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T he A lumni Maga zine of t he Asian Institute of Management

DOUBL E I S SU E 2 010 -2 011 Vol. 5 Issue 4

Deliberate AIM, the Lopez Way AIM Alumni Homecoming 2011 The Double Issue


Leader P R E S I D E N T ’ S

M E S S A G E

THE BLESSING OF THE renovated ground floor of AIM’s main building on 25 February offered a timely illustration of this issue’s theme of philanthropy. Originally built with funds donated by Eugenio Lopez, his son Oscar Lopez made the renovation possible with a fresh donation. Philanthropy has also come in the form of service, 17 years worth of which Jose Cuisia rendered as Chair or Co-Chair of the AIM Boards of Trustees, Governors, and Scientific Research Foundation. Following his presidential appointment and congressional confirmation as Philippine Ambassador to the United States, Joey Cuisia officially relinquished these responsibilities on 25 February 2011. The unexpected ambassadorial assignment accepted by Cuisia left Napoleon Nazareno, President and CEO of PLDT and SMART, as sole chairman of the AIM Boards. For the first time in its history, leadership of AIM’s highest governing bodies has passed over to an AIM alumnus. Poly Nazareno, had joined the Board of Trustees in August 2005 and had just taken on the co-chair position in August 2010, graduated with MBA Class ’73. Fortuitously, the events that required Board changes came shortly before the joint annual meeting of the Boards of Trustees and Governors. The Boards thus had the opportunity to express their thanks to Cuisia for his extended stewardship over the Institute and to ratify Poly Nazareno’s new positions. Beyond the organizational changes, the joint meeting also became the platform for establishing the directions for the Institute as it moves forward. The Boards reaffirmed the principles and policies that should guide the Institute, much of it already articulated at its founding and restated at various intervals since then. AIM was set up as a leading graduate school of management in the region serving an international student body. Radical changes in management education and the environment in which AIM must compete have made this objective more difficult to sustain. But the Boards believe that this should remain AIM’s goal. Attaining this goal would require the concerted assistance of all AIM stakeholders, from the Boards and the management to the alumni and, especially, the Faculty. The Boards approved the framework plan presented by the Faculty at the meeting for developing new areas of research and teaching programs and mobilizing financial support for the Institute. The Boards also recognized the importance given by the

Faculty to addressing governance issues. They underlined the imperative of resolving divergence of views through internal mechanisms instead of protracted court litigation. In a spirit of renewed commitment, the Governors and Trustees called on the Faculty and the alumni to strengthen its collaboration through a common vision for strengthening AIM as a premier management school in the region. Pushing for speedy implementation, the Boards set a time frame of three months for the elaboration of the Faculty plan under the guidance of a Steering Committee that would include alumni members of the Boards and Faculty. It also decided on an unprecedented mid-year joint meeting in June to review and approve the plan. The alumni who had come for the Homecoming, traditionally held on the week of the joint meeting of Governors and Trustees, welcomed the Board action. The Alumni Association of AIM and FAIM, which also held elections for their officers, responded with their own commitment of support to AIM and the pledge for a more active engagement in fund-raising efforts. Chaired by Tito Serafica, MBM 1991, Beyond the organizational the organizing class for changes, the joint meeting AIM’s 43rd Founding also became the platform Anniversary and for establishing the Homecoming, provided directions for the Institute a solid base for renewed as it moves forward. The alumni engagement Boards reaffirmed the the Institute. principles and policies that with Together with the other should guide the Institute... jubilee classes, they brought back to the campus over 700 alumni for the occasion. With contributions of PH1million each from the AAA-Indian Chapter, chaired by M.P. Singh (MBM 1976) and the Triple A Club chaired by Jesli Lapus (MBM 1973), alumni fund-raising reached the highest donations so far recorded during an alumni homecoming celebration. The start of the Lunar New Year in February has thus ushered in new transitions in AIM. The year’s theme was singularly appropriate: “May Bago sa AIM! Tayo Na! The first part translates simply to “Something New at AIM.” The second part, “Tayo Na!” adds a double layer of meaning. It can simply mean, “Let’s Go!” Or, “We Are the One!” or “It Is Our Turn!” Indeed, with six seats in the Board of Trustees and the chairmanship held by alumni, their enhanced role in governance may well be the new element in AIM.

Edilberto de Jesús PRESIDENT, ASIAN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT


DOUBLE ISSUE

VOLUME 5 ISSUE 4

EDITORIAL TEAM Greg Atienza EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Susan Africa-Manikan ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Sherbet Katigbak-Manalili MANAGING EDITOR

Haji Zulkifly Baharom SENIOR OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT

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Melissa de Sagun EDITORIAL STAFF

Maritess Aniago-Espiritu Voltaire Masangkay Amy Nerona Jun Javellana ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE STAFF

Rene Azurin Gerard Ian De Sagun Gary Grey Angela Joo-Hyun Kang Meghann Lee Rose Cheryl Orbigo Dina Paterno Kim Patrocinio Jerry Quibilan Venie Ranosa Regnard Raquedan

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CONTRIBUTORS

Chili Dogs DESIGN, ART DIRECTION & ILLUSTRATION

Jovel Lorenzo Amy Nerona Jester Bigalbal

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NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PHOTOGRAPHERS

COMMENCEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Time of Our Life Stronger, wiser, and united Cohort 5 Learning the Three Values at AIM

Lexmedia Digital PRINTING

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Edilberto de Jesús

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PRESIDENT OF THE INSTITUTE

Victoria Licuanan DEAN OF THE INSTITUTE

CHAIRMAN, FEDERATION OF AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC.

Joselito Yabut

COVER STORY: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Deliberate AIM: The Lopez Way Power People Converge for AIM Milestones 2011

CHAIRMAN, AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION – PHILIPPINE CHAPTER

Marvee Celi-Bonoan

Greg Atienza EXECUTIVE MANAGING DIRECTOR, ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE

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SPOTLIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989: Authority, Influence and Persuasion Roberto V. Garcia, MBM 1973: Making a Difference Joselito G. Yabut, MBM 1979: The Good Seed SHOWCASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Travel: Dinagyang Festival Experience Golf: Homecoming Golf Tournament Bookshelf: Power and Privilege: Essays on Politics, Economics, and Government Did You Read the Case?

The AIM Alumni Leadership Magazine (AIM Leader) is a quarterly publication of the Asian Institute of Management with editorial office at the Alumni Relations Office, Asian Institute of Management, 123 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City, 1260 Philippines Telephone No.: 892.4011 locals 331, 540 and 533 Telefax: 893.7410 | Email: aimalumni@aim.edu Copyright 2007, AIM Alumni Leadership Magazine. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any manner, in whole or in print, in English or other languages, without written permission is prohibited.

IN MEMORIAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Datuk Ir. (Dr.) Mohd Annas Hj. Mohd Nor Gaston Zavalla Ortigas PHILANTROPHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 An Investment for the Afterlife Passion: The Most Beautiful Make-up of a Corporation Moving Towards Lasting Bonds with Malaysia

Datuk Ir. Mohd Annas Hj. Mohd Nor.

EXECUTIVE MANAGING DIRECTOR, SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH FOUNDATION

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CLASS NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: JOVEL LORENZO


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CALVIN COOLIDGE, THE 30th president of the United States had once said, “No person was ever honored for what he received. Honor has been the reward for what he gave.” With this issue of the AIMLeader, we give honor and special appreciation to all those who have given much to the Institute. Now celebrating its 43rd founding anniversary, our school has been witness to more than four decades of support from many friends and benefactors who believe, and continue to believe in the leadership that it has spawned through the many alumni leaders who marched proudly from the halls of the caserooms into the battlefileds of the corporate and development world. We pay special tribute to the Lopez Family Foundation through Mr. Oscar Moreno Lopez who has so generously provided the resources for the much needed upgrade of the 43-year old AIM lobby and ground floor caserooms and offices. The legacy of philanthropy and service of the Lopez family has been part of AIM’s history as 43 years ago, in 1968, the Eugenio Lopez Foundation, Inc. donated Php 6.5 million for the construction of a school that was to be known as the Asian Institute of Management. We congratulate MBM 1991 through Tito Serafica, Chairman of the Homecoming Committee, for organizing one of the most successful Annual Alumni Homecomings at the AIM campus—“May Bago sa AIM! Tayo Na!” (There’s Something New at AIM! Let’s Go!), inviting alumni to visit the campus to see the sparkling new lobby and to meet and greet classmates and professors. In one of the most well attended homecomings in ARO’s history, the joyous occasion successfully raised PHP 4.5M for the AIM Alumni Fund. We also recognize the generosity of time and talent of our distinguished alumni who have given much of themselves in pursuit of sustaining a bright future for our beloved school—Roberto “Bobby” Garcia, MBM 1973 who is now a member of the AIM Board of Trustees; Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989, President of Kelab AIM Malaysia; and Joselito Yabut, MBM 1979, Chairman of the Alumni Association of AIM. We also give special mention to Dato’ Haji Sarip Bin Hamid, MBM 1979, who has engaged in charitable activities since 2002 via his family company, Golden Prism Sdn. Bhd., and to H.E. Victoriano M. Lecaros, Philippine Ambassador to Malaysia who has been most supportive of AIM through KELAB. And of course, we pay respect to our beloved Datuk Ir. (Dr.) Mohd Annas Hj. Mohd Nor, MM 1984, FAIM Chairman, who joined his creator last November 15, 2010. In my visits to the various AIM Alumni Associations during the last quarter of 2010, I am continuously moved by the commitment and dedication of our alumni to our school. We are especially grateful to the alumni in Kunming

and Bangladesh, who have established new and vigorous chapters. Meaningful exchanges were also made with our alumni in South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, India (Bangalore and New Delhi), Shanghai, Taiwan and Hong Kong. As we approach significant milestones in AIM history with many interesting developments, and with our 50th anniversary a few years from now, we continue to appeal to generous alumni donors to support the Alumni Fund: for Scholarships—to keep our caserooms vibrant with the best and the brightest students in the region, for Learning Space—to constantly improve the facilities in the campus, and for Research and Development to keep our case packs updated with the latest in global advancements in business technology, management and leadership. As alumni of the Asian Institute of Management, we have no doubt received much in terms of excellent management education, in learning the tools of the trade, in garnering leadership attributes that are vital in propelling our careers and fields of endeavor. Even more importantly, we have gained invaluable friendships that have lasted through the years through our batchmates and professors, and precious relationships that have bonded us to the school. Undeniably, it is as good a time as any to give back to the Institute that has become part of our personal history. To increase the percentage of To increase the percentage alumni giving which of alumni giving which is vital in assessing is vital in assessing and and determining the determining the future of future of our school, our school, we invite all invite all alumni alumni from the Philippines we from the Philipand around the world to make a gift to the Institute. pines and around the world to make a gift to the Institute. Any amount, no matter how small will play a significant role in increasing the numbers of alumni support which is crucial in the next seven years leading to our Golden Anniversary. The Alumni Relations and the Development Office has established an Online Giving page at www.aimalumni.org which will help you give a gift anytime from around the world. Should you wish to make a gift, we would be grateful if you could contact us at aimalumni@ aim.edu and it will be our pleasure to assist you. We thank our guest editor for this issue, Dina Paterno, Executive Managing Director of the AIM Development Office for assisting us in compiling materials for this issue. The Chinese say that “A man’s true wealth is the good he does in this world.” By doing what’s best for the school, we will not only provide true wealth for ourselves, but for the future generations of alumni as well.

Greg Atienza EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, AIM ALUMNI LEADERSHIP MAGAZINE EXECUTIVE MANAGING DIRECTOR, ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE SECRETARY GENERAL, FEDERATION OF AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS, INC.


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AIM Maintains Prestigious AACSB International Business Accreditation

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IM INITIALLY achieved AACSB International accreditation in 2004. AACSB International announced in April 2011 that 68 schools, including AIM, have maintained their accreditation. Since 1916, AACSB has been the longest serving global accrediting body for undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral degrees in business and accounting. Only 620 out of 13,000+ business schools in the world, less than 5%, have earned this mark of excellence. Only 33 b-schools in Asia are AACSB accredited. Apart from AIM, they are the National University in Singapore, Melbourne Business School in Australia, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and China Europe International Business School in

Shanghai, to name a few. AIM is the only b-school in the Philippines with AACSB accreditation. To maintain accreditation a business program must undergo a rigorous internal review every five years, at which the program must demonstrate its continued commitment to the 21 quality standards relating to faculty qualification, strategic management of resources, interactions of faculty and students, as well as a commitment to continuous improvement and achievement of learning goals in degree programs. AACSB means that AIM has surpassed rigorous standards. “It takes a great deal of selfevaluation and determination to earn and maintain AACSB accreditation,” said Jerry Trapnell, vice president and chief accreditation officer of AACSB International. “Schools not only

itself as a leading management school in the region. Very few examples of this expertise (culture, business, and politically consonant cases) exist in the management education industry. Without a doubt, AIM enjoys a leading role in this activity”, pronounced the AACSB Review Team. “AIM has endorsed the On its linkages with the importance of producing Asian community, AACSB cited socially responsible, entrepreneurial leaders and that “AIM has developed since its managers through initiatives genesis in 1968 a very rich and prolific set of interactions with such as the creation of an Assurance of Learning Center. the: a) business practitioner/ AIM’s strong passion for owner, b) government officer, implementing assessment and c) civil association decision processes through its maker worlds. AIM’s relationship programs has contributed to its solid reputation among with these three constituencies is at the core of its operamanagement education institutions for its ongoing tion. Examples of this area of dedication in striving for excellence are the wide variety excellence in its business education programs.” -AACSB of in-company degree and nondegree programs that constitute up to 60% of the school revenue, “AIM has endorsed the the rich and relevant participaimportance of producing socially tion of people from these sectors responsible, entrepreneurial as guest speakers in class, and leaders and managers through the great convocation power AIM initiatives such as the creation of an Assurance of Learning Center. has when it organizes events for policy making and/or Corporate AIM’s strong passion for impleSocial Responsibility conferences menting assessment processes through its programs has contrib- in the ASEAN region.” On AIM’s development uted to its solid reputation among management programs, AACSB management education institusaid that “The Master in Develtions for its ongoing dedication opment Management (MDM) in striving for excellence in its Program is high quality and business education programs,” enjoys special recognition in the said AACSB International. AIM’s use of case method con- ASEAN region. AIM has benefited from this program by retinues to be unique and powerful. ceiving awards and recognitions The AACSB Review Team cited AIM’s professors and case method such as Beyond Grey Pinstripes Awards for Business School for their “exceptionally effective Innovation in Social Impact practices that demonstrate leadManagement, and the Excelership and high quality continulence in Integration in Curous improvement in management riculum Award for having the education. AIM has developed a very robust expertise in the use of most content on social impact and environmental management the case methodology throughout topics in its core courses”. its 40 years of academic activity. AIM’s achievement was Additionally, AIM has adapted, written and/or used many ASEAN recognized at the AACSB Interconsonant cases that re-assure its national Conference on April 28, 2011 in New York City. aspiring strategic plan to position

must meet specific standards of excellence, but their deans, faculty, and staff must make a commitment to ongoing improvement to ensure continued delivery of high-quality education to students.”


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AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

AFCSR 2010 THE AIM RAMON V. DEL Rosario Center for Corporate Social Responsibility (RVR Center) conducted the 9th Asian Forum on Corporate Social Responsibility on October 21 & 22, 2010 at the Crowne Plaza Mutiara in KL, Malaysia. In attendance were 342 delegates from 245 organizations in 27 countries. With the theme “Improving Business Competitiveness through CSR,” the AFCSR 2010 featured four plenary sessions and thirty special interest sessions that focused on specific processes, learnings and best practices of companies and organizations from all sectors of society. The conference had more than 80 speakers and moderators from 18 countries in Asia, Europe, and the United States. The conference also introduced, for the first time, a plenary debate that highlighted

a motion to “encourage CSR more than Philanthropy.” AIM President Edilberto C. de Jesús emphasized in a press conference the growing interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the region. “Asia-Pacific boasts the highest number of participation for this kind of discussions. Awareness is definitely building up,” he added. The conference concluded with the awarding ceremonies for the Asian CSR Awards and the Intel-AIM Corporate Responsibility Award (IACRA) during a gala dinner. The evening’s Guest of Honor, Malaysia’s first lady and AIM alumna YABhg Datin Paduka Seri Rosmah Mansor, spoke on the importance of CSR in Malaysia, and handed the trophies to the winners who were selected from 141 entries from 15 countries and 99 organizations. The AFCSR 2010 was co-

chaired by AIM Governors Ybhg. Tun Dato Seri (Dr.) Ahmad Sarji Bin Abdul Hamid and Ybhg. Tan Sri Dato (Dr.) Lin See Yan, and RVR Center Chairman Mr. Ramon R. del Rosario, Jr. and was co-presented by Intel and the German Technical Cooperation (GTZ), on behalf of Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development. The event was also organized in collaboration with the Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR) Centre for Sustainable Development and CSR and the Kelab AIM Malaysia. Over fifty conference sponsors and partners and more than twenty media partners also participated in the conference. A posthumous Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to the family of the late Tun Ismail Ali by AIM and Kelab AIM Malaysia. Tun Ismail was a Founding Member of the AIM Board of Governors and remained on the Board for 25 years.

The RVR Center leads AIM’s efforts to achieve excellence by establishing international alliances for research collaboration to generate intellectual capital. Through its partners and sponsors, the Center helps the Institute expand student and faculty competencies and broaden its community of stakeholders. Since 2002, the Asian Forum on Corporate Social Responsibility has generated over 3,700 AFCSR alumni. Summaries of the Asian CSR Award nominations since 2003 are located on this website, and for more information on the AFCSR, please visit the conference website at www.asianforumcsr.com

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THE START TO A PROMISING CAREER FOR AIM GRADUATES LAST APRIL 30, 2011, THE Asian Institute of Management presented the latest batch of graduates for Master in Management (MM), Master in Business Administration (MBA), and Executive Master in Business Administration (EMBA) at the Fuller Hall. Associate Deans Ricardo Lim and Grace Ugut of W. SyCip Graduate School of Business and Executive Education and Lifelong Learning Center, assisted Gloria de Guzman, Member of AIM Board of Trustees in awarding the diplomas to the graduates who were subsequently inducted into the AIM Alumni Association. The keynote address was given by AIM Alumna Ruth Callanta, (MM 1986) President of

CCT Group of Ministries. Joanne Rivera and Dr. Amit Khandeparkar spoke on behalf of the graduates. Joanne started her speech by stating that every graduate share one motivation —that is to be better. As their graduation marked a new journey into the real world, everyone must continue to be open to new ideas. Because we never know who we are learning from... and we never know who we are teaching. Dr. Amit recalled his AIM journey as he thanked the AIM for providing him a new perspective in life. He described life as a classroom where everyone has class participation (CP). The AIM community congratulates the new graduates of MBA, MM and EMBA.

AIM Presents MBA and EMBA Graduates The Asian Institute of Management presented the latest batch of graduates for Master in Business Administration (MBA) and Executive Master in Business Administration (EMBA) at the Fuller Hall last December 12, 2010. Associate Deans Ricardo Lim and Grace Ugut, of W. SyCip Graduate School of Business and Executive Education and Lifelong Learning Center, assisted President de JesĂşs in awarding the diplomas to the graduates who were subsequently inducted into the AIM Alumni Association. Mansur Ali Khan and Emma Topacio spoke on behalf of the MBA graduates. Mansur

reminisced the 16-month ride that was not merely about each individual but more on a group that is popularly known as Cohort 5. Emma conveyed that as their days in AIM has come to a close, they would stop analyzing cases and start solving real business problems. It is now their duty to transform themselves so they can inspire others at their very best. The keynote address was given by Cecilio Pedro, President and CEO of Lamoiyan Corporation (Happee Toothpaste), recognized as the Most Outstanding Toothpaste by the Consumer Union of the Philippines. He emphasized that as the graduates of this institution, they should never forget to AIM for success: A- Aim high I- Be Innovative M-Be considerate to Man The AIM community congratulates the new graduates of MBA and EMBA.


AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

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A Renewed Spirit of Commitment AT THEIR ANNUAL JOINT MEETING on 25 February 2011, the Governors and Trustees of the Asian Institute of Management led the Faculty and the Alumni towards a consensus on a common vision. Together, the stakeholders committed to strengthen AIM as a premier Asian management school. At the end of the meeting, following his confirmation as Philippine Ambassador to the United States, Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. tendered his resignation as the Co-Chair of the Boards of Trustees and Governors. He served as co-chairman and chairman for seventeen years. Co-Chair Napoleon L. Nazareno, PLDT and SMART President and CEO, assumed the chairmanship of both Boards. Nazareno is the first AIM alumnus to hold these positions. Three other alumni newly-elected as Trustees, Ricardo S. Pascua, Roberto V. Garcia and Jesli A. Lapus, were attending the joint meeting for the first time. With the support of the Governors and the reconstituted Board of Trustees, Cuisia and Nazareno decisively dealt with the policy directions to guide AIM as it moved forward. The Boards reaffirmed the international character of the Institute and declared that management control would remain in Philippine hands, thus ending speculation that AIM was for sale to foreign entities. The Boards, under the joint leadership of Cuisia and Nazareno, commended the faculty for their efforts to resolve internal issues and to unite behind a plan to strengthen AIM as a premier school of management in the region. The Boards, management, faculty and alumni agreed to work together in establishing the two framework and systems for internal governance, developing new areas of research and teaching programs, and mobilizing financial support for the Institute. After the sessions on February 25, the Trustees and the Governors participated in the inauguration of the renovated ground floor and caserooms of the Eugenio Lopez Foundation Building, made possible by generous donations from the Lopez Group Foundation Chairman, Oscar M. Lopez, and Meralco Millennium Foundation Chairman, Manuel V. Pangilinan.


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Dr. Ralph Sorenson Visits AIM

public distrust in capitalism and corporations, of well publicized greedy and corrupt top management in leading companies. He further points out the doubts on the governance of companies with interlocking directorships and other grounds for conflicts of interest among other reasons. The by-product of these are the new laws, regulations, and interventions into the private sector to promote honesty, integrity and morality. He says that the big question to the U.S. and the rest of the world is: Is it possible to retain free-market capitalism as a powerful positive force for creating jobs, innovation, and economic well-being while making it more responsive to the interests of all stakeholders, not just shareholders? Or are we destined to see ever-increasing government involvement & intervention in the workings of the private sector? Then, Dr. Sorenson gives another side to the story. He ON FEBRUARY 23, 2011, states some examples of comDr. Ralph Sorenson, esteemed co-founder of the Asian Institute panies that appear to be Doing Good While Doing Well such as of Management and board of governors member, paid a visit to Google, Johnson & Johnson, and Whole Foods. Dr. Sorenson then the Institute to talk to the Masgives an overview of one these ter in Business Administration (MBA) students about “Conscious “Firms of Endearment”, Whole Foods, where he is a director of Capitalism: Doing Good While the company. He believes that its Doing Well.” management approach of “ConDr. Sorenson opened the talk by speaking about our era of scious Capitalism” is a new busi-

VP Binay Talks to AIM Students ON VALENTINE’S DAY 2011, Vice President of the Philippines, Jejomar C. Binay, visited the Asian Institute of Management campus. As an alumnus of AIM (TMP 1996), he adopted the AIM primary mode of learning which is the case-method for his talk to the Master in Management (MM) and Master in Development Management (MDM) students. VP Binay started with the case facts, narrating about Makati city since 1986 up to the present. He then affably interacted with the inquisitive students—sharing his experience, responding enthusiasti-

cally to queries and giving his opinions on various topics such as public-private partnerships, managing corporations vs. managing governments, socialized housing vs. low-cost housing, and human trafficking among other things. He probed the situation, shared his concerns, evaluated his options, and planned a course of action like all AIM students. “AIM is pleased to be able to bring such an accomplished alumnus back to campus,” said Edilberto de Jesús, President of AIM. VP Binay’s visit was a real treat to students, an event everyone could learn from.

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ness paradigm. They drive their business by setting the “tone at the top”. This means that they cap the CEO compensation to 19 times that of the average team member as compared to other companies where CEOs are paid 300-400 times more; 93% of stock options go to non-exec team members while there are only modest grants for CEOs; and other similar practices. Dr. Sorenson sees 3 Pillars of Conscious Capitalism that are relevant today. The first pillar is enterprises should be primarily driven by their mission and their sense of purpose. The second pillar is being committed not solely to maximizing profits to shareholders, but rather to optimizing returns to all stakeholders: customers, employees, partners, investors, communities, and environment. The last pillar lies on “servant leaders”

Are we destined to see ever-increasing government involvement & intervention in the workings of the private sector? and entrepreneurs (often founders of the company) who lead by purpose and mission. Dr. Sorenson then talked about the core values of Whole Foods where he emphasizes that in the long run, it is better

to be mission driven than profit driven and that profits are an end result of optimizing gains for other shareholders. He tackled a variety of questions with the students on topics such as changing an existing company’s culture to conscious capitalism and how it can work in other companies and organizations. The talk concluded by Dr. Sorenson concurring with the students that companies can indeed do good while doing well. Dr. Sorenson’s visit hopes to set a higher bar for our future MBA graduates. Dr. Ralph Sorenson is President Emeritus of Babson College, Professor Emeritus and former Dean of the University of Colorado Business School, former professor at the Harvard Business School, and former Chairman and CEO of Barry Wright Corporation. He has served on the boards of directors of 15 publicly traded companies and is a director of several private companies in which his partnership has investments. Dr. Sorenson earned an A.B. degree (Magna Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa) from Amherst College and an MBA degree (with distinction) and Doctorate from the Harvard Business School. To download the complete presentation go to www.facebook.com/aimbschool and click on the files tab.


