering a significant amount of scholarships to all those accepted into our MBA program. For most accepted applicants, this scholarship will exceed the price increase, so effectively, the cost remains similar or less,” he explains. AIM has put in place other mechanisms to assist students in financing their graduate business studies, including the establishment of the BPI-AIM Student Loan Facility for Filipino students and qualifications for US student loans for Americans. AIM is also planning to make institutional changes to support these initiatives. “The tuition increase will be supported by scholarship fundraising and increased donor engagement,” he says. “By 2013, we will have a new Vice President for Institutional Advancement to lead such fundraising.” Alumni support and engagement is critical as the institution paves its path to becoming one of Asia’s top five business schools in five years. “We are encouraging our alumni to support us as we work toward attaining our vision of becoming Asia’s source for global leadership talent, insight, and wisdom,” he adds.

Technological Innovations in Environmental Management

disinfection, chlorination, ozonation and different types of membrane processes. Through this treatment, sewer systems become more efficient and drainages less clogged. EcoSystem Technologies pioneered in the Philippines sequence

since these can be planted under roads and buildings. Having a small sewage treatment plant within an area will absorb floodwater.

THE FREQUENT OCCURRENCE OF natural calamities, especially typhoons and floods, in the Philippines in the last few years has challenged experts to come up with innovations that would lessen possible damages and risks. To contribute to the ongoing discussion on how to solve flooding and minimize its effects, the AIM Dr. Stephen Zuellig Center for Asian Business Transformation gathered a group of experts and stakeholders in the field

batch reactors, which are industrial processing tanks for the treatment of wastewater. The tanks save space

AIM paves the way for enhanced student diversity and quality of experience, changes set to improve career placement of graduates

THE ASIAN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEment (AIM), a pioneer in international management education in Asia, is set to make changes that will enhance the quality and diversity of its student body and the impact of the MBA programchanges that will lead to improved career opportunities for its graduates.

“From a two-section student population of 140, we will be reducing the enrolment to a single section of 70 students for our September 2013 intake,” explains AIM president Dr. Steven J. DeKrey. “We will conduct a tighter selection process of the batch of MBA applicants next year to ensure

STIKE Kapihan:

of environmental management for the 8th Science, Technology, Innovations, Knowledge, and Entrepreneurship (STIKE) Kapihan last August 30, 2012. EcoSystem Technologies Inc. president Robert So discussed widescale wastewater treatment. According to So, a closed system wastewater treatment reuses water and reduces garbage. The system works by removing contaminants from wastewater and using technologies such as UV

Elmer Mercado and Robert So

Small scale, big effects Mr. Elmer Mercado, an environmental planner who once served as DENR undersecretary, presented small-scale wastewater management as an “ecological sanitation tactic” being practiced in small communities. In Bacolod City, for instance, some communities use hydraulic ram pumps. The water pumps rely on gravity and use two valves to generate a repeating “hammer effect” that drives water up a pressure tank and into a delivery hose. This technology does not use engine, fuel, or electricity, and can be made


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

EU to Work Closely with PH to Achieve Development Goals AMBASSADOR’S FORUM @ AIM, October 5, 2012. His Excellency Guy Ledoux, Head of the Delegation of the European Union (EU) to the Philippines, first shared the history of the European Union, starting from the creation of the European Economic Community (EEC) in 1957 when the Treaty of Rome was signed; through 1993 when the Single European Market came into force allowing the free movement of people, goods, services and capital; up to the signing and effectivity of the Maasticht Treaty in the same year, creating what is now known as the European Union. From the original six member states, the EU today consists of 27 European countries. The institutions (commissions and councils) that made up the European Union were also introduced. The Ambassador highlighted the following facts about this geo-political entity. The EU, with a population of 500 million, is the world’s largest economy generating 25 percent

of the world’s GDP estimated at US$15.39 trillion (2011 estimates). It is also the world’s biggest exporter generating US$1.791 trillion (2010 estimates) and the world’s secondlargest importer generating $2 trillion (2010 estimates). The EU is the world’s biggest trader, and its Euro is the world’s second largest reserve money, next only to the US dollar. The Ambassador also shared information about the EU’s external policies: common foreign and security policies, common commercial policies, humanitarian aid response, and development cooperation policies. Under its Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) the EU can send troops and civilian experts provided by EU member states to help in crisis situations. In terms of humanitarian response, EU provides 50 percent of the world’s aid. It has provided aid to more than 100 countries including the Philippines, Iraq, Afghanistan, Palestinian Territories, regions of Africa, Chechnya, Tajikistan,

from mostly recycled materials. Mercado also cited the cities of Dumaguete, Bayawan, Muntinlupa, and San Fernando, which have adopted a sustainable wastewater management system based on the “alternative holistic approach for ecological and economical sustainable sanitation.” Mercado described that the system saves water, protects water quality, prevents pollution, and returns valuable nutrients into the soil for agricultural purposes. These communities seem to do a good job at wastewater management because of sociological factors, Mercado said. “People in the community work well together because they immediately see the effects of their work. They receive instant gratification.”

AIM professor Benjamin Bagadion, a former DENR undersecretary, stressed the importance of wastewater management. He said people tend to focus on solid wastes like plastic. But he pointed out that liquid waste “is also a major factor in floods and the cause of the spreading of diseases.” From plastics and beyond In Metro Manila, plastic waste appears to be a top concern. Undersecretary Corazon Jimenez of the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) revealed that plastic sachets comprise most of the garbage being collected in the city. Strict implementation of proper waste segregation has been collectively suggested to solve the problem, but

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EU’s support for programs on human rights training, the peace process, and those that increase women’s participation in peace building with continue.

political, security, economic and social affairs as well as issues of specific interest such as human rights, counter-terrorism, energy and migration. The Ambassador assured the participants of the forum that EU will continue working closely with the Philippines in achieving development goals. EU’s support for programs on human rights training, the peace process, and those that increase women’s participation in peace building with continue. The EU will also further strengthen its economic partnership with the Philippines through the continuous trade of goods and services, and increased investments. The Ambassador also talked on European Higher Education Fair Manila 2012: Brighter Prospects which was held last November 14, 2012. A symposium on the opportunities and best practices of academic linkages of more than 20 European Higher Education Institutions and Philippine Educational Institutions, their aim is to attract Filipinos to study in European Higher Education Institutions through the Erasmus Mundus Scholarship which the EU supports. The EU has provided almost €4 million or Php 228 million to the Erasmus Mundus Scholarship since 2004.

Jimenez said the MMDA is still open to suggestions from private organizations. The MMDA is willing to partner with other organizations to address the recurring problem. While some cities and towns in the country have imposed a ban on plastics use, Mr. Michael Eric Castillo of the MMDA noted that the banning of plastics is “not a good solution,” as this sequentially lets people turn to the use of paper bags. Paper, while ecological, is also costly in terms of tree and water use. Castillo added that a waste problem often underestimated is the fast-paced evolution of mobile phones. “Disposal of phone batteries and chargers, as well as the phone itself, can’t be fixed by nature.”

Another problem related to waste management and flooding is location. AIM professor Mario Antonio Lopez shared, “We have many places that shouldn’t have been developed.” Places like Marikina, which is prone to floods, shouldn’t have been developed as residential areas. Forum participants included representatives from the MMDA, Department of Science and Technology, EcoSystem Technologies, Aboitiz-AP Renewables Inc., Makban Geo, Philippine Association of Landscape Artists, and AIM students and professors. The forum was held at AIM, Makati City. To know more about the STIKE Kapihan series, contact Mariska Barretto at mbarretto@aim.edu or (632) 8924011 ext. 2073.

Nepal, Sri Lanka, Colombia, Central America and Caribbean. In the forum, the Ambassador provided a sectoral breakdown of EU’s Development Cooperation and ODA resource commitments in 2011. Zooming in on the EUPhilippines Relations, the Ambassador shared the details of the Partnership and Cooperation Agreement, which was the first agreement between the EU and the Philippines since 1980. The agreement covers


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AIM Goes High Tech ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2012, AIM WENT HIGH-TECH AS IT HOSTED THE SOCIAL Good Summit at the Stephen Fuller Hall. Organized by Rappler and TweetupManila, the event is part of a global movement started by Mashable to celebrate UN Week which was held simultaneously with a parallel event held in New York. The objective was to come up with “ways in which digital technologies like social media can be used to solve the world’s challenges and make this world a better place.” Rappler CEO Maria Ressa shared details on social media’s involvement in Rappler’s news gathering and news reporting, citing Rappler’s revolutionary creation “Mood Meter” as a tool to echo public perception on national events. TV host and online celebrity Bianca Gonzales talked about her personal take on social media awareness and involvement. The original “I should have been informed” guy, Christopher Lao discussed cyber bullying and its effect on his life. Head of the Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office (PCDSPO) Secretary Ricky Carandang talked about the government’s efforts in disseminating information using the social media platform. Secretary of the Department of Tourism, Ramon Jimenez Jr., spoke on how media has evolved and how social media played a vital role in the “It’s more fun in the Philippines campaign.” The event was streamed live, in high definition, on the news Website rappler.com. About 500 participants were very pleased with AIM’s newly upgraded bandwidth of 100 mbps, courtesy of PLDT. Floor-to-ceiling LED screens flashed tweets of the event. At the end, the Summit generated a Twitter scrape of 91 million ripples.

CL ASS NOTES


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Washington SyCip Receives Asia Society's Lifetime Achievement Award AIM FOUNDER MR. Washington SyCip, founder of SGV, the largest professional services firm in the Philippines received the Asia Society's Lifetime Achievement Award at Asia Society's 2012 Awards Dinner held at Cipriani 42nd Street in New York City last November 8, 2012. The recipients of the Global Leadership Award were Honeywell Chairman and CEO David M. Cote and Chairman, CEO, and President of Archer Daniels Midland Company Patricia A. Woertz. The honorees demonstrated vision, leadership and commitment

which have earned them global praise and recognition. In their acceptance speeches, the honorees discussed their business success in Asia and what they believe economic development in the region will mean for the world. Jose L. Cuisia, former AIM Chairman and Ambassador of the Republic of the Philippines to the United States, and New York Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney were among the 400 guests who attended the event. Source: http://asiasociety.org/new-york/ annual-awards-dinner-honoreesemphasize-economic-cooperation

we also recognize the need to make quality education more accessible to those who recognize its value, and this is that have been admitted to any of why we have partnered with BPI AIM’s Master’s degree programs, to provide a solution for worthy candidates that don’t have the provided they have duly passed a credit review by AIM. The total financial capability to enroll in a graduate school.” amount of the loan may be as “Graduate school is an much as the full tuition cost, investment in one’s future,” which may be repaid starting Nazareno states. “We at AIM, three months after graduation. however, also view it as invest“We are honored that we Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) President are involved in a program like ing in the future of the Philipand CEO Aurelio Montinola III (left) and Asian pines and Asia. By providing a this. The Ayala Group, BPI and Institute of Management (AIM) Chairman vehicle to make quality graduate AIM have always been in the Napoleon L. Nazareno (right) at the signing education more accessible, we ceremony to launch the BPI-AIM Student Loan forefront of education,” shares Facility, a pioneering and innovative effort are helping more and more BPI President and CEO Aurelio between the two institutions to make graduate young Filipinos reach their Montinola III. “Education is a education more accessible for Filipinos. potential, so that they are able major contributor to Philippine to contribute significantly to TWO INSTITUTIONS THAT growth and is one of the the overall improvement of the play critical roles in the develop- highest priorities of the current private sector and of communiadministration,” Montinola ment of the education sector in ties throughout the region.” the Philippines have partnered continues. “We are proud to be Also present during the part of the equation.” to provide aspiring graduate For his part, AIM Chairman signing ceremony were: Eustacio students with viable means to Napoleon L. Nazareno remarked B. Orobia, Jr., Former Chairman obtain graduate education. that there is a greater need more of the AIM Alumni Association; The Bank of the Philippine Ramon M. de Vera, AIM than ever to make graduate Islands (BPI) and the Asian Scientific Research Foundation education more accessible for Institute of Management (AIM) Board of Trustee; Former Filipinos. “We live in a time have launched the BPI-AIM AIM President Edilberto C. de that places great emphasis on Student Loan Facility, which Jesus; Gil A. Buenaventura, BPI the need for leaders that are enables prospective students Senior Executive Vice-President from the Philippines to obtain a sensitive and responsive to the and Chief Operating Officer; needs of emerging markets, Master’s degree at AIM without Alfonso L. Salcedo, Group Head, and AIM is well-situated to worrying about their finances. Corporate Banking Division, help prepare those future The BPI-AIM Student Loan BPI; and Alberto E. Pascual, Facility is extended to applicants leaders,” he shares. “However,

Student Loan Facility for Aspiring Graduate Students Launched

From left: Asia Society co-Chair Henrietta H. Fore, Washington SyCip, Asia Society Trustee Lulu Wang, and Asia Society co-Chair Ronnie Chan. (Bennet Cobliner)

Division Head, Corporate Banking Division, BPI. About the Bank of the Philippine Islands Founded in 1851, Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) is the oldest bank in the Philippines. BPI is the third largest commercial bank in the country in terms of total assets with significant market share in deposits, corporate & consumer lending, and asset management & trust business. The Bank also leads in the overseas Filipino’s remittance business, finance & operating lease business, government securities dealership, securities distribution, and foreign exchange business. BPI is the recognized leader in electronic banking, having introduced most of the firsts in the industry such as the automated teller machines (ATMs), point-of-sale debit system, kiosk banking, phone banking, internet banking, and mobile banking. It has the largest distribution network of over 800 branches and almost 1,800 ATMs. BPI has the largest market capitalization in the industry and the highest credit ratings from international rating agencies.


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MBA Student Wins Drucker Challenge Essay Contest SIDDHARTH WADEHRA (MBA 2012) was proclaimed one of the winners of the 3rd Drucker Challenge Essay Contest in October 2012. His work was selected from nearly 100 entries received by the competition, which aims “to raise awareness among young people on the works and ideas of Peter Drucker and a management philosophy that puts the human being in its center.” With the theme Reinventing Work, Reinventing Organization, the contest invited students, junior managers, and entrepreneurs “to share their views on the changing structure and mindset of the workforce, and the impact it will have on institutions and management.” “I first learned about Peter Drucker’s management ideas in my classes at AIM,” Siddharth said. He was inspired to submit an entry to the contest because he wanted “to pitch my ideas and my learning at AIM among the other members of the business fraternity about how companies today are reinventing themselves” and because the winners receive free membership to the prestigious Peter Drucker Society in 2013. He considers the Drucker Challenge “among the most prestigious management events globally where some of the best brains from the best business schools and enterprises deliberate on key trends in management and shape how business is being reinvented across the globe.” Prior to this, Siddharth headed the MBA team that represented AIM in the Hult Global Case Challenge in San Francisco earlier this year. He has not joined other writing competitions, but he enjoys writing. His book Asia Incredible will be released in India soon. The book talks about the shifting of business from western economies to Asian countries and highlights inspiring stories of AIM alumni who have leveraged the growing opportunities in Asia to turn their ventures into global enterprises. “I owe my success in the competition to my education and experience at AIM,” he confessed. “The case method allows us to apply the principles and concepts of management gurus like Peter Drucker to real-life scenarios and challenges... This was the foundation of my essay. The faculty helped us to stay ahead of the curve by telling us the fast-changing trends in the market, especially with the impact of technology...The learning and experience have been a wholesome journey. I have thoroughly enjoyed every part of it.”

Julie Tañada, MBM 1993 Wins Agora Award MS. JULIE TAÑADA received the Agora Award for Marketing Education last October 2012. Tañada has been teaching Marketing for 15 years at the De La Salle University, and was adjunct professor at the Asian Institute of Management in 2008. She graduated Cum Laude with a double degree in Communication Arts and Marketing from

St. Scholastica’s College. She took her Master in Business Management at the Asian Institute of Management after college and earned her degree in 1993. The Agora Awards represent the pinnacle of marketing achievement as awardees are exemplary professionals and role models who have pursued and achieved excellence in marketing.

Alejandro Lito R. Aprieto, BMP 2006 wins the Supply Management Practitioner of the Year

ALEJANDRO LITO R. Aprieto, C.P.M., DSM, BMP 2006, Group Manager for Supply Chain Management Division- Philex Mining Corporation, was awarded the Supply Management Practitioner of the Year last April 2012 by the Gawad Sinop Awards. The Foundation of the Society of Fellows in Supply Management (SOFSM) and the Philippine Institute for Supply Management (PISM) pay tribute to supply management professionals who have exhibited outstanding achievements in the performance of the profession, and to corporations who have instituted best practices and human resource development programs in supply management. This is an annual award given by the association since 1993 to professionals in the Procurement, Logistics, Materials Management and Supply Chain Management Profession. “Given the importance of Good Governance in Corporate Management, particularly in Procurement and Supply Chain, this is an important career milestone for professionals like me in this field,” Lito says. “This is a small token I would like to take back to AIM where part of my professional training was honed.”


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MBA Team is 3rd Place of 724 in Singapore Competition TEAM HIGH AIMERS, composed of MBA students Anirban Chowdhury, Bryan Kenneth Tsang, and Madhuranath Ramachandra recently finished second runner-up in the National University of Singapore (NUS) Cerebration Business Case Competition, which is one of the biggest MBA case contests and which drew 724 teams from around the world. Team High AIMers earlier won their case track on Lenovo, beating 200-plus teams from schools like Columbia, Queen’s School of Business, Chinese University of Hong Kong, NUS, Nanyang, Duke, and two IIMs. “The case was about developing sustainable market leadership strategies,” described Madhu. “Lenovo is a very large and complex business to analyze. So this is the type of challenge that excites AIM students, who are trained to be the ‘case method tigers’ of the business world.” The competition had four phases: executive summary, business plan document, semi-

finals presentation, and grand finale. “In each phase we had to adapt our strategies and preparation based on the requirement of that specific round,” said Madhu on behalf of the team. Anirban worked on number crunching and finance; Bryan and Madhu on the marketing strategy and implementation. “There is a saying, ‘true collaboration is when there is no distinct claim by any person on any idea.’ In the end, our document was something like that,” added Madhu. “Lenovo operates in hundreds of geographies and sells products across categories like smart phone, tablet, laptop, desktop, and smart TV. Assessing such a business across all business segments would be very complex. So we split the work across broad geographies initially. In the business plan document rounds, we divided the work based on the sections required. So, in the end, all of us had deep knowledge of all sections of the presentation.” In the grand finale, Team

Team High AIMers with mentor Prof. Gully Go

High AIMers was pitted against groups from Purdue University, London Business School (LBS), Washington University in St. Louis, Indian School of Business, and China Europe International

“Lenovo is a very large and complex business to analyze. So this is the type of challenge that excites AIM students, who are trained to be the ‘case method tigers’ of the business world.” Business School (CEIBS). Four of these teams were top placers in the two other case tracks. LBS and CEIBS eventually landed in first and second place. Team High AIMers received

SGD3,000 in prize and a trophy. They acknowledged the support they received from AIM faculty, staff, alumni, and fellow students in their journey to the finals. “We’re really happy to represent AIM at such a prestigious global event,” they said. “Our intense training in case method and Written Analysis of Cases helped us to crack a very challenging case like that of Lenovo. The focus of AIM education is on developing leaders and managers with excellent critical thinking capabilities, and this is definitely a key skill requirement in case competition. So we can attribute a significant part of our success to AIM education.”

