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Generation T AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Transformation within a generation

$600 m in Indigenous income BEST OF THE WEST THREE WEST AUSTRALIAN LEADERS TELL HOW GOVERNANCE IS CHANGING LIVES

GOOD GOVERNANCE = GOOD LEADERSHIP CHANGING THE MODEL TO DELIVER A NEW BENCHMARK IN GOVERNANCE EDUCATION


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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE WOULD LIKE TO ACKNOWLEDGE OUR PRIMARY SUPPORTERS FOR 2013-14

Special thanks also to the wonderful AILC Alumni for their ongoing support and for being our dream – and of course to the facilitators, trainers, staff and Board that help us achieve greatness where only goodness seemed possible. Particular thanks to those who gave their time to be profiled in this publication, including Kalan Knight; Dorinda Cox; Vickey Hill and Kelly Francis.

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd PO Box 4110 Kingston ACT 2604 Australia P 02 6251 5770 E ailc@ailc.org.au ailc.org.au

Published by the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Copyright © Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd 2014 This publication is copyright. No part may be reproduced by any process except in accordance with provisions of the Copyright Act 1968. Author: Tim Winkler – Twig Marketing Photography: Marina Neil, Julius Pang and Michael Torres. Design: ZOO


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Who we are ESTABLISHED BY INDIGENOUS LEADERS IN 2001, THE AILC IS A NOT-FOR-PROFIT COMPANY, OWNED AND CONTROLLED BY INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS. AS A REGISTERED TRAINING ORGANISATION (RTO), THE ORGANISATION HAS BUILT AN OUTSTANDING PROFILE AS ONE OF THE NATION’S LEADING INDIGENOUS EDUCATION PROVIDERS. As a result of the success of its programs, the AILC has developed a loyal and active Alumni group across Australia, forming Leadership Plus, the largest network of Indigenous leaders in the country. Recognised Indigenous leaders on the organisation’s staff and Board provide access to skills, knowledge, opportunities and networks, helping participants in AILC courses to thrive. The AILC has extensive experience in delivery of Indigenous leadership programs at a range of locations across Australia. As an Indigenous organisation, staffed by a majority of Indigenous staff, the AILC is experienced in negotiating issues of access and cultural sensitivity in order to deliver successful and relevant Indigenous leadership programs.

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Contents 05

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MILESTONE

MILESTONE

GRADUATE PROFILE

06 INTRODUCTION FROM CHAIR

07 MESSAGE FROM CEO

09 CLOSING THE CHASM

11 MILESTONE

17 WHAT’S IN YOUR LEADERSHIP TOOLKIT?

21 GRADUATE PROFILE

NO SHAME IN SHUNNED FAME FOR TRUE LEADER

23 MASTER CLASSES

AN IMPORTANT MILESTONE FOR INDIGENOUS LEADERS

CHOOSING LIFE

30 INDIGENOUS MENTORING

31 MILESTONE

32 RECOGNITION

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MILESTONE

BOARD PROFILES

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GRADUATE PROFILE

GRADUATE PROFILE

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LEADER FOR A NEW GENERATION

MILESTONE

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GOVERNANCE

FINANCIALS

SPEAKING UP FOR BETTER GOVERNANCE

14 TOWARDS THE TOP END – OUR NEW BASE IN DARWIN


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MILESTONE COMMENCEMENT OF THE AILC’S FIRST ACCREDITED GOVERNANCE PROGRAM IN PERTH

“The course helped me realise the skills of leadership and governance I had already developed and the importance of putting them into practice in my own community.” - DORINDA COX CERTIFICATE IV IN BUSINESS (GOVERNANCE) GRADUATE

April 2014: Good leaders need to understand governance in order to develop sustainable plans and to monitor performance and compliance. Boards and senior management tasked with governance also need to understand leadership in order to develop sound plans and progressive strategies.

The AILC has therefore developed a Certificate IV of Business (Governance) in partnership with the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations (ORIC)so that it can provide a new benchmark in both Indigenous leadership and Indigenous governance education.

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The decision by the Governor-General and Lady Cosgrove to jointly support the AILC by becoming Patrons demonstrates the value that Australia places on Indigenous leadership at the highest level and the importance of the AILC’s work in a national context. These milestones are spectacular, given our humble beginnings – but they are also just markers on a longer, more important journey. There are more than 500,000 Indigenous people in Australia and among those peoples there are very different needs and cultures. Indigenous leadership and governance courses must open up new opportunities for people from all cultures while recognising and encouraging cultural distinctiveness of individual communities.

INTRODUCTION FROM CHAIR ISSUE 02 Dr Tom Calma AO Chair

Welcome THERE IS A LOT TO CELEBRATE, AS THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE HAS ACHIEVED MANY MILESTONES OVER THE PAST YEAR – GETTING CLOSER TO THE GENERATIONAL TRANSFORMATION THAT IS AT THE HEART OF OUR GOALS. We now offer new courses in governance and a new program of master classes, helping to establish Australia’s first comprehensive study pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people wanting to develop skills and knowledge in both leadership and governance. That is a really important step – providing an avenue for progression and development for Indigenous people wanting to pursue further study. This success has culminated in recognition of the AILC and our staff through a number of awards over the course of the year and has led to opportunities to establish a number of new corporate partnerships.

For example, many people know that honey can be found in the bush. However, my people, the Kungarakan, have recognised the distinctive types of honey found in our area – tul-pooee, which is found in stumps and antbeds; yuka-pin, found in growing trees; palark-pah, a variety found in other trees and dark honey, which is the colour of treacle. It is not enough simply to find honey – different types of honey have different uses. Similarly, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are not a homogenous group. Respecting and enabling people to become the best they can be within the prism of their own culture is essential. Further ahead in our journey, there is also an important challenge. To have a realistic chance of building enough leadership and governance capacity to help Close the Gap in this generation; we need to be training at least 1000 Indigenous people each year by 2020. That would enable us to reach one per cent of the Indigenous population every five years or so and through the momentum of leadership and excellence demonstrated by that group, to positively influence a large proportion of Indigenous Australians. The journey is going exceptionally well – but the way we choose to walk and the pace that we achieve will be pivotal in reaching the right destination. Dr Tom Calma AO


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Our students learn the importance of networking to help solve problems, fill jobs, gather ideas and support each other. They learn how to write press releases and strategy plans and a host of other practical exercises so that when they return to their family or their workplace or their community organisation they can contribute more immediately. To make sure they do that, in a number of our courses we also give them a final project which requires them to hold an event or deliver a small project in their own community before they can graduate.

This is education with a purpose. MESSAGE FROM CEO

This is education that can change lives – and we have hundreds of letters to prove that it has.

ISSUE 02

This is education that lets you live life from a menu, rather than a predetermined meal plan. When we go into a restaurant, we select the meal we want and can afford, the drink we want and can afford, we tell the waiter how we want our steak cooked. We choose our experience. Too often, life is less like a restaurant and more like a meal plan – with a feeling that we simply have to accept whatever we happen to be given.

