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Generation T ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Transformation within a generation


THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE WOULD LIKE TO ACKNOWLEDGE OUR PRIMARY SUPPORTERS FOR 2015-16.

Special thanks to the AILC Alumni family, and to the facilitators, trainers, staff, Board and supporters who make the amazing work that we do possible. Particular thanks to those who have given their time to be profiled in this publication, including Bowen Ryan, Gordon Cole, Steve Cochrane, Bill Simpson, Carmel Debel, Shaenice Allan and Melanie Kennedy.

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd Po Box 186 CURTIN ACT 2605 Australia P (02) 6251 5770 E ailc@ailc.org.au ailc.org.au Published by the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Copyright © Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd 2016 This publication is copyright. No part may be reproduced by any process except in accordance with provisions of the Copyright Act 1968. Author: Mitchell Smith Photography: Sourced by the AILC Design: Darkies Design


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ABOUT US

MESSAGE FROM CHAIR

MESSAGE FROM THE CEO

WHAT WE DELIVER

ALUMNI PROFILE: NO STRANGER TO LEADERSHIP

10412NAT CERTIFICATE II IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP

GOVERNOR GENERAL AND LADY COSGROVE – DUAL PATRONS OF THE AILC

QUALITY & COMPLIANCE UPDATE

10413NAT CERTIFICATE IV IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP

ALUMNI PROFILE: PERFORMANCE = REWARD

ALUMNI PROFILE: EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME

BSB41915 CERTIFICATE IV IN BUSINESS (GOVERNANCE)

REBRANDING WITH A PURPOSE

BLAKCHAT CULTURAL ADVICE LINE

ALUMNI PROFILE: LEADERSHIP IN ACTION

ALUMNI PROFILE: THE ROAD TO BEING A LEADER

ORGANISATIONS INVEST IN LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE

ALUMNI PROFILE: CULTURE MATTERS

ALUMNI PROFILE: A ROLE MODEL FOR YOUTH

BOARD PROFILES

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The Australian

Indigenous Leadership Centre OUR VISION For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples to excel in leadership for the benefit of all Australians.

OUR MISSION To empower Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples through unique educational opportunities to be inspirational leaders of today and tomorrow.

SETTING THE BENCHMARK Indigenous owned and run, the AILC has enjoyed great success in delivering positive outcomes for its graduates since 2001. The AILC remains the only provider of accredited course in Indigenous leadership and governance. Specialising in place-based education, the AILC delivers courses to locations throughout Australia with flexible teaching models to cater to people from a wide range of backgrounds. With a course retention rate of more than 95% for graduates, the AILC has secured partnerships and attracted support from a number of leading Australian organisations and all levels of government. Following completion of their study, 79% of students said they had taken on an enhanced leadership role. AILC graduates also go on to receive on average a nearly $14,000 pay increase after graduating.1 The AILC has an expanding network of alumni with over 2,000 students having now received accredited qualifications in Indigenous leadership.

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Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership student Cheryl Andy with Trainer Duane Vickery and Program Leader Anthony Dewis in Perth.

Data collected from an independent KPMG review of AILC courses and outcomes in 2011.


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t x e n e h t g n i p Develo f o n o i t a r e n e g p i h s r e d a e Indigenous L in Australia

ORKS AND TOOLS FOR AS A LEADING DEVELOPER OF INNOVATIVE SUPPORT NETW E OF SERVICES RELATED RANG A IDES INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS, THE AILC ALSO PROV CULTURAL COMPETENCE. TO INDIGENOUS HUMAN RESOURCES, EMPLOYMENT AND The AILC’s courses unlock opportunities for Indigenous people of all ages to develop their careers and expand the ways they contribute to the community. This transformative, culturally-tailored education in Indigenous leadership and governance provides participants with the skills to maximise their potential. As an Indigenous organisation staffed by a majority of Indigenous people, the AILC has extensive experience in negotiating issues of access and cultural sensitivity in order to deliver successful and relevant Indigenous leadership and governance programs. Founded by Indigenous leaders in recognition of the importance of leadership in driving sustainable change in Indigenous communities, the AILC plays a pivotal

role in ‘Closing the Gap’ between Indigenous and nonIndigenous Australians. Only one organisation delivers accredited Indigenous leadership and governance programs nationally. Only one organisation offers Australia’s first educational pathway for Indigenous leadership and governance education. Only one organisation has developed the largest Alumni network in Australia, with a total exceeding 2,000 Indigenous leaders. That organisation is the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre.


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Message from the CHAIR T

he Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre has undergone a great deal of transformation this past year.

Early this year we saw our long-serving CEO Rachelle Towart go, having touched the lives of thousands. I would like to thank Rachelle for her dedication to our organisation and for playing a pivotal role in putting Indigenous leadership and governance education on the map. On behalf of the AILC Board I would like to extend a warm welcome to our new CEO, Belinda Gibb, who joined us in May this year. Belinda has brought with her a wealth of experience and ideas that I have no doubt will see her excel in the role. Our Board is also in the process of change. This year we said goodbye to Board member and good friend Natalie Walker. I thank Natalie for her dedication to the AILC. We also welcomed our newest members of the Board John Paul Janke and Cath Brokenborough, who each bring a great deal of knowledge and experience to the table. I would like to thank the rest of the Board for their service this financial year and look forward to continuing on this journey together into the future. Although change is not necessarily always easy, it is certainly something to be embraced. While organizational change on this scale occurring in such a short space of time may seem challenging at first, it does provide an excellent opportunity to refresh.

There is an astounding need for the leadership and governance courses that we provide. We need more Indigenous people with economic development opportunities and more of our community members finishing University. We need more Indigenous talent with leadership and management skills being sought by Government departments and the private sector. We need to continue to Close the Gap in key areas such as health and life expectancy and reduce the high incarceration rate of Indigenous Australians. The education that we provide is an important stepping stone to achieving these outcomes. With 220 Indigenous leaders graduating with accredited qualifications with us in the past financial year, and joining our near 2,500 strong Alumni group, the AILC continues to make an incredible contribution to the cause. We plan to harness the power of this large Alumni base more effectively moving forward, increasing the level of communication and providing opportunities for mentoring and further development. The AILC continues to raise the bar in the space, remaining the only provider of accredited Indigenous leadership and governance education. Our work is not finished, however, and we remain committed to meeting the challenges faced by Indigenous Australians head-on to ensure a brighter future for our people.

Best wishes,

Charles Prouse Chairperson Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre


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Message from the CEO T

he weeks leading up to my first day as the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre CEO were filled with great excitement and wonder for what the future might hold. Nothing could have prepared me, however, for the day I stepped into an AILC classroom for the very first time. It was incredibly inspiring to see our Indigenous leaders of tomorrow working together and making the most of their opportunity with our organisation. This past financial year has been another successful one for the AILC, following a trend of continued high achievement over a number of years. With more than 200 students completing accredited qualifications in leadership and governance across our government funded and fee-for-service courses this year, the AILC is in a stronger position than ever before.

While we are certainly proud of this continued success, we are always hungry to do more. This year saw the development and implementation of our cultural advice phone line ‘BlakChat’, dedicated to providing effective solutions to cultural conflicts in the workforce. We also delivered our first Diploma of Business in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Management. I am thrilled as the new CEO to have the chance to bring fresh ideas and breathe new life into this organisation. One of my priorities in the new financial year is to reinvigorate the Alumni space, with new and exciting engagement opportunities on the horizon. I am thoroughly excited, as I am sure you will be, to see what this next chapter will bring.

Warm regards,

Belinda Gibb Chief Executive Officer Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre

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What we deliver

THE AILC DIFFERENCE

The AILC has three accredited courses on scope which are delivered nationally. These courses develop the capacity of individuals to take on personal, community, organisational, work and family leadership roles. Students learn to recognise their own leadership skills and how to utilise them in various settings such as in the workplace and out in the community. Each of these courses require face-to-face training in the identified course location, in addition to the completion of both on-course and off-course assessments. Students are provided with up to 500 hours of support from AILC staff to assist them with the successful completion of their qualification.

The AILC’s unique approach provides a culturally-safe, highly focused way for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to develop their leadership skills in a dynamic learning environment. Our courses provide an invaluable opportunity for Indigenous people to achieve their full potential, delivering proven tangible outcomes that have a positive impact in workplaces, families and communities.

Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership students Phillip Sibosado, Molly Thomas, Tiarne Thomas and Sam Summers celebrating their graduation in Perth. THE CORE GROUP OF DEPARTMENT OF PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET FUNDED COURSES* THE AILC HAS ON OFFER INCLUDES:

10412NAT Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership 10413NAT Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership BSB41915 Certificate IV in Business (Governance)

THE AILC ALSO HAS AN AGREEMENT WITH THE RESOURCE NETWORK FOR LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY (RNLD), WHERE RNLD OWN AND DELIVER THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

10124NAT Certificate II in Master- Apprentice Language Learning Program 10541NAT Certificate III in Aboriginal Languages for Communities and Workplaces

* These courses may also be purchased by organisations in a fee-for-service capacity.


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Where we delivered in 2015-16 LEADERS HAILING FROM NEARLY EVERY STATE AND TERRITORY TAKING PART IN OUR COURSES. THE COURSE COMPLETION RATE WAS SOLID, WITH 90% OF OUR ENROLLED STUDENTS IN GOVERNMENTFUNDED POSITIONS GOING ON TO RECEIVE FULL QUALIFICATION.

THROUGHOUT THIS REPORTING PERIOD, THE AILC DELIVERED EIGHT DEPARTMENT OF PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET (DPM&C) FUNDED ACCREDITED COURSES IN FOUR DIFFERENT CITIES. THE GEOGRAPHICAL SPREAD OF OUR STUDENTS WAS DIVERSE, WITH ASPIRING INDIGENOUS

DPM&C Course completion statistic

DPM&C Course delivery map 5 Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership • 2 in Canberra • 1 in Darwin

90% of enrolled students in DPM&C funded places achieved qualification.

• 1 in Cairns • 1 in Perth 2 Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership • 1 in Canberra • 1 in Perth 1 Certificate IV in Business (Governance) • 1 in Darwin

Gender of students

Geographical spread of students

15% Western Australia 2% South Australia 18% Northern Territory 32% Queensland 26% New South Wales 7% Australian Capital Territory 0%

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r e g n a r t s No

to

“THE BENEFIT WILL BE TO THE COMMUNITY BACK HOME. IT WILL BE TO THE SCHOOL THAT I WORK IN, THE STUDENTS THAT I WORK WITH AND FOR AND MY FAMILY AS WELL. THE BENEFIT WILL BE THAT I AM MORE INFORMED ON HOW TO WORK WITH DIFFERENT PEOPLE AND ACHIEVE THE BEST RESULTS,” SAYS CARMEL DEBEL, GRADUATE OF THE AILC’S CERTIFICATE IV IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP.

Carmel Debel


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p i h s r e d lea As a devoted mother and employee at St Mary’s Catholic College in Cairns, Carmel is certainly no stranger to being a leader whether it be at home or in the workplace. But she says the Certificate IV altered her perspective on leadership and opened her eyes to the different styles and how and when they can be used.

“The course definitely changed my perspective on how to do things,” Carmel says. “I learned how to better be a leader, how to do that in an effective way and take a balcony view of what is happening in groups. “It is not always about the leader and it is not always about the group. It is about how they work together to come to an end goal and do so effectively.

“I don’t need to always rescue people. Sometimes the learning is enabling people to answer their own questions, giving them that little bit of a hint to help them get to where they are trying to go.” Students of AILC courses take turns as the daily leaders, assisting the course facilitator with running each day’s session. At the conclusion of each day, the daily leaders receive feedback from their peers. This was a highlight for Carmel, who says the task provided a good opportunity for self-reflection.

“I learned so much in doing that, especially hearing back from the group and having the time with Duane the facilitator to learn about myself and self-reflect,” Carmel says.

“Then also I got to hear what other people’s thoughts were and take those on board.” Carmel says while it can be frightening to step outside your comfort zone in taking part in an AILC course, she would encourage all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to have a go. “I would say don’t think twice (about taking the course). It is better to get out there and give things a go.” “Sometimes the unknown scares us, but being in this sort of environment that is safe and with like-minded people, I would encourage people to give it a go.” “The experience is something that I would recommend to everybody.”

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10412NAT Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership 10412NAT CERTIFICATE II IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP INTRODUCES THE KEY ELEMENTS OF INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP IN AUSTRALIA AND BUILDS UPON THE CAPACITY OF EMERGING INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN LEADERS TO LEAD. THIS COURSE GIVES STUDENTS THE BASIC KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND BEHAVIOURS TO ENABLE THEM TO COMMENCE AND BE INVOLVED IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP ROLES. IT

ASSISTS STUDENTS TO IDENTIFY THEIR OWN STRENGTHS IN ORDER TO PLAN THEIR LEADERSHIP JOURNEYS IN THE FUTURE. THIS QUALIFICATION WAS DELIVERED SIX TIMES THIS FINANCIAL YEAR ACROSS FOUR CITIES, WITH 117 INDIGENOUS LEADERS IN DEPARTMENT OF PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET FUNDED PLACES RECEIVING FULL QUALIFICATION.

Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership Students Caroline Swan and Luke Murray present their vision statement in Perth.


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Course completion statistic

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Course delivery map

Gender of students

94% course completion rate

Funding source

Core Units VU21059 Develop leadership skills as a member of an Indigenous community SITXCOM201 Show social and cultural sensitivity BSBCMM201A Communicate in the workplace BSBCUS201B Deliver a service to customers BSBWOR202A Organise and complete daily work activities

Geographical spread of students 1% Victoria 10% Western Australia 1% South Australia 17% Northern Territory

CUFRES201A Collect and organise content for broadcast or publication

35% Queensland 26% New South Wales

CHCNET301D Participate in networks CHCCS211B Prepare for work in the community sector

10% Australian Capital Territory 0%

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The Governor-General and Lady Cosgrove - Dual Patrons of the AILC

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n 2014, His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) and Her Excellency Lady Cosgrove took on the role of inaugural joint patrons of the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre. Their appointment served as recognition of Indigenous leadership and governance training and its role in ‘Closing the Gap’ between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Their presence at the AILC’s Certificate II and IV in Indigenous Leadership courses in Perth in May 2016 was a highlight, providing a memorable experience for our staff and students. The Governor-General first addressed the students on the subject of leadership then, as a change of pace, gave them the opportunity to ask their own questions in an informal setting.

Course Coordinator of the Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership in Perth, Anthony Dewis, says the students were able to take a lot away from the Governor-General and Lady Cosgrove’s visit. “They say actions speak louder than words, and the Governor General giving up his time to come and talk to the students proves that. He had a heavy influence on both groups,” Anthony says. AILC CEO, Belinda Gibb, says the Governor-General and Lady Cosgrove’s patronage has been beneficial to the message that the AILC promotes and looks forward to further appearances at future AILC events. “The Governor-General and Lady Cosgrove’s patronage delivers a strong message about the importance

of strong Indigenous leadership in Australia,” Ms Gibb says.

“It was exciting both for our staff and students to have them attend the course in Perth, and we are very much looking forward to having them come along to more of our events in the future.” Members of the AILC also had the opportunity to attend the Governor-General’s Long Lunch on the lawns of Government House in celebration of Harmony Day 2016. Around 1,000 people from a vast array of backgrounds were seated together at a 327-metre-long, many of them bringing along a meal representative of their culture.

The Governor-General speaking with students in Perth.


Quality Update

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Compliance

THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE HAS ALWAYS HAD CONTINUOUS DEVELOPMENT, QUALITY AND COMPLIANCE AT THE FOREFRONT OF ORGANISATIONAL FOCUS.

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his year the AILC has undergone a great number of changes, with a heavy focus on course material and experience as well as internal and external policies and procedures.

Of course, the option is still available to those who do not have internet access to deliver a hard copy of their expression of interest and enrolment package to the AILC.

One of the points of emphasis has been streamlining the student application and enrolment process. Potential students may now register their interest in any of our courses online by completing a simple web form.

In light of the positive reception to these documents going online, the AILC is looking at developing an online student portal. This resource would allow easy access to course material and potentially even the ability to hand in assessments. This would in turn greatly simplify course administration and create a better experience for students.

Since the change, the number of applicants has increased greatly and it has also paved the way for simpler data collection and analysis. It is also now easier than ever for AILC Alumni to update their contact details with a dedicated web form on our website that is regularly shared on social media. The AILC enrolment package is now digital as well, creating a hassle-free, streamlined process for our students. This includes the LLN (Language, Literacy & Numeracy) test which has been adapted to web format.

