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Ailie miller - 538625


Ailie Miller My mother always thought it was strange how much time I’d spend reading the real-estate section of the newspaper as a teenager. She also thought my obsession with The Sims when I was ten was a bit extreme. But then, the realization struck that perhaps I wanted to be an architect. Since that moment in year 6 nothing else really sparked my interest, and the further into this course that I get, my decision only ever seems to be reaffirmed, and I know that I’ve made the right choice. Born in England to a family of Scots and spending a brief three year stint in Singapore, it was in 2000 that we moved to Australia, and Melbourne has remained as my home since, just don’t tell anyone that I prefer Sydney.

Besides my love for a city with hills, harbors, and cobbled stones, there are a few things that are currently driving me nuts:

Though my first pet hate is definitely one of individual preference, the construction of buildings that seem to want to scream at you that, ‘I’m something new and different’ really do irritate me. I simply do not understand why anyone would design a building that only addresses the ‘style of now’. In how many years is it going to become an eyesore? I do believe modern buildings can be beautiful, tasteful, stand the test of time, and become something iconic. But to me, to be able to achieve this, simplicity and traditional elements is the only way. By being respectful to the buildings environment, neighbors, and not resembling a snorkel mask, I think modern buildings can be brilliant, and they have some of the most functional and impressive interior spaces around. Currently, I’m sitting facing an orange house, with a green gate. Which I feel only proves my point on the over use of colour. If this house were white, black, or something neutral, it would probably be really quite beautiful, and yes boring. Which is why I’ve come to the conclusion that I like, small white buildings and giant black shiny, matt skyscrapers. They’re almost the building form of the perfection of a little black dress, and jeans with a white tee. I feel that by reducing the emphasis on colour, texture and materiality becomes more important. Which are more refined details that I quite like to discover in buildings. I also feel it creates a more homogenous environment, if all the buildings weren’t in clashing colour tones vying for attention. I also really appreciate garden space, and find it deeply upsetting at the decision to maximize internal space at the cost of the external. Sadly I feel that in a lot of buildings, the outdoor retreat is overlooked and underappreciated. So these are probably the three main things that get me frustrated about the architecture world. Though usually I find that I’m pretty much in awe by the brilliance of peoples minds and designs.


Studio Air - ABPL30048 - Semester 1, 2013 - Group 3 - Daniel & Kirilly

Almost next to nothing. My struggle with rhino in virtual environments essentially scared me away from ever trying to work with it again. My Bodyspace project was an abstracted representation of the degenerative affects of Alzheimer’s on the brain, where this degeneration was expressed with mold. This form was then modeled in clay, cut up to create curves, lofted in rhino, and then using my own octagon surface panel pattern, the design was then unraveled into 32 strips, printed and laser cut at the FabLab, and manually put together. Though I found the whole experience to be a bit of a nightmare, it was a valuable subject, and I was very proud of what I’d been able to achieve in my first 12 weeks of becoming an architecture student.

Ailie miller - 538625


Discourse

of

Architecture:

Architecture is a functional form of art. It’s intended to provide a function, but to be something more than just a practical object it has to evoke some kind of idea or emotion. Being able to encourage thinking, analysis, observations and interpretations of what is physically in front of you, is to me, what art is all about. The ability to provoke thought. This ability to encourage thinking and reflection is intricately tied with the idea of architecture as a social representative medium. By encouraging social engagement, architecture can be used to promote positive social behavior. It is able to do this simply by existing, almost as a ‘backdrop’ to people’s lives. I see it something like a giant version of an Ikea store, and each different building is just a giant interpretation of one of the little made-up Ikea rooms. Each providing and presenting something different, designed for different stages in life and encouraging a different styles of living. Looking at architecture as a ‘backdrop’ enables the architect to control how people live and behave, thus enabling the encouragement of positive social behavior and norms. In reference to my two chosen precedents, floating solar sphere for Stockholm, both designs show architecture as an art form critiquing society.