Rachelle Towart CEO

I’M FREQUENTLY ASKED WHAT INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE COURSES ACTUALLY TEACH. THE GRADUATE OUTCOMES SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES AND WHEN PEOPLE MEET OUR ALUMNI THAT ARE INVARIABLY IMPRESSED, BUT UNFORTUNATELY THE NAMES OF OUR COURSES CAN SOMETIMES CREATE CONFUSION. Leadership and governance courses taught by the AILC provide Indigenous people from all walks of life with the skills to be an even better version of themselves – equipped with skills to shine as a manager, rather than just an entry-level worker; to become a stronger contributor to their families and also to their communities. We teach communication, negotiation, some history, conflict resolution, and dozens of other subjects, but the key difference is that our exclusively Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander facilitators teach practical skills and knowledge that is practical and relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders people.

AILC courses are a ticket to escape from the set menu – but we need to deliver them to far more people, so they, in turn, can contribute more to their communities and families and help overcome the tide of disadvantage that constantly threatens to overwhelm Indigenous communities. Join us. Donate, consider whether your staff can benefit from our services or simply tell someone else about positive change being delivered by Indigenous people for Indigenous people at the AILC. Rachelle Towart, CEO

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COURSES/PROGRAMS NOW ON OFFER THE AILC OFFERS A COMPREHENSIVE RANGE OF INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE COURSES/PROGRAMS: –– FOUNDATION PROGRAM IN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE

–– BUSINESS (GOVERNANCE) CERTIFICATE IV

–– INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CERTIFICATE II

–– COMPREHENSIVE WORKPLACE ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

–– INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CERTIFICATE IV

–– CULTURAL COMPETENCY PROGRAM

–– ADVANCED DIPLOMA OF INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP

–– INDIGENOUS MENTORING PROGRAM

NEW LENS ON LEADERSHIP THE AILC IS WORKING CLOSELY WITH COMMUNITIES ACROSS AUSTRALIA TO RESHAPE LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS IN A RANGE OF WAYS, INCLUDING: –– NEW COMMUNITY APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTATION AND REVIEW OF ALCOHOL MANAGEMENT PLANS

–– TAILORED LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE FOUNDATION PROGRAMS INCORPORATING LOCAL KNOWLEDGE

–– LEADERSHIP COURSES FOR INDIGENOUS PRISONERS TO REDUCE RECIDIVISM

–– CULTURAL COMPETENCY PROGRAMS MATCHED WITH LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS FOR ORGANISATIONS HOPING TO ATTRACT, DEVELOP AND RETAIN THEIR INDIGENOUS STAFF

–– SCHOOL-BASED LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS TO TEACH FUNDAMENTAL LEADERSHIP CAPABILITIES


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chasm Closing the

THE GAP BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS IS NARROWING ON SOME INDICATORS

AND STUBBORNLY REFUSING TO CHANGE ON OTHERS – OFTEN SEEMING MORE LIKE A BROAD CHASM THAN A SIMPLE ‘GAP’.

The latest Closing the Gap Report shows that enrolment in pre-school programmes is improving, and child mortality has been significantly reduced. However many other challenges in employment, literacy, life expectancy and school completion rates for Indigenous people are still a reality.

DIRECT EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES

THE IMPORTANCE OF LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE

–– Average incomes of AILC graduates rose almost $14,000 after graduation; and

Building Indigenous leadership and governance capacity remains one of the key tools to empower Indigenous communities to develop their own solutions and provide a sustainable path towards improvement in life outcomes for Indigenous people and organisations. The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC), a not-for-profit education provider owned by Indigenous people and run by a majority of Indigenous people, remains Australia’s only national provider of accredited training programs in both Indigenous leadership and Indigenous governance.

An independent KPMG review of AILC programs and outcomes in 2011 found that: –– 60% of graduates of AILC accredited programs earned a promotion after completing their course; –– 79% said they had taken on an enhanced leadership role after finishing the course;

–– 95% said they felt they were better leaders after completing an AILC course. These substantial employment outcomes mean that the AILC will directly increase the incomes of Indigenous leaders by more than $600 million over the next ten years if it can meet its enrolment targets. These outcomes represent generational transformation – the opportunity to achieve sustained change for the better in Indigenous communities

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Direct increase in Indigenous leaders’ incomes as a result of AILC qualification 700 Annual income increase

500 $ MILLIONS

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Cumulative total income increase

300

100 2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

YEAR

The Challenge ahead In order to meet its goals of delivering generational transformation, the AILC needs to enrol 1000 students each year from 2020. With more than 500,000 Indigenous people in Australia, and the AILC the only provider of high quality accredited Indigenous leadership and governance training nationally, it is imperative that the AILC achieves this growth without compromising program quality or student outcomes. This means the AILC needs to take a new approach to building enrolments and attracting funding, to maximise the opportunity to Close the Gap.

IGNITING CHANGE The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre is proud to be associated with the No Smokes anti-smoking campaign. AILC CEO Rachelle Towart said involvement with campaigns against smoking and in favour of health is a very important demonstration of how the AILC practices leadership “I gave up smoking 10 years ago and have never wished that I was a smoker again. Improving Indigenous life expectancy and health outcomes needs to be a priority for every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person, and the AILC is proud to be playing a part in the campaign.”


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

MILESTONE THE GOVERNOR GENERAL AND LADY COSGROVE ARE APPOINTED THE INAUGURAL PATRONS OF THE AILC.

The AILC is playing a unique role in helping to create a fairer, stronger Australia. Indigenous leadership is critical to our future as a nation. 10 July 2014: His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) and Her Excellency Lady Cosgrove greet staff after announcing their decision to serve as joint patrons of the AILC in a gathering at Government House.

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Speaking up for better governance “PEOPLE WANT TO LOOK AT ABORIGINAL PEOPLE THROUGH THE LENS OF TRADITIONAL CULTURE, BUT CULTURE IS EVOLVING AND WE NEED TO LOOK AT HOW WE INCORPORATE THE CULTURE OF NOW,” DORINDA COX SAYS.


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“A lot of Indigenous people like me who live in urban areas have to look at how to adapt to that environment, so that we don’t lose contact with traditional culture, but we also value and take pride in our contemporary Indigenous culture, as well as our interaction in mainstream Australian culture.” “Governance and leadership are both really important in making that happen – so people don’t get lost along the way.” Fresh from addressing the United Nations in New York on the topic of prevention of family violence in Indigenous communities and celebrating the arrival of her second child, Dorinda Cox could be excused for focusing on her own needs right now. However, after spending the last two decades in a range of roles involving community leadership, she can’t help but look for ways to build identity and leadership in her local community. Mentoring was pivotal in shaping Dorinda’s career. She was nearing the end of secondary school when a friend of her father came over to the family home in Perth and talked to her; suggesting that with her interest in sport, justice and community she should consider a career in the police force. Dorinda subsequently spent eight years in the police force as an Aboriginal Liaison Officer, specialising in sexual assault before moving on to roles in a range of health sector organisations where she has gained recognition as an expert at both State and National levels in the development of Aboriginal-specific programs dealing with sexual assault, healing and health education. Her career has led to further opportunities, authoring papers for a number of journals and being invited to speak at a range of events, leading up to her invitation to address the United Nations in 2013. Dorinda signed up for the AILC Certificate IV course in Business (Governance) in 2014 to bring together her understanding of what governance really was and how to apply it. “The course put into perspective how we already use governance in our everyday life – budgeting, managing finances and making sure all your insurances are in order.

