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Friday November 26 - Thursday December 9 2010

ENTERTAINMENT

19

Kingston s hottest up-and-coming talent

EXPOSURE

MISTAKE BY NAME NOT BY NATURE Singers Del Noble and former Kingston journalism student Scarlett Philps talk to Aimee Davis about getting cabin fever while making their debut EP

See them live in an intimate gig on December 16 at The Fighting Cocks

HAILED by Rock Sound as “soulful, melodramatic pop that dazzles” mistakes.in.animation are a hard working four-piece from Kingston. Having released their debut EP in September the band are set to hit the road with a UK tour planned for early next year.

We’ve been playing solidly as members for a while now and my intention was always to stay in the band. You’ve been described as being somewhere in between Los Campesinos! and Biffy Clyro. Is this a fair description? How would you describe yourselves? Del: I’d say it’s a fair description but also a bit of a lazy one. There’s not many indie-pop bands with boy/girl vocals in this country so comparing us to Los Camps or Johnny Foreigner seems to be a comWatch the Kingston band live at a venue near you mon theme. Scarlett: To be Scarlett, you were in mistakes. compared to Biffy is quite an honin.animation throughout your our. Del writes most of the music time at Kingston University. Was and Biffy has been his favourite it your intention to carry on in the band for a while. band once you had graduated? How was it making your debut Scarlett: I joined at some point EP MTFU or GIP and what is the during my first year and to start meaning behind the name? with it was just Del and I playing Del: It was equally fun and acoustic stuff. Then we got Dave in stressful. Dave took longer than we and Jarryd joined last. expected recording the drums and

I started to suffer from cabin fever in general. Jarryd was ill through the entire process and was awake for only 10 minutes during our week-long stay. Scarlett was on the verge of insanity five days in when she still hadn’t recorded a single part yet had watched more Jeremy Kyle than most unemployed people manage in a month. The name comes from a band in-joke where any problem can be solved with two choices, ‘Man the f*ck up’ and/or ‘Get it pumped’.

Scarlett: Recording literally went up to the last second, but it was exciting to hear everything on record. Have you ever played a show that was a complete disaster or played with a band that you just didn’t get along with? Del: We’ve had a lot of trouble this year with transport and we were late to a show in London, arriving just as we were live on stage. Then the promoter said we couldn’t play as none of the other bands wanted to budge from their slot. As for bands we didn’t get along

with, the dude from Cubrik broke my guitar, so I’ll forever hold a grudge against him for that. What’s next for you guys then? Is there a future release in the pipeline? Del: At the moment we’re still plugging our EP as it’s only been out for two months. We’re looking to play more shows further afield than Kingston/ London, starting with the south coast and gradually working our way north. We plan to make a big go of it in 2011.

NOTHING SOUR ABOUT SWEET S CLOTHING

From a small town boy to a bigtime music mogul, a south-east London grime producer has brought his popular clothing line for dubstep and hip-hop fans to Kingston’s very own house of music – Banquet Records. Wearing his own label, Jay Sweet, 29, appears to know what style is and looks every inch the grime superstar. Although he is renowned for his musical abilities, after producing tracks for worldwide artists such as Wiley, JME and Lethal B, Jay is entering the fashion world with a brand new clothing line called Stay Clever. His line is an infusion of musical genres with a focus on providing stylish merchandise for fans of dubstep music with a hip-hop influence. “The idea of Stay Clever originally came about after the success of a dubstep t-shirt that we made

in 2006,” said Jay. “I’m a big hip hop fan, so I sort of merged hip hop with dubstep to create a T-shirt and luckily it got recognised by a lot of people within that music scene. “We saw a gap in the market for merchandising and clothes within the dubstep music scene. “We’d seen the music grow but there was no clothing to accompany it.” Stay Clever, which is on sale now in Banquet records, is also expect-

Jay Sweet - from music to fashion

ed to hit other record comapines in Kingston. “It’s being sold in independent music shops like Banquet Records because a lot of the t-shirts are music related,” said Jay. “I chose to have the clothing sold there as it’s one of the main, if not the only, record shop in Kingston that still appeals to music lovers.” Jay develops ideas for the t-shirts along with his business partner Joe, but Stay Clever also gets inspiration from local Kingston graffiti artists. They recently contributed the new design Attack of the clever kicks, a trainer/shoe influenced tshirt. Jay has been praised for having a distinctive and innovative approach to the music and fashion. The trend setter admits to wearing his own brand because of the fashionable element the t-shirts have.

Stay Clever is the new line designed with a dubstep and hip hop influence

He adds: “The main influence behind the designs would obviously be music, fashion, lifestyle and current affairs.” Jay hopes his clothing line will kick off just as his grime music did. He plans to open a store and expand his clothing further by introducing a wider range of products.

Who would he want wearing his line? “If I could get my clothing to any celebrity it would have to be rappers Kanye West, Pharrell Williams and Common because they are the most influential streetwear artists.” By Jaipreet Gill


Exposure page for The River