In addition, a number of AILC documents including the RTO Policies & Procedures, Student Handbook and course material are undergoing a rewrite. These updates to procedures and policies are a reflection of the AILC’s need to remain compliant and desire to provide the best possible experience for students.


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10413NAT Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership THE 10413NAT CERTIFICATE IV IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP BUILDS UPON EXISTING HIGHLY DEVELOPED LEADERSHIP SKILLS AND WORKS TO FURTHER DEVELOP THESE KEY SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE. IT ESTABLISHES PATHWAYS TO FURTHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING, ENABLING STUDENTS TO ASPIRE TO HIGHER LEVELS OF RESPONSIBILITY IN CHOSEN ARENAS SUCH

AS SENIOR ROLES IN WORKPLACES AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS. THIS QUALIFICATION WAS DELIVERED TWICE THIS FINANCIAL YEAR ACROSS TWO CITIES, WITH 48 INDIGENOUS LEADERS IN DEPARTMENT OF PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET FUNDED PLACES RECEIVING FULL QUALIFICATION.

Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership Students Derek Kickett, Amanda Leonard and Bill Simpson with AILC CEO Belinda Gibb and their vision statement in Perth.


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Course completion statistic

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Course delivery map

Gender of students

22% Western Australia 2% South Australia

Geographical spread of students

9% Northern Territory

Funding source

33% Queensland 30% New South Wales 4% Australian Capital Territory 0%

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Core Units VU21051 Work with Indigenous community members to develop mentoring skills VU21060 Investigate government structures and decision-making processes VU20942 Investigate the influence of Indigenous history on the current environment VU21048 Complete a basic community project with support HLTHIR404D Work effectively with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people RIILAT401D Provide leadership in the supervision of Indigenous employees

CHCCD509C Support community leadership CHCCS400C Work within a legal and ethical framework PUACOM012B Liaise with media at the local level PUACOM007B Liaise with other organisations BSBCMM401A Make a presentation BSBREL401A Establish networks BSBWOR403A Manage stress in the workplace BSBATSIC412A Maintain and protect cultural values in an organisation


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Performance = Reward A

graduate of both of the AILC’s accredited Indigenous Leadership courses, Gordon has seen his perspective on leadership change vastly over the last year. A proud Noongar man, Gordon has been highly successful in his business endeavours, heading two of his own businesses in G Cole Consulting and Cole Workwear (both based in Western Australia). Both businesses are Supply Nation certified, with Cole Workwear recently being named in the “Supplier to Supplier Partnership of the Year’ award alongside Pacific Services Group Holdings at the Connect 2016 Supplier Diversity Awards. In years prior, Gordon was a Director and the Chief Operating Officer at Kooya Enterprises as well as the Program Manager for the implementation of the Aboriginal Justice Agreement for the Western Australian Department of the Attorney General. Gordon decided to take the Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership course in late 2015 in an effort to re-engage with his personal and professional development. After successfully completing the course, Gordon then

went on to complete his Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership in the first half of 2016.

standing, particularly now having done some self-analysis of my own leadership style,” Gordon says.

“I am involved in business, native title, community organisations and have an interest in leadership, coaching, mentoring and governance,” Gordon says.

“I can see where in the various styles that I fit in with what I do and how I conduct my leadership, and am learning to understand the theoretical side of leadership.”

“I participated in the Certificate II and now the Certificate IV with the AILC to enhance and build on my leadership journey and to reaffirm that I am doing things correctly.”

One of the biggest things Gordon was able to take away was affirmation that he was conducting himself correctly in leading his businesses.

“I wanted to learn more about leadership, particularly around the different styles and aspects of leadership from a theoretical framework point of view and gain an understanding of how I can apply it in my professional and personal life.”

“I think I am on the right track and the courses have reaffirmed that,” Gordon says.

Gordon says the courses changed his perspective on leadership and have given him a greater depth of understanding around what it means to be a leader.

“I see it as a two-way learning process.”

“My perspective has changed and broadened in the sense of under-

“It has given me new skills, tools and knowledge and I imagine others will benefit from that due to me being more aware and understanding of my own leadership and supporting, mentoring and guiding others in their leadership as well.”

AILC courses give students the chance to meet people of a wide range of backgrounds and ages from all over Australia. One of the highlights for Gordon in the Certificate IV


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“MAKE THE DECISION. GET IN THERE AND DO IT. DO THE WORK WITH PRIDE AND YOU WILL ENJOY THE BENEFITS, AS PERFORMANCE WILL EQUAL REWARD,” GORDON COLE SAYS OF THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE’S CERTIFICATES II AND IV IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP.

was seeing some of the younger students grow throughout the course. “There were about a dozen young people aged from 20-30 and the highlight has been watching them develop over the three months,” Gordon says. “It was great to see them really come out of their comfort zone and stretch themselves as part of their leadership journey.” “An interesting outcome of the course is that you get to meet people from all over Australia from remote communities to rural and urban settings.”

“I learned a lot through that networking around understanding where people are at with their leadership journey and that has been fantastic.” “I really enjoyed meeting people and building the relationships and networks that come with participating in the leadership programs.”

Gordon Cole


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Experience

of a lifetime A

proud Wakawaka man, Bill’s leadership journey first began around 2008 when he had the opportunity to take part in an Indigenous men’s leadership course with FAHCSIA. That course opened his eyes and set him on the path to taking the AILC’s courses in 2016. “From there (the FAHCSIA course) I just wanted to learn more about leadership,” Bill says. “I’ve been on a mission to educate myself outside of the kitchen and doing the leadership and governance courses gave me the skills to do so.

“I’m a chef of 28 years and it really opened my eyes to other things that are out there and other career paths that might be available to me.” Bill says he has noticed a difference in himself and his leadership as a result of completing the AILC training, having applied what he has learned both at work and at home. Bill says the leadership training that he

received on course has greatly benefited his ability to lead in his role as a chef in a kitchen, an environment that he says can often be volatile. “I’ve noticed that you take these leadership principles and take them into work and family. I learned a lot about being a better leader, particularly when it comes to leading in volatile environments,” Bill says.

“My work in cooking is an often volatile environment. I’m now better able to step back from that environment and look at what is going on, see who’s doing what then step back in and effectively lead people a lot better.” “It has also given me a lot more accountability, being more genuine with things. Making sure that if I say things are going to get done, they now get done.” One of the highpoints for many AILC students on course is the opportunity

to bond with people from all over Australia who they would otherwise never have had the chance to meet. Bill says the coming together of the students on course was one of the most enjoyable aspects of his studies. “The whole course is one big highlight! Meeting all these deadly people from all over Australia and even meeting the staff from the AILC,” Bill says. “I also came to have an appreciation of different work styles and group dynamics, seeing how different people approach different tasks and being able to be okay with that.” After completing two courses in 2016 Bill has big plans for the future, having already just recently established his own consultancy company.

“I’ve established Fire Stone Consultancy, delivering leadership and hospitality talks and short courses and mentoring small businesses who may be in trouble,” Bill says.


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“IT’S CHANGED MY LIFE. DOING THIS COURSE AND LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP, IT REALLY HAS,” SAYS BILL SIMPSON, RECENT GRADUATE OF THE AILC’S CERTIFICATES IV IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP AND BUSINESS (GOVERNANCE). “It (the Governance course) helped me realise that almost all of my skills were in some way transferable from hospitality to a more formal business style of work.” “I’ve also just started in a new job as a mentor and cultural educator for Diversity Dimensions, working with Woolworths as part of their Indigenous Employment Program.” Bill says that the courses have greatly benefited him and he would encourage others to take them so that they too can see the benefit of the training that the AILC provides. “Get into it, stop making excuses,” Bill says. “It will change your life and it will change the way that you think and lead. It is a benefit to anyone and everyone that does it.”

Bill Simpson


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BSB41915 CERTIFICATE IV in Business (Governance) BSB41915 CERTIFICATE IV IN BUSINESS (GOVERNANCE) INTRODUCES THE KEY ELEMENTS OF OPERATING IN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER ORGANISATIONS AND THE CAPACITY OF INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN LEADERS TO AFFECT GOVERNANCE. THIS COURSE IS DESIGNED TO REFLECT THE ROLES OF INDIVIDUALS WHO UNDERTAKE RESPONSIBILITIES REQUIRED OF

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER ORGANISATIONS, AND WHO BRING A WIDE RANGE OF KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, TALENTS AND EXPERIENCE TO THEIR ORGANISATIONS AND REQUIRE FURTHER TRAINING. THIS QUALIFICATION WAS DELIVERED ONCE THIS FINANCIAL YEAR, WITH 17 INDIGENOUS LEADERS IN DEPARTMENT OF PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET FUNDED PLACES RECEIVING FULL QUALIFICATION.