Then it showed how these skills, which we didn’t really recognise that we already had, were directly related to governance for an organisation,” Dorinda said. “The course helped me realise the skills I had developed in my career and the importance of putting those skills of leadership and governance into practice in my own community.” Opportunities such as the imminent settlement between the West Australian Government and the Noongar people in recognition of land rights in the Perth area is expected to result in a range of new business and employment opportunities for the Noongar community – but also new responsibilities to manage and optimise outcomes from the settlement. Dorinda plans to draw on her experience in leadership and governance to set up a business consulting on leadership and governance within her community. “It can be a really lonely time being a leader, writing policy papers and speaking at forums. I’ve worked in a number of environments where you are the only Indigenous person trying to help non-Indigenous people understand our culture and the circumstances that have led to social problems such as family violence,” Dorinda says. “There is so much potential in my community, but people need the confidence to realise the skills that they have and how to harness them to make the most of the opportunities that currently exist and others that will come in the future. “We are going to have quite significant business and employment opportunities but we have to get the governance right. One of the biggest challenges with self-determination for communities like mine is to stay true to our principles going forward. After our people have been governed by other people for so long, we have to make sure we are fully prepared to effectively govern ourselves.”

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Towards the Top End Our new base in Darwin

After delivering programs in the Northern Territory for years, the AILC has decided to put down permanent roots in the Top End, moving to establish a base in Darwin. Announced at a breakfast hosted by Chief Minister the Hon Adam Giles in June, the AILC will make Darwin its first permanent presence outside Canberra, in order to build stronger relationships with partners and Alumni in the Territory.


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

We realise that if we are to build a generation of Aboriginal people capable of changing the future, capable of lifting their contribution to workplaces, to communities and to families, we needed to rapidly grow the number of leaders that we can train. AILC Chair Tom Calma said.

We have taken the step to establish a permanent base here in Darwin as the first of a series of training bases across the country, to expand our capacity to deliver quality courses to people not just in their home state, but also as often as we can, in their home town.

GOAL The NT branch will be the first of a series of new AILC branches to be established in states and territories over the next five years as the AILC seeks to achieve its goal of enrolling

1000 students per year by 2020.

The AILC has taught a range of programs in the NT in the past, including the first Indigenous leadership program ever taught to members of the Stolen Generation as well as other leadership and mentoring courses.

More than 150 Territorians are already AILC Alumni and the establishment of the new office is also designed to further strengthen the network of Indigenous leaders in the area.

In future, the AILC has plans to deliver a range of new programs in the NT, tailoring leadership and governance programs so they meet key needs. – – Plans for a leadership program taught in NT prisons to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders behind bars discover their potential, identify new opportunities for their future and avoid reoffending; and – – Plans for a school-based leadership program for Indigenous students, giving them a chance to learn key leadership skills and knowledge as part of their schooling.

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MILESTONE NORTHERN TERRITORY CHIEF MINISTER ANNOUNCES THAT THE AILC IS TO SET UP A PERMANENT PRESENCE IN DARWIN.

“The AILC’s decision to make a new home in the Territory is a win for all our Territorians.” - HON. ADAM GILES, CHIEF MINISTER, NORTHERN TERRITORY

13 June 2014: Northern Territory Chief Minister the Hon. Adam Giles hosts a breakfast to celebrate the AILC’s commitment to opening a permanent branch in the Top End. Stakeholders from across the Territory attended to hear plans for innovative new programs and collaborations.


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LEADERSHIP TOOLKIT? THE AILC HAS CHANGED THE LIVES OF THOUSANDS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE THROUGH INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE PROGRAMS – INCLUDING MORE THAN 1400 ALUMNI WHO HAVE COMPLETED ACCREDITED AILC QUALIFICATIONS. But what does the AILC actually teach? Without going into the specifics of each course, the following list provides an outline of some of the key skills and knowledge taught to AILC students.

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COMMUNICATION – – The importance of active listening and of the opportunity to express yourself – – How to communicate professionally in the workplace in order to contribute – – How to communicate better with family – – Understanding the responsibility of needing to speak up against injustice – – Practice in persuasive, non-confrontational dialogues

TEAMWORK PROBLEM SOLVING

– – Building understanding and experience with positive team dynamics through assignments and activities – – Understanding what to do when teams fail or experience tension

– – Conflict resolution and problem solving skills – – Role plays to learn practical problem solving skills and techniques

INITIATIVE –– Development of skills and understanding in networking –– Development of media and presentation skills –– Development of public speaking skills


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

SELF-MANAGEMENT –– Time-management skills and tools –– Organisational skills –– Review and reflection capabilities

STRATEGY – – Conflict resolution and problem solving skills – – Role plays to learn practical problem solving skills and techniques

KNOWLEDGE –– Understanding Australian history and culture from an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander perspective. –– Improving understanding about professional relationships and corporate behaviours –– Understanding regulatory and legislative requirements for businesses and organisations –– Awareness of resources to help graduates resolve problems themselves

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THE AILC

difference AILC courses are all delivered by Indigenous facilitators and trainers and are structured with content and learning methods that suit the diversity of learning styles among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Importantly, the AILC recognises that Indigenous leadership and governance must be drawn from an amalgam of western knowledge, traditional culture and also contemporary Indigenous community culture. Leadership must be from the heart as well as the head. Governance must reference cultural understanding within the prism of legal and regulatory requirements. Working within culturally safe environments, AILC students learn how best to work between the worlds of contemporary and traditional culture, and Indigenous and western culture, to achieve improved outcomes for themselves, their families and their communities.

––Further information on AILC courses is available online at

––

www.ailc.org.au/courses


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NO Shame in shunned fame for true leader The price of fame was simply too high when Kalan Knight traded in the chance to be a star for a job behind a bar. It was 2012 and a top-rating national TV talent show had liked his audition tape. A lot. “I got through three rounds of interviews and auditions and was expected to sing in front of a live audience in Sydney for the audition, but it turned out everyone needed a story,” Kalan says. “I told them about my life and they were really focussed on something that had happened to me when I was at boarding school. They told me all of Australia would get behind me because of my story and there was a lot of pressure. “For two weeks the producers kept ringing me, trying to convince me not to quit, but I did. I didn’t want the sob story vote, I just wanted people to support me if they liked my singing and not to be pitied.”


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Lemon Tree Passage, a small town north of Newcastle, was the winner. He took a job in the local bowling club, sings regularly at open mic competitions and even draws attention in the supermarket when he’s singing to himself. “People stop me and say, hey, you’ve really got to do something with that,” Kalan says. Ever humble, he stops short of saying the word ‘talent’ to describe his capabilities. In addition to family, he has three key passions – music, the environment and his culture.

“As a barman, you meet all sorts of people and sometimes they criticise the Aboriginal people or the culture.”

Each day as he gets ready for his shift, Kalan pins his name badge on the right side of his chest and a badge with the Aboriginal, Torres Strait and Australian flags on the left, over his heart.

He hails from the Tharawal mob, based in and around Sydney, but has grown up in Worimi country around Port Stephens, with the challenge of belonging to both cultures ever-present. Kalan found a new confidence in his identity after completing a Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership with the AILC in 2014. “Before the course I would feel a bit more reserved talking about Indigenous culture, because I didn’t feel like I knew enough, but it filled in a lot of the gaps and also gave me a lot more confidence,” Kalan says. “As a barman, you meet all sorts of people and sometimes they criticise the Aboriginal people or the culture. In the past I would have gone off and become very defensive as I am passionate about both of these things, but after the course I stand back, listen to what they are saying and then use their language to explain things back to them in a manner they would understand.

