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Generation T AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Transformation within a generation

A PLATFORM FOR LIFE #08

Positive Outcomes

for the Bush #12 Living for Tomorrow #16


THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE WOULD LIKE TO ACKNOWLEDGE OUR PRIMARY SUPPORTERS FOR 2014-15

Special thanks also to the wonderful AILC Alumni for their ongoing support and for being our dream – and of course to the facilitators, trainers, staff and Board that help us achieve greatness where only goodness seemed possible. Particular thanks to those who gave their time to be profiled in this publication, including Sarah Lugnan, Michael Weir, Graeme Smith, Kate Thomann. June Walley, Eugene Warrior & Alan Coe.

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd PO Box 186 Curtin ACT 2605 Australia P 02 6251 5770 E ailc@ailc.org.au ailc.org.au Published by the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Copyright © Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Ltd 2015 This publication is copyright. No part may be reproduced by any process except in accordance with provisions of the Copyright Act 1968. Author: Tamara Giles & Mitchell Smith Photography: Sourced by AILC Design: Smarta by Design


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Contents 02

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ABOUT AILC

ALUMNI PROFILE POSITIVE OUTCOMES FOR THE BUSH

STUDENT PROFILE KEEPING PACE

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OUR PRODUCTS

AWARD WINNING MASTER CLASS

AILC PARTNERSHIP WITH EY

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MESSAGE FROM CHAIR

STUDENT PROFILE LIVING FOR TOMORROW

ORICA INVESTS IN INDIGENOUS LEADERS

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MESSAGE FROM CEO

STAFF PROFILE MAN OF MANY TALENTS

THE BOARD

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STUDENT PROFILE A PLATFORM FOR LIFE

ALUMNI PROFILE PASSION FOR CHALLENGES

FINANCIALS

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STAFF PROFILE LEADERSHIP IS KEY

DOUBLE THE RECOGNITION

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Changing Lives AILC COURSES TRANSFORM LIVES – AND SHAPE COMMUNITIES. THE AILC DOES NOT MAKE LEADERS IT SIMPLY PROVIDES THE KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, NETWORKS AND SUPPORT THROUGH TAILORED COURSES THAT ENABLE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE TO RECOGNISE THEIR TRUE POTENTIAL AND SET A PATHWAY TO ACHIEVE IN A WAY THAT NO OTHER ORGANISATION DOES.


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About the AILC The AILC courses provide an opportunity for individuals to achieve their true potential – with tangible outcomes that can have a positive impact across families, workplaces and communities.

The AILC was established by visionary Indigenous leaders in 2001 and is still the only national provider of accredited courses in both Indigenous leadership and Indigenous governance. We can only develop a critical mass of Indigenous leaders who have been given opportunities, knowledge and skills through AILC Indigenous Leadership and governance courses through the support of our partners. Both corporate and government partnerships play an essential role in providing not only resources, but curriculum advice, networking and employment opportunities to ensure that the AILC remains Australia’s leading Indigenous education provider. Whether you are the CEO, or the newest employee on the block, you can contribute to stronger AILC partnerships and help Close the Gap between Indigenous and nonIndigenous Australians.

The AILC is the only national provider of accredited Indigenous leadership and Indigenous governance programs and also provides a range of services related to Indigenous human resources, employment and cultural competence. We already have partnerships with some of Australia’s leading corporations and understand the importance of practical courses and services that deliver tangible gain to employers and also clear benefits to Indigenous employees. The AILC is a pioneer in developing Indigenous leadership and culture and has established: • the largest network of Indigenous Alumni in Australia comprising of over 2000 Indigenous graduates. • the first comprehensive leadership pathway for Indigenous leaders from all learning backgrounds • Masterclasses in governance to provide advanced learning opportunities for Indigenous managers with experience to build on.

The AILC is the only national provider of accredited Indigenous leadership and Indigenous governance programs and also provides a range of services related to Indigenous human resources, employment and cultural competence.