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Knowledge Management Summit in Bangalore

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N DECEMBER 3 and 4, 2010, AIM Alumni India (AIM-AAI) held the Knowledge Management Summit in Bangalore. This was actually the 2nd annual alumniconference organized by the alumni association. The first conference organized In 2009 was the IdeaXchange in Mumbai, also under the leadership of M.P. Singh (MBM 1976), President of the Alumni Association in India. The Alumni Relations Office assisted the AIMAAI in inviting alumni to the event and publicizing it in the alumni portal and MYAIM newsletters. The Knowledge Management Summit is the 5th of a series organized by AIM Triple A Awardee Ashok Soota, MBM 1973. While very specialized in the I.T. sector, the confer-

ence was immensely successful because of its partnership with the prestigious Confederation of Indian Industries (CII). The summit enabled AIM to gain the attention of significant organizations in India with more than 350 participants. There were some 50 alumni from Hyderabad, New Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Bangalore. The visit to India afforded the Alumni Relations Office the opportunity to meet, on an individual and group basis the alumni participants, as well as to personally visit and meet the alumni chapter members in New Delhi. At the end of each session with the alumni, ARO and the Development Office were able to impress upon the graduates the need to help the school as co-owners, and introduced the language and concepts of alumni fundraising.

AIM Triple A Awardee Ashok Soota India Alumni Association President Mr. MP Singh


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Alumni Networking in Shanghai IN ARO’S GOAL TO PROMOTE networking among alumni from the different countries, an exclusive meeting with alumni in Shanghai and the Philippines via Skype was arranged last November 19, 2010 at the IMRM Board Room at the 3rd floor of the Eugenio Lopez building. Venue in Shanghai was the Philippine Consulate arranged through Hon. (Ms.) Maria Rowena Mendoza Sanchez. Special guest speaker for the event was Professor Thomas Alexander from the Harvard Business School. Presently with the AIM core faculty until late 2011, Prof. Tom provided a novel experience of the latest case methodology for the AIM alumni, to relive their AIM case room experience. The case proceedings were live online in the AIM campus on Skype. EMD Dina Paterno of the development office coordinated the Philippine side of the Skype connections. Former AAAIM Chairmen Teddy Villanueva, MBM 1973

and Ramon De Vera, MBM 1973 attended on behalf of the Philippine chapter, while the Shanghai chapter was represented by Peter Jiang, MM 1995, Catherine Chen, MBM 1998, Max Niu, MM 1998, Henry Jiang, Maria Yang,

MBM 1975, Liu Yongfen, MM 1995, Salvador (Jojo) Saberola, BMP 2008, Barry Chen, MBM 1996, Hsiung Ko-tsang (Rock), MM 1993, Rosemarie Gao, MBA 2010, Gil Dolon, BMP 2002 and Vivien Zheng, MM 1999. Repre-

senting the Beijing Chapter was Jack Niu, MM 1998. Dinner with the alumni followed at the Shanghai Style restaurant with ARO hosting the small gathering of active alumni after the virtual caseroom event.

Taiwanese alumni welcome ARO Executive Managing Director Greg Atienza (seated 5th from left) and Development Office Executive Director Dina Paterno (seated 4th from left)

Re-engaging Taiwan and Hong Kong Alumni FOR THE FIRST TIME, the Alumni Relations Office visited the alumni chapter members in Taiwan (December 14, 2010) and Hong Kong (December 16, 2010), to meet the very senior alumni in the chapters. In Taiwan, ARO and the Development Office were warmly greeted by 14 alumni who took

the opportunity to reorganize the association with John Yang stepping down as Chairman and Patrick Hsiao, MM 1990 elected as the new Chairman. ARO gave a briefing about the latest developments at AIM and strategic possibilities and partnerships that may be forged between the chapter and the institute.

In the region, Taiwan has the most number of AACSB accredited schools and thus, the alumni association members are most eager to see AIM expanding its vision and spreading its wings in pursuit of this vision. They were also most eager to support the AIM Alumni Fund. In Hong Kong, the Chairman

and the Vice Chairman of the Association, Joe Tam and Rosa Wong respectively, met with ARO and expressed their desire to remain as a social club. They were open to the possibilities of assisting the Institute through fundraising, as they expressed their willingness to be engaged in a more meaningful way.


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Vice-Chairman: Dani Firmansjah, MM 1994, Chairman, AIM Alumni Association Indonesia Treasurer: Joselito Yabut, MBM 1979 Chairman, AAAIM Philippines Members of the Board of Trustees of FAIM: Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989 President, Kelab AIM Malaysia Dr. Gan Cheong Eng, MBM 1982 President, AIM Alumni Association Singapore Jack Nui, MM 1998 Chairman, AIM Alumni Assoc Beijing Ex-Officio: Ofelia Odilao-Bisnar, MBM 1988 Immediate Past Acting Chair of FAIM Secretary General: Greg Atienza, MBM 1983 Executive Managing Director, AIM Alumni Relations Office

FAIM Holds Annual General Meeting THE FEDERATION OF AIM ALUMNI (FAIM) held its Annual General Meeting and Elections last February 26, 2011 at the Bancom Room of the Asian Institute of Management. Present were the chapter leaders of the Philippines (Joselito Yabut, MBM 979 and Ofelia Odilao-Bisnar, MBM 1988 as Acting Chairman of FAIM), Malaysia (Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989), India (Mahendra “MP” Singh, MBM 1976), Indonesia (Dani Firmansjah, MM 1994), Singapore (Dr. Gan Cheong Eng, MBM 1982, Vice Chairman of FAIM), Taiwan (Ching-Kuo “Patrick” Hsiao, MM 1990), China-Beijing (Wenzhong

“Jack” Niu, MM 1998) and Bangladesh (Anwar Chowdhury, MM 1998). Also present was Greg Atienza, MBM 1983, Executive Managing Director of the Alumni Relations Office and Secretary General of FAIM. The alumni leaders honored past FAIM Chairman Datuk Ir. (Dr.) Mohd Annas Hj. Mohd Nor, MM 1984, who passed away last November 2010. Datuk Annas has been president of the Kelab AIM Malaysia (KAIM) since 1997, and has also been chairman of the Federation of AIM Alumni (FAIM) since 2004. The FAIM members acknowledged

AIM Alumni Association in UAE, Dubai

the presence of the revitalized chapters of Taiwan and Bangladesh, and warmly welcomed Patrick Hsiao and Anwar Chowdhury respectively. After discussions of resolutions and reports by the Secretary General, the members proceeded to elect the members of the FAIM Board of Trustees for 2011-2012. The newly elected FAIM Board of Trustees (BOT) as follows: Chairman: MP Singh, MBM 1976 President, AIM Alumni Association India THE AIM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION in UAE, Dubai held an organizational meeting last October 1, 2010 at Century Village. Seated from left: ALMIRA TAPIADOR, MM 2008, Corporate HR Manager, Saudi German Hospitals Group; LOUISEVILLE KAPOOR, MBM 2003, Secretary for AIM-in-UAE, Head of Performance Management & Business Analyses Market Unit Middle East, Ericsson; Shabana Easwaran, wife of Ganesh V. Easwaran; ASHISH GOEL, MBM 2003, Vice Chairman for AIM-in-UAE, Manager for Strategy Planning & Business Performance, Arabian Automobile and JESUS B. GALANG, MBM 1970, Chairman for AIM-in-UAE, Managing Director, GALANG LLC. Standing from left: THOMAS KURUVILLA, MBM

With a network of more than 38,000 alumni worldwide, there now exists 25 active AIM alumni chapters in 14 countries. Through the Federation of AIM Alumni Associations, country and city chapters exist in Bangladesh, Canada (Toronto), China (Beijing, Shanghai, Kunming, Hong Kong and Taiwan), Dubai, India (Mumbai, New Delhi and Bangalore), Indonesia, South Korea, Malaysia (Kuala Lumpur and Sabah), Nepal, Philippines (Manila, Baguio, Pampanga, Cebu and Davao), Singapore, Thailand, United States of America (East Coast), and Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi). The Federation of Asian Institute of Management Alumni Associations, Inc. (FAIM) is a private, non-stock, non-profit corporation with address at the AIM Alumni Relations Office, and is registered with the Philippines Securities and Exchange Commission. 1997, Managing Director, Arthur D. Little Middle East; RICHARD LIM, MBM 2002, Assistant Treasurer for AIM-in-UAE, Senior Manager, Ernst & Young; KANISHKA GUPTA, MBM 2003, Treasurer for AIM-in-UAE, Tatweer Dubai LLC; SACHIN KAPOOR, MBM 2003, Corporate Relations Manager, American Life Insurance Co; VINIT SHAH, MBM 2003, Project Director, Dubailand; CRISTINA K. VITUG, MBM 1995, Customer Services Manager, Brightpoint; GANESH V. EASWARAN, MBM 2001, Assistant Secretary for AIM-in-UAE, Senior Vice President, Clariden Leu; PRASHANT BATRA, D.E.C. 2008, Human Resources Manager, Emirates; PANKAJ SINHA, MBM 2007, Major Account Manager, Intertec; GAURAV KWATRA; and CHANDRA SEKHAR MALLURI, MM 2008, Senior Engineer, Petrofac.


AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

Seated from L: Habibur Rahman, Md. Mobin, Ekramul Kabir, Muzaffar Ahmed, Enamul Hoque, Mahfuzul Karim and Ranjaneswar Halder Standing from L: Monir Hussain, Abdul Wahed, Fayez Md. Mostaque, Sukhendra Sarker, Milon Paul, Anwar Chowdhury, Sudhir Nath, Mehboob Elahi, Pontosh Saha, SM Kabir, AKM Sharif Akhter, and Md. Giasuddin

The Reinstitution of AAAB Creates New Link Across the World by Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989 President, KELAB AIM Malaysia ALUMNI ALL OVER THE world have been getting together to celebrate the New Year 2011 at a range of nostalgic and heart-warming events encouraging AIM’s esteemed network of former, current and future graduates. In Dhaka, Md. Anwar Hossain Chowdhury, MM 1998 hosted a fabulous buffet dinner at Baton Rouge Restaurant, Pink City, Gulshan attended by 18 alumnus from all over Bangaladesh. It started with each and every alumnus having a chance to share their first-hand experiences about studying at AIM and living in the Philippines, especially in Makati City and the greater Metro Manila. The host, Anwar updated alumni present on current developments and interesting facts about international alumni events and the FAIM. He briefed them about the bedrock of a new strategic partnership that was developed with Kelab AIM Malaysia whilst attending the World Congress of Accountants (WCOA) 2010 in Kuala Lumpur from 8-11 November. That networking has led to new friendships formed with prominent Former High Court Judge Dato’ Syed Ahmad idid, ABMP 1983; Ching Lai Huat,

MM 1984; and Dr. Tajudin Alias, MDP 1975. Old acquaintainces of MM 1998 class namely, Deputy Chief of Army, Lt. Gen Dato’ Zulkifli Zainal, Kol Nixon and Kol Fadzil were reunited. Preceding the New Year Dinner and as part of the alumni ongoing commitment in giving back to AIM, the 19 alumni in Dhaka inaugurated a pro-term meeting presided by Mr. Milan Bikash Paul, MM 1988 and unanimously endorsed the reinstitution of AIM Alumni Association in Bangladesh (AAAB). Anwar was elected the Converner of AAAB and is currently assisted by an eight-member convening committee to draft the constitution and formalize its legal entity with the respective regulatory agencies in Bangaladesh. In his acceptance speech, Converner Anwar reiterated that “AAAB will provide opportunities for networking and fostering social, professional and business relations among alumni worldwide, opportunities for social gatherings, a channel of communication between alumni and AIM as well as assisting with promoting AAAB on the international level. As starters, a delegations of Malaysian Alumni

will visit Dhaka on 20-23 April to establish business networking and productive collaborative alliances with Bangaldeshi Alumni via AAAB. Our convening committee will work towards betterment of FAIM.”

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The Committee consists of one convenor and eight members: Convenor: Mr. Md. Anwar Hossain Chowdhury, MM 1998, Chief Financial Officer, DFID-Shiree/ EEP Members: Mr. Milon Bikash Paul, MM 1988, Executive Director, PSTC; Mr. Sarker Sukhendra Kumar, MM 1989, Director Administration and Risk Mgt; Mr. Rajaneswar Halder, MDM 1990, Director, Finance and Administration, TIB; Mr. Md. Muzaffar Ahmed, MDM 1997, Project Director, SC UK; Mr. Sultan Mohammad Gias Uddin, MDM 1999, Director, Research CODEC; Mr. Enamul Hoque, MDM 2000, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Industries, Government of Bangladesh; Mr. S.M. Kabir, MBM 2000, Professor, Marketing Department, Rajshahi University; Mr. Akhter AKM Sharif, MDP 2009, Manager, Strategic Planning, Cemex Cement.

AAAIM BOD Meet in MMDA

By Gary Grey, MBM 1974 AAAIM Director

Last January 19, 2011, the AAAIM Board of Directors had its first meeting for 2011 at the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Headquarters in Makati City, Philippines. This was to celebrate the appointment of AAAIM board member, Corazon “Coratec” T. Jimenez as General Manager of the MMDA. The group was given a tour of the MMDA premises, had a sumptuous lunch while an AVP on MMDA played, and had its board meeting where the main topic was the coming AIM Alumni Homecoming, now branded as “Milestone”.


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AIM Alumni Kunming Chapter Established

Prof Fil Alfonso seated in the front is flanked by Dato’ Syed Ahmad Idid, Triple A 2006 and Dato’ Nik Abdul Aziz Mohd Kamil, MM’75 with other alumni.

Alumna Ong Li Dong, MM’97 networking over a good lunch with fellow classmates Brig. Gen. Sheikh Mokhsin, Sasi and Kol Ben. Looking on is Phil Commercial Attache Eric Elnar, MDM’04.

KELAB AIM Malaysia Elects New Officers THE MALAYSIAN CHAPTER of AIM Alumni Associations, KELAB AIM Malaysia held its 34th Annual General Meeting last October 2, 2010 at the Orchid Room of the Royal Lake Club, Kuala Lumpur. The event was graced by the presence of AIM Professor Emeritus Fil Alfonso, who is also Vice-Chairman of the AIM Board of Trustees and the Executive Director of the Ramon V. del Rosario, Sr. AIM Center for Corporate Responsibility. Elected into office were the following: President: Haji Zulkifly Baharom Vice-President: Kol.(R) Mohd. Ariffin Che Mat Din Hon. Treasurer:

Mr. Ching Lai Huat Directors: Prof. Dr. Ahmad Zaki Hj. Ismail Dr. Jauzi Hj Abdul Aziz Dr. Ir. Tajudin Alias Lam Kin Yee—Chair, Sabah Branch Hon. Auditors: Mr. Khoo Chin Guan Mr. Sasitharan Vasoo Newly elected KELAB President Haji Zul thanked past President Datuk Ir. (Dr.) Mohd. Annas Haji Mohd Nor for his leadership and devoted services to the Kelab for the last 13 years (1997-2010). AIM congratulates the newly elected officers of Kelab who will continue to represent the Institute in various activities.

THE AIM ALUMNI KUNMING Chapter was established last November 16, 2010 at the Shiping Huiguan, No. 24 Zhonghe Ally, South Greenlake Road , Kunming. Dinner was co-sponsored by the Beijing and Shanghai alumni, and the AIM Alumni Relations Office. The Kunming Chapter is unique as it is the first AIM alumni association where almost all graduated from programs offered by the Center for Development Management (CDM). Of the 29 alumni in the Kunming database, 21 are MDM graduates, three from PDM, two PPDM, two BMP and one from the MBA program. The 29 members of the Kunming Chapter include the following: Yiqun, Zhang (BMP 2002), Qiang, Zhang (BMP 2005), Hong, Tao (MBA 2006), He, Ling Ling (MDM 1994), Hong, Tian (MDM 1995),Wang, Wanying (MDM 1996), Lu, Xing (MDM 1997), Shen, Lixing (MDM 1997), Hu, Huabin (MDM 1998), Qin, Jiali (MDM 1998), Cong, Dai (MDM 1999), Jing, Wu (MDM 1999), Youxin, Shen (MDM 1999), Lu, Caizhen (MDM

2000), Wang, Jieru (MDM 2000), Wenzhong, Yang (MDM 2002), Yao, Yunsong (MDM 2004), Ling, Li (MDM 2005), Chen, Yaohong (MDM 2006), Lu, Yao (MDM 2006), Xu, Xuejun (MDM 2007), Yan, Mei (MDM 2007), Huang, Shan (MDM 2008), Ying, Xia (MDM 2009), Abular, Madonna A. (PDM 1989), Jun, Xu Xue (PDM 2004), Yao, Lu (PDM 2004), Yang, Liqiong and Zhou, Bo (PPDM). The Alumni Relations Office is grateful to Huabin Hu, MDM 1998 and Xia Ying, MDM2009 for their voluntary inputs, advice and assistance in setting up the Kunming Chapter.


AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

Guiapal Cited as 10 Most Inspiring People in Manila Bulletin

Haji Zulkifly Baharom Receives the Order of the Crown of Kedah Congratulations. Zul flanked by his wife Hajah Zarina Ishak (right) and Dato’ Wira Hj Mohd Puat Mohd Ali, State Chief Financial Officer and Dato’ Hajah Che Barni Mohd Nor, Deputy Rector of Kolej Universiti Insaniah (left) at Balai Penghadapan, Istana Anak Bukit, Alor Setar.

HAJI ZULKIFLY BAHAROM, President of Kelab AIM Malaysia and a member of the FAIM Board of Trustees, has been awarded the Ahli Mahkota Kedah (AMK)Order of the Crown of Kedah in conjunction with the 83rd birthday of Sultan of Kedah, His Royal Highness Tuanku Al-Haj Abdul Halim Mu’’adzam Shah Ibni Almarhum Sultan Badlishah. The ceremony was held on January 27, 2011 at the Balai Penghadapan, Istana Anak Bukit, Alor Setar, Kedah. The award was conferred in recognition of Zul’s voluntary services to promote the regional alumni network and graduate management education links between AIM in the Philippines and Malaysia. Zul is also General Council of the Malaysian Institute of Management (MIM), Chairman of Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi (SBPI) Kuantan and SBPI Rawang as well as Executive Director of Malaysian Training Providers Berhad, Panel Advisory of Perbadanan Nasional Berhad (PNS) Academy and Director of the Asia Human Resource Development Congress. He also teaches HR Management and Development subjects at International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) and Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS).

The Kedah Malay Sultanate is the oldest Sultanate in Malaysia and its origins can be traced back to almost 900 years. With the first Muslim ruler, Sultan Muzaffar Shah in 1136, it is made evident that this State is rich in historical heritage. Since then, there have been 28 Sultans following who ruled consecutively from eight different capitals throughout Kedah. His Royal Highness Tuanku Al-Haj Abdul Halim Mu’adzam Shah is the fourth Sultan of Kedah to have ascended to the throne for over 50 years. His Royal Highness was appointed as the fifth King of Malaysia between 1970 and 1975. AIM President, Dr. Edilberto de Jesús’’ congratulatory message stated “Haji Zul, you are most deserving of this Royal Honor. AIM takes pride in the success and achievements of its alumni in their various fields of endeavor. Your accomplishments exemplify in realizing the AIM vision of contributing to the growth of Asian societies by developing professional, entrepreneurial, and socially responsible leaders and managers. May you be blessed with continuous success in your chosen field and we thank you for keeping the AIM legacy alive

through your achievements.” Zul expressed delight with the kind and encouraging words from the President, professors and alumni in the region. “I’m grateful and humbled to His Royal Highness for the honor of a state award. It is a recognition not only for the 4,000 alumni in Malaysia but also to the almost 40,000 alumni in over 70 countries. For over 40 years, AIM, the oldest business school in Asia remains committed to its mission to create a better Asia and a better world.”

The proud moment. His Royal Highness Sultan of Kedah conferring Haji Zul with the state award Ahli Mahkota Kedah.

MANILA BULLETIN, January 7, 2011. MDM 2008 alumnus Aleem Guiapal had been named as ten of the most inspiring people of 2010 by writer Rachel Barawid of Manila Bulletin. In her article she writes: “The people of Mindanao should be proud of Muslim youth leader Aleem Guiapal. For several years now, the 32-year-old project director of Mindanao Youth Speak has become an ambassador for Mindanao. He has been striving to change the tainted image of Mindanao and its people by putting their land and themselves on the global map as an ideal destination for business. “Guiapal, a Ten Outstanding Muslim Youth 2008 awardee, has been speaking in various international fora to lure investors to Mindanao, to seek assistance to empower small and medium enterprises, to help Muslim businessmen gain access to opportunities in other countries and to grant Muslims access to funds through Sariya banks and technology training on Islamic banking. A victim of the conflict in Mindanao himself, Aleem chose to move on with life and instead help his fellow Muslims attain peace, equality, respect, and success.” To read more: http:// www.mb.com.ph/ articles/297071/ten-inspiringpeople january 7, 2011

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THE AIM-CENTER FOR Development Management (CDM) and the Dr. Zuellig Center for Asian Business Transformation kicked off the first of two Health Financing Summits at the Cebu Institute of Medicine Amphitheatre last January 26, 2011. Organized with local health groups such as the Cebu Institute of Medicine and Visayas Primary Health Care Services, the summit’s topic, “The Role of Health Financing in Achieving Universal Health Care”, aims to provide a better understanding of health financing literacy for the society. There were one hundred thirty participants from grass community leadership, civil society organizations, local government

officials, hospital owners, and health experts. The summit served as venue of discussion for the current health agenda as unresponsive health policies were identified, leading to the root causes of health inequity. Also, it provided an initial assessment of dynamics of the changing environment of health care systems and businesses that may address solutions to business transformation and stakeholder concerns. In the first session, Dr. Bayarsaikhan, WHO Regional Adviser in Health Care Financing, Western Pacific Region, talked about Strengthening Health systems; Dr. Tom Fernandez, Cebu Institute of Medicine, dis-

cussed linking community and hospital health systems together; Dr. Alvin Caballes, UP Manila Social Medicine Unit, pointed out hospital financing concepts and practice; Dr. Fidelis Quiza, Cebu Institute of Medicine, put forward how Formulary and Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) contributes to efficiency in health care; Hon. Stephen Lillie, UK Ambassador to the Philippines, deliberated on the gatekeeping model of financing doctors. For the second session, Sonia Lorenzo, former San Isidro, Nueva Ecija Mayor and AIM Team Energy Center for Bridging Societal Divides Fellow, reasoned about health financing as a tool for social development;

Dr. Ramon Paterno, University of the Philippines-National Institutes of Health (UP-NIH), tossed around the difference of Case Mix system (case payment) and Fee for Service. For the third session, Dr. Kenneth Hartigan-Go, Asian Institute of Management, together with Dr. Francisco Flores, JICA consultant and Ministry of Public Health Sri Lanka, had an interactive session with the participants on how to decrease out-of-pocket expenses; Dr. Erlinda Posadas, Visayas Primary Health Care Services Incorporated and Prof. Francisco Largo, Faculty University of San Carlos Department of Economics, concluded with the meaning of universal health care. The AIM-Dr. Stephen Zuellig Center for Asian Business Transformation aims to contribute to the development and continuous improvement of home-grown Asian industries which may develop from local, to regional, and to globally competitive businesses. It will undertake relevant research to address issues faced by health care industries in the region as they respond to changing landscape and market challenges. By focusing on improving the health and well-being of people in the region, the center will develop educational materials from the research findings and surface pertinent lessons for use at the Asian Institute of Management, industry and concerned stakeholders. The second summit will take place on February 8, 2011, at the Davao School Foundation, Mindanao. For inquiries, please email Brian Lim at blim@aim.edu

AIM Forum Talks on Investment Opportunities in ARMM

Interventions through non-profit entities have been long prevalent in many developing areas, such as the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). Yet the problem still exists, poverty prevails. Addressing the issue, the iInvest Forum, together with the Asian Institute of Management-Center for Development Management (AIM-CDM), conducted a forum at AIM’s Global Distance Learning Center last March 1, 2011. With the theme, “Fiduciary Oversight and Principles of Endowment,” the event highlighted on the socioeconomic issues of non-profit entities in the Southern Philippines.

Clariza Lomotan Mullins, CTP, shared her experiences in investment, finance, and planned giving as she reviews the investment effectiveness of stakeholders. She then reiterated the priority investor trends and courses of action to bring change in Southern Philippines. AIM Fellow Secretary Pombaen Kader (DSWD-ARMM) emphasized the need to collaborate through Public and Private Partnerships to create international investment opportunities. In her recent projects on Community Development Assistance (CDA), DSWD-ARMM prepared livelihood

training and workshops to develop a sustainable community. The forum was spearheaded by AIM Alumnus Aleem Guiapal (MDM 2008), the Office of the Governor of ARMM, National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF), Al Amanah Islamic Investment Bank of the Philippines, AIM-Center for Development Management, AIM-International Muslim Students Association (IMSA), DSWD, consultants and partners of AG Consulting and AGMM Trading Corporation, and the Mindanao Youth Speak (MYSpeak) of the Young Moro Professionals Network.