Core Units BSBATSIC412 Maintain and protect cultural values in the organisation BSBATSIL411 Undertake the roles and responsibilities of a board member BSBATSIL413 Review and apply the constitution BSBATSIM417 Implement organisational plans BSBATSIM419 Contribute to the development and implementation of organisational policies

BSBATSIL408 Manage a board meeting BSBATSIL412 Participate effectively as a board member BSBATSIM414 Oversee the organisation’s annual budget

BSBATSIM418 Oversee financial management

BSBATSIW416 Obtain and manage consultancy services

BSBATSIM416 Oversee organisational planning

BSBATSIC411 Communicate with the community


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Course completion statistic

Course delivery map

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Gender of students

24% Western Australia 12% South Australia

Funding source

33% Northern Territory

Geographical spread of students

5% Queensland 12% New South Wales 0%

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Certificate IV in Business (Go vernance) graduate Kevan Hor der with trainer Duane Vickery and AILC CEO Belinda Gibb.


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Rebranding with a

purpose THIS YEAR THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE’S LOGO WAS REVISED IN ORDER TO BECOME MORE RECOGNISABLE AS AN INDIGENOUS ORGANISATION.

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fter a number of years sporting our previous logo, the AILC decided it was time for a change. While the previous design certainly held corporate appeal, it did not necessarily represent, or resonate with, the Indigenous communities that the AILC works with. At the same time, however, the AILC aimed to retain some of the brand recognition that has come with the many years of success with the previous logo. Local Canberra organisation Darkies Design, founded by 2016 ACT NAIDOC Person of the Year Dion Devow, was commissioned to develop a number of concept designs. Dion says it has been fantastic to have the opportunity to work with the AILC on the rebranding. “Darkies has been honoured to have the opportunity to work with another Indigenous organisation on their rebranding, particularly because of what the AILC does for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country,” Dion says. Following feedback from the AILC’s staff and Board, the new logo was chosen based on its ability to resonate with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people without straying too far from the previous logo design.

AILC CEO Belinda Gibb

The redesigned logo incorporates

elements typical of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art while retaining the shape, lettering and a similar colour to the old design. This new design provides a more meaningful representation of what the AILC is about and the communities that our organisation aims to connect with. AILC CEO, Belinda Gibb, says she is excited to see the new logo incorporated into various marketing and promotional materials. “Dion and the team at Darkies have done a terrific job and we are all very much looking forward to using the logo on all our future material,” Ms Gibb says.

“This new logo is a great representation of who we are as an organisation, and I think it will also allow us to build a greater connection with Indigenous communities.” The AILC already has plans in place to continue working with Darkies Design to produce designs for various marketing and promotional materials. The revision has paved the way for an abundance of new and exciting opportunities that the AILC can’t wait to share with students and supporters.


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BlakChat Cultural Advice Line IN 2014, THE AILC CONDUCTED CONSULTATIONS TO ESTABLISH A STRATEGY TO BUILD AND MAINTAIN CULTURAL CAPABILITIES RELATING TO ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLE IN THE WORKFORCE. THESE CONSULTATIONS IDENTIFIED THE CHALLENGES FACED IN SUPPORTING ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER STAFF AND HIGHLIGHTED A GAP IN UNDERSTANDING OF CULTURAL OBLIGATIONS AND COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES.

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key strategy developed from these consultations was the development and implementation of the BlakChat Cultural Advice Line. The service provides cultural advice and assistance to support Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees and employers in a confidential, culturally-safe environment. The BlakChat Cultural Advice Line provides advice and support for a huge range of cultural-related issues, such as: Explaining the scope of time commitments and cultural responsibilities related to family and kinship obligations; • Building employer cultural capability to engage effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff members – helping them to contribute more to the workplace; • Providing strategies to deal with differences in communication styles and key motivators and drivers to understand when staff are required to perform under pressure;

• Building common ground culturally by demystifying Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and history; • Providing advice and support to new and existing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees; • Providing advice to Indigenous employees on paths and opportunities for career development within their organisation; • Reducing feelings of isolation for Indigenous employees who have moved away from their country/community; and • Fostering a workplace culture that respects and values the skills, experiences, and perspectives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees and communities. The BlakChat Cultural Advice Line delivers positive outcomes to clients, with the benefits seen by Indigenous and non- Indigenous employees and employers alike.

Indigenous employees are able to seek advice in relation to cultural aspects of workplace issues, counselling support and advice on how to pursue career progression. Indigenous employees benefit from the Indigenous Advisor’s cultural awareness of the special conditions that affect Indigenous Australians and experience in resolving workplace issues arising from Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander culture. Non-Indigenous employees will be provided with insights into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, advice on practical, culturally-sound ways to resolve workplace issues and support mechanisms to improve outcomes from interaction with Indigenous staff. Businesses are better able to support their employees both Indigenous and non-Indigenous in working together and having respect and understanding of appropriate cultural workplace interactions.


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Leadership in action “LEADERSHIP FOR ME IS A RESPONSIBILITY AND A ROLE THAT AT SOME POINT IN YOUR LIFE YOU HAVE TO ACCEPT,” SAYS STEVE COCHRANE.

“It doesn’t always have to be about Indigenous leadership. It is about being a leader for your family, at work and out in the community.” Steve was originally scheduled to be part of the first ever AILC Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership, before he tragically lost his daughter to cancer prior to the commencement of the course. “I had to come back to the next course. When I did that next course, I had so much support from people because they understood what had happened and my situation and it was a time that I needed people to rally around me and support me,” Steve says. “The same friends that I met on that course, I still meet on a weekly to

monthly basis at different times. It just instils in you the feeling of being part of a much bigger picture.” Steve first decided to take the Certificate II course because he held a job that required him to do a lot of work out in the community. “Although I’d grown up strong in community, I hadn’t done a whole lot of work outside of my own community. I was starting to step out and thought, well, it’s a good way initially just to introduce me to other community members,” Steve says. “At the time I felt the community didn’t have a lot of leadership. I was getting older and thought that maybe I needed to step up, but also thought that maybe first I needed some education about how I should be a leader.

Steve Cochrane

“I realised at that first course that there were a lot of people in the same situation as myself – that had the knowledge and the skills but lacked the self-esteem to step up and take the responsibility of the role of leadership.” After that first course, Steve kept coming back. To date he has completed every single accredited course that the AILC has to offer, including the Advanced Diploma in Indigenous Leadership. “The first course put a fire in my belly not only for wanting to become a


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Steve Cochrane with AILC Director Prof. Tom Calma AO. good leader but to lead a good community,” Steve says. Throughout his years studying with the AILC, Steve says he has been able to greatly build his confidence as well as form numerous friendships with people he has met on course. He also took plenty away from his interactions with the trainers and his fellow students, and says he would encourage new students to go in with an open mind. “Every course the highlight has been that I have walked away with more friends, a boosted level of confidence

and also a greater understanding of leadership and its various applications. I’m now a lot more comfortable with my responsibilities not only as an Aboriginal person but as a leader,” Steve says. “You need to go in with an open mind and remember that your own community is not the only one. Be open to learning from anyone and everyone there with you, no matter how old or young they are.” Steve’s education has not ended with the AILC. This year he completed a career development program with the

Premier’s office in NSW and was also awarded a Classic Wallabies Indigenous Exchange Scholarship. “I completed the career development program then got an email to apply for the Classic Wallabies scholarship. I was awarded that and I have just come back from a two week trip to Scotland where I started my MBA (Masters of Business Administration) studies,” Steve says. “And that comes about from being confident in not only my abilities, but the determination I have now as an Aboriginal person.”

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d a o r e h T i e b

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“THERE HAS BEEN MANY THINGS.

LEARNING TO FIND MY VOICE IN A PUBLIC ARENA HAS BEEN AMAZING. TO HAVE THE GUIDANCE OF THE AILC IN ADDITION TO THAT OF THE FACILITATOR HAS BROADENED MY HORIZONS IMMENSELY, AND FOR ME THAT IS WHAT IT IS ABOUT,” SAYS MELANIE KENNEDY.