The Sky Mirror in New York commons.wikimedia.org

The Sky Mirror in London alisonlucy.worldpress.com

Anish Kapoor’s Sky Mirror, was a £900,000 art installation of 200. I was fortunate enough to have seen in Sydney and was blown away by its simplicity and beauty. When a work of art is as large as this, it is 10m in diameter, and is featured in such prominent social settings, Sydney Harbor, New York 5th Avenue, and London, having been some of its temporary exhibition sites, it is possible to start categorizing it under the title of architecture. This giant concaved reflective stainless steel mirror, encourages the discussion of, society and art.

This monumental piece of work, is able to be so thought provoking in its simplicity, and for this it’s a truly great piece of work.


Studio Air - ABPL30048 - Semester 1, 2013 - Group 3 - Daniel & Kirilly

Plans for Stockholmsporten, by BIG architects

http://www.designboom.com/architecture/big-architects-stockholmsporten-master-plan-winning-design/

Winston Churchill

Bjark Ingles Group, BIG, had the winning proposal for a new junction of two of Europe’s major Highways, and entrance to Stockholmsporten. Its most defining feature is a giant hovering reflective sphere over the junction, which also provides solar energy for the surrounding town area. This sphere shares a physical similarity to Kapoors Sky Mirror, but it also reflects some of the same social critique ideas, nature as art, architecture as art, society and the environment, and social interactions. The design is more than just a giant floating reflective ball, it creates 580sqm that is divided into pie slices of natural vegetation, wetlands and forests. These are connected via bike paths, which join onto public whilst also providing enough energy to support itself and for the 235 residents. These two works of art/architecture, are both encouraging an individual interpretation, and emphasize the importance of social space. However it is the reception and response of these works, which will dictate how successful they are in achieving their goals.

Ailie miller - 538625


Week One Challenge My lack of documentation falls from the fact that I recently partitioned my hardrive and am now running and working on windows for the first time in my life, and didn’t understand that when you ‘printscreen’ it doesn’t save to the desktop or your files, but rather to this mysterious place called ‘clipboard’ which essentially means ‘paint, but then you paste your picture and save it from there.’ As a result, I lost a lot of my experimentation.

After watching the videos and experimenting in Rhino, I’ve become really aware of just how much I’ve forgotten from first year! To begin, I practiced lofting some closed curves together and then in grasshopper used to move the points around to create some changed shapes.

I also experimented using the curves and triangulation to create contours. . instead I was able to triangulate between the points on the individual contours but not between the curves themselves.


Studio Air - ABPL30048 - Semester 1, 2013 - Group 3 - Daniel & Kirilly

I then moved on to using the populate 3D tool and the voxipop, using the number slider tool to create more spaces, this was actually a lot of fun to do, and created some interesting shapes deleting these forms. I attempted to follow the video in creating a wire frame, but got lost along the way, you can see in the grasshopper screenshot that there was incorrect information along the way between the explode function and the edges tool.