The badge was a graduation present after he completed his Certificate IV course in Indigenous Leadership with the AILC and is a reminder of his pride in being Aboriginal, as well as his pride in the positive contributions Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are making to Australia. “If you take the time to look at all the positive outcomes from Indigenous leadership around the country, it will surely dissipate any negative stereotypes about Indigenous people,” Kalan says. “My whole outlook and the way I deal with situations now has become more positive because of meeting other people in the course and getting some really useful skills. “I’ve already used some of the skills – I learned how to write a press release and put one together for a NAIDOC event and also I saw how when you build networks of people all working towards the same thing it can be really powerful.”


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Master Classes Governing Girls

an important milestone for Indigenous leaders

A unique program of Master Classes drawing out the life lessons of highly successful Indigenous women has been developed in a partnership between the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC) and Ernst & Young (EY). Indigenous and non-Indigenous business leaders wanting to continue their leadership development were quick to sign up for the Master Classes, held in Sydney in May and Canberra in June.

The Master Classes concept was developed in response to continual requests from AILC Alumni for practical, ongoing leadership development opportunities. The AILC is Australia’s only national provider of both accredited Indigenous leadership and Indigenous governance education courses and is continually seeking new ways to build networks and skills for Indigenous leaders.

The Master Classes featured a panel of highly successful Indigenous women, presenting insights “This master class series is the result of a really into the secrets of their success, effective partnership between with tips and life lessons relevant the AILC and EY – providing to Indigenous and non-Indigenous “...Indigenous leaders can practical knowledge and leaders alike. Held at EY corporate opportunities so that Indigenous offices, the events provided a grow beyond low-level leaders can grow beyond lowvaluable opportunity for the AILC roles and become leaders level roles and become leaders and EY to deliver a practical program in their own right.” in their own right.” AILC CEO tailored to build leadership capacity Rachelle Towart said. and networks with emerging and AILC CEO Rachelle Towart also established Indigenous leaders. “Australian governments and many Australian business Kate Kelleher of KC Consultancy organisations have recognised that building Indigenous Services said the Sydney event was inspirational. leadership capacity is essential in order to Close “To re-connect with those we know, to meet new the Gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, to be stimulated in thought by the panel and Australians. Events like this are a useful contribution facilitator’s stories … [it was] a great gathering of towards reconciliation.” minds,” she said. Further Master Classes are planned for later in 2014, including a new series focused on insights from Indigenous men, with requests for events in Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide and Melbourne.

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MILESTONE FIRST AILC MASTER CLASS IN SYDNEY

“To re-connect, to meet new people, to be stimulated in thought … [was] a great gathering of minds.” - KATE KELLEHER OF KC CONSULTANCY SERVICES

20 May 2014: A unique program of Master Classes drawing out the life lessons of highly successful Indigenous women was offered for the AILC’s first Master Class series, developed in a partnership

between the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC) and Ernst & Young (EY). Master Classes were initiated after repeated requests by Alumni for professional development with practical outcomes.


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LEADER FOR A NEW GENERATION AT THE FRONT OF THE ROOM, THREE OLDER ABORIGINAL WOMEN WERE ADDRESSING ABOUT 50 STAFF FROM THE OIL RIG LOGISTICS COMPANY, TELLING FORK-LIFT DRIVERS, SUPERVISORS, CLIENTS AND MANAGERS ABOUT THE FLAVOURS OF BERRIES AND NUTS FOUND IN THE LOCAL BUSH.

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Kelly Francis, who had introduced the women and organised the event, watched closely. “As part of our AILC governance course we had to organise an event, so I decided to put on a bush tucker tasting and Kimberley Survival event at my work to share my culture.” Kelly says. “I have organised a lot of events before, but because I had thought up this idea myself, I really had to make sure everything went right. “Everyone really loved it. You could tell they were interested and really listening because for the whole hour, not one person pulled out their phone to text or check their messages. “A few weeks later, our company won $500 for a Shell safety award and my boss was so impressed with the presentation by the ladies that he donated it to their community organisation, Babagarra. I was really happy with that.” Kelly signed up for the Certificate IV in Business (Governance) program in 2014 after spotting a message about the course on Facebook. “I looked at the criteria and looked through all the units they were doing and I thought it could be really relevant for my job. Because the company I work for is so unique, there is no other formal training for my position and I thought it would benefit my work skills,” Kelly says. “Being a single mum and working full-time it was a bit hard to take the course on, but they gave me some time to do it at work and also to use the computer and print off my assignments. I could also ask them for support along the way, which was really helpful. Kelly was born in Derby and grew up in Broome, spending time in both Darwin and Perth to finish her schooling before she took on a traineeship at an Indigenous radio station, Goolarri Media enterprises. She spent the year organising events, doing administration and at lunchtime, when the regular announcers took their breaks, she had her own show, playing requests for listeners who would call in from across the Kimberley. After a number of other roles, Kelly secured a job at Toll Mermaid Logistics, where she monitors operations and security while also helping to coordinate occupational health and safety. Two years in, Kelly feels like she belongs.

“I LOVE THE CHALLENGE OF IT. EVERY DAY YOU LEARN SOMETHING DIFFERENT AND THEY KEEP ON GIVING YOU NEW CHALLENGES AND NEW THINGS TO LEARN.” KELLY SAYS. “I love the challenge of it. Every day you learn something different and they keep on giving you new challenges and new things to learn.” Kelly says. “We had to do a briefing letter for our boss on the outcomes of the course and any ideas we had that the company could implement and I was really a bit terrified about writing it and the idea of actually giving it to him. Anyway, I did, and he thought it was great and we have pretty much implemented most of the ideas. “I suggested implementing a Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) but it turned out Toll Energy has a RAP that could cover us and after my briefing letter, the national office got me involved in planning the launch. “I’ve already used the skills I learned on the course. For instance, we needed to find a person to work on reception and after we had learned how to use our networks, I used my networks to find a young Indigenous person who turned out to be suitable and is now working on reception. She’s been there a few weeks now and she is bubbly, she reminds myself of me at that age.”


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OVERNANCE PRACTICALLY EVERYONE IN AUSTRALIA WANTS TO SEE THE GAP BETWEEN INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS PEOPLE CLOSED; BUT TO DO THAT, WE ALL HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE THAT MONEY INVESTED IN INDIGENOUS DEVELOPMENT IS WELL SPENT. Over the past 13 years, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC) has provided Indigenous leadership training that has transformed the lives of thousands of Indigenous people, and staff feel that they have learned a thing or two about the sorts of skills and processes required to deliver Indigenous education effectively. When KPMG conducted an independent review of our operation they found that graduates of our accredited Indigenous leadership courses increased their income by an average of almost $14,000 and more than 60% reported that they had received a promotion directly as a result of the skills and knowledge acquired from their course. After years of requests from Alumni wanting more skills to serve on boards and run their own companies, the AILC decided to develop a new governance course, calling in expertise from corporate partners to help develop the new Certificate IV of Business (Governance).