Melanie Kennedy


to

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r e d a e l a g in A

graduate of the Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership as well as Certificate IV in Business (Governance), Melanie’s leadership journey with the AILC has come full circle. Upon self-reflection after completing the Certificate II, Melanie realised she perhaps could have made more of the opportunity that the course provided. This fuelled her desire to return and complete further leadership and governance education with the AILC. “I did the Certificate II course seven years ago. I walked away from the course with the mindset that I wished I had put my best foot forward and made the most of the opportunity,” Melanie says. “It was a really safe place to begin my leadership journey and interact with people who are on the same sort of journey, so I had wanted to come back for a number of years. “I came back to do the Certificate IV in Business (Governance) last year in Darwin, then this year I finally got the opportunity to do the Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership in Perth.”

“The highlight for me is coming together with Aboriginal people from across Australia. Having the opportunity to get a whole range of perspectives and being encouraged to think outside the box and acknowledge and admire diversity.” Melanie says the courses have helped facilitate her growth, particularly when it comes to having the courage to take risks and not being afraid to make mistakes.

“The big thing I’ve been able to take away is the ability to take risks. I know now that it’s not the worst thing in the world if people laugh at you or if you make mistakes,” Melanie says. “This (course) is a great place to make the mistakes and get some feedback to support you to build on them.” With people of all different age groups attending the course with her, Melanie learned firsthand that leadership can come from anywhere, even when you might not expect it.

“Leadership can come from anywhere in the community. It’s not just the corporate world, and it’s not just from community services,” Melanie says.

“It can come from our children, young people, and people of established age such as our elders. Most people do have leadership to offer and these courses are a way for them to expand on that.” The AILC’s courses are about more than just development for the workplace. Melanie says she was able to identify this, and would encourage all Indigenous people to take part regardless of their career aspirations. “Have a go. Even if you aren’t interested in pursuing a formal leadership journey, the confidence and the self-esteem that you take home within yourself that your family notices,” Melanie says. “It encourages them to grow, take risks and enjoy life.”


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Organisations invest in leadership and governance THE AILC WAS COMMISSIONED BY A NUMBER OF ORGANISATIONS THIS REPORTING PERIOD TO DELIVER A COMBINATION OF ACCREDITED AND NON-ACCREDITED COURSES. THESE INCLUDED THE CERTIFICATE II AND IV IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP, THE DIPLOMA OF BUSINESS AND SHORT COURSES IN CULTURAL COMPETENCY AND YOUTH LEADERSHIP.

T

he accredited courses were delivered to organisations including Indigenous Business Australia (IBA) and government departments including the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) and the Department of Defence.

great need for the education that the organisation provides.

AILC CEO, Belinda Gibb, says that organisations taking up the opportunity to engage with the AILC reflects the

The AILC’s Certificate II and IV in Indigenous Leadership courses delivered in a fee-for-service capacity

“The demand for our courses is representative of the great value of the training that we provide and the positive outcomes that they deliver,” Ms Gibb says.

enjoyed a high course completion rate, with 97% of students receiving full qualification.

First Diploma of Business In conjunction with the Australian Institute of Management, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre this year delivered its first Diploma of Business.

m IBA. igenous Leadership students fro Ind in II ate fic rti Ce by ed duc Vision statement pro


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IBA Certificate II in Indigenous Leadersh ip graduate Courtney Livermore with IBA CEO Chris Fry. Delivered across three cohorts of Australian Taxation Office (ATO) students at training locations in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, the Diploma course has so far proven to be a great success. The Diploma consists of five compulsory short courses in addition to the ATO’s choice of eight elective units. The elective units chosen by the ATO are relevant to both the qualification and the student’s work environment, maintaining the integrity of the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) alignment and contributing to a valid, industry-supported vocational outcome.

The Brisbane and Sydney courses have already been completed, while the Melbourne course is scheduled to conclude in late 2016.

Leadership Survey The Leadership survey, a new initiative by the AILC, was developed for the three ATO Diploma cohorts to help increase awareness and understanding of student leadership and learning levels. The surveys were conducted prior to the commencement of each course through online survey tool ‘PeoplePulse’. The survey process was de-

signed to assist individuals to understand the nature of the identification of learning and development and how it aligns with the critical development of their leadership and learning journey. The survey also provided trainers with invaluable insight which helped to ensure that the right level of focus on development could be provided to individual students and or cohorts as a whole. Upon completion of the survey, students and AILC staff participated in either a face-to-face or over the phone debrief to provide feedback and ensure understanding of the results.


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e r u t l u C

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“WHAT INSPIRED ME TO TAKE THE CERTIFICATE II IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP WAS THE CHANCE TO MEET BOTH OLDER AND YOUNGER INDIGENOUS PEOPLE WHO WERE INSPIRED TO GUIDE THE YOUNGER GENERATION OF OUR CULTURE. I HAVE ALWAYS HAD A PASSION FOR LEADING BY EXAMPLE FOR MY YOUNGER SIBLINGS, TO MY COUSINS AND EVEN YOUNGER INDIGENOUS STUDENTS AT SCHOOL WHO LOOKED UP TO ME!” SAYS SHAENICE ALLAN.

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proud Indigenous woman, Shaenice takes pride in being independent. This led to her beginning work at a young age and moving away from family last year to study at the age of just 19.

“I have lots of experience, as I have been working since I was 15. I have never wanted to rely on my parents or family for money, so I wanted to take the initiative to earn my own,” Shaenice says.

Shaenice Allan

“In the middle of last year (2015) I moved to Sydney without my family to study. At the end of the year, I completed the Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership in Darwin and then went on to complete a Certificate IV in Allied Health Assistance.


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s r e t t ma

“I am currently studying a Bachelor of Physiotherapy at the University of Sydney. My main goal with this degree is to contribute to Closing the Gap.”

One of the younger students in her Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership class, Shaenice decided to take the course with the aim of broadening her knowledge and improving on her already solid foundation of leadership skills. She also saw it as an invaluable cultural opportunity, with the chance to share stories and knowledge with Indigenous people from all over Australia. “I wanted to take the leadership skills passed on by our elders, and pass on the history of our ancestors. I wanted to take the initiative to continue this culture strong and proud,” Shaenice says. “I also wanted to widen my knowledge around what being a leader in my community is. Not only for Indigenous people, but for non-Indigenous people as well – I want to show them that stereotypes don’t exist.

“One of the key lessons we learned during one of the presentations on course was about mental health and how big an issue it is today. Hiding it, putting it away and not confronting your issues can make it worse.” “It was really eye opening to hear some of the stories, and everyone

including me had the chance to open up. It was inspiring to hear some of the horrific stories, but yet these strong women came through their issues by dealing with them rather than running away from them!” Shaenice says her perspective on leadership was altered as a result of taking the course, where she learned about different leadership styles and techniques. “When the word leadership popped into my head before the course, I thought of it as just about someone who just leads people, but it isn’t. It is more than that,” says Shaenice. “It has different meanings, and there are different types of leaders. You could be someone who wants to lead themselves or someone who wants to lead a specific, targeted group of people. Being a leader is more than just leading. It is about being inspired to help, guide and lead a person or group. “I have improved my leadership skills, and gotten to know a bit more about both myself and my culture. I got to learn about and express parts of myself that I never knew existed.”

The people Shaenice met on course left a lasting impression that left her inspired and determined to succeed. One part of the experience that stood out for Shaenice about the course was the ability to connect with the other participants, regardless of their age or where they come from.

“There were two elders from the Tiwi Islands on the course. What inspired me about them was that they knew little English, and were always speaking to one another in language. It makes me so happy and have hope for our culture knowing that other tribes still speak their language today,” Shaenice says.

“The way their faces lit up when they spoke about their culture up in the Tiwi Islands was inspiring. It is encouraging to know that I am not the only one passionate about our culture.” Shaenice says she made great memories and would encourage others to take up the opportunity to learn and meet new people. “The presenters are amazing, and while the content is somewhat a lot to take in … when it comes to that last day when you are going home after graduating, you don’t want to leave.” “Sharing and spending so much time and knowledge with your mob, it inspires you to take home what you have learned and share it with others at home. You take home skills you never thought you would have and are not only helping yourself but those around you as well.” “This course teaches you so much! I loved every bit of it, and I miss it!”


l e d o m e l o r A

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h t u o y for

“I’VE ALWAYS WANTED TO TAKE THE COURSE BECAUSE OF THE LINE OF WORK THAT I AM IN, WORKING WITH KIDS IN FOSTER CARE. I’VE BEEN ABLE TO USE MY LEADERSHIP AND MY CULTURE TO BE EFFECTIVE IN MY WORK,” BOWEN RYAN SAYS.