MBA Students Champions of PPM Case Competition

JAKARTA, INDONESIA— MBA students Manish Anand, Prachi Maheshwari, and Sahil Shah were recently declared winners of the 3rd PPM School of Management Regional Business Case Competition in Jakarta. They bested 56 other groups in the elimination round and 11 others in the finals. Inspired by the success of their classmates in previous competitions, the three students

decided last July to join the event although they were geographically apart at the time: Manish was in Bangalore, Sahil in Mumbai, and Prachi in Manila. The group studied a 60-page case about a 552-hectare, integrative, recreational property in Jakarta similar to Disneyland and Sentosa. “It was having trouble maintaining visitors,” said Manish. “We had to submit a 20-page report, find the issues, do research, and come up with an action strategy to turn it around...We used to meet every night on Skype to first discuss our plan of action, what to do, how to do our research, and who’ll do what.” In preparation for the finals,

in which they had to present their strategy, the team was mentored by Prof. Gully Go and received pointers from Dean Grace Ugut, Prof. Nieves Confesor, and Prof. Manny de Vera. The finals were held in the recreational property itself. The first round was in debate format. From the 12 teams, only four moved to the second round, in which the judges were the general director and stakeholders of the property. “They asked us three practical questions, like if I want to change this resort, then what would be the implications?” narrated Manish. “We are used to it since we handle those cases on a daily basis. The questions were not out of the book and out of the case...It was

like presenting to a board and a board asking a question.” The team won $1,750 and a certificate, which they framed and presented to the AIM-W. SyCip Graduate School of Business, which had given them financial and moral support. They credit the case method for their success in the competition. “It’s the reasoning that we developed here. It’s about why and how to build a story,” noted Sahil. “We saw presentations that were lacking in parts to tell a cohesive story,” observed Manish. “The important thing we learned is how to analyze, how to handle a problem, actually looking at it at a higher level and tell a better story.”


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In 2005, along with friends Raymund Magdaluyo and Ricky Laudico, Marvin ventured into the restaurant business establishing SumoSam at the Shangri-la Plaza mall, offering a fusion of American and Japanese recipes. Since then, SumoSam has multiplied in the city and there are now 11 branches with Marvin targeting 25 branches by the end of the year. Aside from SumoSam, MarInc. (HSSI), was named the vin also started other restaurants However, destiny had other Entrepreneur of the Year Philip- plans. With his dashing good such as Mr. Kurosawa, John and pines 2012 last October 18, 2012. looks and charm, Marvin was Yoko, Johnny Chow, Robotosan He will represent the country in discovered for film and television and Marciano’s. the prestigious World EntreAs head of his multiple restauas an actor, and worked in more preneur of the Year which will than 30 movies and TV shows in rants, what is Marvin’s secret to be held in June 2013 in Monte success? “We listen to what our a span of a decade. But he kept Carlo, Monaco. his initial passion alive and while customers have to say,” he shares. AIM alumni Tommanny Tan attending to his acting career, Customer relations is the name of and Marvin Agustin received the Marvin studied at the InternaMarvin’s game. An added ingrediEmerging Entrepreneur award ent to his success is the importional School for Culinary Arts and the Young Entrepreneur and Hotel Management. He also tance of keeping his staff happy. award respectively during the took the Managing the Arts Pro- Keen on personnel development, ceremonies. being a restaurant crew himself in gram at AIM in 2003 to acquire knowledge about running a busi- the past, Marvin takes extra effort to develop his employees by honness and entrepreneurship.

Five AIM Alumni Chosen as Finalists in Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year

“‘THE ENTREPRENEUR OF The Year Philippines 2012’ celebrates the powerful and focused passions within our Filipino entrepreneurs; their fierce determination to see progress unfold across the country,” said SGV Foundation President Vic Noel in concluding the year’s search for the country’s most successful and inspiring entrepreneurs. Founded in the US in 1986 by Ernst & Young to recognize the achievements of outstanding entrepreneurs worldwide, ‘The Entrepreneur of the Year’ eventually evolved to become ‘The World Entrepreneur of the Year’ awards in 2001. In 2003, the SGV Foundation, Inc. established ‘The Entrepreneur of the Year Philippines’ program to recognize extraordinary Filipinos. This year’s search produced 20 nominees from 17 diverse organizations in the Philippines. Five graduates of AIM programs were nominated in the search for Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Philippines 2012. The finalists were Raphael Juan (ME 2002), president of Centro Manufacturing Company, on which AIM has produced a case; Mariel Vincent Rapisura (ME 2004), president/CEO of Social Enterprise Development Partnerships, Inc; Tommanny Tan (ME 2008), president and CEO of Filipino Entrepreneurs and Resources Network (FERN), Inc; Marvin Agustin (MAP 2003), president of SumoSam Foods, Inc; and Siu Ping Par (EMBA 2009), COO of PR Gaz Franchising Corp. Jaime I. Ayala, Founder and CEO of Hybrid Social Solutions,

CL ASS NOTES

Learning and Loving the Culinary Craft

MARVIN AGUSTIN, MAP 2003 President, SumoSam Foods, Inc. When Marvin was seven years old, he would help his mother deliver processed meats and collect payments to augment their family income. At 10 years old, the young lad would go to Divisoria to buy t-shirts and sell around the neighborhood. The hardworking and helpful boy would then lend a hand in the kitchen- “I was assigned to cook rice,” he smiles. These early challenging life experiences were but the ingredients in the broth that would eventually bring fame and success into Marvin Agustin’s colorful life. In high school, Marvin worked as a mascot and as a staff in a video store. But it was his job in a well known restaurant in Manila, Tia Maria that ignited his dream to become a restaurant manager one day.


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

ing their skills and helping them reach their goals. Marvin’s restaurant management skills have been recognized with a Best Operations award from the Ayala Merchant Awards in 2009. In 2008, John and Yoko was named Most Promising restaurant and in 2009, Mr. Kurosawa in Eastwood, Libis was named one of the best restaurants by Philippine Tatler. Learning the values of hard work and determination at an early age has certainly worked well for Marvin. As an inspiration and role model to the youth, Marvin certainly deserves the Young Entrepreneur Award 2012 from ‘The Entrepreneur of the Year Philippines 2012’.

chise of the Year for the medium category in the 11th Franchise Excellence Awards. For future entrepreneurs, Mrs. Pars conveys that “No matter how successful you are you can’t be complacent.” She also concludes that innovation and hard work is crucial to success.

Gaz Haus branches were opened right at the center of communities for easier access. They also set standards for performance, safety and quality for staff and products, thereby professionalizing the industry. One of the challenges that the Pars encountered in the early stages of their endeavor was building awareness for their brand, Innovating as they had budget constraints their business. But Industry Practices intheyexpanding soon realized that the key was not in the product itself, but NELSON C. PAR, EMBA 2009 in its distribution. Emphasis on Chairman and CEO, Siu Ping Par product quality and service is also Chief Operating Officer, a signature of PR Gaz, as employPR Gaz Franchising Corporation ees are required to wear uniforms When Mr. and Mrs. Nelson when delivering products, and the and Siu Par decided to put up exact weight of each LPG tank is their own company to bring LPG properly observed. Cylinders are products closer to the consumalso well maintained and staff are ers, little did they realize that trained to do leak tests. they would be introducing inAnother innovation that the novations in prevailing industry Pars introduced to communities practices. At that time, consum- was the Barangay Safety Semiers had to go to gas stations to nar, where consumers are edupurchase their LPG requirecated on how to detect products ments for household consumpof poor quality and are taught tion. “Distribution to customers safety measures in handling LPG was inefficient,” shares Mr. Par. tanks. They have also introduced “We wanted our own channel to franchising to overseas Filipino control the quality of the LPG workers (OFWs) which, accordproduct from the refinery until ing to Mrs. Par, “Gives us a sense it reaches the customer,” added of fulfillment as we help OFWs Mrs. Par who graduated from her find a business with the money EMBA at AIM in 2009. they’ve earned.” PR Gaz counts a The result was PR Gaz Haus, total of 139 outlets as of 2011 and an LPG retail and distribution the Pars share that they are aimchain launched in 2003. The ing for 500 stores by 2015. The company made the distribucompany was recognized in 2011 tion of, not only LPG tanks and as the Outstanding Filipino Franaccessories, but also cooking equipment easier for customers to access. An SMS or a phone call would deliver LPGs at customers’ doorsteps for free. Further decentralizing LPG distribution, PR

A Passion for Teaching MARIEL VINCENT RAPISURA, ME 2004 President/CEO, Social Enterprise Development Partnerships, Inc. Mariel Vincent “Vince” Rapisura has always been passionate about microfinance, social entrepreneurship, and poverty alleviation. After graduating from the Ateneo de Manila University with a Bachelor in Management degree in 2000 Vince went on to earn his Master’s degree in Entrepreneurship from the Asian Institute of Management in 2004. Gaining considerable experience in the microfinance and social entrepreneurship field, Vince worked in 20 countries other than the Philippines and eventually spearheaded the Microfinance Diploma Course at the Ateneo de Manila University which counts participants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. Adept at creating market niches and turning around ailing microfinance institutions (MFIs), Vince is the perfect mentor to start up social enterprises. He also designs strategies and capacity building interventions to assist MFIs achieve good performance standards. In 2004, Vince partnered with Edwin M. Salonga to establish Social Enterprises Partnerships, Inc. (SEDPI) to promote entrepreneurship, financial literacy, and capacity building to overseas Filipino workers (OFWs), social

“No matter how successful you are you can’t be complacent.”

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enterprises, start-up businesses and microfinance institutions. SEDPI had a simple but compelling vision—to become a sustainable social enterprise for the economic empowerment of the poor. They believe that social change can be achieved through education and entrepreneurship. Approaching the perennial problem of poverty from a different point of view, Vince and Edwin used their teaching and business skills to educate the underprivileged on microfinance and capacity building. They also provided financial and

technical assistance, training and systems to help incubate start-up enterprises. Since SEDPI was established, it has trained more than 15,000 social enterprise stakeholders from approximately 1,500 organizations in 21 countries. As a result, SEDPI surveys reveal that 70% of its clients are better able to provide education for their children, 43% had improved housing, 38% had better savings, 37% had improved income and 25% had better diets. Through their online Financial Literacy Training courses, SEDPI also assists OFWs and their families better manage their finances as most OFWs have no insurance or investments. They plan to use technology to replicate their programs in other countries. Vince encourages budding entrepreneurs to “Never give up.” Also, “being with the right people” is a crucial factor for success, he shares.


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perseverance paid off and in 1999, CMC was contracted to design and produce the Isuzu Passenger Van. A lack of capital RAPHAEL JUAN, ME 2002 to manufacture the order became President, another problem which Raffy had Centro Manufacturing Company to overcome, and this experience Raphael “Raffy” Juan grew proved his temerity in overcomup in an environment filled with ing obstacles. jeeps, chassis, vehicle parts and With Centro’s success in accessories. His father’s business, fulfilling orders, the company’s MD Juan Enterprises assembled reputation grew over the years jeepneys and it instilled in the as more OEM contracts from young boy a love for vehicles. Mitsubishi, Hyundai and Toyota He worked with his father as VP came in. Raffy also continued to for Operations after graduating expand the business by manufacfrom De La Salle University turing truck-mounted equipment Manila with a BS Marketing such as cranes, tail lifts, hook degree in 1991. But Raffy lifts, garbage compactors, and eventually toyed with the idea of starting his own manufacturing company. Noticing a shortage of vehicles in the country with only 33 vehicles per 1,000 people compared to other countries in the region with more than a hundred vehicles per 1,000 soft ride suspensions. In 2004, citizens, he became determined the firm was awarded by TUV to diversify from the family American, Inc. an ISO 9001:2000 business to manufacture trucks. certification, becoming the first Using an old family wareISO-certified truck body builder house, Raffy set up Centro Manu- in the country. In 2012 the comfacturing in 1996. However, the pany’s credibility was augmented Asian financial crisis challenged with a certification under TS his start-up and the company 16949:2009. would only turn out 30 truck Raffy shares that high-level bodies in 3 years- the number service and reliability is a factor of which they now produce in for Centro’s success, a trait which one day. His determination and he learned from the Japanese. A dedicated team for client needs and after-sales product warranties is also in place to provide impeccable service for customers. Centro is now one of the biggest truck body builders in the Philippines with sales that increase at an average of 32% annually, with a capacity to produce 450 units at its Novaliches and Maguya plants. Export contracts are in place for the Middle East and South America, and Raffy is eyeing Africa, Myanmar and Sri Lanka for future expansion. With all this success, Raffy thanks his father for teaching him the value of determination. And his advice for future entrepreneurs? “Your business should be your biggest love,” he says.

“Your business should be your biggest love.”

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Innovating Direct Selling TOMMANNY TAN, ME 2008 President and CEO, FERN, Inc. When Tommanny Tan graduated from De La Salle University – Manila (Bachelor of Science, Computer Science) in 1990, leading FERN, Inc to where it is now was farthest from his mind. Although Tan came from a family of entrepreneurs involved in international trade of consumer goods and electronics, his interest at the time was with programming and honing his computer skills. Still, when Tan eventually took over the family’s import and manufacturing business, his sharp, natural business acumen was immediately evident. Tan was able to implement operational changes that boosted productivity, immediately increasing production efficiency thirty-fold. In 2003, even without any prior knowledge about direct selling or network marketing, Tan joined a colleague in a business that distributed clothes, shoes, beauty products, and a “nonacidic” form of vitamin C. As Tan learned the business, he saw that although there was viable business in all products, the vitamin C had the most potential. The company, Filipino Entrepreneurs and Resources Network (or FERN, Inc), encountered financial difficulties in 2004. Rather than leaving the company, Tommanny Tan saw this as an opportunity to take over. Taking over as President and CEO in 2005, Tan scrapped all other products, and left FERN-C, the Non-Acidic Vitamin C, as FERN’s sole product. Since FERN-C was a pioneer in non-acidic vitamin C, there were many difficulties with acceptance. Tan solved different issues related to accreditation, approval, and acceptance of the product, lobbying the FDA to acknowledge “sodium ascorbate” as a legitimate generic name for vitamin C. Tan then relied on a handful of loyal networkers to market and sell FERN-C.

From decline and impending bankruptcy in 2004, FERN, Inc steadily rose throughout the years, even breaching the P1 Billion mark (in annual sales) in 2008. Today, FERN has 10 locations all over the Philippines, over 200 competent employees, and 1 Million FERN members. The company’s success served as the sign to introduce other innovative health products to the Philippine Market. In 2008, FERN-Slim, a safe and all-natural weight control supplement was launched. In 2010, FERN introduced FERNCoffee, the coffee blend with 8 nutrients. Soon after, a rose hip joint supplement powder, FERN i-flex, followed. As an industry leader in the Philippines, FERN, Inc. was set to expand operations internationally. In 2012, FERN took off as a major international competitor through the inception of i-fern—the company’s global wing. With i-fern, Tan envisions that soon, the Filipino will be known and respected as excellent entrepreneurs worldwide.

For his achievements as an exceptional businessman in the service of the Filipino, Tan has been featured in one of the country’s leading publications, and has received prestigious awards including the prestigious ERNST and YOUNG Emerging Entrepreneur of the Year (Philippines, 2012) and as a PLDT SME Nation’s MVP Bossing Award (also in 2012). As a Go Negosyo advocate, Tan believes in “changing lives one at a time.” He has faith that entrepreneurship can uplift Filipinos as he has changed the image of direct selling through FERN, Inc., and continues to promote healthy living and entrepreneurship among its members. Source: Businessworld Online


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

HOMECOMING: An AIM Alumna’s Journey Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor (BMP 1982) Visits Alma Mater

YABHG DATIN PADUKA Seri Rosmah Mansor, spouse of the Prime Minister of Malaysia, Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak, visited AIM last October 15, 2012 for a personal homecoming 30 years after she graduated from the Basic Management Program in 1982. With the Meralco Caseroom as venue, AIM president Dr. Steve DeKrey welcomed the distinguished alumna and guests. He said the historical event was a double celebration as, earlier in the day, Prime Minister Najib Razak witnessed the signing ceremony between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front on the Framework Agreement for peace, a roadmap aimed at paving the way for long-lasting peace after more than 40 years of conflict in Mindanao. The Datin’s homecoming to AIM provided a second reason to celebrate the occasion.

In her keynote address, Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor shared that her AIM education “provided an insight into my own skills and gave me guidance on how and where I can best contribute to my country. Attending AIM’s course reaffirmed my belief that investment in education, particularly from early childhood, is indeed the foundation for progress and panacea to many of the world’s ills.” She added, “The right kind of education, made accessible to all, without prejudice, guarantees equitability and fairness in humanity of all color, creed, and indeed gender.” Expounding on her early childhood education and care program under the banner of PERMATA Negara, which means children as jewels of the nation, she shared anecdotes on how the program was able to serve and make a difference in the lives of more than 26,000 children. She proudly stated, “Just after a year

in operation, a study by the Sultan Idris University for Education revealed that PERMATA children are one to two years ahead of their peers in cognitive, social, and emotional development.” As institutions such as AIM provide support for continuous learning, Datin Rosmah expressed hope that the school would forge partnerships with other institutions in Malaysia in the future. In gratitude for her gracious visit, gifts to Datin Rosmah were presented by AIM president Steve DeKrey, AIM dean Ricardo Lim, AAAIM chairman Ed Sison, FAIM directors Haji Zulkifly Baharom and Eustacio Orobia, Jr., and Student Association overseas president Pranav Chaturvedi. The special guest reciprocated by presenting gifts from Malaysia to the AIM hosts. An elegant cocktail reception was held at the Meralco foyer after the program. It was a wonderful opportunity to enhance cordial relation-

“Attending AIM’s course reaffirmed my belief that investment in education, particularly from early childhood, is indeed the foundation for progress and panacea to many of the world’s ills.”

ships between the Malaysian and Filipino guests. Malaysian and Filipino dignitaries who graced the occasion include H.E. Eduardo Malaya, Philippine Ambassador to Malaysia; HE Bill Tweddell, Ambassador of Australia to the Philippines; Dato Seri Dr. Ibrahim Saad, former Ambassador of Malaysia to the Philippines; HE Masaranga R. Umpa, Ambassador of the Philippines in Abuja; Datuk Siti Azizah Sheikh Abod, Special Officer to the Prime Minister; Hon. Vic Lecaros, Assistant Secretary of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) in Malaysia; Delia D. Albert, former DFA Secretary; Hadja Bainon G. Karon, ARMM Vice Governor; Congresswoman Hon. Bai Sandra Sinsuat Sema; Dr. Patricia B. Licuanan, Commission on Higher Education Chairperson; Bai Omera D. Lucman, National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) Commissioner; Atty. Maria Antonina Oblena, First Secretary and Consul of the Philippines to Malaysia; Sitti Djlia Hataman, NCMF Executive Director; Pombaen Karon- Kader, DSWD-ARMM Assistant Secretary; Nariman Ambolodto, DILG Assistant Secretary; and Bureau of Muslim Economic Affairs Director Aleem Guiapal.