At the same time, the AILC also developed an introductory two-day Foundation Program in Governance and Leadership to provide an overview of key concepts – particularly aimed at Indigenous people involved in governance who may not have participated in education programs since leaving school. Both programs have commenced with great success in 2014 and look set to enjoy strong ongoing demand as both Indigenous and nonIndigenous people recognise the synergies of expertise in both leadership and governance. Indigenous leadership and Indigenous governance are independently important; but devastatingly effective when combined. The AILC believes that adding high quality programs in governance to its suite of Indigenous leadership courses provides an opportunity to equip Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders with a suite of skills that will enable leaders to embed positive change in their communities. AILC governance programs available: –– Two day Foundation Program in Indigenous Leadership and Governance –– Certificate IV in Business (Governance)


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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

CHOOSEing

LIFE

Years of being a patient or seeing to patients have left Vickey Hill very impatient.

Working in hospitals across Perth, Vickey Hill regularly sees non-Indigenous people walk through the door in their 80’s and 90’s, but the oldest Aboriginal person she has ever seen walk through the hospital doors was about 65. This first-hand sample of hospital wards in Western Australia’s capital is a powerful example of the real-life impacts of the Gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Documented for decades in dry government reports, the shorter life expectancy of Indigenous people suddenly becomes more real through the eyes of a hospital regular. “I met with a lovely lady who was 96 the other day in a hospital, but the oldest Indigenous person I see coming through was maybe 65,” Vickey says.


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

“It’s made me want to focus on a career based around Indigenous health, particularly working with younger kids. When kids are in primary school, they tend to be a bit more flexible and open to change. They need to be given the option to choose a healthier lifestyle and to understand that if they make the right choices, they could have a chance to live a lot longer.” Vickey completed a Certificate IV in Business (Governance) with the AILC in 2014 in order to prepare herself for running a health consulting business that she intends to establish next year, working with communities in the Northern Territory and Western Australia. At the same time, she also wanted to do the course to help raise expectations and standards of governance in Indigenous communities that she visits. “I spent about 20 years raising kids and working at what is now Centrelink, but always wanted to study,” Vickey says. “It was important to do the AILC governance course to help prepare me to run my own business, but also because I wanted to take it back to communities. If I go and work in a remote community I want to be able to ask what their policies are and whether they have a Reconciliation Action Plan in place and if they don’t have them, to help them put those in place, because governance is really important for the future of our communities. “The course has helped me understand the importance of policies and given me the confidence to ask about policies and to contribute more.” It is hard to imagine a woman more likely to achieve change. Anyone capable of raising six children while simultaneously holding down two jobs and studying multiple qualifications is clearly not short on motivation or persistence. She is predicting that she may have to force herself to ignore Facebook for a while, though, as the network updates, support and swapping of advice with AILC Alumni across the country is proving a little too distracting for now. “It really is fantastic to have a network of friends across the country. I completed an AILC Indigenous Leadership course in 2005 and we all still keep in touch. The people I know are Australia wide and good to look for info for something you don’t know. It’s a really valuable resource and the friendships just get stronger over time.”

“The course has helped me understand the importance of policies and given me the confidence to ask about policies and to contribute more.”

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Indigenous Mentoring INCREASING DEMAND FOR HIGHLY CAPABLE AND WELL-QUALIFIED ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER STAFF IS MAKING IT INCREASINGLY DIFFICULT FOR ORGANISATIONS TO HOLD ONTO THEIR BEST INDIGENOUS EMPLOYEES. Organisations seeking strong outcomes from a Reconciliation Action Plan will recognise that a tailored Indigenous mentoring program is one of the best investments that they could make to develop, retain and also to attract Indigenous staff. By providing a clear understanding of how to best forge relationships between Indigenous staff and nonIndigenous supervisors and mentors, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre’s Indigenous Mentoring program provides practical advice tailored to the needs of both mentors and mentees.

The AILC has redeveloped its popular Indigenous mentoring program to meet the diverse needs of Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants who wish to further develop their mentoring skills, communication techniques and conflict resolution in the community and workplaces. The three-day course is also useful for non-Indigenous Australians who wish to work more effectively with Indigenous Australians in the workplace and/or in Indigenous communities. The Indigenous mentoring program develops the capacity of individuals to take on personal, community, organisational, work and family leadership roles. Students learn how to recognise and capitalise on their own communication skills and build their skills in managing and mentoring. The course is designed to support and affirm Aboriginal and Torres Islander cultures in its diversity while building and developing skills to manage learning and work in diverse environments. Participants are provided with a safe and dynamic learning environment so they can develop effective mentoring and communication techniques and practice mediation and conflict resolution while maintaining culturally-appropriate communication with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The AILC believes mentoring is very important in order to: –– Encourage and support further leadership skills development; –– Support development of planning skills in Indigenous community organisations; –– Contribute to the development of other skills that are locally identified as a priority; and –– Support the development of skills identified by organisations as a priority.


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

MILESTONE FIRST COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATION PATHWAY FOR INDIGENOUS LEADERS

“This people on this pathway have the potential to write a new, positive chapter in Indigenous history.” - AILC CEO RACHELLE TOWART

April 2014: The first comprehensive education pathway for Indigenous leaders has been established by the AILC, through the development of a new Foundation Program in Indigenous Leadership and Governance which introduces participants to study, through a range

of Certificate and Diploma programs, leading to degree programs. The pathway provides a clear direction for Indigenous people seeking to build their skills in leadership and governance.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE AILC AND ITS STAFF HAVE BEEN MARKED BY A RANGE OF AWARDS RECEIVED DURING 2013-14, RECOGNISING THE EXTRAORDINARY ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE TEAM IN DEVELOPING ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S LEADING INDIGENOUS EDUCATION ORGANISATIONS.

The AILC recognised as the 2013 ACT Small RTO of the Year

Chair Dr Tom Calma AO recognised as a national leader in education, appointed Chancellor of the University of Canberra in February 2014 – the first Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander man to hold the position of Chancellor of an Australian university

CEO Rachelle Towart named as one of Australia’s 100 Most Influential Women in the 2013 AFR/Westpac Women of Influence Awards

Rachelle Towart named Australia’s Top Community CEO in the Westpac 2013 Community Leaders Awards

Rachelle Towart named Emerging Leader of the Year in the not-for-profit sector in the 2014 NAB Women’s Agenda Leadership Awards


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Board Profiles TOM CALMA AO CHAIR Dr Calma is an Aboriginal elder from the Kungarakan tribal group and a member of the Iwaidja tribal group whose traditional lands are south west of Darwin and on the Coburg Peninsula in the Northern Territory. He has been involved in Indigenous affairs at a local, state, national and international level, worked in the public sector for 40 years and is currently on a number of boards and committees focused on rural and remote Australia, health, education, justice reinvestment, reconciliation and economic development. Dr Calma is a strong advocate for Indigenous rights and empowerment; he spearheaded initiatives including the Close the Gap for Indigenous Health Equality Campaign, the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples, development of the inaugural National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy, and Justice Reinvestment. Dr Calma is Co-Chair of Reconciliation Australia. Dr Calma was appointed National Coordinator, Tackling Indigenous Smoking in 2010 to lead the fight against tobacco use in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. He was Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner (2004-10) and Race Discrimination Commissioner (2004-09) at the Australian Human Rights Commission, served as Senior Adviser to the Minister of Immigration, Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs, and represented Australia’s education and training interests as a senior diplomat in India and Vietnam (1995-2002). In 2012 Dr Calma was awarded an Order of Australia; Officer of the General Division (AO) for distinguished service to the Indigenous community and to cross cultural understanding. He was 2013 ACT Australian of the Year. In January 2014 he became the 6th Chancellor of the University of Canberra and the first Indigenous male Chancellor of an Australian university.