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graduate of the Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership course and based in Western Sydney, Bowen works closely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in his role as Aboriginal Case Manager at Life Without Barriers. An avid rugby league player, Bowen says he has been able to take what he has learned not only into the workplace but onto the footy field as well where he is a role model for the younger players. He regularly plays in Aboriginal football tournaments including the Koori Knockout which is one of the largest annual gatherings of Indigenous people. He says he learned a lot from the course about both his culture and leadership and found himself with plenty to consider upon completing the first block.

“I learned more about my culture, after the first block I had a lot to go away and think about,” Bowen says.

“It is very powerful both emotionally and spiritually, the way you go home and you think about things like your family and your future as well. “It has opened my eyes to where I want to be in a few years from now.” AILC courses regularly attract people from communities Australia wide, from urban areas to remote communities. Bowen says one of the highlights was having the chance to meet and hear the stories of his fellow students.

“I really enjoyed hearing about the different journeys and different people over here in Perth. It is so far away from home, but it is still the same country and people living the same lives pretty much in what we do, but just on different paths.”


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“Listening to their journeys and hearing the stories of people who have had a completely different path to me was a real eye opener.” Bowen says he would recommend the course, particularly to younger Indigenous people. “I’ve always wanted to do it and I’m trying to encourage a lot of younger people to do it,” Bowen says. “I highly recommend it.”

Bowen Ryan


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Board Profiles versity’s Centre for Indigenous Education and Research as well as being ECU’s Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Equity and Indigenous). Prior to joining ECU, Colleen was Manager of the Kulunga Research Network at the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research.

Charles Prouse – Chairperson Charles Prouse is a Nyikina man from Derby, in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Charles has been and AILC Board member from August 2002 to 2009 and again in 2011. He was appointed to the role of Chair in October 2014. He served as the CEO of Supply Nation and prior to that CEO of the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy (NASCA) in Redfern. Charles is also on the Board of The Benevolent Society. He has a Bachelor of Science in geographic information systems. Charles completed the AILC’s Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership in Adelaide in November 2001.

Prof. Colleen Hayward AM Professor Colleen Hayward is Head of Kurongkurl Katitjin, Edith Cowan Uni-

For more than 30 years, Colleen has provided significant input to policies and programs on a wide range of issues, reflecting the needs of minority groups at community, state and national levels. She has an extensive background in a range of areas including health, education, training, employment, housing, child protection and law and justice as well as significant experience in policy and management. In much of this work, she draws on her qualifications including Bachelor of Education (Murdoch University), Bachelor of Applied Science (Aboriginal Community Management and Development) (Curtin University), and a Post Graduate Certificate in Cross-Sector Partnerships (Cambridge University). Professor Hayward was named the 2008 National NAIDOC Aboriginal Person of the Year Award, and was inducted into the WA Department of Education’s Hall of Fame for Achievement in Aboriginal Education in 2009. In 2011 she completed her term as a foundation member of the inaugural Board of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples. In June 2012 Colleen was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for service to tertiary education through administrative and research roles, to the advancement of the rights of Indigenous people, particularly in

the areas of social welfare, law and justice and children’s health. That year she also became an Ambassador for Children and Young People and was inducted into the WA Women’s Hall of Fame. In 2015 Colleen was recognised as a Distinguished Alumni Awardee for Murdoch University and was a finalist for WA Australian of the Year. Professor Hayward is a senior Noongar woman with extensive family links throughout the south-west of WA.

Prof. Tom Calma AO Professor Calma is an Aboriginal elder from the Kungarakan tribal group and a member of the Iwaidja tribal group in the Northern Territory. He joined the AILC Board in 2009 and served as Chair from 2011-2014. Professor Calma is Chancellor of the University of Canberra, a former Social Justice and Race Discrimination Commissioner and Senior Diplomat and has been involved in Indigenous affairs at a local, community, and state, national and international level. He has worked in the public sector for over 40 years. Tom is the National Coordinator, Tackling Indigenous Smoking, a consultant, patron of three national organisations, Co-chair of Reconciliation Australia, and was awarded an


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Order of Australia, General Division (AO) in 2012, as well as a member of numerous boards and committees. He holds honorary doctorates from Charles Darwin, Curtin and Flinders universities.

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one of Australia’s top ten emerging leaders, winning the sport category, is an alumni of Harvard Business School and has addressed the United Nations on Indigenous Affairs.

Natalie Walker

Jason Mifsud Jason Mifsud has been leading cultural transformation across numerous sectors for over 20 years, delivering significant organisational change and development in Aboriginal Affairs. On his mother’s side, he is a member of the Kirrae and Peek Whurrong peoples’ of the Gunditjmara nation in southwest Victoria and his father migrated from Malta, providing him with a rich sense of cultural pride and integrity. Jason has a unique and broad skill set in business, community and sport, holding senior management and executive roles as well as playing and coaching at AFL level with the St KildaFootball Club and Western Bulldogs Football Club. He currently sits on the Board for the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre, the NAB Indigenous Advisory Group and the national reference group for Recognise, supporting constitutional change. He previously sat on the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission. He has held representative roles on the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation’s Suicide Prevention Taskforce and the Victorian Government - Ministerial Advisory Council for Indigenous Affairs and Economic development. In 2010 Jason was recognised as

Jason Glanville Jason Glanville is a member of the Wiradjuri peoples from south-western New South Wales and previously was the inaugural CEO of the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence (NCIE) based in Redfern. Prior to joining the NCIE Jason was Director of Programs and Strategy at Reconciliation Australia. Over the last 20 years Jason has worked in a range of positions in community-based Indigenous organisations, State and Federal Governments and non-government peak organisations. Jason is Chair of the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute and on the boards of Reconciliation Australia, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre and Carriageworks. He is also a Trustee of the Australian Museum and a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Indigenous Policy. Jason was a member of the Steering Committee for the creation of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples. Jason is a member of the Museum of Contemporary Art’s Indigenous Advisory Panel and a member of the University of Technology’s Vice Chancellor’s Indigenous Advisory Committee. In 2010 Jason was named in the (Sydney) magazine’s 100 most influential people of Sydney and in 2011 he was featured in Boss Magazine’s True Leaders of 2011 list.

Natalie is a Kuku Yalanji woman from Port Douglas in Far North Queensland, now living in Sydney for the past 12 years. Natalie is an entrepreneur with over 15 years experience across government, not for profit, corporate and small to medium enterprise sectors. Natalie’s start-up achievements include Supply Nation and KPMG’s Indigenous Business Stream within its Government Advisory Services. Natalie’s current start-up project is Inside Policy – a national collaboration of omnigeeks who work with government, corporate and third sector clients to help them solve the most complex policy challenges. Herself a proud omnigeek, Natalie has degrees in psychology and law, and she is about to commence her Masters in Economics. Natalie is also a director of the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre, sits on National Australia Bank’s Indigenous Advisory Board and was the Deputy Chair of National Indigenous TV before it merged with SBS. She is also a reformed techno-phobe who after spending five months being the oldest person in the room at a New York city tech start-up incubator, she now loves everything tech. In her downtime, you can find Natalie cruising the web for beautiful infographs or meditating in some Indiana Jones-style monestary in a remote part of the world.


Appendix financials


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Contents For the Year Ended 30 June 2016 Page Financial Statements Directors' Report Auditors Independence Declaration under Section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001 Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income Statement of Financial Position Statement of Changes in Equity Statement of Cash Flows Notes to the Financial Statements Directors' Declaration Independent Audit Report

1 4 5 6 7 8 9 19 20


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Directors' Report For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

The directors present their report on Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited for the financial year ended 30 June 2016. 1.