First Row(L-R) Prof. Bienvenido Fernandez Jr., Dr. Kenneth Hartigan-Go, Dr. Pancho Flores. Second Row(L-R) Mr. Miguel Garcia, Dr. Tom Fernandez, Dr. Ramon Paterno, Dr. Fidelis Quiza, Ms. Sonia Lorenzo, Ambassador Stephen Lillie, Dr. Bayarsaikhan, Dr. Alvin Caballes, Dr. Petty de Castro, Dr. Bryan Lim

AIM Organizes Universal Health Care Summit in Cebu


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6. The “normal” honeymoon ratings of Noynoy Aquino follow several years under the only continuously unpopular president in Philippine polling history. Satisfaction with the performance of the national administration as a whole, top institutions and top officials has improved compared to the previous administration. 7. On the Reproductive Health bill, the “cafeteriatype” program for the family planning is popular for both Catholics and non-Catholics. 8. The August 23 hostage taking crisis brought on dissatisfaction with both the government and the media. 9. Public satisfaction with government performance on the Maguindanao massacre case worsened from December 2009 to September 2010. 10. Incidence of Hunger in late 2010 is still above the long-term average. Self-rated poverty is now 49%. The real value of the median poverty surveys, but few were influthreshold of the poor recovered enced, with neither bandwagon somewhat at the end of 2010, nor underdog effect dominant. after falling for several years. 4. Despite expectations of 11. Optimism with irregularities remaining serious personal life and the economy as in past years, satisfaction of in general improved, while both voters and poll workers the losers-gainers gap with the conduct of the elecnarrowed favorably, in tions was much higher in 2010 the latter part of 2010. than in 2007. There were fewer The 108-slide presentation witnesses of irregularities, and is available for sale on a 2011 anxieties about sabotage or ma- edition CD-ROM, incorporating chine failure were diminished. also all reviews from 20025. Post-Presidential election 2011, the TV-5 SWS Exit satisfaction with the way democ- Poll, the People’s Evaluation racy works has finally reached of the May 2010 Automated a high level, similar to 1992 and Elections, selected 2010- 2011 1998, after being conspicuously Social Climate columns, and absent in 2004. the article, “What SWS Stands for: Democratic Discourse.” The SWS surveys are Despite expectations of open for public research at irregularities remaining serious as in past years, the SWS Survey Library at satisfaction of both voters #52 Malingap Street, Sikatuna and poll workers with the Village, Quezon City. For conduct of the elections inquiries, please contact was much higher in 2010 Jeanette Ureta at Jeanette. than in 2007. ureta@sws.org.ph

The 2011 SWS Annual Survey Review

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PC-SWS PARTNESHIP: 2011 SWS SURVEY REVIEW. Prof. Juan Miguel Luz of Asian Institute of Management (AIM) served as moderator during the open forum after the presentation of Dr. Mahar Mangahas, SWS president, at the 2011 SWS Survey Review. Joining Dr. Mangahas in the panel for the open forum were (from left) Dr. Vicente Paqueo, former professor at the UP School of Economics in Diliman; Sec. Joel Rocamora, lead convenor of the National Anti-Poverty Commission and chairperson of Akbayan partylist; Dr. Edna Estifania Co, dean of the National College of Public Administration and Governance (NCPAG) in UP Diliman; and Mr. Peter Wallace, vice president of the Management Association of the Philippines. On January 21, 2011, the

Asian Institute of Management’s Policy Center hosted the 2011 Social Weather Station (SWS) Survey Review together with Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS). The annual Social Weather Stations (SWS) Survey Review generally portrays last year’s social weather, based on several SWS surveys of adults, household heads, voters, and poll workers, as follows: 1. The SWS Pre-Election Surveys and the TV-5 SWS Exit Poll saw Noynoy Aquino’s lead narrowing up to February, but recovering strongly up to his victory for the Presidency. These surveys also correctly depicted Jejomar Binay’s come-from-behind win for the vice presidency. 2. For the first time in Philippine history, a statistical sample of voters was polled only 50 meters away from the Voting Venters in the TV-5 SWS Exit Poll. 3. Filipino voters have become more aware of election


AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

ADB-AIM Knowledge Hub Holds Currency Wars Forum THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT Bank (ADB)-Asian Institute of Management (AIM) Knowledge Hub for Trade and Investment (K-Hub) recently organized a forum with Prof. Frank Warnock of the Darden School of Business, University of Virginia, entitled “The Problem of Plenty: Currency Wars, Capital Flows and Emerging Market Consequences” at the SGV Case Room of AIM in Makati City, last November 24, 2010. Prof. Frank Warnock started off the forum by underlining some obvious facts—China’s large current account surplus, the U.S.’ large current account deficit, China’s currency management against the U.S. dollar, etc. A less obvious fact that he highlighted was that the surge in capital inflows that many countries experienced in 2004-2007 gave way to an

unprecedented number of sudden stops. “Is a new wave of capital flows gathering power?” Prof. Warnock asked. He looked at this through three different perspectives—the U.S., China, and emerging market economies (EMEs). After presenting these perspectives, Prof. Warnock suggested that the U.S. and China should agree that China is overtly controlling its currency through its exchange rate policy and that the U.S. is overtly influencing its currency through its fiscal and monetary policies. EMEs, however, will have to look at many options—accumulate more reserves, impose capital controls, allow currency appreciation, among a few. Three discussants commented on Prof. Warnock’s presentation—Mr. Omar Cruz, Executive Vice President and Chief Investment Officer of

AIM Partners with NUS on Workshop on Diabetes

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Philippine experience; and Dr. Juzhong Zhuang, Deputy Chief Economist of the Economics and Research Department of Asian Development Bank, provided a regional outlook. The conference was attended by representatives from international organizations, the academic community, and the private sector.

“Is a new wave of capital flows gathering power?”

Philippine American Life and General Insurance Company gave his views from a business investor’s perspective; Dr. Laura Ignacio, Senior Economist of the Center for Monetary and Financial Policy of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas talked about the

The ADB-AIM Knowledge Hub for Trade and Investment is a collaboration between the ADB and AIM which aims to facilitate regional trade and investment policy dialogues. Part of the K-Hub’s work is to facilitate and move forward a regional coordinated private sector response to the crisis and to further economic growth as a complementary effort to ADB’s initiative focusing on the public sector. For copies of presentations and more information, please go to the K-Hub’s website, khub.aim. edu.

THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY of Singapore(NUS), in partnership with AIM-Center for Development Management and Dr. Zuellig Center for Business and Transformation, conducted a two-day workshop on “Diabetes Mellitus: A Public Health and Clinical Forum,” at the AIM Conference Center Manila (ACCM) last April 25-26, 2011. The workshop featured NUS Professors Kee Seng Chia and Rob Van Dam, who focused on public health relating to Diabetes. After explaining the facts on Type 2 diabetes mellitus, Prof. Kee Seng Chia provided a multisectoral approach on prevention of the disease. Aside from discussing the genetic and non- genetic risk factors of diabetes, Prof. Rob Van

Dam shared research studies that illustrate how coffee can be beneficial to diabetes mellitus. Lectures on the clinical aspect of Diabetes Mellitus were discussed by Dr. Leilani Mercado-Asis of Philippine Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Dr. Alberto Chua of Philippine Society of Nephrology, AIM Prof. Kenneth Hartigan Go, Dr. Greg Germar, and Dr. Carlos Chua of Philippine General Hospital.

Prof. Frank Warnock, AIM Visiting Professor and the Paul. M. Hammaker Research Associate Professor of Business Administration at the Darden School of Business, University of Virginia


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Reunion of ME Alumni at AIM A REUNION OF MASTER IN ENTREpreneurship (ME) alumni was held last December 13, 2010 at the SGV Conference Rooms 1 and 2 at the Asian Institute of Management, Hosted by the Lead Host Class for Homecoming 2011, MBM 1991 and the Alumni Relations Office, the event was an opportunity to meet alumni friends and to update them on the latest developments on the homecoming scheduled on February 24 at the AIM campus. The group was well represented by most of the batches. Among the attendees were Rogelio Lim (ME 2), Mac Panuncialman and Lolly Tiu (ME 3), Francis Gomez and Rommel Juan (ME 6), Viva Andrada (ME 7), Millie Kesner, Dennis San Juan and Candy Hwang (ME 8), Rowena Matti and Nando de Leon (ME 9), Joseph Lee and Jan Pabellon (ME 12), Boyet Dequino, Gregory MaraĂąon and Miguel Luis Pelino (ME 14), Tom Gotuaco, Roberto Chan, Mark Magat Me, Edzel Ramos, Peter Mangasing and Raj Uttam (ME 15). The group was also joined by Chairman of the Homecoming Committee, Mr. Tito Serafrica, MBM 1991 and his

classmates, Alo Gelano, and Reu Dellota. Mr. Jun Orobia, Vice Chairman of the AAAIM also graced the occasion. Ms. Frechie Nieva, Sales Director of the AIM Conference Center Manila provided invaluable assistance in organizing the event. Master of Ceremonies of the program was Mr. Greg Atienza, MBM ’83, Editor-in-Chief, AIMLeader Magazine and Executive Managing Director of the Alumni Relations Office. He started the night by welcoming the class and thanking each one for being at the pre-Christmas party to celebrate the season. The warmth of the holidays filled the room as the alumni interacted with one another, catching up on stories after graduating from AIM. As part of the program, Mr. Serafrica oriented the class on the 2011 Homecoming and gave updates on its developments. Greeting cards, bookmarks and car stickers were distributed as giveaways for the upcoming event. The program was short and concise leaving everybody with simple gifts and memorable moments to cherish.

AIM Hills Program Launches Business Ethics and Anti-Corruption Website On January 31, 2011, The Hills Program at the Asian Institute of Management recently launched a website, www.businessesfightingcorruption. org, to serve as a clearinghouse for all information relating to business ethics and anti-corruption. A central feature of the website allows for business owners and managers to report incidents in which they paid a bribe to a government official. The website does not ask for names involved in the incidents as the information will not be used to target individuals. Nor will the reports be investigated. Rather, the aggregate data will be used to map out corruption vulnerabilities that could be the subject of reform efforts, as well as to assist businesses in managing risks. For business owners and managers with no specific incidents to report, the

website provides a forum for posting comments and seeking advice from others on how to address corruption risks. The website also makes available for downloading a copy of the Integrity Pledge under which businesses agree to abide by ethical business practices and support a national campaign against corruption. In addition, the website contains anti-corruption resources, including relevant laws, sample codes of conduct, and hotlines for reporting corruption. The website is part of a project to promote integrity and accountability in business being implemented by the AIM Hills Program in collaboration with the Makati Business Club, the Management Association of the Philippines, the Coalition Against Corruption, the European Chamber of Commerce, and the American Chamber of Commerce.


AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

During the program, the Center presented its most recent publications: the Leadership Development for Social Change (LDSC) Conference Proceedings, Islamic Leadership in the Changing ASEAN: Fostering Peace and Development, Islamic Perspective on Leadership, and the 13 Stories of Islamic Leaders. Prof. Jacinto Gavino and Dr. Eddie Dorotan, both of whom were part of the pool of conveners, spoke about the LDSC Conference while Prof. Abhoud Syed Lingga, an academic partner of the Islamic Leadership Development Program, presented the remaining publications which he helped to generate. The last publication presented, Stories of Bridging Leadership, was introduced by Prof. Ernesto Garilao, the Center’s former Executive Director and current president of the Zuellig Family Foundation. Aside from being a presenter, vision of creating a society with- Prof. Garilao also received a out social divides by cultivating special recognition for bringing leaders in Mindanao, the Philip- the Bridging Leadership pines, and the Asian Region. The Framework to the Philippines work of the Center, as AIM Dean and extending it to the various and President Edilberto de Jesús sectors of society. Another points out in his message, helps notable individual, Ret. Lt. Gen. Benjamin Dolorfino, was also “the Institute in developing socially responsible leaders that honored as the Center’s first [AIM’s] mission tasks us to do.” Exemplary Bridging Leader and

AIM-TeaM Energy Center for Bridging Leadership Celebrates Its 7th Foundation Anniversary WITH THE THEME, “Celebrating Seven Years of Journeying with Public Sector Leaders,” the AIM-TeaM Energy Center for Bridging Leadership held its Foundation Day last February 17, 2011 at the AIM Conference Center Manila. Being one of the research centers of the institution, it pursues the

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for being one of the earliest and strongest advocates of Bridging Leadership within and beyond the Armed Forces. In the event, Hon. Sonia Lorenzo (Cohort 1, Bridging Leadership Fellows Program), along with Hon. Florante Gerdan (Cohort 2, Bridging Leadership Fellows Program) and Kevin Dela Cruz (participant, Bridging Leadership for the Youth), also launched the National Organization of Bridging Leaders (NOBLe) which serves as the official alumni group of the Center. The program culminated with a speech given by Prof. Arsenio Balisacan, the Dean of the University of the PhilippinesSchool of Economics and the Center’s Chairman of the Board of Advisers.

First batch of Sun Life advisors graduate and receive Sun Life-Asian Institute of Management (AIM) Certified Financial Planner designation

Sun Life Advisors AIM for the Top ON JANUARY 24, 2011, Sun Life Financial-Philippines (SLFP), in partnership with the Asian Institute of Management (AIM), honored 27 Sun Life advisors who completed a 7-month Financial Planning Course (FPC) designed specifically for SLFP advisors, at the Shangri-La Makati. Graduates of the batch were also

conferred with the title of Sun Life-AIM Certified Financial Planner. After finishing the tailor-fit curriculum, the graduates are equipped with advanced knowledge and skills that can help them assist their clients in creating a wealth and protection portfolio. “In fulfilling our mission to provide

financial freedom for every Filipino, we need to ensure that our advisors are knowledgeable and able to dispense sound financial advice. That is why we chose AIM, one of Asia’s premier graduate schools of management to provide world-class training for our advisors,” said SLFP President & CEO Riza Mantaring.

Designed and implemented by AIM’s roster of experts, the FPC complements Sun Life’s own training programs on wealth management. Starting in 2009, SLFP and AIM worked together to create an advanced course of study to elevate the skills and proficiency of Sun Life advisors. The three modules of the FPC cover basic financial planning, basic investment portfolio, as well as monetary and fiscal policies. “This Financial Planning Course created by Sun Life and AIM is the first of its kind in our industry. More than propelling our advisors to a higher level of prominence, we are offering Filipinos the most substantial and suitable guidance to manage their finances,” explained SLFP Chief Operating Officer Naresh Krishnan.


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A I M 2 0 10 S E R V I C E AWA R D S

Five-year recipients (from left) with AIM President Edilberto de Jesús (center): Edwin Javier, Rossini Marbella, Luisito Zuniga, Giovanni Candelaria, Johanna Cebedo, Armando Taruc, and Erez James Lagbo

Ten-year recipients: Odette Dechavez, Jeric Merana, Josephine Contreras, and Mary Grace Reynoso

Fifteen-year recipients: Maritess Espiritu, Cristina Balanquit, Priscilla Arabe, Celia Paat, Cecilia Contreras, and Reynaldo Jr. Balbiran. Cristina Gemma Dominguez, Edythe Bautista and Marvee Bonoan (not in group photo).

Twenty-year recipient: Carolina Imperial

Celebrating Classes Gather for Reunion at AIM A SURFEIT OF GOOD NEWS GREETED more than sixty alumni who trooped back to AIM last September 24, 2010 for the Reunion of Celebrating Classes in preparation for Homecoming 2011. Present were graduates from the classes of 1971, 1976, 1981, 1986, 2001 and 2006. In his welcome remarks, AIM President Edilberto de Jesús noted that the alumni are gaining a greater voice in the affairs of the school with the nomination of six alumni in the fifteen-member Board of Trustees. “The alumni are coming of age and asserting their claim as the crucial stakeholder of the institute,” he said, and noted that he started the day with alumni during the Breakfast Forum with MBM 1979, and ended the evening to welcome the homecoming classes back to AIM. The Chairman of the Alumni Association of AIM, Joselito Yabut, MBM 1979 welcomed his fellow graduates and invited them to support the plans of the Lead Host Class, MBM 1991, for the Homecoming in 2011. Before introducing the chairman of the homecoming committee, the Executive Managing Director of the Alumni Relations Office, Greg Atienza, briefed the attendees on the responsibilities of the host classes and noted that “the 20th anniversary

celebrants will be performing their ‘jury duty’ as is the tradition. But the lead host class will be doing this only once as alumni of the Institute.” In his presentation, the chairman of the homecoming committee, Tito Serafica, MBM 1991, highlighted the good news happening at AIM such as the nomination of six alumni to the Board of Trustees, the renovation of the dorm, ground floor caserooms and offices, as well as the AIM lobby through a donation from the Lopez Group. With these new developments, he proposed a working theme for the Homecoming: “May Bago sa AIM, Tara Na!” (“There’s something new at AIM. Let’s Go!”). He briefed those present on the planned activities for Homecoming Week which includes a Fun Run, a Golf Tournament and the Grand Homecoming Night in February 2011. He urged commitment from the batches to support their efforts by ensuring maximum attendance and financial contributions for the AIM Alumni Fund. It was an evening of fun and merriment as the graduates posed for pictures with their batches and won raffle prizes courtesy of Manny O Wines and the Alumni Relations Office. East West Bank also provided premier partnership for the event.


The Asian Institute of Management would like to thank the following Alumni for their generosity to AIM.*

Thank You for Supporting The AIM Alumni Leadership Fund! Your support to AIM will spell a big difference for the students who attend AIM every school year, for the faculty who mold these students’ entrepreneurial, social and developmental mindset, for the quality of materials that are offered in the case room and for the overall learning environment that AIM offers its students. CHANG Yoon Jeong (MBM 1980) CHUN Jin Suk (MBM 1979) GOWRI, Shankar HONG-SOO Lee (MM 1979) HYUN Oh Cho (MBM 1985) HWANG, Malvan (MBM 1974) RUNKLE, Lorna Morte (MBM 1983) TAE Sook Han (MBM 1984) MALOLES-KEEHN, Jocelyn (MBM 1985) DE LOS REYES, Jennifer (MBM 1986) ONLINE GIVING DONORS (www.aimalumni.org) GARCIA, Roberto V. (MBM 1973) LEVERIZA, Renato Jr. (MBM 1976) AMPONG, Dexter Aldi (MBA 2008) LOPEZ, Mario G. (MBM 1970) ODILAO-BISNAR, Ofel (MBM 1988) YABUT, Joselito (MBM 1979) PASCUA. Ricardo (MBM 1971) *For the period of June 2009 until February 2011. AIM would like to thank the following Alumni individuals and Classes who responded to the call for the first ever Homecoming Alumni Fund pledging held on February 24, 2011 at the AIM Campus: Class of MBM 1971 Triple A Club (c/o Jesli Lapus, MBM 1973) Class of MBM 1991 Joselito Yabut (MBM 1979) Class of MBM 1973 Class of MBM 1990 Alumni Association of AIM - Indian Chapter (through MP Singh, MBM 1976, President AIMAAI) Gregorio and Ma. Cristina Atienza (MBM 1983)


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whether it was going from 6 to 8 pack abs, creating a group of friends known as the AIM community, shopping in Zara or Zara online, singing for the entire batch or spinning music from a laptop, doing the salsa or choreographing dances of events, playing the lying down game and posting pictures of it or just taking a shot at class participation. There were times that the stress did get to us. We resorted to slightly different ways like mass mailing people, asking them to return misplaced cigarettes, and when financial management became too much to handle, we just put our hands up and say “it’s so easy.” Also, we put our hands up for class participation, only to end up stating our names, even if it was towards end of our MBA. Life has changed for us. We now seem to be able to create a synergy between casual conby Mansur Ali Khan, MBA 2010 versations and leverage during THE PAST 16 MONTHS HAVE a poker game; we walk into a store and analyze the business been rigorous to say the least. We were given an analogy at the model, talk about the long-term start of the MBA that it was like and short-term strategies of the being in an army boot camp. But business; and we even analyze most of us will agree that a boot the value proposition of the camp falls short when compared restaurant that we eat at. Through this 16-month to reading 800 cases in a span roller coaster ride, it has been of 16 months, overnight written analysis of cases, generating 100 about us, not you, not I or any individual but we, the graduates page economics cases in three that will be remembered as slides, presenting term papers Cohort 5. on marketing in less than 10 I would like to end by quotminutes as a group, sleeping an average of four hours a night due ing from a song I feel appropriate for the occasion and it goes to the workload, being under pressure to do class participation something like this: (CP), and finally working on the So take the photographs Management Research Report or And still the frames what we fondly know as MRR. in your mind It has been an eventful ride. Hang them on a shelf We have in our own way bonded In good health and and dealt with the strenuous good times workload. We did it all together, Tattoos and memories And dead skin on trial. For what it’s worth, Through this 16-month It was worth all the while. roller coaster ride, it has It’s something unpredictable been about us, not you, not But in the end it’s right. I or any individual but we, I hope you had the time the graduates that will be of your life. remembered as Cohort 5.

Time of Our Life

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GRADUATION SPEECH 2010

Stronger, wiser, and united Cohort 5 by Emma Topacio , MBA 2010 MANSUR HAS DESCRIBED IT perfectly. The past 16 months has definitely been a journey. But this journey does not end with our graduation. AIM was merely the forge that turned 69 lumps of coal into diamonds. Each diamond is precious, each unique in their luster, and all have been toughened and shaped by the last 16 months. As graduates of the Asian Institute of Management, much is expected from us. Asia is home to the fastest growing economies in the world. Not only are we expected to drive that growth, we must also shape the Asia of the future. We go into uncertain times and rough markets but our education at AIM will not only bring us jobs but careers not merely money but true wealth that comes from making a difference. It is our leadership, our integrity, and our ability to create value that will propel our countries forward. In this room, I can see the future leader of a nation, the founder and CEO of a multi-billionaire conglomerate, perhaps even the future Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund. Remember the face beside you, for one day you might find them on the front page of the newspaper. Wherever life leads us, let us all remember a quote from Professor Gallegos’ ethics class: “Success is getting what you want, while happiness is liking what you get.” Graduating from this school is an achievement itself, but the honor of being an AIM MBA comes with a duty as well—the duty to fight corruption, cynicism, and apathy, the duty to deliver our fellowmen from poverty, and above all, the duty to become fully ourselves so that we can then inspire others to

become the very best. For as surely AIM shaped us, we, too, shall shape others. Some of our classmates cannot stand with us today, but stand with us in spirit. No matter which country or which [ISEP] school they are at, they stand with us now: with the same pride, the same joy, and yes, the same nagging sadness that our time at AIM has come to a close. Today we stop analyzing cases and begin instead to solve business problems. Today we stop writing WACs and begin to communicate change. While we never have to report to a case room, we do have to continue learning. While we may no longer sit by the poolside, we will continue to be part of each other’s lives. And while we never stop drinking: we must also never stop dreaming. When we finally achieve greatness, we will look back on this day. We will look back at our families who believed in us, our professors who pushed us to excel, our long-suffering administrative staff who cared for us, and our friends who helped us learn, loved us when we failed, celebrated with us when we succeeded, and kept us sane in the process. So many people are part of what we will become. Today, we thank them all. Without them, our education at AIM would not have been possible. Without them, we would be lesser people. We thank them with everything that we are. We thank them with everything that we will become. We came to AIM 16 months ago as individuals with little work experience and an eager mind. We leave today, stronger, wiser, and united under one name—Cohort 5.