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Delhi Chapter Launches Knowledge Series

AIM Alumni Establish Chapter in Europe AIM ALUMNI BASED IN London met last May 2012 at the Balls Brothers Pub at Fenchurch to formalize the establishment of the first ever Alumni Chapter in Europe. Present during the initial meeting were April Lim (MBA 2005), Michelle Boquiren(MBM 2000), Nitin Chandak (MBA 2005), Himanshu Kher (MBA 2005), Nithyanand Poornanandan (MBA 2004), Sunil Pethe (MBA 2004), Rajesh Solanki (MBM

Dr. DeKrey Meets AIM Alumni in Shanghai LAST OCTOBER 18, 2012, AIM President Steve DeKrey delivered the opening speech at the 4th International Business School Shanghai Conference, considered the largest top-level forum for business schools in the Asia Pacific region. Dr. DeKrey spoke on business school rankings and its influence in having a b-school recognized internationally. While in Shanghai, Dr. DeKrey took the opportunity to meet the AIM alumni leaders through a gettogether at the Yue Palace at the 2nd floor Crowne Plaza hotel. The alumni presented DeKrey with a “Welcome Card” as a token of appreciation for his visit. From left: Catherine Chen, MBM ’98, Jack Niu, MM ’98, Yi Wu, MBM ’98, Dr. Steve DeKrey, Vivien Zheng, MM ‘99, and Peter Jiang, MM ’95.

1999), and Deepak Winston (MBM 2000). Election of officers was held and the following were appointed: Rajesh Solanki (President), April Lim (Vice President with Himanshu Kher as deputy) and Deepak Winston (Secretary / Events Director with Sunil Pethe as deputy). The group will be meeting quarterly to establish itself as the contact point for all AIM alumni in Europe. For more information, alumni may contact Rajesh Solanki at solankirajesh@gmail.com.

THE DELHI CHAPTER OF AIM Alumni Association (India) has initiated a “Knowledge Series”, a regular series of talks where legends from all walks of life will be invited to Delhi NCR to speak on areas of their expertise. The first lecture of this series on “Entrepreneurship” was conducted last August 19, 2012 at the India Habitat Center in New Delhi. The speaker was Mr. Prem Jain, himself a proven entrepreneur, who has founded four successful tech ventures in the US. He is also named the “Tech Entrepreneur Legend” by TiE and is advisor to the illustrious Chairman and CEO of CISCO, Mr. John Chambers. Mr. Jain is a distinguished alumnus of BITS Pilani (India’’s top engineering institute) and the University of California, Davis. He travelled all the way from San Francisco to New Delhi to deliver the talk, and shared his story on how he went on to create billions

of dollars worth of brands by building teams that would refuse to abate, launching four successful ventures one after another. Charging the audience with his unassuming, down to earth approach to entrepreneurship, he rekindled the business dreams of the fifty-odd participants who attended the event. The knowledge and insight filled session was followed by an AIM style cocktail dinner that reunited alumni who were nostalgic about their days as students in Manila. The Delhi Chapter acknowledged with gratefulness the major sponsorship of MP Singh, President of AIM Alumni Association India.

“Knowledge Series” guest speaker, Mr. Prem Jain (center) has founded four successful tech ventures in the US. With him are AIMers Fredrik Agerhem, Prasun Chowdhury, Prem Jain, Hareish Gur, and Srinivas Rao.


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

Alumni Get Together in Hyderabad AIM ALUMNI IN Hyderabad recently held a get together last August 5, 2012 at the Sailing Club. Girish Gelli, MBM ‘98, Shasank Kalyan, MBM ‘97 and Jayaram Mamidipudi, MBM ‘80 helped organize the event. There are now around 45 AIM alumni in Hyderabad and the event was well attended with members having a good time making new acquaintances and catching up with old friends. The group was broad-based with the presence of alumni from 2010 and even from 1972. The meeting was aptly held on Friendship Day. There was active CP all around: members discussed a number of things including ways to improve AIM’’s brand name in India. The group now plans to meet regularly in the future.

AIMAS officers and members led by AIMAS President Dr. Gan Cheong Eng welcomed Anirban, Bryan and Madhu to Singapore last November 3, 2012 at the Cafe and Terrace, Raffles Town Club. Seated from left: Ning de Guzman, MBM 1973, Derek Liew, MBM 1973, Dr. Gan Cheong Eng, MBM 1982. Standing from left: Anirban Chowdhury, MBA 2012, Madhuranath Ramachandra, MBA 2012, Emil Cruz, MM 2011, Winson Lan, ME Singapore 2003, Clare Yeo, MDP 1994, Amarjit Singh, MM 1981, and Bryan Kenneth Tsang, MBA 2012.

AIMAS Hosts Team High AIMers THE WINNERS OF THE Lenovo Case Track in the National University of Singapore (NUS) Celebration-2012

Business Case Contest, Anirban Chowdhury, Bryan Kenneth Tsang and Madhuranath Ramachandra met with the members of the AIM Alumni Singapore (AIMAS) last November 2012. The Team High

AIMers also finished second runner-up in the NUS Business Case Competition, which is one of the biggest MBA case contests, and which drew 724 teams from around the world. The members of the team from MBA Cohort 7 remarked, “We would like to highlight the amazing support provided by the AIM alumni—especially Mr. Ramon De Vera, Dr. Gan Cheong Eng, Mr. Deb Mazumdar and Mr. Sai Athreya and the invaluable AIM alumni led by AIMAS President Dr. Gan Cheong Eng (standing fourth from left) welcomes Madhu, Bryan and Anirban in Singapore.

Deb Mazumdar and Sai Athreya treated Anirban, Bryan and Madhu to lunch at Punjab Grill, Marina Bay Sands last October 31, 2012.

assistance from the Alumni Relations Office headed by Mr. Greg Atienza and the Chairman of AAAIM, Mr. Eduardo Sison.” AIMAS members, led by Dr. Gan Cheong Eng treated the students during their stay in Singapore.

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AIM Alumni Gathering in Australia

From left: Noellie Garand, Daraius Bilimoria, Adie Gupta and Rolando Echevarria.

AIM GRADUATES IN Sydney Led by Adie Gupta (MBM 1998) held a gathering last October 24, 2012 to start the formation of an alumni chapter in Australia. In attendance were Daraius Bilimoria (MBM 1985), Rolando Echevarria (MM 1997), Noellie Garand (MDM 2009) and Adie. The group plans to meet once in three months with either a guest speaker, or with an alumnus to speak on relevant topics. For more information, please contact adie.gupta@gmail.com.

Ikatan Alumni AIM Activities THE AIM ALUMNI chapter in Indonesia recently staged an Asian Business Forum with the theme, “The Euro crisis amid Sluggish and Uncertain Global Economic Development: The Challenge for Asian Coun-

tries.” The conference was held at the Museum Bank Indonesia, Jakarta Kota last November 8, 2012. AIM President Steve DeKrey graciously accepted the invitation to speak on leadership in Asia. Dr. Arifin M. Siregar, a member of AIM’s Board of Governors was also a part of the roster of guest speakers.

The event was organized by the Vice Chairman of the Federation of AIM Alumni (FAIM) and President of Ikatan Alumni AIM Indonesia, Mr. Dennis Firmansjah, MM 1994. More than 20 alumni participants attended the event made possible with the support of Atmosperforma as secretariat and Antara Kantor Berita Indonesia as media partner. After the Asian Business Forum, a Semi-Annual Meeting of FAIM was held at the

Morrissey Hotel, Jakarta. The AIM alumni leaders were pleased to welcome AIM President Steve DeKrey during the meeting, as he presented a FAIM Chairman’s award to Haji Zulkifly Baharom, President of Kelab AIM Malaysia for his exceptional efforts in advancing the AIM alumni community worldwide. A networking dinner was hosted that evening by Haji Kasmuri Sukardi for AIM alumni from Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines at the Restoran Sari Kuring in Jakarta Selatan. It was a wonderful opportunity for alumni from different nations to share common bonds as members of the AIM community, and to expand friendships beyond their shores. Dr. Arifin M. Siregar presents a token of appreciation to AIM President Steve DeKrey.


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

Triple A Club Welcomes New AIM President Steven J. DeKrey IT WAS A NIGHT OF MANY firsts for the Triple A Club. Last September 21, 2012, the exclusive alumni club held their first ever dinner meeting with their spouses at the Casa Roces restaurant in Malacañang Compound. Hosted by Triple A Club President Former Sec. Jesli A. Lapus, MBM 1973 and Sec. Hermionio “Sonny” Coloma

Triple A Club President Jesli A. Lapus, MBM 1973 at the Triple A Club Dinner last September 21, 2012

Jr., MBM 1978, the dinner did not only serve as a get-together for the group but also as an introduction to AIM’s new President Steven J. DeKrey, who was joined by his wife Mrs. Veronica DeKrey. The hosts showcased their Filipino hospitality to the guests of honor that night with Sec. Lapus welcoming his guests with his good-intentioned humor and giving a short background on the Triple A Club. Sec. Coloma remarked on the historical significance of the date and place of their dinner which was coincidentally held on the 40th anniversary of the Martial Law Proclamation and that Casa Roces is the home of Chino Roces who was jailed together with Ninoy Aquino in 1972. President DeKrey then addressed the Triple A awardees in attendance and told them what he knew about AIM before he took the post. He is optimistic about the Institute’s future saying that the school is in the right place, the country is doing the right things and the economy is picking up. According to him, the support and enthusiasm from

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Seated from left: Victor Jose I. Luciano, MBM 1970, Herminio B. Coloma, Jr., MBM 1978, Dr. Steve DeKrey, Jesli Lapus, MBM 1973, and Ramon Farolan, MM 1975. Standing from left: Roland Young, MBM 1974, Perpetuo de Claro, MBM 1973, Arthur Aguilar, MBM 1972, Alfred A. Xerez-Burgos, Jr., MBM 1971, Renato Valencia, MBM 1971, Francis Estrada, MBM 1973, Jesus Francisco, MBM 1971 and Edgardo Limon, MBM 1974.

the alumni community has also been overwhelming and that his meeting with AIM Chairman and alumnus Napoleon “Poly” Nazareno, MBM 1973 and the Board is one of the key factors on why he accepted the job. Going beyond this support, however, the President stated that his first order of business is looking

for people who will not only care, but also do things that needed to be done. After the dinner, some of the guests, along with Dr. DeKrey and his wife, toured the Roces’ ancestral home with Sec. Coloma serving as guide. All in all, it was an evening of fun and good fellowship for everyone.

Alumni Gathering in Thailand

Alumni Relations Office found an opportunity to hold a get together for alumni in AS THE 2012 ASIAN Thailand. It also proved to Forum for Corporate Social be a superb time for the new Responsibility (AFCSR) was held AIM President, Dr. Steve in Bangkok last October 25-26, DeKrey to personally meet the AIM Rep Office and the AIM graduates in Bangkok. Seated from left: Chawan Theungsang, MBM A lunch was graciously 1982, Cecille Calleja-Taufique, MBM 1982 hosted by the organizers of Voravuth Bill Chengsupanimit, MBM 1982, the AFCSR at the Shangri-La Greg Atienza, MBM 1983, Jerome Ty, MBM 1982 and Nataya Ouirivach, MBM 1982. Bangkok last October 25.

Seated from left: Achara Pricha, MBM 1983, Dr. Steve DeKrey, Nataya Ouivirach, MBM 1982 , Nipaporn Gulpanich. (Standing from left): Greg Atienza, MBM 1983 Khantong Dalad, PDM 1993, Paitoon Taveebhol, MDP 1985, Suchart Narksavaek, MDP 1994, Chawan Theungsang, MBM 1982, Patama Apple Thammongkol, Ramon De Vera, MBM 1973.


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The Lead Host Class of MBM 1993

“LET’S CONNECT, LET’S CELEBRATE” Reunion of Celebrating Classes Held at AIM “CONNECT AND CELEBRATE” was the theme of the Reunion of Celebrating Classes last October 29, 2012 at the TPIC-Bancom, 3rd floor of the Asian Institute of Management. Sixty-seven alumni attended the event to reunite and rekindle memories

AAAIM Chairman Ed Sison, MBM ‘73

they had as students in the institute. Celebrating Classes for Homecoming 2013 are 1973, 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2003 and 2008. Alumni Association of AIM (AAAIM) Philippine chapter Chairman Mr. Eduardo Sison,

MBM 1973, opened the night by greeting the eight celebrating batches. He reported on the achievements of the alumni such as the formation of new AIM alumni leader groups and the increasing number of AIM alumni chapters around the world. “Our alumni leaders continue to respond to global changes with the mission of sustaining AIM’s position as THE business school in our region,” he added. AIM President, Dr. Steve DeKrey also welcomed the alumni back to the school and recognized the excellent performance of the Board of Directors of the Alumni Association of AIM. He enthusiastically greeted each celebrating batch and acknowledged the attendees who made their way through the Manila traffic in order to join celebration. Dr. DeKrey stressed the role of AIM alumni in the Institute’s vision: “To be Asia’s source for

global leadership, talent, insights and wisdom. Insights are what the faculty should provide, and I see wisdom as what the alumni should give,” he said. Dr. DeKrey ended his speech by expressing his gratitude to last year’s homecoming Chairman, Ms. Rowena “Wing” Bayoneta, MBM 1992. Through the leadership of Ms. Bayoneta, MBM 1992 donated one million pesos to the AIM Alumni Leadership Foundation. The Chairman of Homecoming 2013, Francisco “Jay” Bernardo, MBM 1983, presented the plans for the Homecoming Week in February. He launched “Stars on 45” which will be the fund raising platform for the homecoming. They plan to invite overseas alumni to donate USD 45 each to raise funds for scholarships. Mr. Faiz Sheik, MBM 1993, on the other hand, explained the concepts and flow of the 2013 Homecoming Night proper. He elaborated on the role of technology as it will be incorporated in the grand celebration.

Jay Bernardo, Homecoming 2013 Chairman

The Grand Alumni Homecoming will be held at the grounds of the Asian Institute of Management as AIM celebrates 45 years of excellence as one of the leading business schools in Asia. In line with this, MBM 1993, chose CONNECT as the main theme for the anniversary. Along with Resorts World Manila, SMART and PLDT will be the main sponsors for the homecoming activities. The reunion ended with former classmates sharing happy memories and scrumptious food. MBM 1992 donated drinks for this mini reunion.


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Class of MBM 1973

Graduates of 1983

DeKrey with alumni from MBM 1988

Class of 1998

Graduates of 2003

Class of 2008

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Alumni

Family Day

2012

MORE THAN 35 ALUMNI families gathered for a funfilled Alumni Family Day on November 25, 2012 at the Sun Valley Estates, Antipolo, Rizal, Philippines. Hosted by Sun Valley, the AIM Alumni Association Philippines (AAAIM), and the AIM Alumni Relations Office, the event welcomed over 150 alumni, their children, grandchildren, and other family members to enjoy the recreational activities at the Sun Valley Sports Plazaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;

billiards, basketball, giant swing, kiddie cars, playground, soccer field, swimming pool, table tennis, and the zipline. Chaired by Mr. Roger Damasco, TMP 1988 and AAAIM Board Member, the Alumni Family Day aimed to strengthen ties with alumni and to allow alumni to spend some quality time with their family and friends. Sun Valley, Global Port, and Harbour Centre generously sponsored the event.


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The Asian Century Has Begun

The Ambassadors’ Forum @ AIM is a venue for the professional exchange of knowledge and skills related to international development issues and trends. During the third Ambassadors’ Forum @ AIM, Australian Ambassador to the Philippines Bill Tweddell excitedly talked about his love for Asia and what he refers to as the Asian Century. Ambassador Tweddell has been assigned to six countries in the region as a member of Australia’s overseas diplomatic missions.

THE INCREASING ‘ASIANISATION’ OF AUSTRALIA’S population through immigration patterns was noted by Australian Ambassador to the Philippines Bill Tweddell, with now more than two million Asians calling Australia their home. According to new figures from the Australian bureau of statistics, the number of people of Asian origin in Australia has almost doubled in a decade, from 1.03 million in the middle of 2000 to 2.1 million in the middle of 2010. “This change has altered how Australia relates to the region, which is reflected on the number and size of Australia’s diplomatic missions in Asia. Today, eight out of Australia’s 10 biggest diplomatic missions are in Asia—with Manila the eighth biggest in our overseas network.” This, the Ambassador highlights “demonstrates our commitment to relations with this country.” The Ambassador also spoke of Asia’s “remarkable” rise. He has witnessed the major changes in the region in recent decades. According to him, the “dramatic emergence of China and India will define this century in entirely new terms; these changes will have profound effects on Australia.” These changes are already being felt in his country, and have forced Australia to begin doing a number

of things: first, to recognize that change is occurring; second, to identify the opportunities and risks that come with that change; and third, to ensure that the country is positioned to take advantage of the opportunities and minimize the risks. The need to go through this checklist, the Ambassador added, is borne out of Australia’s relationship with Asia and the swift development of countries like Japan, Vietnam and China in the past two decades. According to Ambassador Tweddell, “As recently as 1990, the Australian economy was larger than the ten economies of ASEAN combined. Today, our economy, as robust as it is, is about two-thirds the size of ASEAN’s economies in market exchange rate terms. And while Australia has grown consistently in the past 20 years, the rapid growth of China has meant the latter’s economy being four and a half times bigger than Australia’s. China and India are projected to grow from a fifth to a third of the global economy.” Strategy is becoming important in the midst of changes to the economic landscape in Asia, and the shift from the West to the East in so far as global significance is concerned. This has meant the creation of “friendships and partnerships considered unlikely


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in the recent past, as rivals and even former foes combine to drive regional change. As Prime Minister Gillard has said, these are changes of type, not of degree.” Australia straddles this delicate balance between the things it stands for and will not compromise as it creates new relationships with Asia’s rising powers such as China, India and Indonesia. Global wealth and power are also shifting. “To give just one example of that The Asian century shift, it has been predicted that as early highlights the as 2025, the emerging and developing fact that business world could well be a net foreign investor, as usual for while developed countries become net governments is not enough... foreign borrowers. Yet, while so much is new, many old tensions remain: we need look no further than the Korean peninsula for an example of that, where a rogue state poses a threat to its neighbors and to the region as a whole and, above all, to its own captive people,” asserts Ambassador Tweddell. All of these can affect Australia’s national policies. As Prime Minister Julia Gillard says, “These relationships will not manage themselves and we are far from being complacent about them. Australia can stand strongly in our changing region, as a mature and confident player,” Ambassador Tweddell says. The Asian Century, as far as Australia is concerned, brings strategic, social, and environmental challenges. The Ambassador noted that the boom in mining investment in his country was fueled by Asian demand, increasing five-fold since 2004. The Ambassador further asserts, “In the Asian century, what used to be considered Australia’s traditional disadvantages—our reliance on natural resources, our location in the world—become great new strengths.” The demands of Asia on Australia have also ceased to make what’s

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called the “tyranny of distance” real, giving the country what The Economist Magazine terms “the advantage of adjacency.” There is also future demand on Australia that the Asian growth continuously creates. For instance, the growth of the Asian middle class means more demand for Australian coal and iron that are used for building apartments, urban trains and other infrastructure. Ambassador Tweddell added that the booming Asian countries “will look to countries like Australia for tertiary education and for technical skills; they will travel in new ways, seek new custom-made holiday experiences, not the package tours of former years and, through life, they will want sophisticated financial advice and the benefits of world class medical services as well.” The Asian century highlights the fact that business as usual for governments is not enough, as there “is not a single aspect of government policy and national planning that will not be touched by the great changes to come. Food security and foreign investment, immigration and education, stock market structures and financial regulation, energy policy and environmental standards—this is a vast landscape of change,” the Ambassador continues. The rapid growth “will change the social, economic, strategic and environmental order of our world.” PM Gillard’s White Paper on Australia in the Asian century is a measure of how serious we are in facing these changes. The intellectual task of the paper was “to comprehend fully the implications of the Asian century, to describe in detail its opportunities and risks, and to ensure that these implications are understood across Australia.” In ending, Ambassador Tweddell emphasized how “serious Australia is in ensuring that the nation adapts and reforms to maximize the opportunities and minimize risks brought about these changing realities around us.”