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Our Products Applied Leadership The AILC has pioneered a new approach to prioritising and resolving key issues in Indigenous communities- developing applied leadership programs which equip community members with the knowledge and capabilities required to resolve their key problems.

High tech high touch environment The community discovery technique discovers both qualitative and quantitative factors that are critical to any community.

In delivering applied leadership programs, the AILC runs a one day workshop with communities to identify the priority issues they want to address in their community. The AILC then develops tailored leadership programs with content and case studies that equip participants with knowledge and skills that will help them deal with their chosen issue.

Each community workshop has about 20 participants. Participants use a combination of workbooks to record personal thoughts and sophisticated electronic keypads for anonymous instant feedback.

This concept was developed in response to feedback and ongoing consultation with Indigenous communities and can be tailored to a wide range of key issues.

The approach is undertaken with integrity, empathy and sensitivity to the environment, context and cultural norms. This develops relationships and engages the community in a quest to work together, learning from each other for better outcomes.

A good example of this was the program we put together in the Northern Territory. The communities had identified alcohol management as an issue that they needed assistance with. The AILC developed leadership courses incorporating case studies and examples that only relate to alcohol management issues. The courses were very successful in those communities, with the content designed to directly equip local people with the skills and knowledge they needed to tackle their chosen issue. Indigenous leadership programs typically provide individuals with a raft of skills that they can use in their career, their family life and their community. This approach is critically important in order to build capacity for individuals. However, in cases where training must focus on areas of community need, applied leadership programs are more appropriate.

Social indices are calculated based on the community scores and reflect value and performance. Continued engagement with the community ensures benefits and behaviour change are sustained. Social based net benefit can therefore be measured and tracked online through the AILC’s program.

Community Leadership

Collaboration and consultation by design

The AILC uses a combination of high interaction to engage with communities across Australia. Needs are discovered and ranked providing clear priorities and targets for action. Overall, the process of interaction and self-determined priorities results in significantly higher levels of understanding, agreement and focus for action. Participants feel listened to and involved.

A scientifically – valid yet highly empathetic and collaborative approach is fundamental to the design of the AILC’s community consultation process. Accessibility, willingness and ability of communities to engage are the key and people are living with significant impairments are catered for including illiteracy, impaired vision, hearing and movement. The net result is community led priority determination.


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10412NAT Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership – deliver 8 units

10413NAT Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership – deliver 14 units

BSB41910 Certificate IV in Business (Governance) – deliver 12 units

BSBCMM201A Communicate in the Workplace (C)

VU21051 Work with Indigenous Community Members to develop mentoring Skills (C)

BSBATSIC412A Maintain and protect cultural values in an organisation (C)

BSBCUS201B Deliver a service to customers (C)

VU21060 Investigate Government Structures and Decision Making Processes (C)

BSBATSIL411A Undertake the roles and responsibilities of a board member (C)

BSBWOR202A Organise and Complete Daily Work Activities (C)

VU20942 Investigate the influence of Indigenous History on the current environment (C)

BSBATSIL413A Review and apply the constitution (C)

SITXCOM201 Show Social and Cultural Sensitivity (C)

VU21048 Complete a Basic Community project with support (C)

BSBATSIM416A Oversee organisational planning (C)

CHCNET301D Participate In Networks (C)

RIILAT401D Provide leadership in the supervision of Indigenous Employees (C)

BSBATSIM417A Implement Organisational Plans (C)

CUFRES201A Collect and Organise Content for Broadcast or Publication (C)

BSBATSIC412A Maintain and Protect cultural values in an organisation (C)

BSBATSIM418A Oversee financial management (C)

VU21059 Develop Leadership Skills as a Member of an Indigenous Community (C)

HLTHIR404D Work effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (C)

BSBATSIM419A Contribute to the development and implementation of organisational policies (C)

CHCCS211B Prepare for Work in the Community Sector (E)

CHCCD509C Support Community Leadership (C)

BSBATSIC411C Communicate with the community (E)

PSPGOV201B Work in the Public Sector Environment (E)