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to finish. But his older brother promised that when he became a ’D LIKE TO TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO FIRST successful doctor, he would help each sibling finish college and thank the people that have helped me throughout this improve their family’s quality of life. journey. My learning team. Eventually all the plans came true. John finished with Julius, your sense of pride for your country and a chemical engineering degree, his youngest sister graduated deep concern for the plight of the Armed Forces of the with a degree in chemistry, and the other, in accountancy. Philippines have shown me that there is still hope in Fast forward a few more years when John became a father. attracting the best generals this country has to offer. Knowing that he didn’t want his children to have the same life as he Jyoti, your careful balance of humility while standing up for did, he worked day in and day out to improve the quality of life for his what is humane has inspired me to open up my social consciousness. The passion in the way you speak and how you actively listen family. Then, tragedy fell upon him. John’s beloved mother passed away and, a couple of years later, him and his wife got separated. helped me cope during the darkest times of my MM experience. As a single parent, John didn’t stray from his focus: to provide Neeraj, who is Jyoti’s adopted son at AIM, you helped me survive FM, LOB and SCM. Your thought-provoking insight on business the best future for his children. He strove to work harder. He eventually climbed up the ladder in his company and started constantly challenged me and helped me stretch my imagination. receiving compensation that was a mere dream during the time And finally, Father Tony. You are our team’s spiritual compass. he was selling newspapers. This is where I end my story. When things would get emotional and we were all ready to lash at The three values I’ve picked up from AIM, I can relate each other, one look at you, and we would feel deeply apologetic for raising our voices and allowing our anger to overcome our learning. to John’s life. First, know what is important. It is If I wasn’t in this learning team, I only when you have defined your priorities wouldn’t have made the strides that I did that you can truly live your life regardless throughout the 11 months. So, again, I of the obstacles thrown your way. thank you from the bottom of my heart. John knew that in order to get himself I’d like to thank the core faculty of and his family out of the low-income class, MM. Thank you for being leaders in your he had to study hard and work even harder. own right. I will forever be grateful for the Know the reasons why you negotiate moments you all restrained yourselves from with time so you can allow yourself to becoming violent during a low CP day. enjoy a certain freedom: freedom from obOf course, I can’t forget Cora and her ligational paralysis. Some people run their staff for dropping whatever it is they were lives as if their obligations to those around doing to make sure they attended to our them are being counted and measured. needs first. Without you and your team, we Believe me, your children will not wouldn’t have survived our assignments, count how many parent-teacher meetings WACs, exams and MRRs. So thank you. you had to miss if they are fully confident I’d like to thank my daughter Jasmine that they are your first and only priority. who gives me purpose and my family, my They will know in their hearts that that two brothers Koko and Mark, who built my sort of irregular behavior doesn’t mean you confidence to take a risk and leave my life by Joanne Rivera, MM 2011 love them any less. in the US. Even in the business world, Lastly, I’d like to thank GOD. Who’s obligational paralysis happens when invisible hand held me through the rough we try to make everyone happy. The patches of self-doubt. hundreds of cases we read have taught All of us are sitting here today because us that there will always be losers. We just need to make sure of a shared motivation: TO BE BETTER. Each one of us had come we are on the right side. Understanding of your priorities to a turning point in our lives where what we were doing was no makes us decide the trade-offs. longer enough. We wanted to achieve more. We are asked to segregate value-adding activities and We wanted to become better parents and give the best future make sure that we place importance to those that really matter. for our children and families. Because, if not, we will be blindsided. We wanted to be better managers who walk the talk. When John’s brother started providing for his family as Most of all, we wanted to be better leaders. I learned three values here at AIM, but before I get into that, promised, John returned to school and finished his degree and became self-sustaining. He could have wandered off or blamed his I want to share the story of a man I will call John. parents for not finishing early enough, but he chose not to. John John had a humble life. His mother was a teacher and his was already earning income during those two years that he wasn’t father worked at a warehouse. John had three siblings. in school, but he chose to go back and receive his degree. When he was very young, his parents taught him the virtue When you know what is important, you know what not to take of humility. John’s parents didn’t have enough money to pay for for granted. everyone’s education so he spent time on the streets at the age of The second lesson I learned from John’s story is that educaseven, selling newspapers. tion is the only thing in your life that no one can EVER steal from Throughout the years, John’s opportunities were always delayed. The girls in the family had the first priority to finish school, you. An alumnus and faculty member once said, “Never deprive yourself of learning.” and his parents had to support his older brother through medical school. John had to stop college for two years to allow his brother “Learning the Three Values at AIM,” continued on page 73 >>

LEARNING THE THREE VALUES AT AIM

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In Memoriam FAIM Chairman President, Kelab AIM Malaysia Member, AIM Board of Trustees

Datuk Ir. (Dr.) Mohd Annas Hj. Mohd Nor, MM 1984 IF YOU THINK NICE GUYS CANNOT survive the cut-throat corporate world, then you have not met Datuk Annas, the former Chairman of Energy Commission and just recently Special Adviser, International Business for Genting Power Holdings Ltd. ‘NICE’ is a word that is consistently used whenever Datuk Annas’s name crops up. He was so curious, so trusting and full of energy! “He is one of the nicest men that I have met,” gushed H.E. Ambassador Victotiano M. Lecaros. I remember Tun Ahmad Sarji, Chairman of PNB and Member of AIM Board Of Governors, said “Datuk Annas is very hum-

“All of you must always be patient and caring; get things done via consessus is the best way to go.” ble and has time for everyone who wants to see him. It is hard for him to say no, which can be construed as his strength, I suppose. I never heard any of those working with him or under him say anything bad about this nice and obliging gentleman.” In person, the most striking feature about Datuk Annas is his face, which shines with kindness and serenity. In an age where being ruthless and cunning is

held up as virtues to be admired in a man, it is nice to meet a nice guy who has done well for himself because of his ‘niceness’. He lived a simple life and many of our alumni who visited his home noticed this. We realized here was a man who was interested in offering his services to the Kelab and AIM and had no intention of harming anyone. That was why we make him to be the Life President of Kelab AIM. Datuk Annas’s advice to me and the Kelab Board was to be patient and not move too fast. “All of you must always be patient and caring; get things done via consessus is the best way to go.” His parting shot to would-be-managers: “To be an effective manager, you must remember that you do not serve only oneself and your bosses but the whole management and organization.” I want our Board to live up to his expectations. I want our our Kelab to be as good as he has imagined it. We must do everything to make sure our Kelab lives up to a greater height! Farewell and rest in peace, Mr. Niceman. If there are rain puddles in heaven, we know you are jumping in them today. And here on Earth, we place our hands over our hearts, and commit ourselves as AIM alumni to forging a Kelab that is forever worthy to your gentle, happy soul. —Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989


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In Memoriam

GASTON ZAVALLA ORTIGAS (January 23, 1931 – August 31, 1990) PHILIPPINE PEACE ICON GASTON “GASTY” Z. ORTIGAS, FORMER DEAN OF THE Asian Institute of Management (AIM), was remembered in a simple gathering held last January 22, 2011 at the AIM. Peace advocates gathered to commemorate a former colleague who had greatly affected and shaped the peace movement in the country. AIM President Edilberto de Jesús, Prof. Felipe Alfonso, Prof. Jun Borromeo, Prof. Rafael Azanza through Prof. Titos Ortigas, Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process Sec. Teresita Quintos-Deles, and Cong. Henedina Abad for Sec. Butch Abad shared memories and reflections. Gasty Ortigas, the late educator and leading peace advocate, fought against the Martial Law rule of former President Ferdinand Marcos in the 1980s until his death. Sec. Teresita Quintos-Deles, co-founder and the first Executive Director of Gaston Z. Ortigas Peace Institute, recounted how the “worldwide-recognized” peace movement in the Philippines started. She described Gasty as one of the early movers of the peace sector as he helped establish calls for peace. “He played whatever role needed to be played. He provided money, meeting places, breakfasts, and ...even if things his equanimity,” Deles stated. She added that even if things got got tough, it would tough, it would be alright “because Gasty was there.” be alright “because Deles also said that she is grateful for Gasty’s presence durGasty was there.” ing the formative years of the peace movement because of the


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PHOTOS: CHILI DOGS

lessons she has learned from him in carrying out her peace work. The memorial was held during the 20th anniversary celebration of the Gaston Z. Ortigas Peace Institute. The Gaston Z. Ortigas Peace Institute, which was established on Gasty Ortigas’ birthday (January 23, 1991), is a group of peace advocates composed of nongovernment organizations, peoples’ organizations, academic institutions, and civil society networks who have come together to facilitate peace-building efforts throughout the country. Sec. Dinky Soliman of the Department of Social Welfare and Development also graced the event. Closing prayer for peace was led by AIM Alumni Relations Executive Managing Director Mr. Greg Atienza.

Source: http://www.gov.ph/2011/01/25/peace-icon-gaston-z-ortigas-remembered/


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Philanthr py

Dato’ Haji Sarip Bin Hamid, MBM 1979

An Investment for the Afterlife by Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989

THE OLD ADAGE SAYS, “IT IS MORE BLESSED TO GIVE THAN to receive.” But when I began tracking down alumni in Malaysia that gave a portion of their wealth back to society, I was surprised. While a few gave generously, most gave a paltry sum. Measuring the level of philanthropic activity among alumni is no easy task. For one thing, there aren’t any statements, publications by the Kelab Secretariat that actually track who gives what and to whom. That Malaysian alumni are generally generous is without doubt. But how much they choose to give is what makes one a philanthropist, and another only an occasional donor. Up front, I must put a caveat that this finding is but not definitive because the tradition of philanthropy has not taken root among alumni. Muslim alumni channel their resources through various government-related initiatives. For example, there are government institutions that manage philanthropic activities for the Muslims through the collection of various types of zakat and acceptance of wakaf contributions. Zakat is distributed among eight categories of people or services, four of which relate to the poor and the needy. Wakaf is charitable endowments for various causes made by Muslims for the greater good of society. Some famous alumni also opt to use a variety of vehicles to carry out charitable activities. For instance, Triple A Dato’ Haji Sarip Bin Hamid, MBM 1979, retired Executive Chairman of the blue chip publicly listed company, AIC Corporation Berhad, has engaged in charitable activities since 2002 via his family company, Golden Prism Sdn. Bhd., as well as a dedicated foundation called Sarmid Holdings (M) Sdn. Bhd. One may indeed assume that Dato’ Sarip’s business expansions and philanthropic activities are a reflection of his given name Sarip, by his cognitive act of choosing for the better. As Dato’ Sarip’s good fortune increased prior to the establishment of the foregoing foundation, his charitable bone also grew. Donating basic food and clothing, paying for mosque refurbishments, school fees and medical expenses came as second nature to him. Dato’ Sarip recalled, “I know what poverty and hunger meant. My father was a rubber tapper. As the eldest of 10 children, I had to work after completing my high school education to supplement the family income. I became a teacher in a small school at my hometown Jasin for six challenging years before I could get the opportunity to pursue higher education at University of Malaya. The teaching stint has developed my long-term commitment to helping the underprivileged.” Ordinary people and the wealthy can be generous, but what makes a philanthropist while another an occasional donor is how much they willingly choose to give. Unofficial disclosure said that since its establishment, the Sarmid Holdings has contributed and is committed to more than RM5 million to diverse projects in order to promote social equity, welfare, education, religion, culture in Malaysia and has expanded its scope of work overseas, among poor dispossessed communities in Asia and Africa. Among the innumerable and prolific philanthropic activities of Dato’ Sarip is the pro-poor initiative of the Islamic Orphanages Welfare Association (Pertubuhan Kebajikan Anak-Anak Islam)

Complex in his hometown Jasin in the State of Melaka. The aforementioned structure is an integrated complex of facilities for the benefit of the less advantaged and unfortunate children, not only among the local population but also among the neighboring districts fraternity. An orphanage is where orphans—children with no parents—live. By all accounts, this is a good orphanage because it is not overcrowded and the children are well-fed, cared for and go to school. It is also open to motivational programs. This orphanage is filled to the brim with kids from so many different backgrounds. Some are true orphans, some are not, and many have been abused. The challenge to the Chairman, Dato’ Sarip, the Principal, Mohd Zaini Haji Mohd Zan and his caretaker team: What is certain is that the kids bring much emotional baggage to the new “homes”, baggage which need to be dealt with harmoniously. We often see in the newspaper cute kids being taken on outings to the zoo, movies and other treats. But rarely do we inquire about the backgrounds of these kids to find out their stories. It is probably that inquiry on untold sadness that they need most, for someone to ask them why they are there. If their untold stories are not dealt with, their emotional scars will not be revealed and they cannot heal. From the above, it is clear that major parts of Dato’ Sarip’s orphanage are being devoted to the spiritual, scientific and behavioral development of the underprivileged in order for them to have equal footing with kids who are luckier. As for the rest, the aim is to ensure a safe comfortable home for the children on the basis of equality and brotherhood, and of charity and kindness, not on any sort of exploitation. Taking into consideration the Islamic concept of management whereby its process is praiseworthy and goal oriented, Dato’ Sarip regards the importance of education seriously. His philosophy of management supports and sponsors the needy orphans who could excel in education and their related field of study. Dato’ Sarip’s philanthropic contribution may have been far greater than any other individual alumni in Malaysia that comes to my mind, only maybe a little less publicized. His need and want to give generously has always been the mainstay of his vision and mission in life, minus the pomp and ceremony. The adage, “Let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth” rings so true, as he silently helps the downtrodden and pretty much keeps out of the limelight. Asked why he is being modest and prefers his deeds and involvement to not be publicized, Dato’ Sarip humbly said, “I firmly believe that the reward for voluntary and wholehearted assistance should be discreet rather than public, and this is highly praised by the religion of Islam. The inspiration and motivation towards giving unconditionally to those in need is actually my investment for the afterlife.”


AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

“Let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth” rings so true, as he silently helps the downtrodden and pretty much keeps out of the limelight.

ILLUSTRATION: CHILI DOGS

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PASSION The Most Beautiful Make-up of a Corporation by Angela Joo-Hyun Kang


AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

ves Saint Laurent said “The most beautiful make-up of a woman is passion.” To all women as well as men, cosmetics are the tools that shine their beauty and charms but there is something more magical that could make their physical and inner beauty distinctive. All people with unceasing passion, with or without make-up, look beautiful and furthermore, their passion is contagious. Grooming Corporate Physical and Inner Beauty In the CSR world, critics often compare corporate philanthropy with disposable cosmetic make-up, calling it window dressing or green washing. In October 22, 2010, the Grand Ballroom of the Crowne Plaza Mutiara Hotel in Kuala Lumpur was engaged in a heated debate titled ‘Should we encourage CSR more than Philanthropy?’ Participants from 27 countries, CSR managers of Asian subsidiary offices of US and European companies, Asian companies, and Asia-based NPO and NGO experts, participated in the somewhat chicken-or-eggs-first style debate. How about in the Republic of Korea, namely, South Korea? According to the 2008 Corporate Philanthropy White Paper by the Federation of Korean Industries (FKI), 209 FKI corporate members and their foundations spent around 2.5% of their profit margins (about 2.1 billion USD) in areas like social welfare, arts, culture, sports and education etc. With this thriving philanthropic culture, South Korean corporations have also developed comprehensive CSR or sustainability management systems ranging from corporate governance, business ethics, social and environmental considerations and consumer satisfaction. Stakeholder based corporate management, rather than shareholder centric, reflects the fact that corporations are following a good path of Conscious Capitalism. Then, how can corporations groom more their physical and inner beauty in their philosophy, vision, mission, management and practices? I would like to outline some ways that are related with my professional and personal stories, by borrowing YSL’s quote, “The most beautiful make-up of a corporation is passion.” Connecting Different Worlds As a native South Korean, I am Founder and CEO of G-CEF (Global Competitiveness Empowerment Forum), a CSR advisory firm that provides professional and catalyst services. In the 1990s until early 2000s, I worked in the corporate world in the areas of PR, marketing and sales at a Korean subsidiary of a French cosmetic company, Clarins Korea and Korean IT venture headquarters including Namo Interactive Inc. expanding global distribution networks. At that time, my English name was Candice. In 2001, I decided to pursue an MBA in order to become a global entrepreneur but I had a car accident on my way to take the GMAT. I was not injured but this event was significant enough that I re-evaluated the meaning of my life. Naturally, I came to believe that gaining an MBA was not the path I was destined to “Let’s believe take and I decided to dedicate more time to God in order to express my in the power and gratitude. This helped me cast off my spiritual blindness and I was able to see what I already had rather than what I did not have. I grew up in a value of corporate broken family and my six-month old marriage ended with divorce in 1994. philanthropy and My religious awakening helped me overcome sad memories and hidden infect others with mental wounds and realize how many wonderful gifts I had received from our passion.” God. I even changed my English name from Candice to Angela in order to remember my life changing awakening for the rest of my life. In order to give back the generosity I had received from God, I moved to the nonprofit world in 2003 to help the weak, the poor and the oppressed as a social entrepreneur. It was not easy to gain work without a social worker certificate, but people who kindly appreciated my enthusiasm and courage helped me a lot. I thought I had left the business world and did not realize my new journey would lead to a search for business integrity. The social welfare foundation that I worked for was a Korean partner of International Youth Foundation, which implements the corporate philanthropic programs of Nokia and Lucent Technologies for disadvantaged youth for social change. At a global workshop meeting in Washington DC, I met its Chinese partner, Gan Dongyu, a Harvard Kennedy School 2001 graduate, who is currently

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Philanthr py envisioned helping everybody to have an internet-based cyber home by giving hope to all, even disadvantaged groups. Often, corporations are looking for good corporate philanthropy ideas from outside, Awakening of Authentic Business mainly from their nonprofit or consulting Leadership Potentials with 5Cs partners. They don’t see what they can do and 1. Corporate Values. Mr. Jacques what they already have, like me in the past Courtin-Clarins, the founder of Clarins, started his face and skin care business when before my awakening. By going back to basics, finding and extracting their existing corporate he realized that the first thing a woman values passionately, corporations can discover did after waking from an operation was to domains, items and activities of corporate raise a mirror and see her face. To Clarins, philanthropy that they can excel at. compassion for women is its “Commitment In South Korea, corporate philanthropy to Beauty” itself. When key members of actively began just after the 1998 Asian Namo Interactive Inc. including me had financial crisis. However, South Korean coman ideation meeting on how to brand Namo panies have gradually started to realize that Web Editor, web authoring software, we they actually have a long history of philanthropic spirit, such as South Korea’s founding philosophy from nearly 5,000 years ago, “Hong-Ik-In-Gan (弘益人間)”, which means “benefiting all humankind widely.” One Korean conglomerate, SK Group, successfully inherited this tradition by establishing its corporate philosophy, “Happiness Maximization”, integrating it into their SK Management System (SKMS) and running various corporate philanthropic programs. 2. Competence. Since corporate philanthropy had started in order to help victims of the 1998 Asian financial crisis, South Korean corporations have been reluctant to link corporate philanthropy with their core business competence. South Korean corporations are afraid to use the terms, “Strategic Philanthropy” or “Corporate Social Innovation” out of concerns as being seen as “unauthentic” Often, corporations are or “impure”. looking for good corporate However, if you have a problem, you philanthropy ideas from need to utilize your best talents to solve it. outside, mainly from their nonprofit or consulting When companies make the best use of their partners. They don’t see what products and services, expertise, networks, they can do and what they credibility and influence with a passionate already have, like me in the dedication for making a difference, they can past before my awakening. produce great results. Gradually, new approaches are appearing, so called, sector and competency based philanthropy. Media corporations are trying to move towards media CSR in the fast changing media industry environment. Many investment and banking institutions like KB, IBK, Woori, Shinhan and Hana are operating microfinance foundations and running employee volunteer activities to help children, youth and disadvantaged groups raise their financial quotient and literacy. POSCO (Pohang Iron and Steel Company) with its eco-friendly steel product technology, FINEX, set up a social enterprise, POSCO Eco-Hous-

Secretary General of China Social Enterprise Foundation. He encouraged me, who was somewhat lost in searching for effective nonprofit management, to go to the US to learn new knowledge. Despite numerous hardships, I successfully acquired a Mid-Career Master’s degree in Public Administration (MPA) at Harvard Kennedy School in 2006 with the precious assistance of many kind people who supported my causes. I came back to South Korea in 2008 and set up my own CSR advisory company aimed at connecting different worlds, corporations and nonprofits, private and public sectors and corporate philanthropy and responsibility etc. All my activities are based on my firm belief that

business and corporate people can make all the difference in the world. Let me tell you why in details from now on.

“PASSION... continued on page 71 >>


AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

Moving Towards Lasting Bonds with Malaysia By Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989

The Philippines’ Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, H.E. Victoriano M. Lecaros, is more than a seasoned diplomat. He is a maestro in building friendship. From his well secured office at the heart of Kuala Lumpur, Ambassador Lecaros who resumed office in August 2006 is silently demonstrating this diplomatic skill to deepen what he described as “very special and unique relations” with Malaysia.

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.E. LECAROS HAS ALWAYS DESCRIBED RELATIONS BETWEEN THE two countries as beyond the norm. “Our relationship is special and unique because it was built on mutual trust of our people,” says the Ambassador. “We have a long history and although we have had problems and challenges, we have been able to overcome these difficulties with wisdom and sincerity in ASEAN collaborative spirits. “We are now experiencing a different era of our relationship. The world is changing, the region is changing and both Malaysia and the Philippines are also changing. As such, the scope of the relationship between the two countries has been enhanced and expanded. Philippines and Malaysia are now working together to further improve economic and business ties as well as taking responsibility together on regional issues such as responding quickly to natural disasters and fighting infectious diseases.” This is the Ambassador who frequently graced events organized by Kelab AIM Malaysia. In recognition of his support and guidance, the Board invited H.E. Lecaros to be elected with the AIM rank of distinction for Distinguished Alumnus, and as Honorary Life Member last December 5, 2008. We were indeed very proud that the Ambassador agreed to accept it. The special conferment ceremony presided by Tun Ahmad Sarji Abdul Hamid, Member of AIM Board of Governors, was held at the Office of the Chairman at the Institute of Islamic Understanding Malaysia that was witnessed by the Board and Triple A network. In his acceptance speech, H.E. Lecaros said “I’d like to make more efforts to increase the number of Malaysian corporate sponsored students to study at AIM Manila. On the other hand, those students who can afford to go to AIM by themselves need much more information about studying and living in the Philippines. Makati is a safe city and we would like to welcome many

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more Malaysian students. “So, my message is, please send your good students to AIM. We’d like to provide more information about Filipino culture. The Philippine Embassy here will assist students and their families who need information about studying and living comfortably in Manila or in other major cities in the Philippines.” H.E. Lecaros has also been successful in bringing Malaysians closer to Filipino culture and the

“I’d like to make more efforts to increase the number of Malaysian corporate sponsored students to study at AIM Manila.” arts. In commemoration of the 111th Anniversary of the Proclamation of Philippine Independence and the Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Establishment of PhilippineMalaysia Diplomatic Relations on June 15, 2009, the Embassy of the Philippines and the Filipino Community, in cooperation with friends of the Philippines in Malaysia proudly presented the 52-year illustrious world-renowned BayanihanThe National Folk Dance Company of the Philippines at the Kuala Lumpur Performing Arts Centre. The significant occasion was graced by Datin Paduka Seri Rosmah Mansor, First Lady of Malaysia.

The Vote of Thanks. Haji Zul (standing) recognizing Ambassador Lecaros (left) during Alumni Lunch at the Royal Lake Club Kuala Lumpur. Other dignitaries present were Dato’ Syed, Tunku Iskandar, Treasurer Ching and Malaysian Ambassador to the Philippines, Dato’ Seri Dr. Ibrahim Saad.

“I’m very happy because Malaysians like our culture.” The Ambassador is convinced that culture offers great opportunities for people exchange and has opened up all doors to come closer to one another.


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AIM Leader Magazine | DOUBLE ISSUE

by Dina L. Paterno

DELIBERATE AIM The Lopez Way

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OMEONE ONCE SAID THAT “ACTS OF KINDNESS can be done in a day, community building is the work of a lifetime.” The Lopez Family legacy of philanthropy involves not just a collection of acts of charity through time, which responds to an immediate need, but more significantly, it is “intentional and extends over a long period of time.” This is in fact the very definition of philanthropy, derived from the Greek word “philanthropos,” coined 2,500 years ago by the playwright Aeschylus (“Prometheus Bound”) and literally translated as “humanity loving character.” It was then adopted by the Greeks as an educational ideal, whose goal was excellence. In the recently launched book entitled “Undaunted, The Lopez Legacy 1800-2010” by Raul Rodrigo, one gets a very clear sense of the role that the Lopez Family has taken on in the greater, daunting task of nation (and community) building in the Philippines. The book is an engaging read as it is a visual chronicle of not just outstanding members of their family and the many Lopez businesses, but of Philippine political and social history as well. For the Lopez clan, it all started with Basilio, “a successful Jaro merchant of mixed Filipino and Chinese blood...in the 1800s,” who would then become gobernadorcillo or mayor of Jaro, Iloilo, at that time the most prosperous province in the Philippines. Basilio’s son, the first Eugenio, would follow in his father’s footsteps as mayor and he also pioneered sugar planting in the Philippines.

Today, the thoughtful legacy of service is continued on in the Lopez Group by family patriarch and family historian, the great grandson of the first Eugenio, Oscar Moreno Lopez. Until his retirement in mid-2010, he was Chairman of the Lopez Group of Companies and First Holdings. His Executive Profile in Bloomberg reads, “he is associated with 46 boards across nine organizations in 10 different countries.” He was also included in Forbes Asia’s list of “48 Altruists/Heroes of Philanthropy” from 12 Asian countries. To the corporate and business world, he is known as “OML,” to his family and friends, “Oskie.” I had the honor and distinct pleasure to have an afternoon interview with “OML” and his youngest son, Benjamin “Jay”

Lopez (AIM EMBA 2000), in the midst of an otherwise busy day when family members and officers from the Lopez Group were at the ACCM for a Lopez-led conference on human resource management. I was invited to join them initially as they had brought in dynamic, young, next-generation leaders of Filipino family corporations to share their insights and experiences. Included in this group is OML’s second son, Federico “Piki” Lopez, to whom OML has turned over recently, the active management of the Lopez Group, together with OML’s younger brother, Manolo (who was also recently appointed as Philippine Ambassador to Japan). It is regular forums of this kind within the Lopez Family and Group that keep them intentional about their work and goals.


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There was in that room, a seriousness about their purpose, at the same time a levity that could only come from a clear and commonly shared vision of who they are. OML himself would later on offer what could explain this, “my father (the second Eugenio, fondly called Don Ening) gave us our three basic values:” 1. “We must always be united,” especially among the brothers as he and his own brother Fernando were, even when they were orphaned. 2. “Education is a priority.” OML recounts that his father, having had a very good education himself (Ateneo, UP Law, Harvard), made sure that wherever they were as they were growing up and even in the most challenging of circumstances especially during the war, that their education was not disrupted. When some 20 members of their family had to evacuate to the mountains of Iloilo during the Japanese occupation, his father found a teacher-couple who stayed with them until they moved to the nearby island of Negros. When they moved to Baguio in the northern Philippines, he made arrangements with the La Salle brothers and the nuns of St. Scholastica to teach his children, nieces and nephews daily and even as bombs were being dropped all over the city towards the end of the war. Later on, it was his father who encouraged him and his older brother Geny to go to Harvard. 3. “Work ethic is very important.” OML recalls that every summer of their childhood, their father would have them work in the company, “doing anything, selling newspapers even.” After the war, Don Ening took over ownership of The Manila

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There was in that room, a seriousness about their purpose, at the same time a levity that could only come from a clear and commonly shared vision of who they are.