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Beyond Effective Leadership Carmela D. Ortigas, Ph.D, PDM 1987 and Gregorio J. Atienza, MBM 1983


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IM CHAIRMAN AND PLDT-SMART CEO POLY Nazareno, MBM ‘73 once wrote: “One way to stop CEOs dead in their tracks is to ask them: How do you become an effective leader? Simple on the surface, but it is one of the most difficult to answer. Most CEOs are so busy being effective leaders they seldom have time to reflect on questions like this. The easiest way would be to pontificate on leadership, but what works for some might not work for others. Rather than preach about what good leadership is, perhaps the better way would be to relate what has and what has not worked for me—in the hope that some of my experiences may prove useful.” (Nazareno, N.L. in ‘Taking Aim: Asian Management Breakthroughs’. 2006) How and do leadership types and styles impact on organizational management processes? How does one become or what makes one an effective leader? Given the running interest that the AIM alumni network have on the matter of leadership, (hence the alumni slogan: “Leadership. Live it!”) the AIM Alumni Relations Office (ARO), found it imperative to conduct a formal study on the matter. Sponsored by Alumni, ARO as a natural consequence decidedly focused on AIM alumni leaders in business organizations. This qualitative research entitled “Causal Studies of Effective Leadership in Philippine Business Organizations” was conceptualized, designed and conducted by an ARO “research team” headed by *Carmela D. Ortigas, PhD, as Research Director. This initial research project of ARO shall eventually cover AIM alumni in three (3) countries—the Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia—for study and comparison. It may include other Asian countries as the significance of such arises. This essay is an executive summary report of Country I: The Philippines. Parallel studies are now being conducted in Malaysia and Indonesia. The results of the data analyzes, integration and comparison between countries may be published in the next issue of the AIM Leader Magazine. This Study has the following main queries in mind: 1. Can leadership style and performance, values and competencies, be linked to the success of identified organizations in the achievement of vision-mission-objectives (VMO) and bottom line expectations; 2. Can this business leadership be adapted/replicated/ developed in multi-sector organizational leaders in the Philippines and in leaders of other Asian countries as well? 3. What kind of strategies can be formulated to facilitate the transfer of and training of “leadership technology”? Analyses of the Empowerment and Leadership Process in 20 Philippine Business Organizations The study is theoretical as well as applied research. This qualitative research, utilized methodologies: questionnaire design; frequency rating; inter-rater reliability; content and thematic analyses; formulation of categories; integration and conclusion. Research data was collected from responses to the Survey Questionnaire; Focused Group Discussions; and interviews with the 20 CEOs. As theoretical research it aims to evaluate the above main questions using existing social, psychological, behavioral theories, organization and management frameworks, and related studies that enable one to predict outcomes. As applied research, the study is committed to practical use—it looks into organizational, social, psychological, behavioral dimensions affecting the way leaders manage work organizations. The study attempts to identify values (core beliefs) and competency (skill sets) of effective organizational

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leaders. It seeks to develop innovative tools for leadership building, adaptation and replication. Thus the primary objectives of the study are to identify, describe, and differentiate characteristics of successful business leaders from the ranks of the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) MBM and MM Alumni. Identified respondents of this study are 20 successful business CEOs in the Philippines. The survey questions given the latter are found in the following:

TABLE 1: CEO Survey Questionnaire 1. What do I consider as important in order to attain our visionmission-objectives (VMO) with speed and ease? 2. What do I regard as essentials in bringing out the best in the workforce on many levels/aspects? 3. What measures do I take to adapt to and harness the cultural diversity in my organization to serve its capacity building needs and impact on my community? 4. Compare Asian and Western styles of organizational leadership. Do I see Asian leaders going Western now or the near future? 5. As a top leader, how can I and my organization create innovative practices to be able to react in a responsible manner to the current critical social-political-economicenvironmental events in order to impact a positive difference in our community, country, and region? 6. What are the questions you ask when you read and hear colleagues talk about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)? Do you see your organization active in CSR? If yes or no, what are some of your reasons? 7. What values, attitudes, skills and behaviors do I believe are essential to achieving my objectives as a top organizational leader in my country and in the region? Formulation of behavioral categories derived from their responses to specific questions, were clustered in terms of Values and Competency are listed in the following:

Table 2: Values and Competencies of 20 AIM Alumni CEOs [ Frequently-mentioned answers from 3-5 counts, separated by a semi-colon (;) ] I. VALUES (Core Beliefs) 1. Social Consciousness (SC): The value of recognizing one’s responsibilities to do good outside one’s immediate organization and appreciation of one’s connectedness to society/nation/ region at large; it consists of active involvement in social-political activities; supports responsible parenthood; it is about being a law-abiding citizen, votes wisely, actively participate in choosing national leadership and team; backs the basic education of the people, imparts family values, dignity of work, good manners and right conduct; joins volunteer organizations and writes blogs about current issues and events. (Q8) 2. Responsive to Cultural Diversity (RCD): The importance of recognizing, understanding and respecting the diverse values and belief systems of the workforce of multi-sector organizations; it means considering including cultural diversity in many decision making and strategic planning processes; it is getting to know, understand better the cultural values of each and the


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difference from one and the other, which will lead to mutual appreciation and mutual respect; finding work meaningful can be a basis for making the diversity actually an asset. (Q6) 3. Harnessing Multi-Diversity (HD): The importance of making time to understand cultural differences and diverse nationality traits, which can be harnessed to serve the development needs of the organization and the community; it includes developing a “listening” mechanism to gauge the culture of organization and the community, e.g. employee one-on-one sessions; having a “meet the CEO session/hour”; it means spending time in career related mentoring with the office staff as well as managers; it includes conducting cultural awareness-raising educational programs, which builds mutual respect of each other’s differences. This can always be pointed out thru reminders and slogans. (Q6) 4. Personal Integrity (P-I): Cherish the value The Asian Leader that top organizational sets noble goals, e.g. leaders place on being ability to sacrifice for upfront with honesty organization, hard work, and professionalism respect for others, love and staying focused of country, creativity/ on the attainment of organizational objectives; innovativeness, high sense of responsibility; it means representing moral leadership and discipline, dignity and compassion by example, as in “walking your talk”; continues leading and learning and growing as a leader; continues equipping team/workforce (with effective skills, and providing efficient structures and systems). The Asian Leader sets noble goals, e.g. ability to sacrifice for organization, hard work, respect for others, love of country, creativity/innovativeness, high sense of responsibility; has or continue to develop a mindset that is “wholistic” and employ both “left brain” or logical strategies and “right brain” or adaptive-intuitive strategies; it is a “servant-leader” type of leadership, which serve the interests of people in the organization as well as other stockholders, the community and the nation; must be passionate for the country and concerned for the poor; must not be involved in unethical business practices; responsive products and ethical ways of doing business; an example to his people—values and behavior that will cascade down and even spill over to his social menu. (Q8 & Q9) 5. Fostering Leadership (FL): Appreciation of the importance of building future organizational leaders; it involves identifying groups of young professionals who indicate leadership potentials, then design mentoring programs conducted by the top executives. It includes keeping the balance between respecting and valuing persons and results of their performance; it means continue building people skills and communication skills in self and workforce. It is encouraging everyone to do their best, affirming and acknowledging talents and performance; it means implementing the acronym: “Fit POET”–Fit People, Organization, Culture to the Tasks. It also consists of ensuring sustainability in the organization by generating resources to implement goals and by networking locally and globally. (Q3 & Q8)

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II. COMPETENCY (Skill Sets) 1. Visioning (VI): engage the workforce to participate in the formulation as well as the implementation of the VMO; approval by consensus is imperative; includes creating a culture of internalizing the VMO, cascading it clearly into the organization in a structured and dynamic way that allows units and departments to accept it readily and respond immediately; means clarity of vision and clarity of everyone’s role in the VMO; understanding and ownership of the VMO by all from the Board to the front liners; making a model of good governance that is open and transparent so that we can focus on our vision and mission (Q1); spending a significant amount of time “preaching” the VMO to the troops; clear sense of priorities; goal congruence between managers and corporate objectives; faith is important because we need to believe that we can do it; focus on objectives. 2. Commitment (CM): The ability to commit every person in the organization to be part of the formulation of the VMG and which becomes a personal commitment as well; it take into account the importance of total dedication to make the VMG a way of life of all members. It means honest laying down of the purpose of the business; it means that full understanding will bring the ‘hows’ and mastery needed in terms of capacity and relationships building; milestones are monitored, celebrating successes, ensuring “pride” in the organization; trust relationship must be developed and shared among staff, between staff and management, all levels. (Q1) 3. Motivating Ability (MM): Communicate clearly the direction and maintain a clear vision of the goals and objectives with key people of the organization; motivation is key in making sure that the workforce will do their utmost best to contribute to achieving organizational goals as well as their own career goals; their inputs are important; they in effect own the company; evaluation of the VMO from Key Results Area (KRA) must be done regularly; stimulate stockholders, board members, alumni, etc. friends with ‘deep pockets’ to invest/infuse funds. Openness and willingness to listen; personalexample is important, even in small things as in being prompt at meetings, people notice and hopefully follow. (Q2) 4. Human Relations Proficiency (HRP): Establish good relationships and promote collaboration and healthy competition to a diverse group of people; staff are treated like “family members”; preciseness is important, but fair in the handling and managing style; it means developing a corporate culture focused on commitment to excellence and loyalty balanced with family values; it means leadership by example; make the people in the organization understand that they have a stake in it; use servant-leadership type of management. (Q2) 5. Team Building (TB): The ability to engage the workforce to join forces and work as a team to achieve unit goals and organizational goals. Every member must have clear roles and functions within the team. It is important to acknowledge their good performance and creatively point out the weak-


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nesses and threats to motivate each one to work as a group. Cascade growth, especially in a competitive organization yet teamwork is encouraged. Provide incentives both financial and non-financial takes like gifts, travels, trainings. Creates a creed articulating noble goals, code of ethics, practices, then institutionalize these.(Q2) 6. Mentoring-Coaching Ability (MC): Provides mentoring/coaching activities. Assigns middle managers to mentor new hires. Avails of non-formal mentoring opportunities. Learn skills of active listening; differentiates mentoring from advising; exposes learners to leadership activities; motivates people by empowering/ enabling them to achieve their task targets thru mentoring, coaching and giving fair incentives; personifies the “ideal” called for by the VMO for my people to see and follow.

7. Discernment Aptitude (DA): The ability to distinguish between Asian and Western styles of management. It includes the ability to discern which is most effectual for achieving Asian organizational goals by Asian organizational leaders; it means verifying as to whether going ‘Western’ is the appropriate direction for Asian organizational leaders to take. Asian management will continue to be different from the West; AIM really teaches an Asian style of management/government. The US model doesn’t work here. (Q6 & Q7) 8. People Oriented (PO): Asian Leaders are perceived as strongly person-oriented and relationships-based. They are more sensitive to the “human, emotional, feeling side of a problem”. They prefer the “pakikisama” and “may pinagsamahan” concept of management approach. They are

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more position conscious and are process-oriented, personalistic, hierarchical; they are more like family in a relational orientation with the workforce. Asian Leaders view their Western counterparts as focused on the outcome and competence oriented. They are seen as generally straightforward, logical and results-systems oriented. They tend to be aggressive, use rational and technological strategy with a scientific orientation. Asian societies are very personal in nature. (Q6) 9. Adaptability (AD): Asian organizational leaders do not see themselves as “going West” entirely. They are highly sensitive and adaptable to the requirements of the local work environment. They try to be both (Asian and Western) giving value to the person as well as the outcome of the A general outcome work. They have effective systems installed, but rely arising from the more on the harmonious analyses of Values and relationships to get results. Competency, is that The Asian way has now most of the respondents, a strong influence, as it not only want to, but seems to work better in intend to actively Asia. There appear to be involve themselves in a meeting of styles. There “leadership building”. is now a growing interest in Asian style of management and leadership. One respondent thinks that the more mature an organization is in its life cycle the more Western it may become. (Q6 & Q7) 10. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Incorporating corporate social responsibility into the business strategy of the organization; encouraging the workforce to participate in determining the CSR program; regularly updating the organization of crucial internal affairs and externally, such as in critical social-political-economic-environmental events that can be significantly influenced by the capabilities of the organization; organization is part of a socio-economic program that espouses provincial development; has clear plans to implement innovative projects in specific sectors within the next three to five years; active in mobilizing grassroots communities for poverty alleviation; CSR should be integral to the business functioning, not just a division or an afterthought; the whole enterprise should be a CSR expression; CSR not a special activity, but a basic social responsibility of (business) organizations, that is embedded into the manufacture of maximum quality goods, efficient production and safe delivery of goods and services. 11. Strategic Planning and Foresight given the global meltdown (SPF): By the Grace of God we performed better; Philippines not yet a global player, as such are able to take time to improve our operations within the Philippines and ASEAN occasionaly. Too early to tell, but strategic plan is in place. It is moving. It is starting to change the situation; strategic planning is a “must” competency. The described behaviors in response to the Survey Questionnaire, clustered into Values and Competency are an integration of Leadership Styles or what makes leaders effective and even transformative, as in this case of CEOs of 20 Philippine

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business organizations who are AIM Alumni. The following are the answers to the main questions asked by the study:

1. Can leadership style and performance, values and competencies be linked to successful leadership in business organizations?

This leadership study empirically demonstrates that indeed the leadership and management style and performance, values and competencies of the 20 respondents play a pivotal role in the success of their individual business. Content and thematic analyses of responses in terms of frequency showed that there are strong similarities in the description of their Values and Competency and Leadership Style between and among the business leader respondents. This high similarity may be due to the fact that all are AIM alumni. Hence they may have learned, for instance, the same unique strategy formulation format or the “AIM brand” in answering, in their words: ‘for achieving vision, mission, goals, with speed and ease’. (Q1) Dissimilarities were expected in the implementation style of the business leader according to the industry brand or kind of organization wherein these particular values and competency were nurtured and/or developed. This aspect is particularly evident in the ways and means, the leaders “bring out the best in the workforce” (Q2). Certainly processes involved in “bringing out the best in people” may be different in a company manufacturing motor vehicle tires, from another that is manufacturing/designing optical frames and glasses, or in a trading and marketing organization or in human services organizations. There were divergent positions on whether Asian leadership should stay on course (Asian way) or whether they should shift to Western’ style of management. (Q6 & Q7) Parallel responses were also noted in “helping leaders deal with challenges of the times, such as critical social-politicaleconomic-environmental events.” Comparable strategies showed up in answers to statements regarding their views on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): ‘social development consciousness’; CSR must be a way of life (Q8). A diverse stand is that: CSR is not a special activity, (rather) the basic social responsibility of organizations, i.e. to produce maximum quality products and highly efficient services and delivery systems. Varying positions were elicited in response to question: “Given the global meltdown, do you feel your company performed better than, the same or below the industry after you took over?”... too early to tell, but strategic plan is in place; by God’s grace, we performed better; Philippines not a global player, it is not affected by this storm that is hitting major economies; our company is getting better every year; had to create demand in untapped markets. In comparing the two types of leadership behaviors, and their impact on their organizations, which established their success, it can be predicted that if results of the study are utilized and disseminated systematically, other organizational leaders, multisector leaders in the Philippines and other Asian leaders may achieve the same level of effectiveness. The answer to the second major research question then:

2. Can this leadership style be replicated, adapted or developed in multi-sectoral organizations in the Phillippines and other Asian countries ?


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With the proper motivation and determination, the answer is, certainly. A general outcome arising from the analyses of Values and Competency, is that most of the respondents, not only want to, but intend to actively involve themselves in “leadership building”. Reviewing the formulated categories in the previous table, one will find the cluster of behaviors under both Values and Competency describing in the words of the respondents: “Fostering Leadership” ; “Mentoring and Coaching Ability”; “Personal Integrity”; “Responsiveness to Cultural Diversity”; “Commitment”; “Motivating”. (Q3 & Q6) Given that the respondents, are after all effective CEOs and Presidents of their organizations, it stands to reason that they would want to foster leadership in their direct reports or other “promising young professionals”. And to “mentor and coach them for leadership roles;” so that consequently their own ‘values’ and ‘competencies’ shall continuously advance for the enduring benefit of their organizations and communities.

3. What kind of strategies can be formulated to facilitate the transfer and training of “leadership technology”?

The research utilization section of the Study recommends how this can be accomplished through, among others: dissemination through regional newsletters and media vehicles such as the AIM Leader Magazine, conduct of leadership conferences, seminarworkshops, lecture series and other similar fora. A significant strategy for replication is the design and construction of a “There is now a growing reliable and valid instrument interest in Asian style for measuring effective of management and leadership behaviors and leadership; leaders attitudes/beliefs in a Likert have effective systems Scale Design. Test items of this instrument will be derived installed, but rely more on the harmonious from respondents’ answers to the open-ended CEO Survey relation to get results, Questionnaire (one such tool which is very Asian; the has been designed and sent on- Asian way has a strong line to AIM Alumni leaders. We influence as it seems encourage alumni respondents to work better in Asia.” to accomplish the online measurement tool and return same. Results in terms of Scores will be used as basis to construct a reliable and valid “Effective Leadership Measure” for eventual personal and organizational use by the AIM Alumni network. –Ed.).