General information Directors The names of the directors in office at any time during, or since the end of, the year are: Names Prof. Thomas Calma AO Jason Glanville Prof. Colleen Hayward AM Jason Misfud Charles Prouse Natalie Walker Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated. Principal activities The principal activities Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited during the financial year were promotion and development of Indigenous leadership and the delivery of accredited and non-accredited Indigenous leadership courses in Australia. The Company is a registered training organisation providing a unique suite of accredited courses in Indigenous leadership and governance, as well as non-accredited short courses in leadership, cultural awareness and mentoring. The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre aims to foster and nurture the next generation of Indigenous leaders by: •

Delivering high quality programs that equip Indigenous leaders with skills, knowledge and opportunities in leadership and governance;

Connecting and supporting Indigenous leaders by linking them with mentors in their chosen fields and by providing opportunities to network and to learn from other graduates;

Researching what makes effective leadership in an Indigenous context, so that deeper knowledge and understanding can be reached about how to support Indigenous people to move forward and tackle current disadvantages;

Creating a national 'space' that encourages conversation and learning about what makes effective Indigenous leadership;

Promoting the value of fostering Indigenous leadership as a key strategy for addressing the issues that confront Indigenous communities today; and

Raising the profile of the value and positive impact of Indigenous leaders across Australia.

The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre is funded by fee for service courses, course sponsors (Government departments, companies and not-for-profit organisations) and from grants and donations. Most courses are sponsored, so that Indigenous students are able to attend at no cost.

1

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Directors' Report For the Year Ended 30 June 2016 1.

General information (Continued) Principal activities (Continued) No significant changes in the nature of the Company's activity occurred during the financial year. Members guarantee Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is a company limited by guarantee. In the event of, and for the purpose of winding up of the company, the amount capable of being called up from each members and any person or association who ceased to be a member in the year prior to the winding up, is limited to $ 300 for members that are corporations and $ 300 for all other members, subject to the provisions of the company's constitution. Operating results and review of operations for the year Operating results The loss of the Company after providing for income tax amounted to $ 88,738 (2015: Profit $ 164,900).

2.

Other items Future developments and results The Vision - Towards a critical mass of Indigenous leaders The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre is Australia's pre-eminent provider of Indigenous leadership training and faces tremendous unmet need for Indigenous leadership education. By 2017, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre should be recognised as the leading authority on Indigenous leadership in Australia, providing advice and expertise on Indigenous leadership to Government, large corporations and communities. Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre will set the benchmark for Indigenous education quality, delivering tailored and evidence-based programs. The curriculum will be informed and enhances through an extensive research program. For the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre to deliver transformational change which can deliver solutions for all Australians and mobilise leaders to inspire social and political change, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre must aim to deliver accredited courses to a minimum of 1000 individuals each year by 2017. If the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre graduates 1000 Indigenous leaders each year, we could confidently say that we would be building a critical mass of leaders able to inspire and mobilise a generation - ensuring one per cent of the Indigenous population are trained Indigenous leaders within five years of achieving enrolment level.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Directors' Report For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

Meetings of directors During the financial year, 4 meetings of directors (including committees of directors) were held. Attendances by each director during the year were as follows: Directors' Meetings Number eligible to Number attend attended

Prof. Thomas Calma AO Jason Glanville Prof. Colleen Hayward AM Jason Mifsud Charles Prouse Natalie Walker

4 4 4 4 4 4

4 1 2 1 4 3

Auditor's independence declaration The auditor's independence declaration in accordance with section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001, for the year ended 30 June 2016 has been received and can be found on page 4 of the financial report. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors:

Director: ...............................................................

Dated 4 November 2016

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Auditors Independence Declaration under Section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 to the Directors of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, during the year ended 30 June 2016, there have been: (i)

no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements as set out in the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 in relation to the audit; and

(ii)

no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

Hardwickes Chartered Accountants

Robert Johnson FCA Partner 4 November 2016 Canberra

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

2016

2015

$ 2,691,588 (894,413)

2,679,159 (880,073)

1,797,175 16,036 (49,194) (21,683) (1,373,828) (457,244)

1,799,086 22,494 (65,484) (21,637) (1,338,577) (230,981)

(Loss) / Profit before income tax Income tax expense

(88,738) -

164,901 -

(Loss) / Profit for the year

(88,738)

164,901

(88,738)

164,901

Note Sales revenue Cost of sales

4

Gross profit Other income Marketing expenses Occupancy costs Administrative expenses Other expenses

4

$

Other comprehensive income Total comprehensive income for the year

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 5

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Statement of Financial Position As At 30 June 2016

Note ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other assets

5 6 7

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment

8

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables Employee benefits Other liabilities

9 10 11

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Employee benefits

10

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

2016

2015

$

$

648,023 16,006 196,770

298,677 594,313 41,623

860,799

934,613

76,874

100,462

76,874

100,462

937,673

1,035,075

237,508 21,201 574,269

192,201 38,140 602,291

832,978

832,632

-

9,010 9,010

TOTAL LIABILITIES

832,978

841,642

NET ASSETS

104,695

193,433

EQUITY Retained earnings

104,695

193,433

TOTAL EQUITY

104,695

193,433

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 6


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Statement of Changes in Equity For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

2016 Retained Earnings $ Balance at 1 July 2015

Total $

Loss attributable to members of the entity

193,433 (88,738)

193,433 (88,738)

Balance at 30 June 2016

104,695

104,695

2015 Retained Earnings

Total

$

$

Profit attributable to members of the entity

28,533 164,900

28,533 164,900

Balance at 30 June 2015

193,433

193,433

Balance at 1 July 2014

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 7

45


46

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Statement of Cash Flows For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

Note CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES: Receipts from customers Payments to suppliers and employees Interest received Interest paid Net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities

14

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES: Proceeds from sale of plant and equipment Purchase of property, plant and equipment Net cash used by investing activities

2016

2015

$

$

3,565,813 (3,230,480) 16,038 -

2,529,698 (2,723,099) 21,297 (613)

351,371

(172,717)

6,909 (10,683)

(64,555)

(3,774)

(64,555)

347,597 300,426

(237,272) 537,698

648,023

300,426

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES: Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year Cash and cash equivalents at end of financial year

5

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 8


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

The financial report covers Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited as an individual entity. Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is a not-for-for profit Company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. The functional and presentation currency of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is Australian dollars. The financial report was authorised for issue by the Directors on . Comparatives are consistent with prior years, unless otherwise stated. 1

Basis of Preparation Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited applies Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements as set out in AASB 1053: Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards and AASB 2010-2: Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from Reduced Disclosure Requirements. The financial statements are general purpose financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012. The company is a not-for-profit entity for financial reporting purposes under Australian Accounting Standards. Australian Accounting Standards set out accounting policies that the AASB has concluded would result in financial statements containing relevant and reliable information about transactions, events and conditions. Material accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements are presented below and have been consistently applied unless stated otherwise. The financial statements, except for the cash flow information, have been prepared on an accruals basis and are based on historical costs, modified, where applicable, by the measurement at fair value of selected non-current assets, financial assets and financial liabilities. The amounts presented in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest dollar.

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (a)

Income Tax The Company is exempt from income tax under Division 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.

(b)

Revenue and other income Revenue is recognised when the amount of the revenue can be measured reliably, it is probable that economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Company and specific criteria relating to the type of revenue as noted below, has been satisfied. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable and is presented net of returns, discounts and rebates. All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST).

9

47


48

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued) (b)

Revenue and other income (Continued) Grant revenue Grant revenue is recognised in the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income when the entity obtains control of the grant, it is probable that the economic benefits gained from the grant will flow to the entity and the amount of the grant can be measured reliably. When grant revenue is received whereby the entity incurs an obligation to deliver economic value directly back to the contributor, this is considered a reciprocal transaction and the grant revenue is recognised in the statement of financial position as a liability until the service has been delivered to the contributor, otherwise the grant is recognised as income on receipt. Donations Donations and bequests are recognised as revenue when received. Interest revenue Interest is recognised using the effective interest method. Rendering of services Revenue in relation to rendering of services is recognised depending on whether the outcome of the services can be estimated reliably. If the outcome can be estimated reliably then the stage of completion of the services is used to determine the appropriate level of revenue to be recognised in the period. If the outcome cannot be reliably estimated then revenue is recognised to the extent of expenses recognised that are recoverable. Other income Other income is recognised on an accruals basis when the Company is entitled to it.

(c)

Goods and services tax (GST) Revenue, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST), except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). Receivables and payable are stated inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows in the statement of cash flows are included on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as operating cash flows.