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Chronicle, a leading national newsdaily. In the 1900s, Basilio Lopez, founder of the clan was also one of the founders of El Tiempo, the Iloilo newspaper. As a matter of interesting trivia, all four Filipino Ramon Magsaysay awardees for journalism were writers for the Chronicle. Underlying these three basic values was service, a family tradition of giving and helping those in need. The example was set almost 200 years ago, when the first Eugenio, together with his brother started a soup kitchen that they financed by selling an hacienda (farmplot), in order to feed the starving people during the Iloilo Famine of 1878. OML also remembers as a child being witness to groups of poor people coming to his Uncle Fernando’s house everyday, to ask for the latter’s assistance. His older brother, Geny would eventually coin the phrase that not only became the popular tagline of one of the Lopez businesses, but embodied the spirit behind all these activities, “in the service of the Filipino.” This deep tradition of service has found its modern-day form through eight foundations within

the Lopez Group. OML’s own daughters head two of these eight, Cedie Lopez Vargas is executive director of the Lopez Memorial Museum, which houses an impressive collection of Filipiniana and younger daughter, Rina Lopez Bautista is executive director of the Knowledge Channel, a dedicated educational TV channel focused on providing free programs to public schools all over the Philippines. Most publicly known and visible is Gina Lopez , niece and eldest daughter of Geny, the third Eugenio, also AIM MDM 1993. Gina’s official title is managing director of ABS-CBN Foundation but she is quite simply an impassioned, dogged advocate whose interests span rescuing and caring for abused children, microfinance and business education programs for the poor, disaster relief and recovery, environmental protection and conservation programs. Gina was featured in the previous issue (Vol.5. Issue 2. 2nd qtr 2010) of AIM Leader Magazine on her dramatic efforts to rehabilitate the Pasig River in partnership with the Dept. of the Environment and Natural Resources. As OML proudly remarked, “the men (in the Lopez family) make the money, the women spend it,” and yes notably, for the nobler causes “in the service of the Filipino.” Don Ening, OML’s father himself was deeply interested in education and gave generously to schools. Among the beneficiaries of his altruism is the Asian Institute of Management. As OML himself recalls “my late father... was approached by Wash Sycip (AIM Chairman Emeritus) for a donation to make possible the construction of a building that would be the home of AIM. It was the missing piece of an ambitious plan to replicate the Harvard Business School in a way that provides rigorous academic training to Asian managers that is relevant in their environment.”

Since the Eugenio Lopez Foundation Building, which houses the main academic and administrative building of AIM, was inaugurated in December 1969 as a result of this major donation, AIM has about 38,000 graduates from its degree programs and many short-term executive courses for over 40 years now and counting. A large number of them have thriving careers, made respectable names for themselves and some while retired, continue to be productively engaged in various endeavors across Asia, the US and Canada. This singular, altruistic pledge of PHP 6.5M made in July 1968 (present value estimated at PHP400-500M) would be repeated 42 years later, in June 2010 with another generous donation from OML and the Lopez Family Foundation. At the signing of the PHP25M donation to rehabilitate the original building made possible through the donation of his father, OML noted that “Today, we need to rededicate ourselves to the ideals that led my father and the Institute’s early proponents to establish AIM. I see the needs in two areas: the physical and the spiritual, not in the religious sense, but in the spirit of excellence for which the Institute was well known... our donation...is perhaps the easy part...Now comes the hard part...For AIM to continue to exist in this kind of world, it must learn to compete as vigorously as it has trained its alumni to compete...We need to reset our goals, review our values and reaffirm our commitment to the lofty ideals that are the reasons for being of this Institute.” He especially urged AIM alumni, “...it is time for those who have benefitted from an AIM education to give back...

The Lopez Credo “WE, the Lopez Group of Companies, believe that our primary reason for being is to serve the Filipino people. Thus we shall do business and in all ways act in a manner that will result in the long-term mutual benefit of the Lopez Group and the various publics and communities that we serve. We will be responsible stewards of all our resources, ever mindful of our obligation to present and future generations of Filipinos. “In our service to the Filipino people, we will be guided by the following distinct Lopez Values— a pioneering entrepreneurial spirit, nationalism, team work, strong work ethic, integrity, social justice, concern for employee welfare and wellness, and business excellence. We know from generations of experience that it is by living according to these values, a company will be built to last. “In the years and generations to follow, our commitment to the Lopez way of service and the distinctive Lopez values will not change. We remain committted to serve the Filipino.”


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Your institution needs you now!” (As of this writing, there is renewed vigorous discussion and debate on how AIM ought to move forward prompted by an offer albeit controversial, of partnership from a US-based education group). The Lopez forebears including OML’s father Don Ening, who always believed that “business had to fulfill social responsibilities,” would be proud to see how far the family has taken the legacy of service and philanthropy today. Towards the end of our interview, OML reaches into his pocket, takes out his wallet and hands me a card, hot off the press and that looked very much like a credit or debit card. On it was written

“The Lopez Credo,” and the very values and principles that were instilled in them and are now articulated in this modern-day version. It was an idea inspired from another company that has lasted for four centuries in Japan, Sumitomo. It read like a prayer card it seemed to me as I quietly looked at it. It was launched the day of our interview at the conference of the Lopez Group, having been initially agreed to and signed as The Lopez “Magna Carta” by 16 Lopez family members and 18 managers and heads of the Lopez Group of Companies in June 2010. Every card-carrying member from hereon will have this handy, clever device to be reminded of these values.

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Oscar Lopez after retirement at 80 years Our donation...is perhaps the easy old, looks forward to part...Now comes the hard part... pursuing his hobby of For AIM to continue to exist in this kind of world, it must learn climbing mountains. to compete as vigorously as it has He has already contrained its’ alumni to compete... quered the top three We need to reset our goals, review our values and reaffirm our commitment in the Philippines and sets his sights to to the lofty ideals that are the places beyond. He is reasons for being of this Institute.” also deeply interested in environmental issues and talked at length about reforestation in the country and the regreening project of the Lopez Group towards this effort. At the same time, he is equally passionate about passing on and demonstrating “adherence to these (Lopez) values.” It will be worth watching how OML will transform himself from corporate leader of a large family conglomerate to the “guru” of the Lopez Values. As he noted in his foreword of the book “Undaunted...,” when referring to the many crises that their family has gone through and their ‘ability to recover and pull through,’ “I believe that we have prevailed—and will continue to prevail—because we always remain true to our core values.”


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POWER

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PEOPLE

E F R AIM

T NES Alumni of the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) converged at the AIM grounds on February 24, 2011 to celebrate the institute’s 43rd anniversary. Dubbed AIM Milestones 2011, the event was attended by alumni from the Philippines and overseas, just as more alumni have taken on bigger roles in leading the Institute. Words by Venie B. Ranosa, BMP 1981 Photos by Jovel Lorenzo


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The following day, AIM also inaugurated the newly renovated ground floor lobby, offices and caserooms in the Eugenio Lopez Foundation building, after the annual joint meeting of the boards of trustees and the board of governors. AIM was founded in 1968 as the first full-time management school in Asia, a result of the collaboration between the Harvard Business School, Ford Foundation, SGV, Ateneo de Manila University, De La Salle College and the Philippine business community. The first classes were held at the Padre Faura (Manila) campus of the Ateneo de Manila. When the new campus was completed shortly thereafter, all facilities and classes were moved to Makati, named the Joseph McMicking campus, in honor of the man who led Ayala Corporation (which donated the prime land on which AIM now stands) and who was the visionary behind the development of what was to be the central business district of the Philippines. The AIM building was designed by the famed Filipino architect Gabriel Formoso. The new school attracted attention for its crescent-shaped theater style classrooms that featured huge sliding blackboards identical to those used at Harvard, and the use of the case method of instruction pioneered by Harvard. AIM is the only school in Asia that has been using the Harvard case method since inception, and one of only four in the world using the case method entirely, thus focusing on critical thinking and executive decision making. However, most of the cases used today are about businesses and companies operating in Asia, which are developed by in-house research teams. The Harvard concept of learning was planted by Harvard professor Ralph Sorenson, a director of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, and Stephen Fuller, associate dean of the Harvard Business School. Dr. Sorenson led the Harvard advisory team that helped create the blueprint which led to the establishment of the premier management school in Asia. He later sat in the founding board of trustees, alongside Asian business icons Washington SyCip (founder and chairman of the SGV Group), Jaime Zobel de Ayala (managing partner of Ayala y Compañia, now the Ayala Corporation) and Eugenio Lopez Jr. (president of ABSCBN) and representatives from Ateneo and De La Salle. Stephen Fuller was named as the first president. Decades later, a Dr. Stephen Fuller Hall was established at AIM in honor of the institute’s first president and in recognition of the living legacy from Harvard. Today, the board of trustees is composed of Washington SyCip as chairman emeritus, Napoleon Nazareno (president and CEO of PLDT and Smart Communications, and director of Meralco and First Pacific) as chairman, and Fr. Bienvenido Nebres SJ (president of Ateneo de Manila University) and Br. Narciso Erguiza FSC (president of De La Salle University) as co-vice chairmen. Former Central Bank Gov. Jose Cuisia Jr. recently resigned as co-chairman of AIM after being named Philippine ambassador to the US. Nazareno, a member of the MBM class of 1973, is the first alumnus to serve as AIM chairman. Others in the board are Roberto de Ocampo (former president of AIM and Secretary of Finance of the Philippines); Rafael Alunan III (president of the Lopez Group Foundation); Prof. Ging de Guzman (faculty member of the AIM W. SyCip Graduate School of Business); Jaime C. del Rosario (chairman of the Jesus V. del Rosario Foundation); Edilberto C. de Jesús (AIM president); Jesli Lapus (former Philippine Secretary of Education and of Trade and Industry, former


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president and CEO of Land Bank of the Philippines, and currently director of Metrobank and managing director of Optimus Management); Ricardo Pascua (former vice chairman, president and CEO of Metro Pacific Group and currently director of its Hongkong parent firm First Pacific, and chairman of Caelum Developers, Inc.); Roberto Garcia (former president of Ramcar and Motolite and currently chairman of Tong Yang Corp.); Joselito Yabut (chairman of the Alumni Association of AIM, and president or director of several broadcasting networks); and the late Datuk Mohd Annas Hj. Mohd Nor (former chairman of the Energy Commission of Malaysia and former chairperson of the Federation of AIM Alumni Associations). The board of governors, also led by SyCip as chairman emeritus and Nazareno as chairman, is composed of chairmen or key business leaders associated with some of the biggest multinationals such as Infosys Technologies Limited, Jardine Matheson, Goldman Sachs Asia Pacific, Carlyle Group, Monitor Group, HSBC, First Eastern Investment Group, Permodalan Nasional Berhad, ID SoftCapital Group, Siam Pulp and Paper Public Co., Australia New Zealand Bank, Golden Hope Plantations Berhad, Merrill Lynch, Sime Darby Berhad, Bank of East Asia Ltd., and Asia Inc. Forum among others. The late Corazon Aquino, former President of the Philippines, also served in the board. With AIM now being strongly driven by its alumni, many of whom influence the directions of businesses, industries and governments around the world, the increased involvement of new leaders in its affairs is a welcome advantage. AIM has more than 38,000 alumni spread out in 76 countries. They hold leadership positions in government, education, social welfare and development, arts and culture, science and technology and business and industry as far north as Russia and Finland and down south as New Zealand and Mozambique. However, the biggest groups come from the Philippines, India, Malaysia, Indonesia, Hongkong, South Korea, Australia, Canada and the US. Among its alumni are Gen. Tan Sri Dato Sri Haji Abdul Aziz Bin Haji Zainal (chief of the armed forces of Malaysia), Hon. Sukavich Rangsitpol (deputy Prime Minister of Thailand), Dato Syed Ahmad Idid (former Justice of the High Court of Malaysia), W. Chan Kim (professor and co-author of the famous “Blue Ocean Strategy” in management), Gregory Domingo (Philippine Secretary of Trade and Industry), Dr. Herminio “Sonny” Coloma Jr. (Philippine Secretary of Communications) and Atty. Edwin Lacierda (Spokesman for the President of the Philippines), to name With AIM now being a few. Domingo and strongly driven by its Coloma both earned their respective alumni, many of whom master’s degrees with distinction. influence the directions

of businesses, industries and governments around the world, the increased involvement of new leaders in its affairs is a welcome advantage.


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However, many alumni are also taking the lead in development work, like Regina Lopez, president of ABS-CBN Foundation. The scion of the Lopez family who is herself a recipient of the AIM Triple A (Alumni Achievement Award) in 2008, Gina Lopez has been actively involved in environmental projects on a national scale. Another is Illac Diaz, an ItalianFilipino social entrepreneur who founded Pier One Seafarers Center, MyShelter Foundation and other social enterprises that now benefit thousands of migrant workers. He took up master of public administration at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and master in entrepreneurship at AIM, and is the recipient of the 2008 Young Global Leader award at the World Economic Forum in Geneva, Switzerland.

Some others are creating new value for Filipino enterprises. Manuel Cojuangco, former director of San Miguel Corporation, co-founded Jewelmer International, the world’s largest producer of south sea pearls. This French-Filipino company, which he heads as chairman and president, is an excellent showcase of Asian artistry that has also made exquisite south sea pearls available around the world—from Melbourne to Dubai to Paris. Cojuangco was awarded the AIM Triple A in 2002 for entrepreneurial excellence. Tony Tan Caktiong (co-founder, chairman, president and chief executive officer of the Jollibee Food Group worldwide and director of PLDT) has been credited for influencing the growth of entrepreneurship (and franchising) in the Philippines. He has been recognized by the Manage-

ment Association of the Philippines (MAP) for management excellence and by Ernst & Young as its World Entrepreneur of the Year in 2004 in Monaco. Until recently, he sat in the board of trustees of AIM. Hence, among AIM’s competitive advantages are its diverse alumni and its alliance with leaders and institutions with global perspective. It was the first private management school in the world to partner with the World Bank, aside from being a center of excellence for the Asian Development Bank in delivering programs towards cultivating progress for Asian societies. A center of business and management research in Asia, it was the first graduate school of management in the world to receive the ISO 140001 standard. It also maintains strong linkages with multilateral and intergovernmental


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...among AIM’s competitive advantages are its diverse alumni and its alliance with leaders and institutions with global perspective.

organizations such as the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), ASEAN Foundation, British Embassy Manila, European Union (EU) AsiaLink Project, Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, International Labor Organization (ILO), International Monetary Fund (IMF), International Finance Corporation (IFC), Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), World Bank, and World Bank Institute (WBI) as well as with International Development Agencies namely The Asia Foundation, Australian Agency for International

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Development (AusAID), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), Ford Foundation, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). In 1975, by virtue of a decree promulgated by the President of the Philippines, AIM became a graduate educational institution of international character classified as a “foreign school of special character, with an international student body, faculty, management composition and control, funding support, programs, curricular offerings, calendar, fee structure, and academic standards”. Twenty years later, in 1995, AIM was


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conferred the Ramon Magsaysay Award, Asia’s equivalent of the Nobel Prize, for its role in promoting international understanding and setting region-wide standards for excellence. The alumni event in 2011 was jointly managed by the AIM Alumni Relations Office and the Alumni Association of AIM (AAAIM) chaired by former Kapisanan ng mga Broadkasters ng Pilipinas (KBP) chairman Joselito Yabut. Other members of this board are Ruperto Nicdao Jr. (current president of the KBP and president of Manila Broadcasting Company), Dr. Mario Lopez (AIM), Prof. Gary Grey (Ateneo Professional Schools), Venie Rañosa (Bank of the Philippine Islands, St. Scholastica’s College), Dean Francisco Lapid (Philippine Center for Entrepreneurship), Lee Kim (KTK Fujikura),

Eustacio Orobia Jr. (People’s Credit and Finance Corp.), Josephine Gomez (Abenson), Cesar Espino (Apple Printers), Jose Ma. Parroco (Manila Broadcasting Co.), Augusto Serafica (Asian Alliance Investments Corp.), Sr. Ma. Consolata Manding FSP (Paulines Institute of Communication), Ofelia Bisnar (acting chairman of FAAIM) and Greg Atienza (executive managing director of the AIM Alumni Relations Office). Also in this board is Corazon Jimenez, who was recently named by Pres. Benigno Aquino as the new general manager of the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA). The host class of this year’s alumni event was the Class of 1991, led by investment banker Augusto Serafica as the alumni homecoming chairman. Joining the celebration were members of the AIM

class of 1971, 1976, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011, a dynamic group of executives and professionals from Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas, who represent batches from the MBA, Executive MBA, Master in Development Management, Master in Management, and other management programs. AIM Milestones 2011 was supported by Microsoft Philippines, IBM/Questronix, Marcventure Holdings as well as Manila Broadcasting Company, Philippine Daily Inquirer, Asian Alliance Investments Corp., Carte Blanche, East West Bank, Citibank, AIM MBM Class of 2001, AIM MDM Class of 1991, BPI Asset Management, Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines, Acer Philippines, San Miguel Brewery, Ginebra San Miguel, Selecta and Social Security System, among others.


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KELAB AIM MALAYSIA PRESIDENT

Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989

Authority, Influence and Persuasion KELAB AIM Malaysia is one of the more powerful alumni networks under the Federation of AIM Alumni. With over 4,000 influential graduates with 15 active Triple A Awardees, the association is primed to move forward with a new leader at its helm. Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989 became the 12th President of Kelab AIM Malaysia during the association’s 34th Annual General Meeting held last October 2010. AIMLeader takes a peak at the new president’s thoughts, plans, and memories of his AIM case room days. AIMLeader: Can you tell us the story of where you were working before AIM, and the circumstances that led you to study at the Institute? Haji Zul: I was fortunate to have served a Fortune 500 Company, the national oil company, PETRONAS during its consolidation growth period in the 1980s and early 1990s. As an industrial/organization psychologist, I was engaged as its Head of Industrial Relations to strategize an employee value proposition for results comprised of good leadership, a clear corporate culture and four pillars: effective Joint Consultative Council, harmonious employee and in-union relationships, competitive compensation management and rewarding staff welfare. In January 1986, I was assigned to the group’s exploration and production arm, Petronas Carigali Sdn Bhd as its Senior Manager for Human Resource (HR) Management and Administration. My primary KPI then was to accelerate the team building for manpower transfer between local and expatriate staff at the offshore joint venture operations in Trengganu and Sabah with ESSO Production personnel and in Miri with Sarawak Shell technical personnel. My enlightened bosses then, Dato’ Ir. Idris Mansor, Managing Director/CEO of Petronas Carigali and Dato’ Haji Nik Abdul Aziz Mohd Kamil, MM 1975, Senior General Manager, Group Human Resources Management jointly recommended for PETRONAS HR Planning and Development Committee to award me with a full-time scholarship to pursue an MM degree program at AIM in 1988. In the 1970s and 1980s, AIM was one

of the top business schools in the world that leaders of the corporate, military, banking and the government sectors preferred to send their rising stars to the Philippines to obtain an AIM degree. What do you remember most about your days as a student? HZ: AIM is well-known for its “case teaching” method. The lessons are almost never lectured. Instead, students are given cases to read before each class. During class, the professor will use questions to lead a group of 65 people into discussions of the case. I had been picked several times by the professors or if not I had to raise my hand to volunteer to tell the class my views. Over 50 percent of our grade was based on class participation. Therefore I had to work very hard to get the opportunity to speak—and when I get airtime, I must speak and articulate the facts very well in order to score the top grade! We discussed three or four cases, each one hour and twenty minutes, every day for one year. My classmates, especially our senior alumni, often joke that AIM has a system so that professors do not have to prepare for class since there is no lecture. Also, professors are never wrong in such a system, as they only facilitate class discussions and never have to lecture on their own views. In reality, what the case teaching method highlights is that most business situations have no obvious right or wrong answer. All professors of MM Class 1988-1989 were the best management teachers in the world. They articulately and earnestly challenged graduate students during the case

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room discussions and MRR presentations with all the key points on corporate performance management, values and potential business growth. However, I am very passionate about Prof. Gaby Mendoza and Prof. Rene Domingo’s style with their structured logic for resolving problems. This technique involves using logic to structure facts and data to make a point. It really helped me because it forced me to think clearly and logically. It ensures that my point makes good business sense. It helps my audience (the company management team) because it is easy for them to follow and understand. How did your AIM education help you in your professional life? HZ: Armed with an MM degree from AIM, I returned home to PETRONAS in June 1989 and was immediately posted as Senior Manager, HR Management and Administration at Baram Delta Operations in Miri—a Joint Venture of Petronas Carigali and Sarawak Shell Berhad. I welcomed the challenge to merge and maximize the best of Carigali and the Shell human capital in Baram Delta Operations for business growth. It was a fast moving international operation. I realized that personal business growth was the apex [for an individual], and the overall value proposition for a new home grown Carigali and established Shell international would make to potential and current employees. It was an appealing proposition. Why is this so? To start with, “growth” is the change all stakeholders aspire to, and it is measurable. We know that “development” was important for both staff attraction and retention. This in turn makes the business grow, and would be reflected in financials that ultimately please everyone. This was convergence!

“A true hands-on leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions and execute it, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others.” Moving to the next level, everywhere I go, I try to get the best people around me (young people smarter than me) and where necessary, outsource expertise. The AIM degree also made me more marketable to prospective employers. I was head hunted many times. However, I only accepted the offer from Malaysia Airlines in 1993 after I had fully served my scholarship contract obligation with PETRONAS. “Authority...” continued on page 72 >>

Interview by Susan Africa-Manikan, MAP 2002 | Photo by Jovel Lorenzo


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TRIPLE A AWARDEE

Roberto V. Garcia, MBM 1973

Making a Difference

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NASSUMING AND HUMBLE, YET HIS PRESENCE reflects the essence of a man whose leadership and influence is immediately felt. Quiet but forceful when the situation requires, MBM 1973’s “President for Life” Roberto V. Garcia has got what it takes to be a true leader. Garcia was elected as Student Association President during his stint at AIM and subsequently as Alumni Association Chairman for two terms starting in 1981. In recognition of his student leadership record in AIM, he was elected to the AIM Scientific Research Foundation in 1989 where he also served as Audit Committee Chairman. His 21 years of service to the AIMSRF culminated in his recent election as a member of the AIM Board of Trustees. This is solid proof of his leadership and the respect he commands in the AIM community. This is especially significant now that the alumni have at last been given a major voice in the running of the affairs of the Institute. It is said that destiny has been written for one even before he can utter the first cry at birth. And Garcia’s footsteps towards his life’s destinations have indeed been swift and unexpected. Bobby came to Manila after finishing his Grade School at the Naga Parochial School in Camarines Sur. He was very fortunate to be accepted in Ateneo de Manila where he was exposed to the Jesuit education and values. Graduating from Ateneo de Manila High School, he went to his chief rival school, La Salle University where he started to make a difference. Garcia is perhaps the only ex-Atenean who became Editor-in-Chief of the “La Sallian” school paper and Chairman of the Student Council. In recognition of his leadership, Garcia was awarded La Salle’s “Most Outstanding Student Leader Award” upon graduation in 1968. The 1970’s was a critical time for the Philippines. Living in the First Quarter Storm of the Marcos dictatorship propelled many to instigate changes for the country. Garcia was not an exemption. “In De La Salle, I was deeply involved in student politics and social issues that led to my consciousness about the widespread poverty and injustice in the country and the need for political and social reforms,“ he shares. After graduating from La Salle’s top LiaCom course, Garcia went to South America to visit his father and then worked in Rome. After a year of hitchhiking and seeing the grand sites of Europe, he decided to come back and do something for the country by eventually working for the government. As a first step he enrolled in the University of the Philippines to take up his Masters in Public Administration. But then it was not the road that was meant for him. “While studying, I got an offer from my former boss at Philippine Airlines where I had also worked after graduation,” Garcia narrates. Manolo Agustines patiently listened to the young Garcia’s dreams of working for the government, but suggested that instead of running the risk of getting corrupted by the system, why not pursue a career in business by going to AIM. “When you hit 50 surely you will have made enough money to live comfortably. Then you can work for the government and hopefully be less tempted by the corruption in the system and make a real difference is helping the country,” Agustines advised. Garcia was offered by Agustines to help build up Ramcar, a small battery business owned by the family. When Garcia asked his former boss what his vision for Ramcar was, he said that he wanted the company to be the best battery manufacturer in the country. “I said why not aim to be the biggest?” Agustines said, “be the best first then you will be the biggest.” Garcia was hooked.