Discussion of Conclusions: Effective and Transformative Leadership

In the beginning, the question was raised: What makes CEOs effective? The analyses of the variables showed that the CEOs’ behaviors and attitudes clustered as values and competency are working definitions that portray effective leaders. Furthermore, the detailed ways that they employed to bring out the best in the workforce, both as persons and as professionals, indicate that they are transformative as well. In addition, the CEO respondents’ emphases on commitment to all that they espouse signify that they model the behaviors and attitudes that they prescribe for their people. Moreover, they believe that the empowerment approach in leadership creates structures and processes that democratize relationships between the power-

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holders such as top management and down to the service personnel or the “the rank-and-file”. These in turn increase the latters’ ‘sense of co-ownership’ which motivates them to fully collaborate in the attainment of the vision, mission and objectives of the organization. “Leadership may be described as transformative when leaders are perceived as undergoing the processes of personal transformation themselves, which makes these leaders highly inspirational, rather than motivational. Organizational leaders can be motivational through skills that manipulate the external environment; but only those who lead from within can touch and inspire those whom they lead.” (Mossesgeld-Chua, R. M. 2009) Transformation is usually ascribed to individuals who use the outcome of some critical episodes in their personal lives and careers as an impetus for change and transformation. This desire intensifies the pursuit of a wholistic mode of learning, physical-mentalemotional-spiritual, for achieving heightened self awareness. In their lifetime they evince an abundance of kindness, compassion, goodwill and wisdom. In the workplace transformative leaders are as insistent with the development of their people as persons, as they are with the workforce’ performance development as professionals. This was evident in answers of ninety percent (90%) of the respondents of the leadership study. The results of this qualitative research, empirically certify that leadership development interventions, when implemented appropriately according to planned and systematic schemes, are significant leadership-building tools. Generally, the review of literature related to leadership educed evolving types of leadership demanded by changing business environments. It speaks with eloquence of Asian leadership as inevitable and an imperative for global leadership. The AIM alumni respondents appear to resonate with such. In the words of several respondents: “There is now a growing interest in Asian style of management and leadership; leaders have effective systems installed, but rely more on the harmonious relation to get results, which is very Asian; the Asian way has a strong influence as it seems to work better in Asia...” (Competency: Adaptability). Literature further depicts an array of effective leaders, each one, with his/her own unique style of leadership, which may serve as models for various types of leaders. Personal empowerment grows not in isolation but in interactions with one’s significant groups. This is vital to organizational empowerment and transformation. Participation is the key factor to its continuing movement. It appears that AIM alumni may have quite a few lessons to learn from this leadership study, crucial in the volatile, globalized environment of today. This augurs well for AIM’s 45-year old vision-mission statement which remains: “to help sustain the growth of Asian societies by developing competent, professional, entrepreneurial and sociallyresponsible leader managers.” *Dr. Ortigas is Professor of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University, Ateneo de Zamboanga University, PDM ’87, She was Research Director for the construction of the AIM Emotional Intelligence Measure for Asian Business Leaders (EIM²), and the Quality Assurance Measure (QAM) for enhancing faculty teaching effectiveness. She authors well-received books, among which: Group Process and the Inductive Method: Theory and Practice in the Philippines; Psychology of Transformation: Philosophy, Principles, Practice; Strategic Training for Empowerment in the Workplace.


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Story “STRATEGY, I GUESS, WOULD BE THE BIGGEST RECOGNITION OF WHAT A LEADER DOES. KNOWLEDGE IS USEFUL IN EVERY PROFESSION. ORGANIZATION HELPS IN ALL JOBS. SOCIAL SKILLS ARE GREAT. BUT A LEADER ALSO NEEDS TO BE STRATEGIC AND FORWARD-LOOKING. SO THESE FOUR QUADRANTS NEED TO BE DEVELOPED IN AN MBA PROGRAM AND IN LIFE.”


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In his first letter to the AIM community, President Steve DeKrey laid down his vision for AIM which would help the Institute attain a resurgent position of prominence in the region. His vision is for AIM to become Asia’s source for global leadership talent, insight, and wisdom. “That means people come to us for those things,” explained Dr. DeKrey. “If you want to hire somebody for a leadership track or somebody to manage your operations, you should be looking to AIM...I’ve said global leadership because any of us working in Asia needs to be global leaders. “TALENT IS OUR MAIN PRODUCT,” HE CONTINUED. “WE PRODUCE TALENT, WE BRING IN TALENT, we evolve talent in our exec ed. So we should be the source for leadership talent. Insight should be the purview of our faculty...We’d like our faculty to be thought leaders. When it comes to leadership in Asia, our faculty should be the experts. So they share it in the classroom, but also they share it in consulting, in executive education, in upgrading the talent within companies.” Dr. DeKrey added wisdom to the vision because he considers it “the ultimate product of a successful leader. “If you look at the definition, it has something to do with efficient use of knowledge,” he said. “It’s an application of awareness basically. If you’re evolving throughout your career, wisdom accumulates. For me, wisdom comes from our faculty, who have been very experienced, and also our alumni...If AIM is the source of those (talent, insight, and wisdom), it will be a recognition of our leadership within the region.” With AIM’s focus on leadership and innovation in its programs and research, Dr. DeKrey wasted no time in introducing a radical proposal, which was approved by the Board of Trustees last November. The first strategy is to bring in stronger MBA students by cutting the class size in half, i.e., from 130 students to 65-75. “That means even if the number of applicants or strength doesn’t change, immediately our quality will improve,” he noted. “What we care about is reputation and quality.” To Dr. DeKrey, every aspect in AIM has room for enhancement. “We should be in a continuous improvement mode with a quality-reputation orientation. So we look at our student body: we can certainly broaden the diversity and upgrade their experience levels...You look at facilities, at faculty, at students, at products, meaning the curriculum and all of that. There could be improvements in all of those. Additionally, there may be new products that we can develop. I’ve been promoting the idea of an Executive Doctorate of Management or a DBA. It’s a huge need market in Asia; it’s a huge need market globally. I’ve talked to some potential partners about that, and there is interest. In fact, some very significant partners are offering to support this. So adding new products is also another way to gain our quality and reputation enhancement, and provide global leadership talent, insight, and wisdom.”

by Rose Cheryl R. Orbigo, BMP 2005

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“WE CAN BE ASSOCIATED WITH RESEARCH TANKS OR INSTITUTIONS...INNOVATION IN BUSINESS PROCESSES AND BUSINESS MODELS IS ALSO SOMETHING THAT CAN COME FROM THE BUSINESS FACULTY... ULTIMATELY IT’S THE INNOVATIVE LEADER THAT WINS THE GAME. IT’S THAT FORWARD THINKER THAT CREATES THE FUTURE, NOT WAIT FOR IT. The second strategy is to increase the MBA tuition fee. “We’re underpriced in the market. Our tuition is half of what it should be as compared to the regional b-schools. We’re charging $24,000 for a top private school. That’s very, very cheap. Our intention is to raise that tuition considerably and to provide scholarship support.” Recently Dr. DeKrey has been oriented towards the theory of the four quadrants of the brain which makes him convinced AIM is in a prime position to produce leaders. The theory was developed by Ned Herrmann, a manager at GE. “He came up with a concept that’s not left brain-right brain. It’s left-up, left-low, right-up, rightlow,” Dr. DeKrey enumerated. “These quadrants are related to top leader capabilities. We tend to have strengths in one or the other, or maybe in more than one or two. Turns out, recent research by Hermann’s daughter (Ann Herrmann-Nehdi) has shown that the very top leaders are strong in all four. She actually investigated the quadrant preference and capability of the C-suite: CEOs, CFOs, CIOs of the very big companies. It turns out they’re strong in all four: interpersonal skill, academic knowledge awareness or IQ-related abilities, organizational skill, and strategic capability. So a top leader needs to be knowledgeable, be sociable, be organized, and be a big-picture, strategic thinker. “This is where innovation comes in. Leadership is about the future. Nobody knows the future,” he added. “But being able to anticipate, being able to be a forward-looking person predicts leadership success. These four quadrants are the kind of basics of a forward thinker. Strategy, I guess, would be the biggest recognition of what a leader does. Knowledge is useful in every profession. Organization helps in all jobs. Social skills are great. But a leader also needs to be strategic and forward-looking. So these four quadrants need to be developed in an MBA program and in life.” Because of AIM’s case methodology, Dr. DeKrey believes AIM is uniquely qualified to develop the four quadrants. Team orientation enhances social skills. Cases develop forward thinking. The core curriculum builds intellectual capability. “And the final one, organizational, frankly, an MBA student better be organized,” he stressed. “You can’t get through the curriculum unless you organize your time. “I’ve been in other schools that didn’t have a case orientation, and it’s a little tougher to develop strategic thinking and strong interpersonal skill,” he said. “That intense relationship with classmates doing case study is very effective in developing team skill and also communication skill because you need to communicate your ideas in front of the classroom. If you’re not good at it, you won’t do well at AIM, and you won’t do well in a leadership role. So we

have here an opportunity and an advantage in developing those four quadrants because of our case orientation.” Innovation in Asia To Dr. DeKrey and Dean Ricky Lim, Asia is a breeding ground for leadership and innovation. “The Philippines and Southeast Asia lately have been hotbeds for both planned and improvised leadership and innovation,” stated Dr. Lim. “Innovation means developing breakthrough technologies or processes. Innovation also means the way that you do things is completely different...Maybe because of our being in Third World countries where the systems are not always in place— either government or technology or economic—one has to be innovative, and one has to take more leadership roles in a very improvised way. We do it also in unique ways, not at all perhaps how the West would see it.” Dr. Lim listed examples of leaders and innovators. “I like Mahathir [Mohammad] and his policies in Malaysia which, on the surface, will seem to be un-Western-like, in that he has a very clear policy of favoring Bhumiputra. These are children of the soil. Such a policy may not be politically correct in the West. However, for Malaysia it has worked brilliantly because of the economic success it has brought Malaysia.” Another trailblazer is Gawad Kalinga’s Tony Meloto. “He took a gap left behind perhaps by our economic and bureaucratic woes, and filled it by getting a partnership between corporations and wealthy individuals, as well as engaging the poor to come up and build their own houses,” shared Dr. Lim. “He used the community concept of working together and fundraising, and came up with a really excellent business model, one that he’s already parlayed into new kinds of industries, new businesses that he’s creating beyond constructing houses.” A third case would be that of Ramon Magsaysay Award winners Christopher and Marivic Bernido. “The Bernidos are Physics teachers who left their good jobs in New York to revitalize a basically moribund high school in Jagna, Bohol,” described Dr. Lim. “They had to do so not only with little money but a sore lack of teachers in Physics, Math, and Chemistry...They had to create exercises that students could run on their own, perhaps with a little adult supervision, essentially Physics and Math and Science lessons in which kids could run their own experiments and be home in the afternoon in time to help their father to till the fields, to plant, or to harvest. And what came up was a Magsaysay Award-winning concept where literally students could learn on their own.” To Dr. Lim, innovators can be found not only in social non-profit enterprises but also in corporations and the public sector. “You have medium and small guys who are worthy of being called innovators and leaders because they went and did things that nobody told them to do...Leaders and innovators, sometimes they’re the same person, sometimes not. And they can be found not just in the Philippines. Surely you could go to Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Korea, and all these other countries in our region, and write stories about them. That’s why it’s exciting.” “The reason I moved here is because I saw Asia’s being really important to the world back in the ‘90s. That has not changed,” emphasized Dr. DeKrey. “In fact, it’s been confirmed more and more on an annual basis. What’s magnified the importance of Asia is the downturn in the West...South Korea’s important. China’s booming. The four tigers. Now perhaps the Philippines is the fifth tiger. We


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

hope. But the attention of the world and why Asia’s really more responsible as a leader is because of the global downturn, looking for growth. And growth comes from innovation.” Dr. DeKrey cited the research of his friend, Harvard professor Ranjay Gulati, on the link between recession and innovation. Prof. Gulati dug deep into the recessions of the past 100 years and analyzed their impact on companies. “What he discovered is 40-50% of companies vanished. They went bankrupt. They changed their name. They couldn’t survive. The downturn killed them,” explained Dr. DeKrey. “Forty percent were stable. They actually got through the downturn and came out of it...Ten percent prospered. So during a downturn, one out of 10 companies is actually benefitting from it. What’s the explanation for that? They’re the innovators. They’re the forward thinkers who see the world in a different way. How can I invest, prosper, and grow my business in a downturn? Well, it’s not hard if you’re willing to take some risks because most companies are hunkering down and cutting staff and cutting costs. But if you invest during a downturn, the chances are you’ll be much better poised coming out of it. And that’s not only innovation in product; it’s innovation in thinking new business models, new approaches to the market, new activity. So that’s the way to tie innovation in. Because of our case method orientation, the students really develop their creativity. In a case, there’s no right answer. You discuss about what happened and come up with a lot of innovative ideas. So to me, our teaching method really supports it.”

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Research Opportunities While AIM has no research center yet on innovation, Dr. DeKrey said, “I see an opportunity there partly because we have a pretty good base, but also because we’re in a developing economy that’s turned the corner and is starting to grow. And growth requires innovation. To continue to grow, you got to look forward at what’s the next decision.” For AIM to become an expert in leadership and innovation research, Dr. DeKrey sees potential in tying up with universities that have heavy research in technology, as some business schools have done. “It’s a very positive way to infuse that sort of thinking in the students,” he noted. “We can be associated with research tanks or institutions...Innovation in business processes and business models is also something that can come from the business faculty. And writing cases on some of the new approaches is a good way to start thinking about that...Ultimately it’s the innovative leader that wins the game. It’s that forward thinker that creates the future, not wait for it.” To Dr. Lim, AIM’s first strength in leadership and innovation is its alumni and business networks, which give the Institute access to a mine of case stories and research. Its second strength is the case method culture. “Leadership and innovation are best taught not as structured, theoretical frameworks: here are the steps to being a leader. Or here are the nine ways...The way one learns about leadership and innovation is by reading a story and allowing


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A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

the listener to generate his or her own insights. Because of our case method history, I think we are very well-positioned to tell these stories. Aside from writing many case stories, we are also empathetic; we listen very well. We are able to push our interviews to deeper insights and deeper levels.” AIM has a good culture of innovation, “but we’re not quite there yet,” admitted Dr. Lim. “We’re good in the sense that, as a standalone institute, AIM by itself has improvised a lot. It’s had to take the lead in areas where others might be fearful of—new programs, new markets. Our EXCELL (Executive Education and Lifelong Learning Center) has gone out not only to SE Asia, but we’re doing training as far afield as India, Africa, and the United States. “Research-wise, innovation happens in the kind of partners that we take,” he added. “For example, the TeaM Energy Center has to work with leaders from Muslim Mindanao, from the community, from government, from the Armed Forces...Our Policy Center has come up with research on political dynasties and on competitiveness. They are innovative in the sense that they’re going down new paths. But the whole objective of research is to break new ground. So in terms of techniques, we have no new innovations; we’re using the same techniques. Perhaps it’s in the partnering that we’re innovative. We work with all kinds of funding agencies, with all kinds of stakeholders.” Moreover, AIM’s membership in the Association of Asia-Pacific Business Schools and the Global Network for Advanced Management (GNAM) enables it to share cases with these networks and gives it access to materials shared by other member schools. “We’re innovating by sharing, learning together,” noted Dr. Lim. “Because of our associations with these networks, we have greater access to heretofore unavailable sources. GNAM has 17-18 countries represented, so whereas before we never knew what was happening in Chile or in Venezuela or in London because our connections have normally been US, now we will.” To stir the vessel of innovation within AIM, Dr. Lim wishes for less bureaucracy. “We have to be a lot more sympathetic to new ideas. As an educational institution, you have to take positions, and sometimes that creates the ‘not invented here’ syndrome. You have to be able to accept that there are other people who can do things better than you. A true culture of innovation says that innovative people have a certain humility. Maybe we lack that quality for now. We still want to do it by ourselves.” What activities does AIM need to do to be known as an expert in leadership and innovation? “We have to produce cases. We have to produce a large body of work that shows we’ve covered various spectra of leadership and innovation,” said Dr. Lim “We have to publicize this, broadcast this in more fora. We have to be able to use our network better. We cannot just do it ourselves. We need to collaborate with alumni, with our business networks, maybe co-write with them and co-develop. There’s no need maybe for AIM to do it alone...We need new programs that will be able to use such cases and apply them.” Active Alumni How can alumni help AIM produce a succession of leaders and innovators? Dr. DeKrey minced no words: “They can write checks. They can support our school. They can hire our graduates. They can promote our strengths. They are our ambassadors. My word to alumni is to stay close to your school. You’re a stockholder basically. Alumni have the most to gain. Whenever I ask for support from alumni, I’m never embarrassed. Why would I be? It’s an investment for them. I’m doing them a favor. Believe me, if you help us, this school will get better, and you’ll be better. Your reputation as a graduate will improve. There’s mutual gain here. It’s a partnership with alumni,

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and I’d like them all to see it that way. We all look back to that very famous quote of Kennedy, ‘Ask not what your country can do for you.’ And we’d like that attitude where our alums ask what they can do for their school. I do it with my own school. I’m a graduate of a number of schools. I try to help them, and not just financially. I don’t ask of my alums what I wouldn’t do myself. I write checks. “I just came from the East Coast at Darden and Harvard, and I asked a bit about their alumni,” narrated Dr. DeKrey. “They are far and away more connecting with their alums, and it’s something we need to do. We learned about case method from Harvard. We forgot to learn about fundraising. We forgot to learn about other things. If

“...MAYBE BECAUSE OF OUR BEING IN THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES WHERE THE SYSTEMS ARE NOT ALWAYS IN PLACE— ONE HAS TO BE INNOVATIVE, AND ONE HAS TO TAKE MORE LEADERSHIP ROLES IN A VERY IMPROVISED WAY. WE DO IT ALSO IN UNIQUE WAYS, NOT AT ALL PERHAPS HOW THE WEST WOULD SEE IT.” Harvard is our role model, then we need to learn the other parts of being a top business school, not just the case method. So I’m using Harvard as an example way beyond just case teaching—the way they’re organized. I spent a day on their campus...They really are first-rate. That should be our goal. Why should we be anything less than our founder? Our aspiration should be to role-model Harvard in our own region. I mean we’re not pure copycat, but at least inspired and learning from what they’ve done. “Our giving record among alumni is 2-4%. Harvard’s would be 30-50%. Ten times. That’s an indication of alumni engagement,” stressed Dr. DeKrey. “Alumni can help in many, many ways. I’ve been to a few alumni events. I believe they will [help]...I’ve traveled around. Alums are coming to see me and saying, ‘What do you need?’ In Jakarta, I had a number of people saying, ‘What can we do for you?’” Most vivid, perhaps, was a request by an alumnus from the ‘70s to talk separately with Dr. DeKrey after a meeting on campus. When they entered the President’s Office, the alumnus told him, “I just want you to know the batch is excited you’re here. They want me to ask you what we can do to help.” “There’s an enthusiasm I’m starting to feel that’s picking up across the place,” observed Dr. DeKrey. “With the alums, they’re the key. I’ve always been very alumni-oriented. To me, they’re very important to any school’s future. Alums have to be on board, and they’ve got to be proud, they’ve got to be happy, they’ve got to be engaged...More than half of the board are alumni. The school recognizes their importance.” Dr. DeKrey has felt the eagerness not just from the alumni but also the students and the AIM community in general. “The school has been very welcoming of me, and it’s a warm feeling to be here so far,” he confessed. “I told the chairman (Poly Nazareno), ‘If I am convinced that I can add value, I’ll know very soon after I come.’ And I’m feeling like that’s true, that this is going to work out. It’s not going to be easy. It’s not going to be without challenge. There are huge challenges. I’m confident there’s enough to build on that we can make these things happen...I’m committed.”