10


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued) (d)

Property, plant and equipment Each class of property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or fair value less, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment. Items of property, plant and equipment acquired for nil or nominal consideration have been recorded at the acquisition date fair value. Where the cost model is used, the asset is carried at its cost less any accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses. Costs include purchase price, other directly attributable costs and the initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and restoring the asset, where applicable. Plant and equipment Plant and equipment are measured using the cost model. Depreciation Property, plant and equipment, excluding freehold land, is depreciated using both straight-line basis and diminishing value methods over the assets useful life to the Company, commencing when the asset is ready for use. The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable asset are shown below: Fixed asset class Depreciation rate Furniture, Fixtures and Fittings Motor Vehicles Office Equipment Software

20% - 100% 12.5% 15% - 100% 40% - 100%

At the end of each annual reporting period, the depreciation method, useful life and residual value of each asset is reviewed. Any revisions are accounted for prospectively as a change in estimate. (e)

Financial instruments Financial instruments are recognised initially using trade date accounting, i.e. on the date that the Company becomes party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. On initial recognition, all financial instruments are measured at fair value plus transaction costs (except for instruments measured at fair value through profit or loss where transaction costs are expensed as incurred). Impairment of financial assets At the end of the reporting period the Company assesses whether there is any objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. Financial assets at amortised cost If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss on financial assets carried at amortised cost has been incurred, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the 11

49


50

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued) (e)

Financial instruments (Continued) present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the financial assets original effective interest rate. Impairment on loans and receivables is reduced through the use of allowance accounts, all other impairment losses on financial assets at amortised cost are taken directly to the asset. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against other expenses in profit or loss. Available-for-sale financial assets A significant or prolonged decline in value of an available-for-sale asset below its cost is objective evidence of impairment, in this case, the cumulative loss that has been recognised in other comprehensive income is reclassified from equity to profit or loss as a reclassification adjustment. Any subsequent increase in the value of the asset is taken directly to other comprehensive income.

(f)

Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprises cash on hand, demand deposits and short-term investments which are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value. Bank overdrafts also form part of cash equivalents for the purpose of the statement of cash flows and are presented within current liabilities on the statement of financial position.

(g)

Employee benefits Provision is made for the Company's liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting period. Employee benefits that are expected to be wholly settled within one year have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled. Employee benefits expected to be settled more than one year after the end of the reporting period have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. In determining the liability, consideration is given to employee wage increases and the probability that the employee may satisfy vesting requirements. Changes in the measurement of the liability are recognised in profit or loss.

(h)

Economic dependence Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is dependent on the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet for the majority of its revenue used to operate the business. At the date of this report the directors have no reason to believe the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet will not continue to support Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited.

3

Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments The directors make estimates and judgements during the preparation of these financial statements regarding assumptions about current and future events affecting transactions and balances. These estimates and judgements are based on the best information available at the time of preparing the financial statements, however as additional information is known then the actual results may differ from the estimates. 12


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

3

Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments (Continued) The significant estimates and judgements made have been described below. Key estimates - impairment of property, plant and equipment The Company assesses impairment at the end of each reporting period by evaluating conditions specific to the Company that may be indicative of impairment triggers. Recoverable amounts of relevant assets are reassessed using value-in-use calculations which incorporate various key assumptions. Key estimates - receivables The receivables at reporting date have been reviewed to determine whether there is any objective evidence that any of the receivables are impaired. An impairment provision is included for any receivable where the entire balance is not considered collectible. The impairment provision is based on the best information at the reporting date.

4

Revenue and Other Income Revenue from continuing operations

Sales revenue - Grants and course funding - Donations and consulting

Other income - Interest income - Other income

Total Revenue 5

2016

2015

$

$

2,592,216 99,372

2,653,563 25,596

2,691,588

2,679,159

16,038 -

21,297 1,197

16,038

22,494

2,707,626

2,701,653

2016

2015

$

$

648,023

298,677

648,023

298,677

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash at bank and in hand

13

51


52

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

6

Trade and Other Receivables 2016

2015

$

$

CURRENT Trade receivables GST receivable Other receivables

11,127 3,361 1,518

592,681 1,632

Total current trade and other receivables

16,006

594,313

The carrying value of trade receivables is considered a reasonable approximation of fair value due to the short-term nature of the balances. The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date is the fair value of each class of receivable in the financial statements. 7

Other Assets

CURRENT Prepayments Accrued income

2016

2015

$

$

6,691 190,079

41,623 -

196,770

41,623

14


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

8

Property, plant and equipment 2016

2015

$

$

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Furniture, fixtures and fittings At cost Accumulated depreciation Total furniture, fixtures and fittings

12,029 (9,206)

12,029 (8,139)

2,823

3,890

Motor vehicles At cost Accumulated depreciation

28,062 (3,536)

51,954 (4,666)

Total motor vehicles

24,526

47,288

122,646 (75,343)

111,962 (69,461)

47,303

42,501

28,685 (26,463)

28,685 (21,902)

2,222

6,783

76,874

100,462

Office equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Total office equipment Software At cost Accumulated depreciation Total Software Total property, plant and equipment

15

53


8

(a)

3,890 (1,067) 2,823

Year ended 30 June 2016 Balance at the beginning of year Additions Disposals - written down value Depreciation expense

Balance at the end of the year

$

24,526

47,288 (16,910) (5,852)

$

47,303

42,501 10,683 (5,881)

$

2,222

6,783 (4,561)

$

Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: Furniture, Motor Office Fixtures and Fittings Vehicles Equipment Software

Movements in Carrying Amounts

Property, plant and equipment (Continued)

For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

Notes to the Financial Statements

ABN 68 091 455 551

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited

16

76,874

100,462 10,683 (16,910) (17,361)

$

Total

54 AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

9

Trade and other payables

CURRENT Trade payables GST payable Sundry payables and accrued expenses Other payables

10

2016

2015

$

$

211,156 24,042 2,310

1,686 23,687 89,173 77,655

237,508

192,201

Employee Benefits

Current liabilities Provision for employee benefits

2016

2015

$

$

21,201

38,140

21,201

38,140

2016

2015

$

$

Non-current liabilities Long service leave

11

9,010

-

9,010

Other Liabilities

CURRENT Income in advance

12

-

2016

2015

$

$

574,269

602,291

574,269

602,291

Members' Guarantee The Company is incorporated under the Corporations Act 2001 and is a Company limited by guarantee. If the Company is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $ 300 each towards meeting any outstandings and obligations of the Company.

13

Contingencies In the opinion of the Directors, the Company did not have any contingencies at 30 June 2016 (30 June 2015:None).

17

55


56

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2016

14

Cash Flow Information (a)

Reconciliation of result for the year to cashflows from operating activities Reconciliation of net income to net cash provided by operating activities: 2016 (Loss) / Profit for the year Non-cash flows in profit: - depreciation - net (gain)/loss on disposal of motor vehicle Changes in assets and liabilities: - (increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables - (increase)/decrease in accrued income - (increase)/decrease in prepayments - increase/(decrease) in income in advance - increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables - increase/(decrease) in employee benefits Cashflow from operations

15

$ (88,738)

2015 $ 164,899

17,663 9,699

19,594 -

581,668 (190,079) 34,932 (28,022) 40,197 (25,949)

(581,993) (37,271) 138,779 108,845 14,430

351,371

(172,717)

Events after the end of the Reporting Period The financial report was authorised for issue on by the Board of Directors. No matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the Company, the results of those operations or the state of affairs of the Company in future financial years.

18


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Directors' Declaration The directors of the Company declare that: 1.

2.

The financial statements and notes, as set out on pages 5 - 18, are in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and: a.

comply with Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and Australian Charities and Not-for-profits regulation 2013; and

b.

give a true and fair view of the financial position as at 30 June 2016 and of the performance for the year ended on that date of the Company.

In the directors' opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This declaration is signed in accordance with subs 60.15(2) of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013.

Director ................................................................................................................................................

Dated 4 November 2016

19

57


58

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Independent Audit Report to the members of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited Report on the Financial Report We have audited the accompanying financial report of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited, which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2016, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, and the directors' declaration.

Directors' Responsibility for the Financial Report The directors of the Company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Company’s preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report.

Independence In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, which has been given to the directors of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited, would be in the same terms if given to the directors as at the time of this auditor’s report.

20


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Independent Audit Report to the members of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited Opinion In our opinion the financial report of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is in accordance with Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: (a)

giving a true and fair view of the Company’s financial position as at 30 June 2016 and of its performance for the year ended on that date; and

(b)

complying with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation.

Hardwickes Chartered Accountants

Robert Johnson FCA Partner Canberra 4 November 2016

21

59


60

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

3


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