AIM...Life Changing Experiences In 1971 Garcia started his Master in Business Administration at the AIM campus with Agustines as his sponsor. The arduous process of learning using the Harvard case method honed Garcia and his classmates from diverse backgrounds and countries in the language of business and the required analytical skills. Composed of activist student leaders and the brightest students from Ateneo, La Salle and the University of the Philippines, along with outstanding batchmates from India, Korea, Thailand, Japan, Singapore, Malayisa and Indonesia, the class of MBM 1973 would later prove to be one of the most powerful and influential batches at AIM. Today, MBM ‘73 has the distinction of being the class with the biggest number of Triple A Awardees. In the 35 year existence of the Alumni Association, MBM ‘73 has had 10 out of the 29 Chairmen that have been elected to lead the alumni and have led the Alumni Association for 14 years, a record yet to be broken by any other class. MBM ‘73’s dominance was even extended to the golf course where their players won an unprecedented seven straight Class Championships at the Annual Alumni Golf Homecoming Tournament. Again, another record yet to broken by any other class. When asked what he remembers most about his AIM experience, the activist in him relives the time when MBM ‘73 instigated a boycott in protest of the MRR for two consecutive years as they had found the MRR irrelevant and unreasonable at that time. “This was a showdown between our class and Dean Gaby et al. MBM ‘73 was also the founding class of the Alpha Mu fraternity.” Another unforgettable incident for him was September 20, 1972, the day before “As a leader, what Martial Law was declared. “The Student is important is the Association invited Ninoy Aquino to speak ability to inspire.” at AIM. After the talk, he confidentially told us that he feared Martial Law would be declared soon but that he was prepared as he had his toothbrush with him and would immediately go underground when Marcos declared Martial law. Unfortunately, from AIM, Ninoy proceeded to the Hilton hotel where he was arrested the next day.” The rest is history. During those turbulent times, Garcia continued to make a difference as he exerted his leadership. He was elected Class President in first year and Student Association President in his second year. After graduation, as an alumnus Garcia continued his role as an AIM leader when he was elected as Philippine Chapter AIM Alumni Association Chairman and FAIM for two consecutive terms starting in 1981. Perhaps as a consequence, during one reunion, he shares, “one member of the class addressed me as Class ‘President for Life’ and that title has stuck on me up to this day.” Garcia also remembers Fr. Donelan with fondness. “Fr. James Donelan was kind, witty and cultured. Also he gave me my highest grade, a D- during our WAC exam!” Of all the lessons he remembers most, it is the virtue of humility that remains with him even today. “Humility is the beginning of true learning,” he says. “This is particularly true in the case method where one realizes that he has much to learn from his professors and classmates if he is humble enough to admit that he does not know all the answers.” “Making a Difference” continued on page 68 >>

Words by Susan Africa-Manikan, MAP 2002 | Photo by Jovel Lorenzo


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AAAIM Chairman

Joselito G. Yabut, MBM 1979

The Good Seed

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IR PETER ALEXANDER USTINOV, THE GREAT writer and actor was once quoted as saying: “Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious.” This line perhaps characterizes the jovial personality of Joselito Gonzalez Yabut, especially when the Chairman of the Alumni Association of AIM shared that perhaps the best among the many wonderful experiences that he had as a student at AIM was the “Beer Pub” on Friday nights. And that the worst experience that he had was to feel the pressure whenever he failed to complete or read a case study for a class. In fact it came to a point that whenever a student would ask for permission to go to the bathroom in the middle of a class, it became a running joke among the class that the aforementioned student was “feeling the pressure”. If being funny and being serious are truly both sides of the same coin, Joselito G. Yabut is definitely the gold standard. As sure as Jose Rizal will forever be our country’s national hero, so is the stereotype of the spoiled ivy school college graduate, who will one day inherit daddy’s business. If you look at Joselito G. Yabut’s academic and professional career on paper, one can easily be fooled into thinking that he is a part of this breed. The truth of the matter is, nothing could be anything further from it. The Yabuts knew that anything that’s worth the trouble would not be given to them gratuitously: they had to earn everything. Little did anyone know that during this period in their lives, Abelardo would also leave behind a legacy for which his family would endlessly be proud of. Not that any sense of the pride and respect that Joselito G. Yabut Jr. and all of his siblings felt about their father was misplaced; Abelardo Yabut Sr. was, without any shadow of a doubt, a self-made man. When Abelardo Yabut Sr.’s employer at a broadcasting network, where he worked during that time in 1960, brought in his son-in-law to become part of the management, Abelardo knew from the start that there would be conflicts between him and the son-in-law, and he respectfully resigned. He then decided to set up his own broadcasting network. From their family garage, he set up a rudimentary radio broadcasting system that can be best described as a prime example to the definition of the word homemade. With transmitters, borrowed from a friend in Raon Street, being anything but state-of-the-art, Abelardo Yabut sowed the seeds of what would eventually become Nation Broadcasting Corporation (NBC). In 1963 the family-owned corporation was launched, and this was also the time when Joselito witnessed the awe-inspiring work ethic, resourcefulness, and the prodigious relationship skills that his father displayed, something that has rubbed off on him. Joselito recalls that his father would ask friends to defray the cost of a newly started radio station. Abelardo made it a point that the support that he received from his solicitations should be justified. When the company had enough funds, Abelardo Yabut Sr., upon the suggestion of his family, bought in new equipment to modernize the station. Abelardo knew that he couldn’t do everything on his own, and as a true leader, he knew how to listen to the opinions of others. Abelardo was a firm believer that everyone had the potential to make a difference when given the chance and he always kept an open ear to employees who wanted to talk to him. Abelardo made it clear to them that he understood their plight, and was once an employee like them. At such a young age, this image of his father, whom Joselito credits

as being the best manager that he’s ever known, would help mold the youngest Yabut’s vision as to how a company should be run: that when people stick to the basic principles of honesty and hard work to make a contribution to the company to the best of their capacities, everyone can share in the profits. Joselito, from this moment on, would forever be an advocate of this type of “corporate culture” as he himself calls it. Another important lesson that he learned from his father had more to do with Abelardo sense of good morals and common decency, “If someone asks for your help and you have the capacity to give it, then that’s all the more reason for you to do it”. These early years of Joselito G. Yabut’s life would also help define his tireless approach to being hands-on and involved in the family business, and as part of the employees as well. “Everyone starts from the bottom,” a very lighthearted Joselito says with a smile, “and no job was too menial.” He further expounds on this point by sharing his exploits as a teen working for his father. “When I was in grade school we lived in Project 4 and I went to school in Letran, which to be honest, was quite far from our residence.” He then made the decision that a transfer to a school of closer proximity was in order, and he brought up the topic of going to Ateneo de Manila with his father, fearing that they could not afford it. Abelardo then told him not to worry about tuition fees, and that if he could pass an entrance exam, he would surely find a way. It has always been said that children, to some degree, would resent their elders, but never Joselito, who ever since he was a child, had always held his father in the highest regard. Despite the obvious financial hardships brought about by a fledging radio station that their father “If someone asks for was dealing with, he worked hard to your help and you have provide for his family, always through the capacity to give it, the best of his efforts. By this time, then that’s all the more Abelardo was establishing NBC’s first reason for you to do it.” radio station in Zamboanga, under the call letters DXYZ. Faced with the reality of having only a small capital, Abelardo cited the need for them to open in Zamboanga, because the capital that they had was insufficient for Manila-based competition. Led by their father, the Yabut family persevered and NBC was able to expand to a grand total of sixteen AM radio stations, and after 10 years they were finally able to open a radio station in Manila. Transition Out of the Comfort Zone In 1973, just a year after the infamous declaration of martial law in the Philippines, NBC’s first FM station was opened in Manila, known as DWFM. The radio station adopted a new format, and reinvented broadcasting then. Before that, Joselito heard a competing radio station playing a song which they called back then as “Song Citation of the Week.” Through observation and analysis, Joselito concurred that it should be the listeners and not the radio station that picked the song of the week. Hence, Most Requested Song 92.3 was born, and up to this day, Joselito proudly calls MRS 92.3 his ‘baby’. As years moved on and success meant increased listenership and advertising revenues, their competition would heckle and mock them as ‘Most Repeated Song’ instead. The fact remains, however, “The Good Seed” continued on page 69 >>

Words by Gerard de Sagun | Photo by Jovel Lorenzo


68 ity Movement. In 2004, the Philippine Society for Quality conferred on Garcia the prestigious Juran Medal, the highest award for quality advocacy in the country From backyard manufacturer for an individual. to global competitor Of his achievements, Garcia looks With an MBM degree tucked under back on two important lessons from AIM. his sleeve, Garcia was assigned as Marketing Manager of Ramcar Incorporated “First, look at the big picture always,” he notes. “Globalization has made the in 1973. During this period, he was responsible for initiating and implementing whole world one’s market. Backyard the company’s marketing strategy which manufacturers will not survive global competition. Second, look at the long focused on revamping the company’s branch and distribution network. “It was term. Don’t take shortcuts.” the most comprehensive distribution Integrity and Excellence network and the only one of its kind in With a wealth of experiences as a the industry.” Transforming Ramcar from leader, Garcia shares his management a backyard manufacturer to one of the few globally competitive Filipino compa- style. “A leader must adapt his style to nies was the most fulfilling experience of the people he is supposed to lead,” he says. “A leadership style that might Garcia’s professional life. Moving up from Marketing Manager work well with a group of academicians may not be as effective with a group of (1973), Vice President, Marketing & call center agents. As a leader, what is Sales (1974-1979), Executive Vice President (1979-1987), President (1987- important and should be common to both is the ability to inspire.” 1997), and then President of Oriental He finds that the most unique and and Motolite Corporation (1997-2003), difficult management issues usually Garcia’s loyal 34 year career with one revolve around HBO. “To address these company is a record to beat by other requires open dialogue, patience and fellow alumni. most of all sincerity,” he advises. As Chief Operating Officer of OMC, He counts Obama as an ideal leader, formed by a merging of Ramcar and C.C. noting that “he won the hearts and minds Unson in 1997, Garcia was responsible of the American people because of his for implementing the merged corporaability to inspire. As a manager, he has tion’s 5-year plan to become globally made the tough decisions to deal with competitive. This involved setting up a the recent economic meltdown even if he new state-of the-art factory and expanhas had to sacrifice his popularity. The sion of export sales to Australia, U.S. ability to make the tough decisions even and ASEAN. This plan resulted in OMC’s at the expense of one’s popularity is the becoming one of the top players in the mark of a true leader.” global battery industry. And when asked to share what proUpon his retirement in December 2003, under Garcia’s leadership OMC had fessional values would he like to impart to AIM alumni and students, Garcia imbecame the largest battery manufacturer in ASEAN. When he joined Ramcar in mediately cites: “Integrity and Excellence 1970, sales stood at Php7 million. When are the two sides of the coin that makes an outstanding manager.” he left in 2003, the battery group sales amounted to Php2.7 billion. Consolidated Ramcar group sales amounted to around BFF…Best Friends Forever Leading a powerful class of excepPhp7 billion. OMC also had the largest and tional graduates as “President for Life” most technologically advanced maintehas proven to be more of a pleasure and a nance free battery factory in the region. passion for Garcia. Aside from this, OMC had the distinction What makes MBM 1973 tick? of being one of the most integrated bat“There were many well respected tery manufacturers in the world producstudent leaders in our class not only from ing on its own almost every component the Philippines but from Thailand, India, needed in the assembly of a battery. Singapore, Malaysia and Korea as well. As one of the very few globally competitive Filipino manufacturers in the As such we found common ground and our class became very close during our country today, OMC enjoyed a dominant position in the domestic battery industry AIM stay. The two class boycotts against the MRR and the founding of the Alpha with a market share of over 70% inspite Mu fraternity were the crises and an of globalization and the lowering of the opportunity that bound us even closely to protective tariff walls. Furthermore 40% each other,” he relates. of OMC’s production competed in the Furthermore, “a few years ago, Derek export markets like Australia, the United Liew, a Singaporean classmate, started States, ASEAN and other countries such a series of class reunions in which he as Hongkong and Russia. cooked or taught us about wines,” Garcia His efforts did not go unnoticed. In narrates.“These reunions were so enjoy1979, Garcia was the recipient of AIM’s able that they are still going on today. We most prestigious Alumni Achievement Award (Triple A), and in 2000, he received meet at least once a quarter, sometimes even monthly especially when we have the Outstanding Leadership Award from foreign classmates come and visit. We the Philippine Quality and Productiv>> “Making a Difference” continued from page 64

also meet on social occasions like Poly Nazareno’s recent birthday which he hosted exclusively for our class. “Another big factor which has also accounted for the closeness of our class is when Felipe Diego put up the MBM ’73 Yahoo EGroup which has kept us in touch with each other throughout the years. It’s a great way to keep tabs on what’s going on and keeping the class together. Another way we have kept together is when Mon Abad formed a band called Los Bandidos. I think we were the first MBM class to perform at an alumni homecoming. “ With frequent reunions, virtual communications and a deep commitment to the Institute, MBM 1973 has undeniably been the top class donor to AIM with a whopping total of Php 3,550,000 thus far. MBM 1973 started its financial support for the Institute in 1993 when they celebrated their 20th anniversary and donated the proceeds of the Alumni Homecoming amounting to around Php 500,000 for the President’s Conference Room. On their 25th anniversary, they donated Php 150,000 to AIM for ACCM Room 903. In 2003, on the occasion of their 30th anniversary, MBM ’73 donated Php 1 million to the AIM Alumni Fund for Faculty Development. MBM ’73 alumni such as Manoling Cojuangco, Boy De Claro and other classmates have also donated individually to the Institute through the AIM SRF Alumni Fund amounting to Php 1,900.000. Their sincere outpouring of generosity for a school that they love continues to this day. “I am campaigning to have all our class members donate individually to the Alumni Fund. From our pooled class funds, I hope we would be able to donate a Professorial Chair or Scholarship in MBM ‘73’s name.” With 38 happy years of friendship forging the class, Garcia is asked to describe MBM 1973 in three words. “BFF…Best Friends Forever,” he smiles.

Aetas that are leasing their land to us in the SBMA area. The other items in my bucket list include turning over our family business to my two children by mentoring them to ensure the survival and continued success of the business. Going to the Holy Land and Egypt, experiencing an African safari and fishing for marlin in Cabo San Lucas and giant peacock bass in the Brazilian amazon are other things that are on my list.” With an active mind and body, retirement cannot keep Garcia idle. He is currently Chairman and CEO of Tong Yang Corporation and RVG Sparrow Holdings Inc. After retirement from Ramcar in 2003, he took control of the Tong Yang restaurant group and grew the business composed of the popular Tong Yang, Meylin, Mini ShabuShabu and Thousand Cranes brands into19 casual dining restaurants. The group has also expanded into the wellness business with two spas and the KTV entertainment business with the popular Centerstage brand with three branches. The group is also into real estate property management. Garcia keeps himself continuously challenged by keeping the adage “Always try to make a difference” at the back of his mind. Recently elected as a member of the AIM Board of Trustees, he shares his personal vision for the Institute: “I would like to actively participate in the transformation of AIM which will happen over the next few years. This transformation is essential if AIM is to survive and excel in the very competitive environment of Asian management education. We are presently pursuing a partnership with an international educational institute which will hopefully bring us to a higher level of competitiveness and will enable us to make that crucial transition.” As a member of the 4-man Negotiating Committee that is tasked to bring this competitive alliance to fruition, Garcia is actively involved in this historic transformation of AIM. Why choose to be active when the lure of a laid back life beckons? “I’d like to New Opportunities see AIM regain its position as the graduNow semi-retired, Garcia shares ate school of choice in the Asian region. that he is “trying to make up for the times I’d like to see AIM with a truly internaI did not spend with my family because tional faculty and a diversified student of the rat race in my younger days. I now population,” he says passionately. “Any try to make up for this by focusing more educational institute is only as good as on the family and spending more time the graduates it produces. As alumni we especially with my three grandsons.” should give our full moral and financial With a passion for golf, sportsfishsupport to make AIM stronger so it will ing and good books, Garcia continues to produce more successful graduates. make plans for the future with his wife, This in turn will strengthen not only the the former Maribi C. Mapa and his two chil- Institute but the reputation of all its dren, Miguel Roberto, now 33 and Valerie graduates as well.” Anne, now 31. I still have one big chalAnd with these parting words, Garcia lenge left before I really retire. My wife displays the true colors of what it takes and I want to put up a Holyland Sanctuary to be a true AIM leader that has made a and Theme park in Subic. This is a unique difference for the Institute. and ambitious project that will educate us more about the Bible and the life of Jesus The AIMLeader editors wish to acknowland make us Christians more aware of our edge “Taking AIM”, published in 2006 by Tripletop AIM, Inc. from where some of the faith. This project will also provide jobs and livelihood opportunities for the tribal references were used in this article.


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>> “The Good Seed” continued from page 67 that this change would give MRS 92.3 a large listener base as well as gain a reputation for being hit-makers ever since MRS adapted the format of playing the most requested song voted in by the listeners every hour. “To find your own place in the sun, one must venture outside the shade of the family tree.” Joselito fully understood the value of this age-old saying, which is why he saw and fulfilled the need to work for a different company before fully immersing himself in the family business. “I knew that I wouldn’t learn anything if I started out as boss.” Upon graduating from college, Yabut was understandably filled with the sense of entitlement which is a natural trait for fresh college graduates. “After school, we felt as though we knew everything.” This narrow view though was not destined to last for very long. “In 1975 I began working for Planters Products Incorporated, where I learned the inner machinations of corporate structure,” says Yabut. “Straight from college, which was Ateneo, I was immediately put in a favorable position in the Planters Fertilizer Management Group. From this, I was also able to improve my skills on how to approach certain problems, in particular, the things that weren’t taught to us at school.” His endeavors, to say the least were certainly no mean feat. “Discipline was the single most useful thing I acquired from my two years experience at Planters Products Incorporated, apart from accumulating actual work experience in a corporate setting,” he states. “Work for your keep and do your part for the company’s progress,” he adds. Joselito also gives a lot of recognition to Planters Products for helping him pass the Asian Institute of Management’s entrance exam. “My time at Planters also showed me that it simply wasn’t enough to do well in college—actual experience is very, very different.” All these experiences were critical to Joselito’s eventual acceptance into the AIM. Back then it was a prerequisite for all AIM applicants to have some experience in the work force before entering the prestigious graduate school. Despite being the youngest Yabut, Joselito was fortunate enough to possess a sense of maturity that belied his age, and a few years later, he would call on this gift as he spread his wings, ready to embark on the journey that we all must face: to transition out of the comfort zone of school, and to finally begin making one’s way into the real world. Armed with a wealth of experiences in the corporate world, Joselito G. Yabut entered the Asian Institute of Management in 1977 taking the Masters in Business Management degree, and graduated, armed with an AIM diploma in 1979.

A Father to a Son In a strange twist of fate Joselito’s father Abelardo, was given the opportunity of taking part in AIM’s first ever Top Management Program, making them part of the same batch year, 1979. The program took place in Baguio at the Baguio Country Club, and was orchestrated by Fr Jim Donelan. Some of his father’s batchmates included Dr. Buenaventura of the Philippine Heart Center and Mr. Quisimbing from Cebu. “I encouraged my father to take the management program, so that we could talk the same language,” chuckled the young Yabut. Joselito then proceeds to extol his father by relating a small anecdote about the time he asked his father what he learned at the monthlong Top Management Program. Almost as a boast he answers, “I was able to confirm that the things that I did right were right.” On the flip side, his father is quick to add that “but I was also able to confirm that the things that I did wrong.” Abelardo Yabut Sr. was also able to understand more about the structuring of problem solving and decision making analysis, bridging the experiential knowledge gap between father and son. Joselito is forever proud of his father, and the stories that he had in his head about him were probably too plentiful to discuss for a scant hour or so that we had for conversation. But this didn’t stop him from imparting a few of them in our conversation. In a time before the Nation Broadcasting Corporation was even formed inside his father’s head, Abelardo worked for one of the largest media conglomerates in the Philippines even up to this very day, which was the Lopez owned company Bolinao Electronics which became ABS-CBN. During this period, it was Don Eugenio Lopez himself who was in charge of the entire operation. Under Don Eugenio’s era, Abelardo Yabut Sr. was Purchasing Manger and tasked with procuring land in Cebu City, to house the site of ABS-CBN Cebu. The person in charge of selling land to ABS-CBN’s representative was a politician of a substantial position. This instance was the opening scenario of one of the key moments in Abelardo Yabut Sr.’s life. The politician explained that the land was at a certain value per square meter. But if Abelardo was willing to relay to his superiors that the land was available at a higher cost instead, he could get the difference from the jacked-up prices. This offer was declined politely by Abelardo Yabut Sr., but not before firmly stating his stand that whatever money he saves for his company would be put to better use for the company’s benefit. The politician was visibly impressed, and even asked Joselito’s father for an introduction with his bosses, Don Eugenio Lopez in particular. Two weeks later upon his return to Manila, Abelardo Yabut Sr. was summoned to Eugenio Lopez’s office. As it turns out, the politician that dealt with Abelardo was, in actuality, a close personal friend

of Eugenio Lopez himself. To Abelardo Yabut’s surprise, the boss proceeds to tell his father about his politician friend and his encounter with Yabut. “You know what my friend told me?” Eugenio Lopez asked his employee. “You’ve got a very honest man, this Abelardo Yabut.” Because of his professionalism, Abelardo Yabut became a trusted employee and has been endeared to the Lopezes. Another anecdote that Joselito shares is the time when he and Lopez heir, Gabby Lopez, were attending a reunion at the ABS-CBN ELJ Center. Joselito spots the “Pillars of ABS-CBN” with his father’s name on it, along with several other distinguished Lopez employees such as Ben Pambuan, his sister’s godfather. He jokes to Gabby, whose family honored Abelardo Yabut Sr. and was responsible for that plaque being there in the first place, “Gabby that’s my father’s name!” To this the Lopez sire responds “You know why those names are there? That’s because these people are the pillars of this institution.” It was the years that Abelardo Yabut Sr. worked for the Lopez family that helped instill in him a culture of valuing employees who have been critically instrumental to the company’s success. It was also a lesson that Abelardo passed on to his children in the years that he spent laboring to start a broadcasting company of his own. Joselito attributes that everything that he learned from his dad, he was able to implement in his own brand of business management. Moving Forward After finishing his Masters in Business Management course at the Asian Institute of Management in 1979, Joselito was at last finally able to fully dive into the family business, where he stayed on until 1996. He was soon engrossed with everything that was concerned with how the NBC, looking for things to do, figuratively, from top to bottom. “I wanted our employees to know that it wasn’t beneath the owner’s capacity to interact with their employees. I was constantly engaged with hob knobbing with all the people who worked for us, and I became involved in every task.” Joselito was finally integrating everything that he learned from his childhood, university, his first outside working experience, and lastly his education at the Asian Institute of Management. “No task was too menial, I was there in the front lines as a warm body and not as the boss’ son—I was there to lend a helping hand.” Joselito was indeed a helping hand and more. He was not afraid of rolling up his sleeves and getting into the thick of things. “I was a jack of all trades. I would take part in operations, doubling in the programming, a fill-in reporter in some of the news coverage, even a little bit of engineering.” Joselito has a penchant for modernization, most specifically the ever changing world of technological advance-

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ments. He would go to the trade exhibits of broadcasting equipment, and using his time-tested, finely honed skills of business management plus his wealth of experiential knowledge, he would spend hours analyzing how new technology and equipment could help them run NBC better. He had a knack for spotting the utility value and how equipment could be best put to use “The quality of the programming at MRS wasn’t based on equipment, but on how you do things”, says Joselito. “It’s what you dish out on air from the people whom you taught how to do things properly,” he adds. They relied heavily on the skills and talents of their people, and the Yabuts invested a lot of resources on the development of these people. Though Joselito admits that luck can also be a factor in the outcome of a business, their family decided to rely more on the things that they had at their disposal. They understood that human resource was critical, and did everything they could to help their employees grow. If an employee wanted to leave for greener pastures, the family made it clear that they would bear no ill will if they did. The Yabuts treated their employees like their friends, and “no real friend ever lets their friends come to harm. If you treat your workers fairly, they will remember you for what you’ve taught them and how you’ve helped them.” To the Yabuts, it’s a win-win situation to develop lasting relationships with the people at their company. To this day, Joselito gets messages, mostly in Facebook, from former employees who have worked for them back in the NBC days thanking them for all the things that they’ve learned from their work with the Yabuts, and for allowing them to grow and develop their talents. Branching Out from the Typical It was this hands-on approach that set the Yabut family apart from your typical, family business owners. Instead of acting like entitled aristocrats who owned all that they surveyed and left their serfs to do the work, every member of the family was pitching in and doing their part. If there was anything that could be done to help improve the company, the Yabuts went out and did it. As the leader of the Yabuts, Abelardo saw to it that everyone was treated fairly and given their rightful share. This philosophy did not stop with the company’s owners, but extended to all their employees as well. This method of management did the Yabuts and the NBC good, because it was something they truly believed in. And for thirty-three years they kept the NBC and its ventures going. Joselito also describes how his father was someone who never praised him for a job well done. But later on he would hear from other people who worked with them, that his father was actually very pleased with Joselito’s contribution to their family business. Such were the ways of Abelardo Yabut