JASON GLANVILLE DIRECTOR Jason Glanville is a member of the Wiradjuri peoples from south-western New South Wales. He is the inaugural CEO of the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence (NCIE) based in Redfern. Prior to joining the NCIE Jason was Director of Programs and Strategy at Reconciliation Australia. Over the last twenty years Jason has worked in a range of positions in community-based Indigenous organisations, State and Federal Governments and non-government peak organisations. Jason is Chair of the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute and on the boards of Reconciliation Australia, National Australia Day Council, Carriageworks and the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre. In 2010 Jason was named in the (Sydney) magazine’s 100 most influential people of Sydney and in 2011 he was featured in Boss Magazine’s True Leaders of 2011 list.

JASON MIFSUD DIRECTOR Jason Mifsud has been leading cultural transformation across numerous sectors for over 20 years, delivering significant organisational change and development in Aboriginal Affairs. On his mother side, he is a member of the Kirrae and Peek Whurrong peoples’ of the Gunditjmara nation in southwest Victoria and his father migrated from Malta, providing him with a rich sense of cultural pride and integrity. Jason has a unique and broad skill set in business, community and sport, holding senior management and executive roles as well as playing and coaching at AFL level with the St Kilda Football Club and Western Bulldogs Football Club. He currently sits on the Board for the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre, the NAB Indigenous Advisory Group and the national reference group for Recognise, supporting constitutional change. He previously sat on the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission. He has held representative roles on the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation’s Suicide Prevention Taskforce and the Victorian Government - Ministerial Advisory Council for Indigenous Affairs and Economic development. In 2010 Jason was recognized as one of Australia’s top ten emerging leaders, winning the sport category, is an alumni of Harvard Business School and has addressed the United Nations on Indigenous Affairs. He is currently the Head of Diversity at the Australian Football League with responsibly to drive the strategic direction for the Indigenous and Multicultural portfolios.

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PROF. COLLEEN HAYWARD AM DIRECTOR Professor Colleen Hayward is Head of Kurongkurl Katitjin, Edith Cowan University’s Centre for Indigenous Education and Research. In addition to this role, in 2012 she also became Pro-ViceChancellor (Equity and Indigenous). Prior to joining ECU, Colleen was Manager of the Kulunga Research Network at the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research. For more than 30 years, Colleen has provided significant input to policies and programs on a wide range of issues, reflecting the needs of minority groups at community, state and national levels. She has an extensive background in a range of areas including health, education, training, employment, housing, child protection, law and justice as well as significant experience in policy and management. In much of this work, she draws on her qualifications including Bachelor of Education (Murdoch University), Bachelor of Applied Science (Aboriginal Community Management and Development) (Curtin University), and a Post Graduate Certificate in Cross-Sector Partnerships (Cambridge University). Professor Hayward was named the 2008 National NAIDOC Aboriginal Person of the Year Award, and was inducted into the WA Department of Education’s Hall of Fame for Achievement in Aboriginal Education in 2009. She is a member of the Executive Committee of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples. In 2011 she completed her term as a foundation member of the inaugural Board of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples. In June 2012 Colleen was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for service to tertiary education through administrative and research roles, to the advancement of the rights of Indigenous people, particularly in the areas of social welfare, law and justice and children’s health. Professor Hayward is a senior Noongar woman with extensive family links throughout the south-west of WA.

NATALIE WALKER DIRECTOR Natalie has over 15 years experience across government, not for profit and corporate sectors in various management and non-executive roles. Working predominately in the area of economic development, Natalie has extensive knowledge in economic development and supplier diversity initiatives both domestically and internationally. In 2013, Natalie founded Inside Policy, which is a national collaboration of policy wonks, political operatives and technical geeks who love making the world a better place by solving complex policy challenges in the social and economic development space. Inside Policy’s current clients include Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet, Indigenous Business Australia, Reconciliation Australia, Supply Nation and City of Sydney. Prior to founding Inside Policy, Natalie established Supply Nation, an organisation designed to integrate Indigenous Australian owned, controlled and managed businesses into the supply chains of Australia’s largest companies and government agencies. In 2012, Natalie was named as one of Australia’s 100 Women of Influence.

CHARLES PROUSE DIRECTOR Charles Prouse is a Nyikina man and former CEO of the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy (NASCA) in Redfern. Prior to that, he was the Indigenous Employment Program Manager with DEEWR in Sydney. Charles has worked with Aboriginal groups across Australia and has been involved in the delivery of Federal Environmental Management and Employment Programs for Aboriginal communities. Charles has broad experience in Community Capacity Building and Governance and is proud to be part of assisting Aboriginal people with harnessing further opportunities. He is a Board Member for the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC) and has significant networks with Indigenous community leaders across the country. Charles says “As Aboriginal people, we continue to build on the achievements of our Elders. In the 21st Century, the time has come for Indigenous people to be on equal footing with our non-Indigenous brothers and sisters and to share in the social and economic benefits of our country.”


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

MILESTONE CEO RACHELLE TOWART RECOGNISED AS AUSTRALIA’S TOP COMMUNITY CEO

“Great outcomes only consistently happen as a result of commitment, integrity and resolve. Rachelle has demonstrated those qualities in spades.” - AILC CHAIR DR TOM CALMA AO

21 Nov 2013: After securing more than $8.7 million in funding for Indigenous Education, overseeing unprecedented growth in enrolments and establishing a strong national profile for Indigenous leadership, AILC CEO Rachelle Towart was named been named

the winner of the 2013 Westpac Community Leaders Award, recognising outstanding achievements by an executive from an established not-for-profit organisation.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Appendix – financials


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 CONTENTS

Directors' Report

1

Auditors' Independence Declaration

4

Statement of Comprehensive Income

5

Statement of Financial Position

6

Statement of Changes in Equity

7

Statement of Cash Flows

8

Notes to the Financial Statements

9

Directors' Declaration

21

Auditors' Report

22


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 DIRECTORS' REPORT The directors present their report on the company for the financial year ended 30 June 2014. Information on Directors The names of each person who has been a director during the year and to the date of this report are: Dr Thomas Calma Jason Glanville Colleen Hayward Jason Misfud Charles Prouse Natalie Walker Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated. Operating Results The loss of the company after providing for income tax amounted to $22,129. Significant Changes in the State of Affairs There have been no significant changes in the state of affairs of the Company during the year. Principal Activities The principal activities of the company during the financial year were the promition and development of Indigenous leadership and the delivery of accredited and non-accredited Indigenous Leadership courses in Australia. The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre is an registered training organisation, providing a unique suite of accredited courses in Indigenous leadership and governance, as well as non-accredited short courses in leadership, cultural awareness and mentoring. The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre aims to foster and nurture the next generation of Indigenous leaders by: Delivering high quality programs that equip Indigenous leaders with skills, knowledge and opportunities in leadership and governance; Connecting and supporting Indigenous leaders by linking them with mentors in their chosen fields, and by providing opportunities to network and to learn from other graduates; Researching what makes effective leadership in an Indigenous context, so that deeper knowledge and understanding can be reached about how to support Indigenous people to move forward and tackle current disadvantage; Creating a national 'space' that encourages conversation and learning about what makes effective Indigenous leadership; Promoting the value of fostering Indigenous leadership as a key strategy for addressing the issues that confront Indigenous communities today; and Raising the profile of the value and positive impact of Indigenous leaders across Australia. Page 1