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NE WS

COVER STORY

giving

SPOTLIGHT

SHOWC ASE

CL ASS NOTES

i Leadership The AIM Alumn (AALFI), Foundation Inc. el our strengths formed to chann mni and as individual aluer as a group, exercise our pow P 300,000,000 aims to raise PH ropel AIM’s in five years to pnkings. international ra

t responsibility en positions of grea giv en be ve ha we i now that gion in five years. cted from the alumn the top five business schools in the re pe ex is at th Asia amidst ch mu There is d to be one of nagement school in an ma ol ho top sc e r th ou as of e ion tig s” campaign. in its posit to maintain the pres n’s “Back to Greatnes the region and rega tio in da ce un en to es Fo pr ip s sh M’ er AI ad umni Le ve been taught how To increase u to join the AIM Al ical training. We ha s. yo log e rie ho ra vit yc in po I ps em d n, nt an tio co al eti r nt fierce comp d ahead of ou d rigorous me an ive far ce us re ts all se ve at ha th s, . er e back We, as AIM graduate how to dissect case studies in a mann now, we need to giv and AIM education. And r strengths as individual alumni r ou of e us ca be think strategically, go nel ou where we wanted to FI), formed to chan to propel AIM’s international rankWe were able to go undation Inc. (A AL Fo ars ip ye e sh fiv er in ad 0 Le ,00 ni 00 s in the caserooms, The AIM Alum raise PHP 300,0 to s aim the brightest student p, d ou an gr a st r as be r e th we e po as r re ou ar e inc and rese ch, and ou Fund to and exercis ort our Scholarship rease faculty ratings s. This campaign pp inc su to to m u ra yo e og Pr vit in on I ings. nalizati student ment and Internatio s for our faculty and M. our Faculty Develop ade to provide quality accommodation are the owners of AI ni um Al e th d, ee gr ind Up at th es nt iti im me cil cla ge Fa School’s so we can ation, enga alumni led endeavor M cannot lie in me alone. Your particip ck! is an exclusive, AIM AI ba e of giv ce to for e ng tim e drivi w is the mpaign and The task of being th M to its eminence. No low alumni to come forward, join our ca AI g rin sto re to y ke e more fel ming years ahead. and contributions ar AIM’s affairs inspire der in management education in the co in on ati cip rti pa e May your activ r position as the lea school. goal of reclaiming ou ur invaluable support for our beloved help us achieve our yo for e ch in advanc Thank you very mu , Dear Fellow Alumni

With best regards, no Napoleon L. Nazare M AI n, ma air Ch

THANK YOU!

The AIM Alumni Leadership Foundation would like to express its deepest gratitude to the following individuals and groups for their invaluable support to the “Back to Greatness” campaign:

Napoleon L. Nazareno, MBM 1973 Augusto Antonio C. Serafica, Jr., MBM 1991 Mario Antonio G. Lopez, MBM 1970 Tita D. Puangco, MM 1991 Ma. Teresita Luna (On behalf of the Class of MM 2002) Robert F. Kuan, MBM 1975 Virgilio Espeleta, MBM 1991

Ricardo Pascua, MBM 1971 Teodoro Villanueva, MBM 1973 Eustacio Orobia, MBM 1971 Armi Cortes, MBM 1996 Ernest Villareal, MBM 1975 Philip Juico, MBM 1973 John Plaza, BMP 1995 Ofelia Odilao-Bisnar, MBM 1988

Djole Garcia, MM 2008 AIM Alumni Association India, through MP Singh, MBM 1976 MBM 1970 MBM 1971 MBM 1973 MBM 1991 MBM 1992


Yes! I am pleased to support the AIM Alumni Leadership Foundation. I commit to contribute for 5 years. I pledge a gift for:  Php 5,000.00 per year for 5 years  Php 10,000.00 per year for 5 years  Php 15,000.00 per year for 5 years  Php 20,000.00 per year for 5 years  Php 50,000.00 per year for 5 years  Php 100,000.00 per year for 5 years  Php per year for 5 years I commit to contribute once:

 Php

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I Want to HELP Lead AIM Back to Greatness

I would like my gift to be used for:  Scholarship Program  AIM Facilities Upgrade  Faculty Development and Internationalization I wish to have my donation acknowledged as follows:  Individual Donation  Corporate Donation:  Class/Batch Donation:  Alumni Association/Chapter Donation:  Anonymous

Kindly make checks payable to: AIM Alumni Leadership Foundation, Inc. For check pick-up within Metro Manila, Please call the AIM Alumni Relations Office at 892.4011 loc. 553 or 414 or email aimalumni@aim.edu

NAME

AIM PROGRAM & YEAR GRADUATED

ADDRESS

Other Ways to Give* 1. To Give Online: Kindly visit: www.aimleadership.org 2. Wire Transfer: Unionbank-Perea Branch Peso Savings Account: 102410019080 Dollar Savings Account: 132410001849 Swift code: UBPHPHMM

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*Kindly inform us at aimalumni@aim.edu If you have made a donation for proper acknowledgement. Thank you.

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Please fax this form to +632 893.7410 or email aimalumni@aim.edu


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Spotlight

Eduardo N. Sison, MBM 1973

SIMPLY MR. CHAIRMAN their field—three of them graduated magna cum laude, and four of them are board topnotchers, including my wife—that’s how good they are,” Sison beams. The family business, Perez Optical, had been established in 1957 by Sison’s in-laws, Patrocinio Utchingco, MD and an ophthalmologist, and Emiliano Perez, a Cebuano Attorney-at-Law. “My wife wanted the business to grow, but she had difficulty handling the business side,” he said. To support his wife, Sison quit his job and went back to school full-time for three years to become a Doctor of Optometry. was also carrying a stick and his booming After graduating with his third degree, Sison voice startled many of us! I wondered then rolled up his sleeves and took over the manif all AIM professors were like him,” he agement of Perez Optical as General Manchuckles. “It so happened that Prof. Roman ager. While Primitiva handles the marketing was substituting for a professor who couldn’t and clinical service aspects, Sison is in attend just the first day.” charge of operations and management. The Life at AIM was more than a culture husband and wife partnership has enabled shock for Sison. “I had problems in school Perez Optical to bloom from two branches to because studying at AIM was quite hard. seven as of this writing. Although I was good in college, I had a The optometry business is apparently difficult time adjusting to the case method,” ingrained even in their brood. “I have three he shares. Studying until 2:00 am and the children—my eldest boy, Ronald Mervin, took pressure of class participation took its toll up optometry and graduated board topnotchand Sison suffered from migraine for many er like my wife,” Sison shares. Mervin also has weeks. “I lived through a schedule that I had a Master in Entrepreneurship degree from the never done before. You had to participate Asian Institute of Management, and placed in class—you had to discuss cases. In col6th in the 2009 Optometry board licensure lege, your grade comes mainly from exams. examination. Second child James Edward Most of us in class were the top students in is a DPA certified licensed Optometrist, college and everyone was really good. I was having garnered 9th place in the Optometry below the level because of the adjustment board examination back in 1999. He is also period.” Second year was somewhat easier a licensed physician and a diplomate in ocfor Sison though, as he had already adjusted cupational medicine. His focus is on Primary to the AIM rigor. Staying at the dorm for two Eye Care. But the apple of Sison’s eye is his years, he is grateful to his roommate, Bobby unica hija, youngest daughter Dianne Carla, a member of the Dean’s List in her last term, Atendido for his support and friendship. who graduated last December 2012 as part of “In the end, we survived,” he smiles. AIM MBA Cohort 7. “One of the great things about my being a Chairman of AAAIM is that Expanding the Family Business I was able to see my daughter at the campus Sison went back to corporate life after whenever I was in AIM,” Sison laughs. graduating from AIM in 1973. On February 14, 1974, his neighbor set him up with a blind date for Valentine ’s Day, and his date, As Chairman of AAAIM As a member of the class of MBM ’73, Primitiva, became his wife on November of Sison shares the secret of their irrefutable that same year. “My wife comes from a family of seven “Simply Mr. Chairman” cont. on page 56 >> optometrists and they are all very good in

Extremely self-effacing and modest, the current Chairman of the Alumni Association of AIM, Philippine Chapter (AAAIM), Mr. Eduardo Sison had to beg off so many times before this interview finally took place. “Editor-in-Chief Greg (Atienza) threatened to close the AIMLeader magazine if I didn’t agree to this interview,” he laughs. A devoted family man, Sison spent almost half of the interview time talking about his wife and three kids. “I am a very simple person,” he shares sincerely. Perhaps his ingrained simplicity finds its roots in Sampaloc, Manila where the young Sison grew up. Bright and unpretentious, Sison found his way to the National University (NU) where he graduated cum laude with an Engineering degree in the late 1960’s. “At that time, the College of Engineering and Architecture at NU were looked up to as the prime movers of the school. I was proud to be a part of that college,” he said. “I even served as the President of the Student Council in my senior year. But in spite of that, I still did not consider myself that good.” After college, Sison worked for an American firm for three years when his older sister egged him to take the entrance exam at the Asian Institute of Management in 1971—which he took on the very last day. Sison was also fortunate to have received a tuition subsidy from Engineering Equipment Inc. (EEI). “I now feel that my sister’s encouragement was really very good. Even if I was hesitant at first, I learned that AIM was at its peak at that time. Out of the 163, only 111 graduated which represents about a 30% dropout,” he said. “There were so many applicants so the quality of those accepted was very high—we also had a lot of who’s who in the case room. You could imagine the competition in class!” Sison recalls an amusing memory about his very first day at AIM. “Frankie Roman was the first professor who entered our room. And I was shocked because he was wearing a see-through Barong Tagalog with a T-shirt and suspenders underneath. He

W O R D S B Y S usan A frica - M ani k an , M A P 2 0 0 2

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DR. DEKREY MENTIONED THAT IF AT LEAST 10% OF OUR ALUMNI OF 40,000 GRADUATES COULD DONATE AT LEAST USD 1,000 [OR APPROXIMATELY PHP 40,000], THAT WILL GREATLY HELP OUR ‘BACK TO GREATNESS’ CAMPAIGN IN LEADING AIM BACK AS THE TOP BUSINESS SCHOOL IN THE REGION. PHP 40,000 A YEAR IS NOT THAT BIG—THAT’S ONLY ABOUT PHP 3,300 A MONTH!


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Spotlight

“I AM NOT WORKING TO RECEIVE ANY AWARD;

I AM WORKING FOR MY PASSION AND COMMITMENT.”


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

Radha Paudel, MDM 2010

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GIVING LOVE IN THE TIME OF CONFLICT

HILE MOST PEOPLE SAY THAT ALL they wish for is world peace, Radha Paudel, MDM 2010, works towards achieving it. Her childhood exposed her to the day-to-day consequences of conflict, which shaped her character and ignited her passion to pursue her advocacy. “When I was child, my mother and I were discriminated because of our class and gender. This experience shaped my commitment to work differently. I started to engage in activities that culturally, women are not supposed to do. For instance, I took the lead role in facilitating my mother’s death ritual. Girls are not supposed to perform death rituals. But I did. It is the claim of cultural rights of women, equality and women’s empowerment at large,” she stated. Several other life experiences strengthened Radha’s resolve to help eradicate poverty and marginalization in her native Nepal. “When I worked in a hospital as an anesthetic nurse, I cared for a girl, 7 years old, who was raped. I saw other cases where a woman’s uterus prolapsed, and a ruptured uterus. I saw a woman die in front me due to a retained placenta—it taught me to work on emergency obstetrics, as well as the blood bank and surgery. These cases taught me to move forward and go beyond the four walls of the hospital. I changed my education and started looking for the opportunity to work outside.” “During the peak time of conflict, I worked in Jumla, Karnali, Nepal where there was no electricity, telephone, internet, motor able roads, women employees and very limited resources. In such difficult circumstances, I was able to convince, and more importantly mobilize the people, and initiate the emergency obstetric fund, blood bank and operation theater. It is the first time it was done in the Karnali region.” Eleanor Roosevelt said that “It isn’t enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn’t enough to believe in it. One must work at it.” Radha echoes the same sentiment, and shares her insights on the extent of work needed to create and sustain peace. She experienced first-hand how hard it was to differentiate between talking about peace and working to enable peace. “Since childhood, I saw many friends, supervisors, co-workers, and leaders that were more focused on lip service. I saw many liars. I didn’t lie so they isolated me, ignored me. I did not get opportunities because I did not have political power, or connections.

“I prefer to do what I say and say what I can do,” she continues. “To make things happen is very hard though I never gave up. I never influenced my supervisors who believe in lip service, I never pleased them. I pleased the people whom I represented, whom I spoke to and live with. Nepal is rich with resources but lip service does not allow the country to grow. I want to demonstrate, rather than talk about the things that can happen. Of course, there are many challenges on the way of action but there are many ways to solve them. We need willingness so we can make it.” “The conflict, my colleagues, my personal life experience and people of Karnali all encouraged me to establish Actions Works Nepal (AWON). It is a symbol of peace and justice through a series of actions over lip service. AWON is a representative organization of poor and marginalized people especially from Karnali, Midwest and Far West of Nepal.” To say that Radha is a strong woman undermines the nerves of steel that she has within. Her small frame belies her larger than life resolve to eradicate conflict and bring about peace. “I was survivor of the war. I worked during extreme conflict and in the poor regions of Nepal. I realized one important thing: peace is NOT the absence of war. Nepal’s conflict is because of the social discrimination and injustices in terms of gender, class and class. It can be mitigated through coherence and consistency of actions.” Radha is often described as someone who makes things happen. When asked to elaborate, she shares, “I always organize and mobilize the people who are marginalized. They are my power. Their hard life, their sufferings, sorrows are my source of inspiration, my wisdom. I seek help to identify the problem, and but also ask for help in finding solutions as well. I mobilize the locally available resources. There should be urgency and consistency to make things happen. I admit that sometimes I am alone in my endeavors, but I never gave up. Making things happen needs patience and skills to build constituency and alliance building.” Recognizing that making things happen also require technical knowledge on capacity-building, she sought to look for avenues where she can learn about her advocacy further. “In order to validate my practical knowledge and skills on development and social work, I was looking for a higher and short term course. I was frustrated with government and NGO’s working environment, because everywhere I go the feudal culture “Giving Love in the Time of Conflict” continued on page 57 >>

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JOHN PLAZA, BMP 1995

The Mystery Man that Could

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NE FINE DAY, AN ORDINARYlooking Filipino entered the AIM Alumni Relations Office (ARO). With his large frame and plain white T-shirt, he could have been anyone. And then he asked a question: “How do I donate?” The visitor turned out to be John F. Plaza, a graduate of the Basic Management Program (BMP) and a mystery man to some ARO staff, as he had donated quietly a few times to AIM, but none of them had met him before. Although the amounts given were not eye-popping, the staff had noticed his efforts in ensuring that the donations were remitted to AIM. “My biggest constraint is how to send donations,” said John, a senior piping designer in the oil and gas industry. “Sometimes I’m in a remote location offshore. Sometimes I’m in the middle of a desert. The last time I sent a donation was through check, by registered mail.” John started working abroad in 1991 on oil and gas projects, each project lasting a few years. In 1995, he finished an employment contract with Saudi Aramco. “I thought, how long would it take me to get another job?” he said. A former classmate convinced John to take the BMP. Paying for the fees himself, John enrolled in the course. “I had classmates who observed me, seemed to like my presentation, and asked, ‘Where are you working? Would you like to work for me?’ At the same time, even though the program was not done yet, I had a job waiting for me in Metro Manila. “AIM had good benefits for me. I got to know a lot of people,” he added. “The most important things I learned were problem solving, case analysis decision-making, and tools like SAP ADAPA. That’s very useful. I use it until now. Many people wonder why my decisions differ from theirs and, as a result, they are left behind. Although I have peers who are engineers, I differ from them in my decisionmaking process. It’s what I learned here at AIM. You have terms like situational analysis and potential problems.” After the BMP, John spent four months with a manufacturing company in Metro Manila and then went to work overseas again. “Once you’re really involved in an oil and gas project, the employers look for the same people. So every time there’s an oil and gas project, people look for me. “I’ve had many blessings,” he said, adding that it is his main reason for donating to institutions like AIM. “I read from the [alumni] magazine that less privileged people also study at AIM.” John was born into a poor family in Camarines Sur province. His father was a farmer, and his mother a housewife. His father tried his luck in Manila. When he found a job as a mechanic, he sent for his children one by one.

When John reached high school, he passed a number of exams and received a good scholarship package from Don Bosco High School, just a stone’s throw away from AIM. “I fit the requirement of being less privileged,” he said. History seems to repeat itself, as his two daughters are also scholars in a city high school. “I share my blessings,” he explained. “I don’t want to be selfish. In the oil and gas industry, if I don’t have a project, I come home and do nothing. I don’t know how long I will wait for a call...The nice thing about it is, when you get a call, the offers and projects are good.” John has worked in Brunei, Bahrain, Malaysia, and Saudi Arabia. In fact, he can speak six languages. He is moving to a new company in Brunei, where he has been based for the past year. He got a family status package, but he chose not to avail of it because of his daughters’ scholarship. “I don’t make my wife work anymore because I want her to concentrate on the kids,” he shared. “When the kids reach college, they can move at their own pace. That’s when I’ll invite my wife to open a business. I want her to run the business with me as mentor. I’d like her to take the BMP so she can do some networking.” John had tried his luck in business before. “There was a time when the oil industry was down, and I was here for one year. I entered trading,” he recounted. “I would buy wholesale items in Divisoria and bring them to La Union, my wife’s province. It was okay. But the problem was I couldn’t sleep comfortably. At 6:00 AM, I would go to Divisoria. I would buy the stock without noticing the passing of time. I would go home at noon, eat, and take a nap. In the evening, I would ship the items to La Union, where my wife would receive them. Whenever the inventory was down, she would call me and tell me to buy again. Then I would run to Divisoria again... I also participated in bazaars. I realized it’s a tiring job. Sometimes I couldn’t sleep because we were not getting paid or we got bounced checks. I lost money, but I also gained some...I told myself that hen I retire, I’ll go back to business.” But not so soon, as John intends to bid farewell to oil rigs at age 60. “That’s the trend in the oil industry. If your position is really needed, then you can work up to 65,” he noted. “I really enjoy my job because a helicopter drops off about 50 of you to the offshore site. At the end of the day, the helicopter returns for you. Your room and facilities are nice. You have Internet and WiFi. But years ago, in Saudi Arabia, I was really lonely because we had only snail mail back then. That was the first time I went abroad...Now, I take advantage of the holidays in Brunei and Malaysia to return to the Philippines.” When he’s in his home country, John takes his family to Laguna Province for swimming or to the mall for shopping and dining. When he’s at his workstation abroad, he relaxes by using the sports facilities or watching movies. On the job, John describes himself as a low-profile manager. “That way, the staff gets to know me better and I’m more in touch with them. I mentor my staff. The more you teach them, the more they help you. It’s an exchange.”