70 Sr., a man who combined experiential knowledge with a brilliant sense of management, but was very generous when it came to praising his children behind their backs, lest he imparts a culture of egomassaging. Abelardo Yabut Sr. was one who knew what his moral values were, and he has stuck with them ever since. The Yabuts were a close-knit family, and like all families, Joselito confesses that they had their trying times as well. Falling out with one another wasn’t unheard of, especially since the Yabuts have received their share of downs along with their ups. In 1996, the Yabuts were bought out, forcing them to divest all of their shareholdings. It was a difficult time for all of them, and fights between family members were breaking out as a result of all the stress and pressure surrounding their situation. In the end, the proceeds from being bought out of NBC were divided by the Yabuts into seven equal parts, an acknowledgement for each of their individual contributions. After all that they’ve been through, the Yabut family’s core beliefs and values have come out unscathed. If anything at all, their trial as a family served as a way for the Yabut’s bond as a family to become even stronger. A recent chapter in Joselito’s life was opened when he joined IBC-13 shortly when he was appointed as board director in 2001. Eight years after, he was then given the chairmanship of IBC-13. All along, the government owned television network was reeling financially as a result of its sequestration, dating back to the time of Corazon Aquino’s government. The network was suffering as a result of numerous management changes and employee back-wages amounting to the hundred millions which had become a deep- seated problem. Nearly the entire workforce was disillusioned, unmotivated, and didn’t trust the management. Squabbles broke out routinely, and picketing workers have become a routine affair. A “me first” mindset was the mode of how things were done and had become the corporate culture in the television station. Yabut recalls that the first thing he tried to put in order was his implementation of his own brand of corporate culture. “I wanted to instill an unselfish attitude,” he says. Joselito then did what he does best, and from his years of experience from working at NBC, he was able to establish a rapport with the station’s employees, much like he did back in the old days. He made the employees realize that if they worked hard and did their best, they would be duly compensated for their efforts. But at the same time, Joselito also made them realize that if they were just getting by with a lackluster effort for their monthly salary then their wages might as well count as a loss to the company, which was something detrimental for everyone at the network as a whole. On the other hand, he made sure that the management

and board of directors were fulfilling their own duties, such as making sure that the employee’s wages were on time, and providing the station with everything that it might need for operating. In Joselito’s opinion, this was perhaps his biggest contribution to IBC-13, that as the station’s chairman, it was his responsibility to make everyone realize his vision of corporate culture, so that the television network could finally start moving forward. This extends from Joselito’s belief that as a political appointee, with his term recently coming to an end, he wasn’t part of the owners of the television station, but a steward to preserve the value of the government sequestered media company by no less than the Office of the President, an extension of the Filipino people, which was why it was important for him to give his best efforts. Another thing that Joselito will never forget from his recently concluded days at IBC-13 was the love that he received from employees there. This sense of respect and loyalty was forged through years of building a close relationship with the network’s workers. Throughout his time as chairman of the network, Joselito worked in close contact with the labor union, making sure that something was being done about all the unpaid workers’ benefits. The most tangible of such endeavors to help bring about a set-up to pay for the employees back wages and benefits was the signing of a joint venture agreement (JVA) between television station IBC-13 and RII Builders/Primestate Ventures Inc. to develop IBC-13’s four-hectare property located in Diliman, Quezon City. Although the agreement was concluded on March 24, 2010, the actual negotiation process began eleven months earlier. “This is the culmination of a long series of rigorous and careful negotiations which began May last year, formalized with RII’s submission of a letter of intent on June 1, 2009, and finally concluded in March 2010,” says Joselito in an interview with the Philippine Star last year. Under the terms of the joint venture agreement, a brand new five-thousand square meter Broadcast Center will be built for IBC-13 and its sister station RPN-9, while the remaining three and a half hectares would be used for the development of commercial spaces and residential areas. This move was largely motivated in Yabut’s opinion, because IBC13’s overhead expenses and operational costs were growing at a rate faster than revenue could come in. When RII builders submitted a proposal to IBC-13 regarding the joint venture, the board of directors decided to consult their employees before accepting the offer. This process of discussing with their employees continued throughout the entire negotiations, with the employees union in close contact with management, every step of the way. While the joint venture agreement is largely seen as a good business deal for

IBC-13, enhancing the value and improving the image of the television network, it also helped the employees to trust the people that made the company’s decisions for them. At first they were reluctant to cooperate, having been disillusioned so many times by past managements. The development of Broadcast City for the benefit of the employees, paved the way for management to gain their trust and respect. Since the mid nineties, Broadcast City was an idle asset for IBC-13, losing money year after year. Today, as a result of the gains from the recent joint venture agreement, a total of a hundred thousand pesos per employee has been released, fulfilling the promise made to the station’s employees. During its entirety, Joselito was personally involved in the front lines, talking closely with the leaders of the labor union. The corporate culture that Yabut wanted to integrate at IBC-13 had finally arrived. Joselito’s co-workers at IBC-13 loved their boss so much that the labor unions, as well as some of the board members, would come up to him and express their desire to retain him as chairman. Fully knowing that being a political appointee, his time of service was not his own, as he magnanimously accepted the decision to end his term. With the well-being of his employees in mind, Joselito hopes that the progress they’ve built at IBC-13 would continue, even after his departure. He has had a conversation with the network’s Supervising Secretary Sonny Coloma during the turnover, about the details of where they are as a company, and how best it could be sustained. The employees asked if he would accept his old job if it were offered to him again, he would accept the job in a heartbeat. “Why not?” he says. “It’s good to be in a place where you’re wanted,” he says. “I just wanted to add value to the company,” he adds, satisfied that he was able to contribute to achieve this goal. His success during his time at IBC-13 could be traced directly to his past experience working at the NBC. By establishing a “help us help you” attitude brought straight from his dad’s playbook, Joselito’s sincerity, openness, and a relentless work ethic greatly changed the corporate culture at IBC-13. From a TV network that constantly had open disagreements between the board of directors, management, and workers, Joselito leaves it a place where everyone has learned the value of cooperation, trust, as well as a hopeful outlook towards the future. “If you do good, people will best remember you for doing good,” Joselito quotes his father. With this attitude, it’s no coincidence that many of his past workers think of Joselito as their ideal manager. He insists that hearing those words coming from his employees was all the reward he needed for his stint as chairman of IBC-13.

Coming in Full Circle

But happier times of a more personal nature were still ahead for Joselito amid all of his career’s successes and accomplishments and that was when the Asian Institute of Management dedicated a room in his father’s honor. The entire Abelardo family was present, including Abelardo Yabut Sr. himself, when the Abelardo Yabut Sr. Room was dedicated to him at the inauguration of the AIM Conference Center Manila located in Makati City. Looking back, Joselito describes this as being one of the most memorable and happiest occasions for the Yabut family. And he was made even happier by the fact that his father was there to enjoy it. Joselito was ecstatic that his father, who started from scratch, now has a monument at the AIM. It was touching for Joselito to have two of the most influential entities of his life, his father and his school, come together in a full circle, as a room was named after Abelardo Yabut Sr. because of a donation from their family. “The story behind all this ,” Joselito shares ,“is that a batchmate of mine, Josie Cruz Aliwalas of the Scientific Research Foundation, asked me if we wanted to donate some money to the AIM.” As a token of gratitude for this donation, a room would be named after their Nation Broadcasting Corporation. Joselito had second thoughts about naming it after their company, alluding to the fact that businesses can go bust at any given time. In his opinion naming the room after his father made more sense. Joselito turned out to be right, when their company was bought out from them, giving him a sense of relief. It was important for Joselito and his siblings to honor their parents, and for him the best way was to leave a lasting legacy in their name while giving back to the school that has helped him so much. “We didn’t give the money just for the sake of showing that we had the capability. We did it to honor our parents.” In Joselito’s opinion, the amount of money that they donated to the AIM was a small price to pay in exchange for honoring their parents. Nowadays, Joselito keeps himself challenged by devoting time and effort to keeping himself at pace with technology, an advice he would like to extend to people his age. “You should learn how to do your e-mails, don’t let your kids do it for you,” he explains. “Get yourself in front of the computer screen and the keyboard. How can you communicate in the future if you don’t know how to use these things?” He encourages those of his generation not to be put off by technology, but instead find ways to make life easier by using technological advancements. Joselito believes that proficiency in these things could be much more sped up if you had daily access to it. At present he would like to learn more about digital recordings, and applying these to create television advertisements. To keep himself sane, especially whenever he has


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a headache, Joselito takes in the view from his condo unit located near AIM. Or if he had the opportunity, he would head to Tagaytay and enjoy the view there. He also enjoys heading down to the beach and jet skiing as well. As Chairman of the AIM Alumni Association- Philippine Chapter (AAAIM), the things that he would like to achieve during his term would be to think of ways of how the Association can move the school forward. He believes that the alumni can greatly help with this, and Joselito feels fortunate that many of them are greatly interested in contributing to their former school. In fact the AIM Alumni Association is institutionalizing the student loan fund, with the proceeds of the Annual Alumni Homecoming now going to this fund. Joselito would like to call on his fellow alumni to think of themselves as stakeholders of the alma mater. After all, the prestige of their diplomas is what’s at stake, and giving back to the school really helps a lot in keeping the sparkle. During his induction speech as AAAIM Chairman in July 2010, Joselito courageously pledged to work for the realization of a donation of PHP 10M to the school through the efforts of the AAAIM. Joselito describes his class, MBM 1979 as being close to one another. In fact they would try to hold a reunion every quarter, and if someone visited from abroad, someone would make sure that the whole class would have a get together to welcome them. Their batch also proudly boasts of being the first ever class to have complete attendance for their homecoming. Joselito feels lucky that among his batchmates, everyone cooperates with one another. Their batch was the envy of other batches, and they have practically become family with one another. In fact, he was the religious service commentator during the 25th wedding anniversary mass of his batchmates Josie and Jenie Aliwalas. To the young people at AIM, especially to the fresh graduates, he gives the following advice: 1) Be honest. Be sincere about the things you want to do. 2) Don’t be envious of others. 3) Impart knowledge; don’t be selfish about things you know. 4) Be yourself and always strive to be the best. “But most importantly, love and respect your parents,” he smiles. “After all, how can you say that you love God if you don’t love your parents? Your management philosophy should be about being able to contribute socially, starting from your own backyard, your own company. Business isn’t always about dollars and cents. For whatever belief you might have, may it be Catholic, Hindu, Muslim, etc, the purpose of why you were put here on this earth isn’t about trying to accumulate as much wealth as possible in the span of your mortal lifespan, but to make a difference in society for your fellowmen.”

>> “PASSION...” continued from page 38

ing, to build welfare and public facilities and to donate free steel houses to disaster victims using 100% recyclable eco-friendly steel house construction technology. I once dreamed of becoming a social entrepreneur directly helping disadvantaged groups. Now I am more than happy with what I am doing, striving to make CSR a part of corporate competitiveness, because I know corporations better than nonprofits. As long as I still indirectly help disadvantaged groups, I am grateful to God for letting me have a chance to maximize my competence and expertise. 3. Courage. Nobody wants to reveal one’s weakness or mistakes. In order to do this, you need courage. However, once you do it, you will gain more strength and confidence. I am not afraid of revealing my personal stories because each one has influenced my current professional works in good ways. They have become sources of power, as rugged drivers of my works with purpose. I think corporations might be the same; it’s not easy to feature weakness in their corporate philanthropy stories but once they do this with sincere enthusiasm, the public can recognize and answer it. Yuhan-Kimberly Ltd., producing wood pulp based hygiene products, is a leading corporate citizen with its 26-year-old “Keep Korea Green” campaign that has planted 36 million trees. Hyundia-Kia Motors Group also has the courage to address a weakness in its global corporate philanthropy campaign, “Looking for Threeleafed Clover: Happiness” by helping children who lost parents to traffic accidents. Through this campaign, Hyundia-Kia Motors Group has become an active advocate for traffic safety. 4. Collaboration. In South Korea, there is a unique governmental organization called the President Council on Nation Branding (PCNB). Using

strategic private and partnership among various Ministries and Korean conglomerates, PCNB has endeavored to raise the nation brand of Korea in various areas including global philanthropy for developing countries. One of its signature projects is “World Friends Korea” similar to the US Peace Corps. Samsung Group was the first Korean conglomerate to set up employee volunteer corps in 1997, and this triggered a chain of employee volunteerism in the South Korean private sector. Many corporations are also working with KOICA (Korea International Cooperation Agency) for their global corporate philanthropy and employee volunteering programs. The Ministry of Labor, nonprofits and Korean conglomerates support social enterprise together for job creation and social innovation. Cross sector alliance needs much effort, patience and understanding. Whenever I meet different people in corporate, nonprofit and government sectors, I try to do my best to empower their passion in their vocation, to connect each other and to make a virtuous cycle. 5. Capacity Building. At the 2009 Asian Forum on CSR, I was lucky enough to meet a Korean business man, CEO of Rapu-Rapu mining business, in which LG Group has a major stake. He emphasized that his company focuses on environmental, socially responsible and sustainable business in order to create lasting changes that will benefit community people in the region. This encounter reminded me of my past experiences, within corporations, especially in international marketing and sales works, and how they overlap with my current works in CSR. My journey to become a social entrepreneur went through many ups and downs with zigzag style detours. Business school students often ask me whether they should get a social worker certificate in order to work in CSR. Every time, I clearly and proudly say no and not all people have to become social entrepre-

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neurs. Instead, I tell them to become “Social Intrapreneurs” I explain that any person in any position within a corporation— researchers, product designers and marketers etc.—can make great contributions for good “Impacts at Work”. I think corporate philanthropy is a great way to fuel all employees with a passionate and philanthropic sprit to improve the essence of business. I recall other meaningful moments during my work at Clarins Korea. Women who participated in hands-on skin care or make-up workshops always expressed their utmost gratitude. I still vividly remember their uplifted spirits and the confidence shown in their faces. Now, I am in a different vocation called CSR, but I think my role is the same: to help empower corporations with the confidence to do good works and do well financially at the same time, especially by practicing corporate philanthropy. “The most beautiful make-up of a corporation is passion.” Let’s believe in the power and value of corporate philanthropy and infect others with our passion. Angela Joo-Hyun Kang is founder and CEO of G-CEF (Global Competitiveness Empowerment Forum) in Seoul, South Korea. Ms. Kang holds a Mid Career Masters degree of Public Administration from Harvard Kennedy School and has experience in both business and the nonprofit sector in the areas of PR, marketing and sales. She serves as an advisor of the Community Relations Center, Korea Human Rights Foundation and Presidential Council of Nation Branding. She is also a Council Member of Better Social Enterprise Network, Non-executive Director of Alternative Dispute Resolution Center and Co-author of the South Korea section of “The World Guide to CSR” published in UK by Greenleaf Publishing. She is a frequent speaker on CSR topics for B2B & B2C corporations, the Business Ethics School of Federation of Korean Industries, and the Europe Korea Foundation & European Chamber of Commerce Korea. She also spoke at the 2009 Asian Forum on CSR in Manila, Philippines on the topic of “Aligning CSR to Societal Values in Emerging Economies: Tips and Tools” and the 2010 Asian Forum on CSR, “Using CSR to Drive Innovation and Profits” in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. To contact Angela Joo-Hyun Kang, do send an email to Angela514k@g-cef.com / Angela514k@ gmail.com.


72 >> “Authority...” continued from page 63 The key concepts on negotiation skills taught at AIM were very useful in my personal and professional life. It is crucial to understand the other parties’ real interest and best alternative if they do not reach an agreement, to help reframe the context and terms of the negotiation. Once the stage is set, soft skills are key to get the other side to agree. Careful listening closes the deals. I was involved in the planning stage, monitoring various works in progress in the commissioning and start-up operation of the RM800 million Malaysia Airlines Academy at Kelana Jaya. The key skill that I acquired at AIM was the ability to analyze and evaluate the situation and the options, which has helped me to deal with professional project managers and regulators. Most importantly, I learned in the AIM caseroom that you must be able to articulate and defend your analysis and your views intelligently and succinctly; and you must be good on your feet. In business, everyone wants power. To have power means you can make things happen: you can make decisions that will be enforced without resistance; you can have access to information that you need to make decisions; you can allocate resources that can affect careers, job satisfaction, and remuneration, and so on. At AIM, I never missed classes devoted to the topic of power. As with networking, some people are born with a talent for acquiring and using power. I learned at AIM that in resolving conflicts, there are three major sources of power—Authority, Influence and Persuasion. The first is formal and can be exerted directly and forcefully. The second and the third are informal and often take the form of influence that is applied more softly. Developing a strategy to gain power has a lot of similarities in the proc-

ess of resolving conflict/competition.

tional transformation. Half of all CEOs are dismissed from office, but those who can What are the unique management deliver results are in greater demand. issues you have encountered and how I have encountered many roadhave you been able to overcome them? blocks, potholes and detours on my HZ: Being an industrial/organijourney through life. Sometimes I just zational psychologist and basically a have to hang on awhile for the storms straight-arrow MM graduate of AIM, I to blow through. I trust a true hands-on made plenty of mistakes in my postleader has the confidence to stand alone, corporate career in 2008 (after retiring the courage to make tough decisions and from Malaysia Airlines) because I execute it, and the compassion to listen did not appreciate the importance of to the needs of others. I can see they are understanding culture. One of my naïve much like eagles swinging confidently in blunders immediately comes to mind. the air! They don’t flock together like other I was once seconded to a certain ‘big birds; you will find them one at a time. account’ company to act as an in-house “The true test of civilization,” destrategist. In management consulting, clared Former US President John Kennedy I have been trained to speak up and ac(1917-1963) is that “leadership and learntively participate in meetings and in other ing are indispensable to each other.” people’s presentations. Silence in meetI’d like to offer a contemporary twist ings is often interpreted as failure to think on Kennedy’s noble thought. The true and contribute enough. Therefore, from test for the new generation manager day one, I was very vocal in meetings. is that courage does not always roar. I quickly observed that everyone else, Sometimes courage is that quiet voice at including the CEO and his direct reports the end of the day that says... “I will try were very quiet in the meetings. again tomorrow!” Being a ‘gung-ho’ novice, I thought Making your numbers is important, I was just quicker, smarter, sharper and but it is not enough. You will never get on more articulate than everybody else the anatomy of a high-potential list if you there. I was feeling pretty good about do not perform with distinction, or if your myself until I got a polite caution from results come at the expense of someone my senior partner at the consulting firm. else. Competence is the baseline quality The feedback from the CEO was: “Haji for high performance. But you also need Zul does not listen. People are rather to prove your credibility. That means turned off by his constant comments and always deliver strong results, build trust questions during meetings. He seems to and confidence among your colleagues have a problem fitting in.” Since then, I’ve and, thereby, influence a wide array of learned to watch carefully when not to powerful stakeholders. open my mouth. Although your performance gets you noticed and promoted early in your caWhat are your thoughts on leadership? reer, your behavior is what keeps you on HZ: I subscribe to the idea that good the radar as a high potential. Recognize leadership starts with good management, that behavior counts. Outstanding skills and great managers become great leadnever really diminish in importance, but ers. The degree of action is the key to any they become a given as you are expected leader’s effectiveness. I believe that the to excel in roles with broader reach. apex of all leadership is based on results Leadership is a personal responsibilfrom performance that leads to organiza- ity. All of us are leaders and are responsible for our leadership. The CEO is leader of his employees, the man is a leader of his family, the woman is a leader and is responsible for her family’s house and their offspring; and so all of us are leaders and are responsible for our subjects. I also subscribe to the great US military commander and leader, General Norman Schwarzkopf’s definition that, “Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without strategy.” If a leader has the right and noble vision, gives clear direction, communicates well, gets the right people, is an enabler and inspires, he will achieve most of the things he sets out to do. These are the qualities and skills that make a great leader. My ideal leader is Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) who was always cheerful, genial, and pleasant-tempered. His hospitality and generosity were matchless and he was the last man to get upset or

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angry. All persons who knew the Prophet were fascinated and enchanted by the dignity and greatness of his character. His sweet and amiable expression made a profound impression on every stranger who met him. Indeed he was generous, most merciful to all. No other person in history was privileged to have so many extraordinary qualities. Even the enemies of the Prophet acknowledged his justice and honesty: long before he received prophethood, he was called Al-Ameen, the truthful, the trustworthy. Historian William Muir wrote, “The magnanimity with which Muhammad treated people who had so long hated and rejected him is worthy of all admiration.” He adopted a moderate approach to all matters. While on his deathbed, the Prophet sent for the money in his house and distributed it among the poor. Immediately before he breathed his last, he had it publicly announced if anyone owed him anything, he may claim it; and if anyone was one was offended by him, he could have instant revenge. Such was the Prophet of Islam, Muhammad, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him. Tell us about KELAB and your plans as its new president. HZ: The AIM Graduates Association of Malaysia (currently known as Kelab AIM Malaysia) was established on August 17, 1976 with the objectives of furthering management education of its members and providing an avenue for them to meet each other and to keep in touch with their alma mater. The Kelab has a network of more than 4,000 alumni with 15 surviving Triple A Awardees. The Kelab is based in KL with its Sabah Branch operating from Kota Kinabalu. Just to name a few notable active alumni are First Lady of Malaysia, Datin Paduka Seri Rosmah Mansor, BMP 1982; Minister of Finance 11, Dato’ Seri Ahmad Haji Husni Hanadzlah, MDP 1982; Board Member of Maybank, Tan Sri Dr. Hadenan Abdul Jalil, MBM 1975; Executive Chairman of Golden Prism, Dato’ Haji Sarip Abdul Hamid, MBM 1979; MD of Melewar Group, Tunku Dato’ Seri Iskandar Tunku Abdullah, TMP ‘1979; Former High Court Judge, Prof Dato’ Syed Ahmad Idid Syed Abdullah, ABMP 1983 (Convener of Triple A Network); Executive Chairman of Dale Carnegie Training, Dato’ Haji Nik Abdul Aziz Mohd Kamil, MM 1975; Sales Consultant of Royale Chulan Group of Hotels, Madam Effie Goh Toh Hoe, MBM 1978; MD of Pacific College, Mr. Ching Lai Huat, MM 1984; Director of CNM Taxlink, Dr. S. Sivamoorty, MM 1985: Dean, Business and Entrepreneurship School of UniRazak, Prof. Dr. Ahmad Zaki Haji Ismail, MM 1985; and Philippine Commercial Attache, Mr. Eric C. Elnar, MDM 2004. I became the 12th President of Kelab AIM Malaysia at its 34th Annual General Meeting on October 2, 2010. My immediate plan is to consolidate,


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improve and complete the organization. I want to reorganize the Kelab so that it will be ready to meet the challenges of today, which is quite daunting considering the tough global competition among the business schools and the fact that AIM has been overtaken in many areas by our competitors. AIM is no longer the Asian number one Business School of choice for Malaysian employers to send their managers. The Kelab needs to shape up, find a new competitive spirit and get ready to face the tough challenges ahead. In order to meet this, the Board has to quickly build capacity, streamline, get more efficient and look into the areas to really boost its activities. Malaysia is blessed with so many successful, high profile, and very well placed alumni. There are plenty of good opportunities that we are yet to explore. I believe we have only scratched the surface. There is a lot beneath that we could exploit that would generate significant sponsorship and revenues. We should build our downstream capacity that can create value-added programs based on our alumni expertise and experiences. Let’s move on from being just a social network club. Let’s become a value-added professional alumni club. I think AIM should encourage our Kelab to organize management development programs in Malaysia by tapping on the expertise of its alumni since the faculty resources has been spread too thin.

Conversely, a manager who doesn’t know his staff by name, who doesn’t spend the bulk of the day walking the heart of the house, will eventually have problems. He’s just not going to have the same rapport with associates or the knowledge base to make decisions as do his hands-on counterparts. The true test of any company is not merely profit and brand—no, but the kind of manager it turns out.

Describe yourself as a family man. HZ: It is true that happiness comes from doing the simplest things in life. My great time is always the morning walk during weekends with the family at Putrajaya Lake, enjoying home cook meals for lunch, gardening in the afternoon or seeing a good movie at the cinema and having dinner at our favorite restaurants. Mostly I’m cherishing life when engaged in an interesting conversation with my siblings. I have one lovely wife who is an accountant and four beautiful children (two boys and two girls) in their youthful challenges. However, only my eldest daughter, Jann who is doing her Masters in Accounting at UKM is staying with us at home. Our eldest son, Farouq is studying Architecture with UTM. My younger daughter, Zana, studying SPM and youngest son, Fariz, doing PMR are boarding at the Government Residential High Schools in Kuantan and Rawang respectively. My wife and I would fly to the east coast to Kuantan or drive up north to Rawang to visit Zana and Fariz every How can Kelab support AIM’s fundraising alternate weekends. The happiest moefforts for scholarships, infrastructure ments are when all my children are gathand research and development? ered at home during semester breaks HZ: Charity begins at home! The and during festive seasonal reunions new Board at its first meeting on October with my mother and other relatives at our 23 has agreed to re-brand the Kelab to hometown in Perak. become a professional business club that To further strengthen our close-knit would benefit its members. We wanted family relationship, every mid-year or to create a win-win fundraising project during school/college semester break, the known as ‘Giving to AIM: How you can help family and I would go for holidays at any make a difference’! We need to encourage favorite destination in Malaysia. During ‘Bequests’ for alumni and friends who the end of the year break, the family goes want to make a difference after their for a vacation overseas. The children love death. A gift of this kind also helps to to visit various Disneylands world-wide. reduce alumni inheritance tax liability. The Board is mulling to promote this What are your plans for the future? project on ‘Bequests and Wills : What Will HZ: I am very busy living life to the Your Legacy Be?’ to coincide with the fullest! I have a long “To Do” list of things event on the official launch of ‘Tun Ismail and am now ticking them off one by one. Ali Lecture Series’ by the Former Prime I’ve always wanted to do some consulting Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir on the birthday work, lecture at several universities and of the late Tun Ismail on September 16, speak at forums, seminars and confer2010 at PNB Darby Park in Kuala Lumpur. ences. That’s done. A life-long crazy dream is to pursue my PhD program What would you want people to learn with a regional university—it wasn’t a from you both in the professional and big hit but I got that off the ground. Asia in the personal context? e-University has accepted my research HZ: Be a great hands-on manager! proposal. The exciting journey has begun! Why is it so important that our managers The General Council of Malaysian be out on the floor and not holed up in Institute of Management has also an office? If a manager is hands-on, appointed me to lead the Organizing more than likely he’s also on top of his Committee for the maiden launch of its business. He can pick up immediately on new flagship ‘Malaysian Transformation problems, concerns, or issues and take Management Awards’ and to get it on care of them before they fester or grow. stream in 2011.