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 DIRECTORS' REPORT The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre is self-funding, gaining income from fee for service courses, course sponsors (government departments, companies and not-for-profit organisations) and from grants and donations. Most courses are sponsored, so that Indigenous students are able to attend at no cost. The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre aims to generate greater funding source diversity by 2015. No significant changes in the nature of the company's activity occurred during the financial year. Events After the Reporting Date No matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the company, the results of those operations, or the state of affairs of the company in future financial years. Future Developments and Results The Vision - Towards a critical mass of Indigenous leaders The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre is Australia's pre-eminent provider of Indigenous leadership training and faces tremendous unmet need for Indigenous leadership education. By 2017, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre should be recognised as the leading authority on Indigenous leadership in Australia, providing advice and expertise on Indigenous leadership to Government, large corporations and communities. Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre will set the benchmark for Indigenous education quality, delivering tailored and evidence-based programs. Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre's curriculum will be informed and enhanced through an extensive research program. For Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre to deliver transformational change which can deliver solutions for all Australians and mobilise leaders to inspire social and political change, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre must aim to deliver accredited courses to a minimum of 1000 individuals each year by 2017. If the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre graduates 1000 Indigenous leaders each year, we could confidently say that we would be building a critical mass of leaders able to inspire and mobilise a generation - ensuring one per cent of the Indigenous population are trained as Indigenous leaders within five years of achieving this enrolment level. Environmental Issues The company's operations are not regulated by any significant environmental regulations under a law of the Commonwealth or of a state or territory of Australia. Indemnification and Insurance of Officers and Auditors No indemnities have been given or insurance premiums paid, during or since the end of the financial year, for any person who is or has been an officer or auditor of the company. Members' Guarantee The company is incorporated under the Corporations Act 2001 and is a company limited by guarantee. If the company is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $50 each towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the company. At 30 June 2014 the total amount that members of the company are liable to contribute if the entity is wound up is $300 (2013: $300).

Page 2


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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 STATEMENT OF PROFIT AND LOSS AND OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $

2013 $

2

2,702,725 (1,369,637) 1,333,088 52,061

2,311,963 (1,108,774) 1,203,189 19,700

3

(33,919) (1,373,359) (22,129) (22,129)

(51,559) (1,308,658) (137,328) (137,328)

(22,129)

(137,328)

Note Income Revenue Cost of sales Gross profit Other income Expenditure Occupancy expenses Other expenses

2

Loss for the year Total comprehensive income for the year

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. Page 5

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 30 JUNE 2014 Note ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other current assets TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and Other Payables Borrowings Provisions Other current liabilities TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Provisions TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS EQUITY Retained earnings TOTAL EQUITY

2014 $

4 5 6

537,699 46,999 2,091 586,789

633,279 60,500 4,579 698,358

7

55,501 55,501 642,290

48,710 48,710 747,068

8 9 10 11

101,922 15,603 26,236 463,512 607,273

138,845 5,112 42,298 510,150 696,405

10

6,484 6,484 613,757 28,533

696,405 50,663

12

28,533 28,533

50,663 50,663

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. Page 6

2013 $


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014 Note

Balance at 1 July 2012 Loss attributable to members Balance at 30 June 2013 Loss attributable to members Balance at 30 June 2014

Retained earnings $

187,991 (137,328) 50,663 (22,129) 28,534

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. Page 7

Total $

187,991 (137,328) 50,663 (22,129) 28,534

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $

2013 $

2,985,756 (3,041,364) 3,386 (52,222)

2,547,895 (2,887,863) 11,588 (328,380)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment Payments for property, plant and equipment Net cash used in investing activities

7,000 (50,360) (43,360)

(50,615) (50,615)

Net decrease in cash held Cash at beginning of financial year Cash at end of financial year

(95,582) 633,281 537,699

(378,995) 1,012,276 633,281

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from customers Payments to suppliers and employees Interest received Net cash used in operating activities

4

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. Page 8


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies The financial statements cover Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd as an individual entity. Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd is a company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia.

Basis of Preparation The financial statements are general purpose financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, Australian Accounting Interpretations, other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) and the Corporations Act 2001. The company has elected by to apply the reduced disclosure reporting requirements as set out in AASB 1053: Application of Tiers to Australian Accounting Standards. As a result the financial statements and notes do not comply with International Financial Reporting Standards. The Directors have concluded that reporting under the reduced disclosure regime will not affect the relevance and reliability of the financial report and it's supporting notes. The significant accounting policies used in the preparation and presentation of these financial statements are provided below and are consistent with prior reporting periods unless stated otherwise. The financial statements are based on historical costs, except for the measurement at fair value of selected non-current assets, financial assets and financial liabilities.

Property, Plant and Equipment Classes of property, plant and equipment are measured using the cost model. Asset are carried at cost less any accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses. Costs include purchase price, other directly attributable costs and the initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and restoring the asset, where applicable. Plant and equipment Plant and equipment are measured using the cost model.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

Depreciation The depreciable amount of all property, plant and equipment, except for freehold land is depreciated in accordance with management's determination of the pattern of consumption of the asset. For most assets the straight line method best reflects the pattern of consumption and applies from the date that management determine that the asset is available for use. The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable asset are shown below. Both straight line and dimishing value methods have been used in accordance with the asset's expected pattern of consumption: Office Equipment

15% - 100%

Motor Vehicles

12.5%

Software

40% - 100%

Office Furniture

20% -100%

At the end of each annual reporting period, the depreciation method, useful life and residual value of each asset is reviewed. Any revisions are accounted for prospectively as a change in estimate.

Financial Instruments Financial instruments are recognised initially using trade date accounting, i.e. on the date that company becomes party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. On initial recognition, all financial instruments are measured at fair value plus transaction costs (except for instruments measured at fair value through profit or loss where transaction costs are expensed as incurred).

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

Loans and receivables Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. They arise principally through the provision of goods and services to customers but also incorporate other types of contractual monetary assets. After initial recognition these are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less provision for impairment. Any change in their value is recognised in profit or loss. The company's trade and most other receivables fall into this category of financial instruments. Discounting is omitted where the effect of discounting is considered immaterial or the receivable will be received in the following reporting period. Significant receivables are considered for impairment on an individual asset basis when they are past due at the reporting date or when objective evidence is received that a specific counterparty will default. The amount of the impairment is the difference between the net carrying amount and the present value of the future expected cash flows associated with the impaired receivable. For trade receivables, impairment provisions are recorded in a separate allowance account with the loss being recognised in profit or loss. When confirmation has been received that the amount is not collectable, the gross carrying value of the asset is written off against the associated impairment provision or where no impairment has been recognised previously the gross carrying amount is written off immediately to profit and loss. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against other expenses in profit or loss. In some circumstances, the company renegotiates repayment terms with customers which may lead to changes in the timing of the payments, the company does not necessarily consider the balance to be impaired, however assessment is made on a case-by-case basis. Financial liabilities Financial liabilities are recognised when the company becomes a party to the contractual agreements of the instrument. All interest-related charges and, if applicable, changes in an instrument's fair value that are reported in profit or loss are included in the income statement line items "finance costs" or "finance income". Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities 'at fair value through profit or loss' or other financial liabilities depending on the purpose for which the liability was acquired. The company's financial liabilities include borrowings, trade and other payables (including finance lease liabilities), which are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

Impairment of Non-Financial Assets At the end of each reporting period the company determines whether there is an evidence of an impairment indicator for non-financial assets. Where this indicator exists and regardless for goodwill, indefinite life intangible assets and intangible assets not yet available for use, the recoverable amount of the assets is estimated. Where assets do not operate independently of other assets, the recoverable amount of the relevant cash-generating unit (CGU) is estimated. The recoverable amount of an asset or CGU is the higher of the fair value less costs of disposal and the value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from an asset or cash-generating unit. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss is recognised in profit or loss. Reversal indicators are considered in subsequent periods for all assets which have suffered an impairment loss, except for goodwill.