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BLESSINGS.”

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ASIA IS QUICKLY BECOMING THE HOTBED FOR

‘TYCOONS AT 20’


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SIDDARTH WAHEDRA, MBA 2012

YES HE CAN

“Daring”, “Optimistic”, “Brave”. These are all words that suit Siddharth Wadehra. At 27 years of age, the young Silicon Valley engineer left his job, seeking his fortune not in the so-called “Land of Opportunity”, but rather, back in his native India. “I believe that Asia is now the place to be for business, but we can only progress if we support the next generation with quality education and lifestyle” he states with confidence. SIDDHARTH WADEHRA’S NAME is no small matter in the AIM student community. He was one of the winners of the Peter Drucker Challenge 2012, an essay contest where students, managers and entrepreneurs from around the world are invited to share their views on the changing workforce system and how this change will affect institutions. His piece, entitled “Reinventing Work, Reinventing the Organization” dwelt on how modern enterprises survive the cutthroat business environment, why organizations fail and how the enterprise model’s rapid evolution affects the business environment as a whole. Siddharth also participated in the Hult Global Case challenge held earlier this year. The Hult Global Case challenge is “a startup accelerator for social entrepreneurship”, which conglomerates and challenges students to come up with solutions for the world’s most urgent issues. By doing so, the Hult Global Case challenge aims to be one of the world’s leading platforms for social good. The Aspirant “As a boy, I wanted to be everything” Siddharth recalls fondly. “One day I would pretend to be a soldier. The next day, I wanted to be a king.” As he grew, his high school teachers would remember him for his hard work and efficiency in any activity he was assigned to. Wadehra then went to Nagpur University to take up computer science and engineering, and worked as a business analyst for IBM for two and a half years and as an ambassador for Sun Microsystems for one year before enrolling in AIM. “I entered AIM as a nervous young man apprehensive of whether or not I would

be able to survive its rigors” Siddharth shares. Despite his previous experience working in Silicon Valley, he was unsure of whether he was prepared for anything that was to come; he did not, as a matter of fact, know what to expect. One year later, the “nervous young man” would be invited to be a guest speaker at some of the biggest business channels, such as CNBC and BBC. He did not know that his very first book would already be pushing best-seller numbers and be hounded by leading publishers for a second title; he could not know that his actions would propel the AIM team to some of the most reputed business plan challenges, nor win some of the most prestigious global essay contests. “It sounds like a fairy tale, but it really happened” he laughs. Siddharth credits much of his current success to his grooming at AIM. For him, it would not be fair to pinpoint a single good experience, or a single insightful moment. “It’s a package” he says. “You have to experience it to know it; it is impossible to separate and analyze as a group of fragmented entities. Only in its entirety can you describe the AIM experience. Siddharth’s AIM experience has been, for him, a journey of great highs and great lows, a voyage of self-discovery and honing, a quest for skills which cannot be taught but only learned. Although, he says, there is one infinitely valuable lesson he learned during his stay at AIM—that of never giving up, despite the good, bad, and really ugly days—for it is during the worst times that the most experience can be gathered, leading one to grow more mature with each mistake committed, and taking the best out of the situation.

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For Siddharth, being taught by AIM professors has been a privilege and an honor. They have always been cooperative, and have always supported and assisted their students to the best of their ability. However, Professor Lontoc holds a special place for Siddharth Wadehra. “She really took the time and effort to help us understand how economics affects daily business” says Siddharth. “Professor Lontoc was also the mentor of my team at the Hult Global Case Challenge. She left no stone unturned to ensure that we were completely prepared for the event.” These stones would involve inviting industry experts and entrepreneurs to provide feedback on the team’s presentation. All in all, one of the greatest things about AIM is its cultural diversity. The institution houses great minds of various backgrounds, each coming from its own rich and vibrant cultures with their own unique things to bring to the table. As such, each batch and class becomes not only a body of students striving to be the very best in their respective businesses, but also a powerful collective of different ideologies, thoughts, beliefs and cultures—all respecting one another. All pretenses of competition slide away as the batch celebrates as one during events, such as birthdays, anniversaries, and festivals. Siddharth himself is no exception to the rule, having formed sincere bonds with some of his colleagues, and hopes to work with them in the future. The Next Big Thing In his book “Asia Incredible”, Siddharth documents the trials and tribulations faced “Yes He Can...” continued on page 56 >>

BY JOV EL LORENZO


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Justin Garrido, ISEP 2011

Innovating Social Entrepreneurship through Crowdfunding The Wikipedia definition of crowdfunding describes the term as “the collective effort of individuals who network and pool their resources, usually via the internet, to support efforts initiated by other people or organizations.” This fundraising via the World Wide Web has been used to support a multitude of activities such as disaster relief, political campaigns, and scientific research among many others.

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ILIPINO-AMERICAN JUSTIN Garrido had a great career as one of the youngest directors for Aldi, a German-based multinational in Chicago, Illinois when an unexpected life changing moment occurred. “I volunteered at a soup kitchen in Rogers Park, Chicago with some friends on a Saturday in 2008. I met another FilAm who was also there for the first time. He offered to do grace (prayer) before we served the food and afterwards when I asked him what inspired him to do it, he said he saw his cousin there whom he hadn’t seen for a year. His cousin was embarrassed and asked him not to tell his mother. It was so sad,” he shared. “I later drove home tired but inspired, and decided to pursue something with a greater purpose in life.” Researching on social entrepreneurship, Justin quit his job where he had been working for seven years to travel around the world, explore the options that life had to offer, and pursue his MBA. He decided to settle in Australia and take his MBA at the Melbourne Business School (MBS) to pursue a career in marketing strategy for a multinational in Asia. While at MBS, Justin took the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) at the Asian Institute of Management from 2010-2011, and that experience provided another life changing chapter in his life. “I chose to study at AIM because I was told by different family members and family

friends that it was a premiere management institution in the Philippines and Asia with a rich history,” he shares. “I also wanted to experience living in the Philippines for the first time (I previously only visited) and reconnect with my roots. Plus I wanted to start something social or community-based whether it was, say a Net Impact chapter or something of that nature. I wrote a letter to the Associate Dean of International Relations at MBS to allow me to go on exchange at AIM because of these reasons.” Justin recalls fondly his favorite classes at AIM—the Base of the Pyramid Leadership Strategies because it taught him different kinds of social enterprises and CSR business models, and Global Marketing Strategy. “I enjoyed the class discussions and debates in both classes,” he says. “Professor Manny De Vera also gave me good advice.” When asked what was the most significant lesson he learned at AIM, Justin quickly answers, “AIM gave me amazing insights into how to do business in Asia, the challenges, the opportunities. I expanded my knowledge on the base of the pyramid leadership strategies and social enterprise business models. The learning, along with the connections I made through AIM, has given me the confidence to start a social enterprise business here.” While studying at AIM, Justin became inspired to be a social entrepreneur and give back to the country of his parents. “I wanted to find a way to help lower poverty in the Philippines, as well as address other social and environmental challenges, but support the current eco-system of NGOs, social enterprises, foundations, government, and academia.” His serendipitous bond with social entrepreneurship reached a tipping point after he attended the Asian Forum on Corporate Social responsibility in October 2011. “I met different business and social entrepreneur leaders such as Joey Concepcion and Bam Aquino. I heard inspiring talks from leaders in

various industries and backgrounds such as President Aquino. I also met several leaders in the NGO space that helped flesh out my social enterprise business model to the Philippine context. We then developed different business models and ended up with our crowdfunding model.” Encouraged by US based crowdfunding platforms such as Kiva which has raised USD339 million and Kickstarter which funds more than 27,000 projects, Justin shares that “these make you see challenges in countries you’ve never been to, and create a social impact.” Armed with his experiences and AIM education from the Philippines, Justin went back to Melbourne to finish his MBA. His crowdfunding platform would soon be put to the test. Joining the Melbourne University Entrepreneurship Challenge (MUEC) in May 2012, he submitted a business plan to help alleviate poverty in the Philippines. His plan not only included fund raising— it also offered brand management services and marketing for social enterprises in the country. Justin researched about the nine million overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) whose remittances last year—US$ 20 billion— accounted for about 9% of the Philippines’ GDP. He believed that once these OFWs could be engaged through crowdfunding, they could help a portion of the 26.5% of their countrymen living in poverty. Appearing before the judges during the competition, Justin excitedly anticipated questions about the business plan, wanting to know what he may have missed based on the judges’ knowledge about the subject. He had apparently missed very little as his entry—Social Project PH won the Entrepreneurship Challenge. Reflecting on his success, Justin enthusiastically shared that he was gratified as it gave him “instant credibility”. Soliciting

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I WANTED TO FIND A WAY TO HELP LOWER POVERTY IN THE PHILIPPINES, AS WELL AS ADDRESS OTHER SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES, BUT SUPPORT THE CURRENT ECO-SYSTEM OF NGOS, SOCIAL ENTERPRISES, FOUNDATIONS, GOVERNMENT, AND ACADEMIA.


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>> “Simply Mr. Chairman” continued from page 46 influence: “Our class is the most committed in making sure that the school reaches and maintains its goals. Our commitment and love for the school makes us support institute activities and we enjoy being at the forefront of something new at AIM—whether it’s a fund raising activity or a special alumni event.” Sison is also proud of the fact that their class has produced the first home grown AIM dean (Jesus Gallegos), the first home grown AIM president (Francis Estrada) and now the first home grown AIM chairman (Napoleon Nazareno). Thrust into the leadership, Sison now sees many opportunities to give back to his school. “As Chairman of AAAIM”, he says, “I think one of the most precious donations of our volunteers is time. When you become Chairman of AAAIM, you actually serve the school for three years—first year as Vice Chairman, second year as Chairman, and third year as Treasurer of the Federation of AIM Alumni (FAIM).” Sison and the Board of Directors of AAAIM are fully supportive of AIM President Steve DeKrey’s five-year plan. “Dr. DeKrey presented an impressive five year plan during the Asian Business Forum in Jakarta. It will entail much support from the alumni and faculty, and financial support from the alumni in particular. It will involve re-engaging with top business schools abroad such as Harvard,” he said. “This is the direction where our leadership is pointing at and our new President is expecting us to go with him.” To answer the need for alumni resources, Sison is also a member of the newly established AIM Alumni Leadership Foundation Inc. (AAALFI). With his classmate, AIM Chairman Napoleon Nazareno as head, the AALFI was formed to provide the platform for the alumni to have a continuing active participation in the management of AIM. The alumni, through the AALFI, are seen as the main driving force that would assist AIM in regaining its preeminence as one of Asia’s premiere business schools by 2017. “Our vision is to raise PHP 300,000,000 in five years to support AIM’s five year plan for Scholarships, Faculty Development and Internationalization, and the School’s Facilities Upgrade,” Sison shares. “Dr. DeKrey mentioned that if at least 10% of our alumni of 40,000 graduates could donate at least USD 1,000 [or approximately PHP 40,000], that will greatly help our ‘Back to Greatness’

Indeed, the current of optimism that Siddharth radiates from the stories in his book seem to be resonating with the world’s reality. Already, copies of “Asia Incredible” are being pre-booked in bulk, so much so that the team believes that the book, as well as its message, has the potential to surpass some of the major best-sellers related to business. “We will leave no stone unturned to achieve that goal,” Siddharth firmly states. The book will be launched at an AIM alumni event in Mumbai on December 15, 2012; prior to this, the book will be launched at several Indian cities as well. Siddharth tirelessly promotes his book in any and all conferences he has been invited to, for, as he says, he needs as many opinions on it before releasing it into the international community. This, too, was another reason he rose to meet the Peter Drucker Challenge 2012. “I wanted to pitch my ideas and my experiences at AIM to other members of the business world” Siddharth says. “The esteemed jury of the event was comprised of names, names of people who were and still are redefining concepts of management. That was why I wanted their feedback very much.” For Siddharth, the Asian situation, namely booms in population, the rise of urbanization, the growing divide between the average age of people, and the rapidly growing middle class, will not only alter the business world but society as well. Siddharth has great faith in modern innovators, lauding them as being “far more innovative” and be a powerful driving force in society. His “Yes, We Can” attitude is not only backed by the desire to see growth, but also as a gesture of gratitude and thanksgiving. Success is not solely for the benefit of the entrepreneur, says Siddharth, but rather, they rake in the money for themselves but also for society. “Life’s biggest profit is not a number, but what we can give back” he says. Siddharth himself is an example of this optimism. He holds patents and copyrights to several software applications he developed, most >> “Yes He Can” cont. from page 53 especially the one named “Mobiby entrepreneurs who were able to turn Secure”. At the moment, his assets their ventures into global enterprises are at the brink of $4.5 million. “Those —through Asia. The book also talks funds will go a long way in helping me about the opportunities and challenges promote my ideas across Asia” he which thrive in modern Asia, which is, grins. Siddharth also takes a hands-on according to Siddharth, the fastest approach to helping young students and growing region in our modern world. It aspiring entrepreneurs by lecturing and also encourages young Asians to not giving talks in business schools. trudge along the beaten, “tried and true” “Asia is quickly becoming the path, but rather, seize the reigns of the hotbed for ‘tycoons at 20’”, Siddharth current situation and make something says, referring to people such as great out of themselves. Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg. For

campaign in leading AIM back as the top business school in the region. PHP 40,000 a year is not that big—that’s only about PHP 3,300 a month!” he exclaims. The key is in finding the 4,000 alumni donors from around the worldthe magic 10% of the 40,000 who could greatly assist in the campaign. “We don’t need big, eye-popping gifts,” Sison says, “although of course it would be much appreciated. We just want to increase the NUMBER of individual alumni who will show support—who will stand up to be counted as the owners— as the permanent stakeholders of our beloved school. We, the alumni are the backbone of the school. Faculty may come and go but we are the real owners, therefore it is in our hands to maintain the prestige and quality of our Institute.” Sison believes that there are many alumni out there who are willing and able to support the school and AALFI’s “Back to Greatness” campaign. “It’s just that we need to re-engage them and to find the really committed ones. AIM has done a lot for us in terms of propelling our careers and in improving our lives. Now is the time to give back.” When he addresses the student body and fellow alumni, Sison is quick to advise them not to forget where they came from. “They should always be able to look back and say: AIM gave me the opportunity to advance in my career and my life. Therefore they should be able to give back in whatever form to help the school in return. The school gave you the opportunity to learn and handle your positions—you should always find time to give back to the school.” So what are Sison’s future goals after his Chairmanship? “I’m a very simple person—I do not aspire for so much position and wealth. In fact I never aspire for material wealth—the basic comforts are more than enough for me.” And with this simplicity lies Sison’s deepest secret to joy: “I’m still enjoying my life”.

Siddharth, the recent economic surges being experienced by Asian countries are a testimony to this claim, and he hopes to create a credible impact on the society to which he owes so much to, especially via the software industry. To Love Life “It is strange that so many people derive inspiration from tycoons they have never spoken to personally, much less met” muses Siddharth. For him, his parents were his prime role models, who taught him the meaning of love and respect. “They were very selfless people. My father inspired me to be bold, to stand up for my beliefs, to fight the flow when necessary, to be my own man, to believe in myself and to trust God. You could say he lives in me, through his powerful entrepreneurial spirit. My mother, on the other hand, inspired me to live each day dedicated to serving God by serving my family and community to the best of my abilities, as well as to love it to the fullest.” Siddharth’s parents are, for him, the ideal managers – through honesty and focus, as well as an open willingness to invest in their son, Siddharth has become who he is now. Siddharth rises to greet each day with a sense of self-confidence and optimism. “I wake up and feel that I am the best to have walked the corridors of AIM. A stupid thought, given the rich legacy of legends that AIM has produced!” he laughs. For his long-term plans, Siddharth would like to stay connected with the league of AIM alumni, as well as make a considerable impact on Asian society. It is here, in Asia, that the next big thing is going to happen. And for Siddharth, that he created a dent in the universe by being here to spearhead and guide this movement is a great, great honor indeed.

>> “Innovating Social Entrepreneurship” continued from page 54 support and investments became less complicated once he detailed his victory in his proposals. Though MUEC did not award him a cash prize, his peers were convinced to invest generously to ensure the success of his meaningful endeavor. Justin was even able to influence a childhood friend who was about to buy a Porsche to invest in Social Project PH instead. In addition, during his graduation ceremonies in June 2012, his classmates awarded him the Allen Consulting Group Prize for Community Service which included a cash prize of AUD2,500. The funding and support has


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enabled Justin to move back to Manila where he currently partners with MBS classmate Julia Sevilla in implementing the business plan of Social Project PH. Thus far, Social Project now has five pilot projects with social enterprise partners for their beta website which they hope to launch before the end of 2012. Their target: “to have at least 300 projects at the end of our first year with focuses on education, livelihood, health, clean water, and environmental sustainability.” With his innovative platforms almost in place to reach meaningful goals, Justin will surely make a difference in the lives of many Filipinos in the near future. Editor’s Note: Visit Crowdfunding a better Philippines and see how Social Project will soon change the way the world changes the world at http://socialproject.ph/

>> “Giving Love in the Time of Conflict” continued from page 49 was deeply ingrained. Everyone considered me different and stigmatized due to my professional background [being a nurse]. Being a woman from a poor family background and with a tiny physical physique does not help matters. Enrolling in AIM made more sense for me, as I found that the Master in Development Management (MDM) would fit my interest, availability and meet my expectations. “I was right about AIM,” she narrates. “The international exposure is the most significant learning that I have acquired. It enhanced my self esteem and confidence as well as gave me broader knowledge and skills on problem identification and solution in many ways. I loved learning about leadership, organizational management, project management and doing the RRA (field program). “AIM added the brick in my life and career. I tried to lead the organization in 2004 for nine months but I failed. I didn’t get space at the national arena. Prior to AIM, because I was powerless, without any political familial affiliations, not from a rich family, and not from Kathmandu, no one listened to me, and they mostly misused me. AIM gave me selfconfidence and illuminated my social image. The alumni and class network from 17 countries, and belonging to the illustrious group of alumni built my confidence.” Radha continues to share her student life at the school. “In AIM, every day, each session, I was struggling.