>> “Learning the Three Values at AIM” cont. from page 29

As we go back out into the real world, we must be open to new ideas. We must accept that each person, no matter what his or her disposition, positive or negative, will teach us something… someday. We might not like what we learn, but we learn. The biggest challenge is to continuously be open to people and our environment. Because we never know who we are learning from... and we never know who we are teaching. The impact of learning might not be obvious to us but it can be obvious to those we’ve inspired. The greatest fallacy in the concept of leadership is that some people refer to it as a noun. But, as we learned from Pat’s classes, leadership is an activity. We should all be mindful that even if we are not teaching in a formal environment, our actions influence that of others. Our activities are amplified by the people around us. This is important to remember as future business leaders and as parents. John was promoted in his company because he understood the concept of learning and teaching very well. He was able to develop managers and leaders within his organization and to this day, they still give him the same honor any student gives to his most inspirational teacher. Lastly, the third value I learned is that you only get what you deserve based on the efforts you put in. Sometimes, during a case discussion, professors can zero in on the people who didn’t read the case or only read it halfheartedly. Let this not be our mistake when we present to the board. Always put extra effort in everything you do because you never know when the board is watching. You never know when your presentation could end up standing in the way of a promotion. When John was busy raising his kids as a single parent, he made a life-changing decision. Because he loved his children so much, he sacrificed accepting his admission to the prestigious Harvard University for his Masters Degree to be with them. He prioritized his family, learned instead on the job and through life experience, and never looked back. His eyes were on the future. My brother’s and mine. I dedicate this honor of graduating from another prestigious institution, the Asian Institute of Management, to my father, Jesus Emmanuel Rivera, the real John. His tenacity, faith in people, constant mentoring and guidance, made sure that I never took things for granted and that I used the 11 months in AIM as the best training ground for excellence in leadership. He helped me build a foundation that allowed me, as a parent, to set the bar higher. As parents, we constantly ask ourselves, “Are we doing the right thing?” Now, after AIM, I hope you can all confidently answer ‘YES’ at this juncture. We have given our children a gift that we otherwise wouldn’t have been able to provide had we not enrolled. We are giving them the gift of wisdom. To our families and friends, this decision was not without heavy consideration and sometimes regret. So to all the families that supported my classmates throughout this roller coaster ride we call MM, thank you. And finally, thank you to the Asian Institute of Management for giving us the most unexpected gift. The gift of SELFAWARENESS. For without it, I wouldn’t have been BETTER. A better leader, professional, mother, sister, friend and daughter. To my classmates, I thank you for giving me this chance to speak in front of all of you on this momentous occasion.

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DINAGYANG

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by Jerry Quibilian, MM 1976

Festival Experience

MY SHARING IS MY WIFE’S and my wonderful experience in Iloilo City during the culmination of the Dinagyang Festival, the best Tourism Event for 2006, 2007 and 2008 by the Association of Tourism Officers in the Philippines. I have booked our hotel accommodation and bought our airline tickets as early as November 13. This was shortly after receiving the details of the one-month long festival and the suggestion for the hotel closest to where the main Ati Tribu Competition will be staged from the office of Director Edwin Trompeta, Regional Director, Department of Tourism. Director

Trompeta who was kind enough to direct one of his staff to respond immediately to my email. There were four locations where the 14 competing Ati tribes (although none of the Atis are actually involved for reasons that I wish the organizers would explain) staged their performances. The fourth and last location which started at 9:30 a.m. of January 23 was right in front of our hotel. We paid a good price for our viewing seats in front of the hotel but it was worth it as you can see from the attached photos, courtesy of a friend and fellow AIM alumnus. The length of the street fronting our hotel and other streets where

the three other stages were put up were closed to traffic from January 22-23. It was due to this that we were not able to enjoy a visit to the two well-known seafood restaurants in the city, Breakthrough and Tatoy’s. We were able, though, to have batchoy lunch at the famous Ted’s Batchoy on January 21. This was when we were on our way to Jaro to visit the Balantang Memorial Cemetery and National Shirine dedicated to the soldiers who fought the Japanese and died in their hands during WWII. This was in fulfillment to a commitment I made to Atty. Diosdado P. Peralta, brother of the late

Gen. Macario P. Peralta, Jr., the acknowledged hero of Panay. The main objective of this and previous sharings related to our trips to various places in our country is to increase awareness about the beauty of our country, our people and our culture and to encourage those who have not witnessed any such events to consider doing so in the near future. Jerry Quibilan is an active traveler in and around the Philippines and abroad with his wife and MM classmate, Linda. The editorial team of the AIM Leader is fortunate to constantly receive a taste of his many rich travels. He wrote to us in February 2011 about the Dinagyang Festival, a cultural and religious celebration in Iloilo City, Philippines.


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showcase/golf

CL ASS NOTES


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Homecoming 2011

Golf Tournament

The AIM 2011 Homecoming Golf Tournament was held last February 23, 2011 at the Orchard Golf and Country Club in Cavite, Philippines. Led by Mr. Jun Orobia of the honoree class MBM 1971, more than 40 alumni and friends gathered at the fairway to bond with fellow alumni golfers. The winners of the tournament are: Team Champion: MBM 1976 Team 1st Runner-up: MBM 1973 Team 2nd Runner-up: MBM 1974 Class A Champion: Ding Cho Hee, MBM 1976 1st Runner-up: Rufo De Veyra, MBM 1974 2nd Runner-up: Teddy Villanueva, MBM 1973 Class B Champion: Hiroyuki Maruyama, MDM 1991

1st Runner-up: Rene Valencia, MBM 1971 2nd Runner-up: Armert Besa, ME 2008 Class C Champion: Ronnie Canseco, MBM 1984 1st Runner-up: Reu Dellota, MBM 1991 2nd Runner-up: Gary Lim, MBM 1974 Longest Drive: Mac Panuncialman, ME 2001 Nearest to the Pin: Jun Aristorenas, MBM 1976 Most Exercised: Jun Aristorenas, MBM 1976 The event was sponsored by Smart, FAIM, DPC Yellow Pages, Punongbayan and Araullo, South Point Driving Range, Professional Review Network, Inc., Ayala Land Premier, FGV BT Builders Corp., Primax Broadcasting Network, Inc. and A.L. Yabut Management and Development Corporation.

PHOTOS: AMY NERONA AND JESTER BIGALBAL


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POWER AND PRIVILEGE

Essays on Politics, Economics, and Government by Rene B. Azurin, MBM 1973 THIS VOLUME REPRESENTS a collection of selected essays that originally appeared in the newspaper BusinessWorld from May 2008 to July 2010. It is the second such collection appearing under the column title “Strategic Perspective,” these Thursday offerings of mine to the readers of BusinessWorld cover a wide range of subjects— from politics and economics to management and morality— and, as a matter of intention, try to present a broader and deeper analytical viewpoint on issues that invade—or should invade—public consciousness. By bringing to bear elements of history, political and economic theory, and philosophy on public issues, my object is to expand the perspective of the reader beyond the narrow confines of his own particular interest group and into the economy at large, society in general, and time beyond the

present. As a teacher (basically), my hope is that this broadening of viewpoint will eventually spread into the general populace and give more Filipino citizens a better understanding of public policies will best serve the general welfare. Admittedly, the reach of my own voice is limited but I can hope that those with wider audiences will somehow be persuaded by my views and translate these into a more accessible mediums. I am very grateful to BusinessWorld publisher Vergel Santos and the enlightened editors of BusinessWorld for providing me space in this prestigious publication to freely (and without any constraints whatsoever) expound views that are often harshly critical of the powers that be. Vergel, who is also a Director of the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility, has a deep understanding of the role of media in any society that styles itself

My object is to expand the perspective of the reader beyond the narrow confines of his own particular interest group and into the economy at large, society in general, and time beyond the present.

as democratic and has always been in the forefront of the fight to defeat emerging threats to press freedom in this country. A recurring underlying theme in my writings is that the problems of our society since it birth have essentially been caused by concentrated, unchecked power wielded by a privileged few. Such concentrated power is bad for any society because the lopsided distribution of power will produce uneven societal outcomes. Unfortunately, those wielding such power invariably use it—for as long as they are unrestrained— to benefit themselves and their private interests. Consequently, the general thrust of my own position on various public policy issues is toward the dispersal of power and toward the building up of different—and competing— centers of power in society. The overriding object of social action, I believe, should be the creation of counterweights to any power center, particularly mighty government. Those who may temporarily administer the monopolistic coercive powers of the state must be effectively restrained from using such powers to promote private interests and subvert public ones. In this connection, the actual effectiveness of such restraints depends on the relative strength of other societal institutions that may wield some degree of power (like the media, the judiciary, organized citizens’ groups, religious institutions, professional associations, the academe, etc.) in the community of citizens. It is my hope that this small volume will help disseminate this point of view a little more and convert those who read it to this line of thinking. This is, I think, the key to arresting the accelerating downward slide of governance in this country and ultimately solving the still-unsolved problems of our deteriorating society. It is, I believe, not too much of an aspiration. Published by Anvil Publishing, Inc. “Power and Privilege” is available in National Book Stores, Manila, Philippines.

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What’s the book about? The book is a personal take on the MBA program at AIM. It’s part memoirs and part field guide, so it’s honest and real. The humor is subtle, but I’m sure a lot of people will find themselves grinning while reading the book. It’s written for prospective MBA students who want to get into AIM and current MBA students who are struggling to deal with the rigors of the program.There are main topics of the book include getting admitted into AIM, starting the classes, dealing with pressure, grappling with grades, and rising above the challenges. What motivated you to write it? I’ve always wanted to come out with a book and my AIM experience provided me with a great experience worth writing about. After my MBA, I had a wealth of information I wanted to share about AIM and the MBA program. I was able to write about it at The AIM Blogger from 2007-2009, but there’s still a lot more stories to share. I envision this to be a two-part series where the first book is about getting into AIM and dealing with the initial shock. The second book is about finishing strong. What are the things you want to share through the book? I wanted to share my personal experiences as a middle of the pack MBA student—I wasn’t stellar nor sucky, I was just getting by on a very tough program. I believe there a lot of AIM MBA students like me who are going through the same thing and I’m offering advice on how to deal with the pressures of the daily grind. Likewise, I get a lot of questions from prospective MBA’s on how to get past the admissions, from the steps of applying to the things needed to get that extra edge. I devoted several chapters on the admissions process. “Did You Read The Case?” is available at the Amazon Kindle Store. Visit http:// www.didyoureadthecase.com


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Yakub Mathew MBM 1991 is currently the Managing Director of Citibank in New York.

Katherina Ponce MBA 2005 is currently the Assistant VP-Human Resources of United Graphic Expression Corporation at Dasmariñas Technopark, Cavite. She writes: “I just reread the graduation speech I delivered in 2005. So much has happened since then. Now the case studies are no longer academic. They are real and mistakes in insight or decisions can lead to a lot of financial damages. I am currently working for a family corporation going through a major transition and I learned that the most important thing I have applied from my experience in AIM is really the strength of character that

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withstands the battle of wits in the caseroom, the speed of thought that needs to happen just to unearth those CPs and make a point, the self-mastery to navigate and adapt to the business situation and plant seeds of change that are not resisted but becomes an invitation for continuous improvement. I don’t think I have succeeded but I can say that I am definitely surviving and without the tenacity of the training in this leadership boot camp, I’m not sure I could have hacked it. Sure those best practices in business management did help in getting the attention of decision makers but ultimately, the best practices become futile if I am not able to navigate the situation and fuse my character with my competence in executing what needs to be done. In short, this time around the CP will not get me my grade. This time around the outcome needed is something that should be observable and measurable and engaging.” Her thoughts on leadership and philanthropy: “Leadership is that aspect of one’s character that allows you to turn things around. It is being able to engage and influence. It is being able to unleash someone’s potential. It is being able to navigate oneself so that he can navigate others. “I think philanthropy should be part of the pillars that sustain a business. Business Organizations do not exist in a desert island. They exist in a community, in a society, in a social setting. It affects the fabric of lives. It can open doors of opportunities or it can close them. Business Organizations are building blocks that make or break societies. If an organization is engaged in philanthropy, the value chain will be rejuvenated and perhaps their own visions and missions can readily be within their reach.”

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MM

Madhav P. Acharya MM 1994 is the CEO of Gaurishankar Development Bank Ltd. in Nawalparasi, Nepal. He writes: “It was a complete new experience for me to be in the class in AIM. Here in Nepal we used to sit in the class to find out what the professor says about something written in a book or about the established theory, but the professors in AIM looked to be so serious to open their mouth. They hardly dropped any word about the cases but liked to listen us students, what we knew. In the beginning, I was really shocked with the culture but later I found that it was something about real teachings and a bundle of treasure for the students when they face the real world.” He shares his thoughts on philanthropy: “In Hinduism paropakaara pundyaaya paapaaya parapidnam = philanthropy is the virtue and atrocity is the sin. This is what I believe myself.”

Karan Malani MM 2004

Ashwani Kumar Tandon MM 1996

Koko Cayco, MBM 1978: “Here are pictures of our latest reunion with Amiel who is now based in Toronto, Canada.”

Leadership to Nikku is “a process that influences other people to achieve an objective and guides the company in a way to make it more coherent and cohesive. We can also define leadership as a process of leading people in the right direction in order to achieve goals.”

is the Sales and Marketing Head of Besser GmbH. “I graduated in 1996. It was a wonderful experience for me. The case study method was new and unique to me and it gives so much learning. I was overwhelmed by the knowledge of the faculty particularly Prof. Panganiban, Prof. Azanza and Prof. Kim Wolf. The MRR also gave in-depth knowledge of the subject and taught us how to research. “It was nice knowing all of my classmates from different countries and also from Philippines. I have some excellent memories of many of them with whom I had close interaction and it goes same with professors, too.”

Senior Manager for Business Excellence of Future Value Retail Ltd., Mumbai, India, has recently tied the knot and relocated to India from the Philippines. He writes: “Network right and you will go places. B-School is all about knowing, understanding and appreciating your worth. AIM truly gives you that. To Batch 2004, be strong, be united and hope to see you at the next reunion! Keep up the AIM name wherever you may shine!” According to Karan, leadership is “being able to see what others can’t, and showing them the way to it!”

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Rogelio Avenido MDP 1974 is currently the Dean of the School of Engineering of the Manuel L. Quezon University. “Professors Bernardo and Alfonso were my favorite mentors, the overnight can group meetings were exciting, and the early morning jogs with girl classmates were unforgettable. I am a member of the Dispute Resolution Group of the Wholesale Electricity Spot Market and Construction Industry Arbitration Commission as arbitrator and mediator.”


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MDM

Dennis Yaun MDM 1999 is in-charge for Technical Advice and Support of Cercle de Coopération des ONGD de Luxembourg. He writes: “I have learned a lot from AIM which up to now are very relevant to my life. But one thing that always comes to my mind when I am confronted with a difficult situation is what Prof. Vic Limlingan told us before: try to get all the information you can muster that is related to the case, before you elaborate your strategy. It might be that the best strategy for the time being is to do nothing and watch attentively how things unfold— how the competitors fight it out. With the things that are left out or neglected in the battle, opportunities may come up where the best strategy can be crafted. Thanks to AIM for all the things I’ve learned on management. To all my classmates and professors, if ever you are Europe, do get in touch as it is always worthwhile to renew contacts and perhaps meet and exchange news.” His thoughts on leadership: “Leadership is the ability to create an enabling environment for others to realize their full potential for the common good.” On philanthropy: “Doing good is part of human nature, after all (wo) man is a social being which spells social responsibility.”

BMP

Sudath Amaratunga BMP 1993 in Australia is with the Transport Construction Authority as Technical Manager. He shares, “I was in AIM in 1993. The staff members were highly skilled and very helpful. Most of them were great communicators. My favorite lecturer was Prof. Mayo Lopez. I still remember his jokes, friendliness and the set of skills. He is one of the best communicators I have seen. Right now I work and live in Sydney. Please feel

Young alumnus Emran with George (left) and Dato’ Syed (the host), Zul and Dr. Zaki (right) at Bunga Raya Restaurant.

he sent us his greetings and remarked, “I feel so happy and proud to meet Honorable Dato’’ and KL alumni for a get together in such a friendly atmosphere. by Haji Zulkifly Baharom, MM 1989 How I wish I could have the opportunity to spend more HERE WE WERE, Chinese dinner, Dato’ Syed, Dr. time listening to your thoughts Ahmad Zaki, George Chen and and wisdom.” all five of us, with this scribe were were just a Emran G. Mohamad is the youngest bunch of senior alumni getting a graduate of AIM Bridging having come from to know one young Filipino Leadership Program Cohort 3 the Philippines alumnus, Emran Mohamad (2010) funded by the Australia. to meet up with senior alumni who stopped over in KL from a He was also part of the AIM who have faithfully remained meeting in Bangkok. Islamic Leadership Development in Malaysia. It was 8 pm on the This gathering was not Program (ILDP) from framework eve of the Chinese New Year about exchanging name cards, formulation, module writing, and everyone was on time. The networking or clinching busivisual aid making and facilitanewly refurbished Bunga Raya ness deals. We were just there tion. He presented the BangsamChinese Restaurant at the to look back and compare notes oro Development Agency (BDA) Royal Lake Club Kuala Lumpur about Dato’ Syed and Dr. Zaki’s leadership building concept to was bustling with activity and we had a good view of our Asian visit to Cotabato City two years the ASEAN International Leaderago and have a good laugh over ship Conference in Manila when friends enjoying ‘’ Yee Sang’’ the interesting seminars that ILDP was about ro end on April or ‘‘Loh Sang’’! they conducted there. We sup- 2010. He is also part of the joint We were mostly ordinary pose the physical bonding and endevour to organize the alumni alumni with ordinary jobs. face-to-face interaction helped of BLFP with a proposal name: If anyone stood out, by the sustain such long-term friend- “National Organization of Bridgstandards of the world at least, ship. Although Emran’s trip ing Leaders” with the end view of it would have been our host, to Malaysia was short, it was consolidating and sustaining the former High Court Judge Dato’ network of new generation bridgSyed Ahmad Idid who also hap- wonderful to be able to spend an evening with people who ing leaders who have the passion pens to be a Visiting Professor shared a common bond and to for significant social change by and Senior Research Fellow be excited about reconnecting addressing socirtal divides. He is at the Management Resource with the young and the senior. presently attached with DepartCentre of International Islamic Emran is on our e-mail loop ment of Labor and Employment University Malaysia. But that and when he arrived in Manila, in the Philippines. evening, with an eight course

Getting Refreshed in the Company of Young Alumnus

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to handle international project implementations for a multinational organization and using the same skill, I am using now in managing a local government unit to meet the fast paced parallel project implementations. “AIM will challenge you to perform and the learnings are very worth the hardship during the process of discovering new knowledge. I hope to have a chance to study full-time at AIM and really earn an MDM degree. “Leadership is understanding the free to contact me if you are in Sydney at Sudath.amaratunga@tca.nsw.gov.au. needs of group you are handling whether in corporate management or in public AIM is a great place. I still love the staff, my colleagues there and the time I spent. service, and taking the group to the direction that will maximize their potential.” I had loads of fun there and remember AIM forever. Looking forward to visit Manila and AIM soon. “Sacrificing part of your resources you earned from the society, for the benefit of people who struggle for a better tomorrow. If all of us could do this as an annual event, the world will be a better place within few years.”

ITPM

Alfredo II Matugas Coro Jr. ITPM 2006 is the Municipal Mayor of Del Carmen, Siargao Island, Surigao del Norte. He writes: “My learnings in ITPM allowed me

My AIM Experience by Almira I. Tapiador, MM 2008 Corporate HR Manager, Saudi German Hospital Group

M

Y AIM education factored a lot in my present company’s move to hire me with just minimal interview. My immediate head, the CEO of Corporate Office, wanted to have a person who can visualize the big things and at the same time have functional knowledge. Going through AIM made me confident that I have acquired solid education, and since I had gone through WAC, presentations and the rigorous process of thesis, I know I can stand on my own.

However, I soon realized that it does not only take a degree to succeed in a society (and much of the industry) that had been traditionally and until now, are predominantly controlled by male heads. I remember one time we had a lesson from Prof. Sonny Coloma about glass ceilings and none of the ladies in the class reacted violently. He was so disappointed that time. But now I realized that we, MM ladies, were raised in a culture that does not question women in leadership roles and values contribution from all individuals regardless of

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class notes

MAP

Louise Marie R. Foronda MAP 2004 Associate Director of Global Executive Solutions Group, Inc., shares: “Leadership is when words match the actions. It is when a leader’s capacity to leave a legacy to expand and develop talents that is of value to humanity, to be remembered and to have that support of continuity of action when one is no longer around. “Philanthropy is not only giving alms or through donations—but the capacity to see the value of a person— his capabilities, his talents. Our capacity to draw out the talent of a person and make him realize that he is capable of generating his own wealth. Philantrophy is when we make others see the wealth they do not see—when we help them unwrap their God-given gifts. “Thank you for the experience of the serendipity walk during our MAP 8 class—it has given me the perspective to simply listen to my surroundings—an AHA! moment that has made an impact in my life changing decisions, a thought process anybody can apply in their everyday journey to clearly see their life’s purpose.”

age, gender, race or religion. And we took that for granted. We had never felt it being questioned by any individual in our professional or personal lives. Only now that these basic principles were being constantly assaulted, do I value and appreciate it more. In hindsight, I feel that I am luckier than most first time expatriates. I have access to top management, I can easily talk to most of the CEOs, and my immediate head fully supports me. And still, or maybe because of these, there were periods of adjustment and until now, constant exercise of patience and show of knowledge for those who immediately question me because of my gender and nationality. Two years back, I remember Prof. Bobby saying that OTHERS are sometimes the most important factor

HCM

Surya Kumar Roy HCM 2006 is currently the Zonal Manager (I/C) LIC of India. He shares: “Leadership involves creating teams, envisioning goals, execution.”

in decision making. Prof. Angtuaco, in one of our ABC presentations, questioned if we have factored in nationality in our decision making process. I remember thinking, how can OTHERS factor in greatly? And what does nationality have to do with it? Now I realize these details are in fact sometimes the decision breaking factor. Funny that we do not recognize the wisdom given to us on the day it is given in a silver platter. I am forever grateful for the AIM education given to me. I am blessed for having my father and the support [of Ms. Coratec Jimenez] during

I remember Prof. Bobby saying that OTHERS are sometimes the most important factor in decision making.


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Crustacia, Power Plant Mall, Rockwell, July 20, 2010

“Dining together, sharing beautiful moments” Jerry A. Quibilan, MM 1976

Recipes, Greenbelt 3, July 9, 2010

those exquisitely trying days (first three months and thesis defense with Prof. Panganiban) when I felt I did not belong in AIM. I will forever savor the experience, lessons and people who have touched, supported and challenged me in AIM. As Prof. Gavino constantly reminded us, you have to identify the source/cause of the problem and only then can you solve it. And you have to follow your passion to find success. Though it is too early to say that I have found my calling, these experiences gave me a solid appreciation of the education given to me, supportive family and friends who accepted me for what I am, and valuable insights which will definitely lead me to my passion in the near future.

Jack Niu, MM 1998, President, Beijing Chapter of AIM Alumni Associations, shares: “We (Anwar, Manuel, Ben, Bong and me) gathered in Greenbelt last February 25, 2011. We had great time sharing information about our classmates as well as our career updates.”

IN EARLY SEPTEMBER, I HAD DINNER WITH FRIENDS, WITH varying interests and backgrounds, to celebrate the reason de etre of our group which was organized a year ago for a common cause. My seatmate, an AIM alumnus like me, and who belongs to the pioneer class of the now Washington SyCip Graduate School of Business, commented on the Filipinos penchant for eating, eating and more eating. Two of the probable reasons for the observation, besides his wife’s passion for being in the restaurant business, having had a chain of restaurants, were a) that the restaurant where we had our anniversary dinner was full with a number of diners waiting outside for their turn to get inside and b) that there are many restaurants that are either FH or almost full with diners at Greenbelt. It is no wonder then that when some of our batchmates who are now living abroad come to visit, they do have a good time when those of us who are in Metro Manila invite them for dinner or lunch. Last July 9, 2010 for instance, we tendered a joint despedida for Ed de Guzman now residing in Florida and Bienvenida for Joe Sycip and his spouse, Fina, now based in California. We had dinner at Recipes, a Filipino restaurant owned by a son of Ed. Ten days later, on July 19 we had a despedida lunch for Joe and Fina Sycip at Crustacia, Power Plant Mall, Rockwell Center. On both occasions, we had a wonderful exchange of numerous past experiences, especially the beautiful moments and the good times.


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AIM Leader Double Issue  

4th Quarter 2010 and 1st Quarter 2011