Ailie miller - 538625


Ailie miller - 538625


COMPUTATIONAL ARCHITECTURE Computing and its affects on the design process, have lead to a new ‘speed’ of design, a theoretical decrease in human errors, but also a removal of humans from the design process. The ability to use computer generated design software, allows for the architect to make important decisions regarding, cost, construction, and design latter on into the project. A benefit, as the architect will have a deeper understanding of what the consequences of these decisions will be. Unlike using traditional methods, where the architects ability to change the design with ‘ease’ decreases the further into the design process, using computing methods, the architect is able to lengthen this process, and continue to make important decisions towards the cutoff date. Computers respond to facts, controlled messages, and respond accurately. They do exactly what they are told to do and as a result, their results are accurate, thus reducing the impact of human error in the design process. However by removing the ‘human’ from the equation, the benefits of humans are also lost. Computers are only able to understand what we tell them, but they lack the innate knowledge that people have. A computer will do what its told to do, where as a human will do what its told to do, but will understand why its doing it, and will implement boundaries without having to be told. For example, if you instruct a computer to ‘draw a line’, it will draw one that goes on for infinity, however a human would draw one that has a start and an end. Communicating to a computer is different to that of communicating to people, and accurate language is required, in order for it to understand EXACTLY what it is you require it to do. Introducing computing in to the design process has increased the architects importance in the construction of the design. In what is almost a return to the ‘master builder’ phase, architects are now being more involved in the construction of the build. As new styles of architecture emerge, so too must new ways of construction. As a result, architects are no longer able to leave the project once the plans of the building are finalized, instead they are involved in new and innovative ways of fabricating the design. These new innovative ways of fabrication are a result of having to respond to new and more complex geometries. With computation, there’s an ability to create using non regular geometries, Euclidean geometries, using control points and NURBS. The ability to ‘blobify’ designs has led to an increase in curves in design. The introduction to curves and blobs has lagged in architecture, having been seen first, in airplanes, boats, cars and other household objects. These forms respond to rules, functional influences,

This prototype inflatable tent, has been designed using the Rhino plugin Kangaroo, enabling the designer to understand what the affect of the pressurized air will have when it inflates the tent. This allows for the final form to be visualized and constructed to work with the air force.


Studio Air - ABPL30048 - Semester 1, 2013 - Group 3 - Daniel & Kirilly

Ailie miller - 538625


COMPUTATIONAL ARCHITECTURE

Entry to the san Gennaro Festival. A site specific installation constructed using the Rhino plug-in Kangaroo, enabling the designers to understand how the final piece would work in the site, and under the pressure of gravity. The entire structure is in tension, with each individual, 4224 laser cut panels working together to keep the structure stable. Its final form is only possible when installed on site.


Studio Air - ABPL30048 - Semester 1, 2013 - Group 3 - Daniel & Kirilly

and reject historic style, urban and structural norms. Computation, allows for new forms to be generated, based on rules and requirements, away from traditional geometry. To be able to create these shapes, cutting, subtractive, additive, and formative fabrication have to be used. However, though fabrication processes have been advanced, not all forms are able to be constructed fully, and adaptations or compromises may be needed to allow for the design to be realized. Computation allows for performance-orientated designing. These buildings are constructed with limitations and criteria that must be met, thus limiting and specifying their shape and properties to meet the demanded requirements. Computers are able to analytically find which forms are most practical and respond to the desired needs, based on a set of rules that has been given. By narrowing the infinitive possibilities, to those that meet the criteria, designers are able to ‘select’ the superior computer generated design through a process of elimination. These performance criteria are not an ‘after thought’ that is included into the design, but rather shape and build the design through their specifications and limitations from the outset. Computation offers unique opportunities and innovations. Geometries are able to ‘breed’ creating hybrid forms, an almost ‘evolutionary’ design process. Designers are being brought back into the construction and fabrication of their creations, and a new time frame and designing process has been implemented. The importance of drawings and traditional methods of representation is declining, and the importance of digital modeling will become more useful to the construction and visualization of the form. New forms and shapes can now be conceptualized and represented, leading to a new possibility of ‘blobifying’ architecture. Computation has many advantages, however the computer is only able to do what you tell it to do. As a result, it is dependent on the skill and knowledge of the designer to use the computer effectively. Unlike a pen and paper, a pre understanding of how to use it is required. With the rapidly changing technologies, and constant new opportunities, the design world and its ability to create will be forever evolving, and new styles will be emerging, and designers will always be learning.

Ailie miller - 538625


Week TWO Challenge Following the instructions supplied on the LMS, I was able to successfully create ‘driftwood’. The form I used however was hollow, and as a result, the area where the two openings met, was not translated into surfaces but into lines.


Studio Air - ABPL30048 - Semester 1, 2013 - Group 3 - Daniel & Kirilly

Ailie miller - 538625


Week Two Journal