Employee Benefits Provision is made for the company's liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting period. Employee benefits that are expected to be settled within one year have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled. Employee benefits expected to be settled more than twelve months after the end of the reporting period have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. In determining the liability, consideration is given to employee wage increases and the probability that the employee may satisfy vesting requirements. Cashflows are discounted using market yields on Australian Treasury bonds with terms to maturity that match the expected timing of cashflows. Changes in the measurement of the liability are recognised in profit or loss. Employee benefits are presented as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date regardless of the classification of the liability for measurement purposes under AASB 119.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

Provisions Provisions are recognised when the company has a legal or constructive obligation, as a result of past events, for which it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will result and that outflow can be reliably measured. Provisions are measured at the present value of management's best estimate of the outflow required to settle the obligation at the end of the reporting year. The discount rate used is a rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. The increase in the provision due to the unwinding of the discount is taken to finance costs in the statement of other comprehensive income.

Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprises cash on hand, demand deposits and short-term investments which are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value. Bank overdrafts and other short term credit facilities also form part of cash equivalents for the purpose of the statement of cash flows and are presented within current liabilities on the statement of financial position.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

Revenue and Other Income Revenue is recognised when the amount of the revenue can be measured reliably, it is probable that economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity and specific criteria relating to the type of revenue as noted below, has been satisfied. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable and is presented net of returns, discounts and rebates. Interest revenue Interest revenue is recognised at fair value when the right to receive the income has been established. Donations & Grants Grant revenue is recognised in profit and loss when the entity obtains control of the grant and it is probable that the economic benefits gained from the grant will flow to the entity and the fair value of the grant can be reliably measured. Grant revenue that is subject to conditions whereby the contributor requires the receiver to deliver specified outcomes will be treated as revenue in advance until such conditions are met. Once these conditions are met the revenue applicable to the given outcome will be recognised into profit and loss. Donations and bequests are recognised into profit and loss when received. Rendering of services Revenue in relation to rendering of services is recognised depends on whether the outcome of the services can be measured reliably. If this is the case then the stage of completion of the services is used to determine the appropriate level of revenue to be recognised in the period. If the outcome cannot be reliably measured then revenue is recognised to the extent of expenses recognised that are recoverable. All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST).

Page 14


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014

Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST), except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows in the statement of cash flows are included on a gross basis and the GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority are classified as operating cash flows.

Comparative Amounts Comparatives are consistent with prior years, unless otherwise stated. Where a change in comparatives has also affected the opening retained earnings previously presented in a comparative period, an opening statement of financial position at the earliest date of the comparative period has been presented.

Page 15

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $

2

Revenue and Other Income Revenue Sales revenue: Grants and course funding Donations and consulting Other revenue: Interest received Other revenue Total revenue Other income Loss on Sale of Non-current Assets Total other income

2,702,725 39,016 2,741,741

2,311,963 8,068 2,320,031

3,387 16,346 19,733

11,587 45 11,632

2,761,474

2,331,663

(6,688) (6,688)

Interest revenue from: Interest Received Total interest revenue on financial assets not at fair value through profit or loss Other revenue from: Other Revenue Total other revenue

3

2013 $

-

3,387

11,587

3,387

11,587

16,346 16,346

45 45

1,369,637 25,940

1,108,774 35,472

1,300 1,300

8,625 8,625

Loss for the year Loss from continuing operations includes the following specific expenses: Expenses Cost of sales Depreciation of property, plant and equipment Bad Debts Written Off Total bad and doubtful debts Revenue and Other Income Loss on Sale of Non-current Assets

(6,688) Page 16

-


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $

4

Cash and Cash Equivalents Petty Cash Cheque Account Bonus Cash Reserve Cash Reserve Reconciliation of cash Cash and Cash equivalents reported in the statement of cash flows are reconciled to the equivalent items in the statement of financial position as follows: Cash and cash equivalents

5

2013 $

381 238,615 288,062 10,641 537,699

24 120,929 501,946 10,380 633,279

537,699 537,699

633,279

2,261 12,320 32,418 46,999

2,760 17,733 40,007 60,500

2,091

4,579

633,279

Trade and Other Receivables Current Sundry Debtors Trade Debtors Input Tax Credits

The carrying value of trade receivables is considered a reasonable approximation of fair value due to the short term nature of the balances.

6

Other Non-Financial Assets Current Prepayments

7

Property, Plant and Equipment

Page 17

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $

2013 $

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Property, Plant and Equipment: At cost Accumulated depreciation Total Plant and Equipment

140,075 (84,574) 55,501

152,366 (103,656) 48,710

Movements in Carrying Amounts of Property, Plant and Equipment Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year. Office Equipment $

Balance at 1 July 2013 Additions Disposals Depreciation expense Carrying amount at 30 June 2014

8

Motor Vehicles

Software

$

$

Total $

28,081

13,543

1,840

5,247

48,710

7,181

23,891

13,165

1,545

45,782

(57)

(12,298)

(410)

(287)

(13,051)

(17,426)

(2,906)

(3,636)

(1,972)

(25,940)

17,779

22,230

10,959

4,532

55,501

Trade and Other Payables Current Trade Creditors Other Creditors Accruals GST Payable

9

Office Furniture $

17,153 21,639 17,297 45,833 101,922

49,303 36,619 11,610 41,313 138,845

15,603

5,112

15,603 5

5,112

Borrowings Current Credit Cards

5

Total borrowings

Page 18


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $

10

Provisions Provision for Employee Entitlements Provision for Employee Entitlements Total provisions Analysis of Total Provisions Current Non-current

11

42,298 42,298

26,236 6,484 32,720

42,298 42,298

463,512

510,150

50,662 (22,129) 28,533

187,991 (137,328) 50,663

Retained Earnings Retained earnings at the beginning of the financial year Net loss attributable to members of the company Retained earnings at the end of the financial year

13

26,236 6,484 32,720

Other Liabilities Current Income in Advance

12

2013 $

Economic Dependence Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd is dependant on funding from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet to operate the business. At the date of this report the Board of Directors has no reason to believe the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet will not continue to support the company.

14

Company Details The registered office of the company is: Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE LTD 091 455 551 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2014 2014 $ Level 1 21 Benjamin Way Belconnen ACT 2617 The principal place of business is: 245 Lady Denman Drive Yarramundi Reach ACT 2601

Page 20

2013 $


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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

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AILC Annual Report 2013/14  
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