In the MDM program, each subjects’ main objective is eradicating the poverty in Asia through young Asian leaders. But a majority of the class joined this course for their own poverty and not for other people. Each day I felt sad, because no one really represented the poor and marginalized people. I cried several times, but I always remember my mom telling me that ‘crying is not the final solution’. I reflected and asked myself how I can cope better. How can we bridge the gap between those who have and those who have not? Is the birthplace of an individual a choice? Is poverty an accident? Why do the same people/ group become poor from generation to generation? I wanted to work on poverty and social injustice. AIM gave me power that is different from what others thought,” she added. Radha says that studying in AIM gave her power. “I do not have political and economical power. The international degree on development management became my greatest weapon in dealing with people at various levels. I picked up the skills and knowledge from each semester/subjects to move ahead. Leadership, project management, and organizational management help me in my advocacy.” Her biggest belief in her advocacy is “no women, no peace”. When asked why she recognizes women as main proponents of peace, she shares: “Women are contributing in war and peace directly and indirectly, intentionally and unintentionally. Women have different, unique knowledge, skills, priorities, approaches, needs. Their engagement influences the areas, approaches, priorities of the peace building and political process. Women’s roles for meaningful engagement in the peace-building and political process are crucial. “For instance, in my personal experience, my late mom was taking care of Maoists in my country. I saw how Maoists used people in my family. Meantime, I was used in many ways in Jumla from and to both sides, both the government and Maoist. In Nepal since history, 1773 women were contributing in security and war but they were ignored and marginalized in the mainstream of development. “Sixty years history of development is not much effective to transform Nepal,” she narrates. “The rural poor and marginalized women are contributing significantly in the country’s economy but they are still largely marginalized. Thus,

Nepal is behind in many ways: HDI, gender gap index, and others. To restore sustainable peace and justice, especially in poor, marginalized and conflict affected areas, women should participate in a meaningful manner at each sector and level. Without women’s meaningful engagement in each sector and level, there would not be peace and justice.” Radha shares her dreams for Karnali. “I want to show the message of peace and justice emerging from Karnali, Nepal, the most marginalized and conflict- affected place of Nepal, go across the globe through `Miteri GauLet’s live together campaign’. One day, about 15 years later, we hope to have many people and organizations working together and living together. “AWON is working with a holistic approach at local, national and international levels through `Miteri GauLet’s Live Together Campaign’. Its vision is simple but very hard to accomplish because in my experience, people and funding agencies ignore the non-elite leaders. However, I want to mobilize the people and organizations for the cause to live together. I want to see many young women leaders from the grass root level across the world and would love to see the expansion of this campaign beyond Nepal.” Radha’s efforts for the social development of Nepal and her advocacy for peace are being recognized by her peers. She was recently named as one of 2012’s Women PeaceMakers of the University of San Diego Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice. “I am not working to receive any award; I am working for my passion and commitment. I never imagined that my personal and professional stories would be documented by an international organization. It was encouraging. Of course, it enhanced my selfconfidence. I saw it as an affirmation of the legitimacy of Action Works Nepal, an appreciation of my goal, vision and leadership by my peers. “More importantly, the award meant that my team and I needed to be more responsible to whom we represented. I hope my receiving this award would encourage other young rural leaders to work on the social and development field, despite not having any political connection and strong economical background”. She recognizes that pursuing social change and development need individuals who are passionate about the job that they do, and the advocacy that they represent. “Whenever I see others who are experiencing doubts and challenges, I always tell them that

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‘you are confused about your role- just remember the poor and marginalized people specially in Karnali and ask yourself about your role. Your role is to contribute in nation building and not to criticize the people or place. Your place of birth is not your or their choice’”. When asked how it would be possible for future leaders to sustain nation-building and social development, she shares helpful advice. “Leaders don’t ever give up. There is hope and many possibilities. Starting is very challenging but possible. In the beginning there is a great possibility that you will be alone but you will find many once you demonstrate the actions. People are seeking just, rational and consistent actions. Challenges always come up with opportunities. Leaders just have to see and work together despite different mindsets. I always want to impart what my mother taught me when I was a little girl: crying is not the final solution. “A leader’s mindset is the important. How the leader puts herself/ himself in the context of a situation is dependent on this. How can you be an effective leader if you don’t have a proper mindset? Passion is also important. Once you have passion you are never tired, you have infinite energy to explore different ways, contextualize the modalities and move ahead with determination. Above all, commitment is key. Looking for the actions and results require discipline and commitment because it entails so many challenges. With commitment, you demonstrate the accountability and respect to the people and their rights and positions. Radha certainly displays a passion and commitment. “People working in this field and in others, should work with commitment. For those who are working for marginalized peoples, do whatever is written in the ideals of AWON: `eradicate poverty’, `work with poor and marginalized people and communities’. Your decision should impact in the life of poor people. Work for the impact not for the input. The developing countries especially in Asia need results, not just input.” For someone who has been through all unimaginable hardship and has been in the middle of conflict, she continues to be positive, exclaiming, “You change! You can change! See change! Live with change!” She remains committed to bringing about change in Nepal and to accomplishing her mission for Nepal. “People are frustrated with lip service so once they feel and sense the change they are able to inspire themselves,” she closes.


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showcase/golf

SPOTLIGHT

SHOWC ASE

CL ASS NOTES

6th AIM

President’s

CUP

by Karen Cabuyao

AFTER A SIX-YEAR HIATUS since the last tournament in Bali, Indonesia, the comeback of the President’s Cup was utterly momentous as 109 alumni, faculty and guests—the largest attendance yet—took some time off their busy schedules and participated in the golf tournament on October 12, 2012. Held at the Sun Valley Golf Club, an Arnold Palmer designed golf course in Antipolo City, Philippines, the AIM 6th President’s

Cup was in honor of AIM’s new president, Dr. Steven DeKrey. Players and guests socialized over hearty breakfast while waiting for the opening of the first of the four-series event. DeKrey and former AIM President Dr. Roberto de Ocampo led an exciting ceremonial ball, where caddies scrambled for the golf balls for a prize. The first President’s Cup was held during Dr. de Ocampo’s term in 2002. After the tournament, a

sumptuous lunch sponsored by the Alumni Association of AIMPhilippines (AAAIM) awaited the worn-out players at the clubhouse. AIM Alumni Relations Executive Managing Director Mr. Greg Atienza, MBM 1983 hosted the awarding ceremony. AAAIM Chairman Mr. Eduardo Sison, MBM 1973 and Dr. DeKrey delightfully greeted and welcomed everyone to the event. “We should do this annually—not because there is a new presi-

dent, because if that’s the case you need a new president every year, and I won’t allow that,” Dr. DeKrey quipped. “I am here for the long haul,” he firmly said. In closing Dr. DeKrey urged alumni to support their alma mater: “We need your help in admissions, in career services... We need your donations. We need you to be involved. And we also need you in the golf course. I hope this becomes a regular activity because I need to practice.


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

Overall champion: Juan Miguel Rocha, EEMBA

Dr. DeKrey during the ceremonial ball

I look forward to working with you as we revitalize your business school.” Juan Miguel Rocha, who is currently taking the EEMBA, was crowned overall champion of the tournament. Champions for Class A, B and C are: Gary Cruz, Alvin Go and Jennifer Kim. Raffle items were showcased as part of the awarding ceremony. Mr. Winston Arpon, guest of the President, won the grand prize, a TCL 32” TV with subwoofer and sound bar. The tournament was made possible

through the generosity of Sun Valley Golf Club, who sponsored the green fees, Global Port 900, Dynamic Sports Corporation, Meralco, Hotel of Asia Inc., Singapore Airlines, Am Euro Pharma Corporation, Digiwave Solutions Inc., Toyota Global City Inc., Hiniraya, Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, Post10 Worldwide, Impact Magazine, Pinoygolfer, Manila Broadcasting Company, A.L. Yabut Development Corporation, MBM 1992, Southpoint Driving Range, Rudy Project Philippines, 100 Plus, Hershey’s, Matstone, and Perez Optical.

Class A Champion: Class B Champion: Class C Champion:

Gary Cruz Alvin Go Jennifer Kim

Class A 1st Runner–Up: Class B 1st Runner–Up: Class C 1st Runner–Up:

Leopoldo Sanchez Philip Judan, MBM 1973 Manuel De Jesus, ERM 2008

Class A 2nd Runner–Up: Class B 2nd Runner–Up: Class C 2nd Runner–Up:

Alberto Lerma, MBM 1993 Tomas Benitez, MBM 2001 Suseno Dalacat

Longest Drive: Most Accurate Drive: Nearest to the Pin: Most Exercised:

Juan Miguel Rocha, EEMBA Rico Merioles, MBM 1984 Gerard Magadia George Inocencio, MM 2001

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SPOTLIGHT

Central Banking for Every Juan and Maria

by Ignacio R. Bunye, MM1976

showcase/ bookself class notes

THIS BOOK IS WRITTEN SPECIFICALLY FOR THE person with zero to very little background knowledge on banking and finance who would like to know more about central banking in the Philippines. S/he may be a junior in high school just starting to take up economics, or even someone who graduated from a different, unrelated course. S/he might be the type of person who turns to the business headlines in the newspaper and s/he wonders what it all means. Or s/he may be the type who skips the business page altogether. This book focuses particularly on the functions of the BSP and how it affects the lives of the Filipino. I thought of the layperson and how s/he would better appreciate the BSP if its operations were explained in bite-sized pieces. When I joined the Monetary Board of the Bangko Sentral on July 3, 2008, I started writing about the Bangko Sentral and the financial system in my weekly newspaper column. Speaking Out appears Mondays in the Manila Bulletin, Tempo, Peoples' Tonight, Sun Star Manila, Businessweek Mindanao and Filipino Reporter (in New York City). I have had noneconomists comment positively on the manner in which the content is presented. Former Foreign Affairs Secretary Alberto G. Romulo even suggested that I compile the articles into a book. So Sec. Bert, here it is! Economists and bankers may not like their work explained so simplistically, but as explained earlier, this book was written for a different audience. This book is organized into sixteen chapters that contain articles on various topics. Some articles are pretty straightforward, while others come with a glossary or a question-and-answer portion to further explain the topic. This portion is either enclosed in a text box or marked with the Juan and Maria icons. The Juan icon begins the section and the Maria icon is used to show the end of the section. Several articles will refer you to related articles located somewhere else in the book, while some will suggest a website for further reading (By the way, the links are current as of June 2012, but if, for some reason, you find broken links, feel free to use the search box on the BSP website to find what you need. If you don't have access to the Internet, drop by your local BSP Economic and Financial Learning Center and access the sites from there). But for the most part, the articles are written as stand-alone articles. So feel free not to even read the book from cover-to-cover! Skip around if you like.

Innovative Service Design Workbook: Five Step Process Prof. Amang Kim's Workbook Now Available Online AIM IS PLEASED TO announce that Prof. Song-Kyoo “Amang” Kim’s book, Innovative Service Design Workbook: Five Step Process and TRIZ Tools for Service Designers, has just been released on bookboon.com. The workbook aims to provide a systematic problem-

solving process. It “contains a detailed step-by-step process highlighting the various TRIZ (Theory of Inventive Problem Solving) tools that may be used to define, solve, and evaluate various service design problems.” Prof. Kim co-authored the

book with Kah-Hin Chai, KayChuan Tan, Andrew Brian Siy, and An-Jin Shie Liao. To download a free copy of the workbook, go to http:// bookboon.com/en/textbooks/ management-organisation/ innovative-service-designworkbook.


A IM L eader Magazine | F OUR T H QUA R T ER 2012

Ja Tum Seng, MDM 2004

writes: “I am very pleased to inform you that I have now been awarded a Fulbright scholarship to study in the US for two years. I will be studying at the Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. The program will start in mid August so I will have chance to attend the preacademic program for six weeks before the university begins. Warmest regards to all!” Nathaniel E. Acha, MM 1983

is now a freelance consultant. “At the moment, I’m involved in a study for an integrated manufacturing plant that I believe is one major solution to our sugarcane industry in the Philippines. I call this a 3-legged product from crushing or grinding canes to simultaneously produce: 1) Bioethanol- for fuel, 2) Premium or Very High Pol Raw Sugar and 3) Bioelectricity. “The revenue per ton for both mill owner and sugarcane farmers/ planters is considerably higher than manufacturing raw sugar only from cane. Also, compared to an earlier model of producing Ethanol from cane, my 3-legged model is sustainable, and profitable against fluctuations of sugar prices, or ethanol price, or both. “Perhaps the AIM Alumni Office can help me by posting for Foreign Investors who may want to invest in the Philippines, via the sugarcane industry in Negros. The demand for both fuel ethanol and electricity is very high in the Philippines. I too have a Flagship Project proposal for the utilization of two major renewable resources of Negros: “First, we generate 10 billion cu. meters of water per year from seven major rivers, now flowing to the sea only. “Second, we produce annually by- products such as cane fibers(bagasse), and cane residues left in the fields that

can be turned into biomass fuel for electricity. Our province is now importing 100% of its electricity requirements(220 MW-hr) from other provinces. “I really miss my classmates. May God bless you all.” Ofelia Odilao-Bisnar, MBM 1988 writes: “After almost

5 years as a Consultant with Acer Phils., I am now back fulltime in the academe. Since mid April, I joined Makati Medical Center College of Nursing (MMCCN). The college is now part of the Metro Pacific group —under the leadership of Manny V. Pangilinan (MVP). The Metro Pacific Investments Corp. (MPIC)’s assets include power distribution (Meralco), water utilities (Maynilad), tollroads, and hospitals. “Of its six major hospitals, four are in Metro Manila, namely: Makati Medical Center, Asian Hospital, Cardinal Santos and Lourdes Hospital. Of the six hospitals, three have colleges: Makati Med, Davao Doctors and

Riverside in Bacolod. “Our college, MMCCN, offers BS Nursing, BS Psychology and BS Radiologic Technology, and other allied health short courses. Nursing has been our flagship program since we started in mid 70s. We have produced top board placers and have maintained high passing rate (ranging from 85% to 100%); national passing average rate is only 45%. We have a very good reputation and are highly regarded in the health and wellness sector for producing quality and highly competent graduates who are now strategically placed in key positions all over the globe.” Dviwesh Chander ISEP 2012

writes: “The past two months of my stay at AIM as an ISEP student has provided me an enriching and memorable learning experience. The peers, the professors and the whole environment have synergized to equip me to be a better manager and leader in the future. “The Philippines is a

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country that would always hold a special place in my heart, as here, I discovered my passion and love for the water sports. I got richer in terms of experiences from scuba diving, rafting and many such adventurous water sports. “I think AIM is one of the best places to learn and it provides an environment that promotes creative thinking, and most importantly grooms the leadership skills in the person. The course curriculum analyzes the real life business scenarios which keeps you abreast and prepared for your actual corporate experience. “As a part of the ‘Consulting Engagement Cycle’ course, I got an opportunity to work on the live project with DHL Philippines. The exposure to directly discuss with the country heads and the marketing heads from the very beginning was quite a memorable experience. “The most significant lessons I learned at AIM

Ms. Ofelia Odilao-Bisnar (3rd from left) during her Installation as MMCCN President last July 27, 2012 with her family: Janine, JC, and Jasper, and husband Aniceto “Jun” Bisnar, MBM 1989.


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were time management, real life simulations that cultivate the leadership skills, and most importantly, efficiently handling cultural diversity. When you have Italians, French, Mexicans, Filipinos and Indians

COVER STORY

GIVING

helped them in preparing their itinerary to maximize the time of their visit. During their visit, they went to Southwest Forestry University where Mr. Qin is currently working as a Professor. They went to Jinyuan Flower Industry Co., a major player in the supply chain of Kunming’s Flower industry, the flower market in Kunming where growers from China bring their products, and a farm greenhouse of roses. Mr. Choy and his wife is very much thankful for his friends and fellow AIM Alumni in taking the time to make their visit to Kunming a very fruitful one.

as your classmates, it’s quite an intriguing learning experience. “I highly appreciate and thank my classmates and professors for maintaining a Justin Garrido, ISEP 2012 highly conducive and motivating is the Co-founder of Social environment for learning. The insightful class discussions and viewpoints from the professionals of diverse fields has undoubtedly contributed a lot to my learning and equipped me with the new holistic perspective of looking at the business issues.” Mr. Lorenzo “Choy” Siapuatco, MM 1998 and his wife visited

Kunming on March 2 and was welcomed and accommodated by Mr. Jiali Qin, MDM 1998. Mr. Jack Niu, MM 1998, Chairman of the AIM Alumni Beijing Chapter, Mr. Hu Huabin, MDM 1998, Chairman of the AIM Alumni Kunming Chapter, and Ms. Xia Ying, MDM 2009

SPOTLIGHT

class notes

Project.PH. Justin writes: “The most significant lesson I learned at AIM was the constant learning on many topics, which gave me amazing insights into how to do business in Asia—the challenges, the opportunities. I expanded my knowledge on the base of the pyramid leadership strategies and social enterprise business models. The learning, along with the connections I made through AIM has given me the confidence to move back and start a social enterprise business here. “I would recommend AIM to my colleagues because it has a prestigious MBA program with engaging and passionate professors, where you also have the opportunity to work with not just MBA classmates, but also MDM (Masters in Development Management) classmates who come from all over the world with vast and varied experiences in the development field. AIM also gives you great insights into business in the Asia and ASEAN region that can’t necessarily be found in Western MBA programs. And of course the Philippines is an amazingly beautiful country composed of friendly people across 7107 islands. Islandhopping, hiking, surfing, scubadiving—it’s More Fun in the Philippines!”

Antonio H. David, MBM 1973 Dearest Family and Friends, With sadness, we write to inform you of the passing of Antonio H. David—affectionately known as “Bong”. Bong’s favorite quote was: “ I am I and my circumstances” (Jose Ortega y Gasset, Meditaciones del Quijote, 1914). And boy did he live by it. Bong experienced the loss of his parents at a young age. As a result he grew up amidst a large and loving extended family whose generosity he always cherished and strived to pay forward. A meticulous and goal-driven man, he pursued several different professional avenues (engineering, business development and even a trucking business) with tenacity and diligence. Through it all, he never lost his humility and underlying desire to help the poor. In 2006, Bong survived a massive stroke in Istanbul, Turkey. Using this same unwavering determination, he achieved remarkable recovery. Subsequent strokes chiselled at his memory and vision, but had no effect on his conviction to take life by the horns. Even in his final years one could find him on e-mailing to maintain contact with friends, attending reunions, traveling (most recently to the Philippines and a cruise to the Bahamas!) and, of course, doing his favorite activity, exploring the sample aisles at Harris Teeter and Costco. Although he can’t send the message himself, we are entirely certain he would want you, his friends and family, to know that you filled his life with laughter, learning, friendship and, most of all, love. We adored him, will miss him and will always be inspired by him. Best wishes, Chelo, Gino, Mara, Vera and Ajay David


CONNEC T Alumni Homecoming 2013

February 22, 2013

Save the date!



AIM Leader 4th Quarter 2012