CHCCS400C Work within a Legal and Ethical Framework (C)

BSBATSIL408C Manage a board meeting (E)

BSBIND201A Work Effectively in a Business Environment (E)

PUACOM012B Liaise with Media at the local Level (C)

BSBATSIL412A Participate effectively as a board member (E)

(C) Core Unit (E) Elective Unit

PUACOM007B Liaise with other organisation (C)

BSBATSIM414C Oversee the organisation’s annual budget (E)

BSBREL401A Establish Networks (C)

BSBATSIW416C Obtain and manage consultancy services (E)

BSBCMM401A Make a presentation (C) BSBWOR403A Manage stress in the workplace (C)

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Message from the

Chair

THE AILC IS IN A STRONGER POSITION THAN IT HAS BEEN FOR MANY YEARS, LIVING UP TO THE RESPONSIBILITY OF ITS ROLE AS AUSTRALIA’S ONLY NATIONAL PROVIDER OF ACCREDITED COURSES IN BOTH INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP AND INDIGENOUS GOVERNANCE. We wear that responsibility with pride, but also a strong sense of accountability which keeps us striving to continuously improve the way we operate. The organisation’s success has been underpinned by a transformation of the way we operate. A new organisational structure has been successful rolled out, providing greater flexibility in course delivery and greater capacity to expand in future, while maintaining our strong focus on continuous quality improvement. Staff position descriptions have been renewed and there has been a strong focus on staff training and development, building organisational capacity and strengthening governance policies and processes. Our entire curriculum has also been renewed, so that 100% of the materials used for teaching by the AILC have been developed by our Indigenous education experts, informed by the experience of our facilitators and students. These changes have been critical in enabling the AILC to keep expanding as Australia’s leading Indigenous education provider and to keep expanding the breadth and depth of outcomes that we can deliver to our communities. We do this through our ongoing commitment to high quality education and training that is flexible enough to be tailored to individual and community needs. The AILC has an exciting future, but there is still much to be done. I commend to you the milestones of 2014-15 that are outlined in this report and hope you will take as much pride as I do in the impact that our Indigenous organisation has in making Australia a stronger, fairer country that offers hope and opportunity to Indigenous people. Best wishes,

Charles Prouse Chair Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre


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Message from the

CEO

OUR ORGANISATION ACHIEVED SOME AMAZING MILESTONES IN 20150-15 HELPING UNDERSCORE OUR STATUS AS ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S LEADING INDIGENOUS EDUCATION PROVIDERS. Most importantly, we provided life-changing education and training opportunities for a record number of Indigenous leaders – delivering more accredited and also more non-accredited courses than ever before. We also found there was strong demand for ongoing education and professional development opportunities among our graduates and had won a national women’s leadership award for our sell out Governing Girls Masterclasses program, which drew strong crowds in partnership with EY. The Governing Girls program demonstrates the impact of the AILC in developing Indigenous leadership and governance capacity – creating a cohort of leaders looking for further ways to expand their horizons and contribute more to their workplace and/or community. With new partners such as EY, Mercer, Orica the White Ribbon Foundation and the Stroke Foundation on board alongside our long-running partners such as Westpac, the AILC has cemented strong links with the private sector alongside excellent relationships with all levels of government across Australia. I look forward to sharing further updates with you about our outstanding year and our potential to enable sustainable, long-term change in our community, Warm regards,

Rachelle Towart, CEO Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre

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Platf rm A AS A YOUNG BOY, EUGENE WARRIOR USUALLY HAD A BAT AND BALL OR A FOOTY IN HIS HAND. HE WAS CLEARLY DESTINED TO SUCCEED ON THE SPORTING FIELD.


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ustralian Rules football was his great passion and with a quiet determination and focus, he was able to translate his boyhood passion into a stellar playing career with leading teams Port Adelaide Magpies in the SANFL and was drafted to the Adelaide Crows in the AFL as a 17 year old in 1993.

In 2014 Eugene’s involvement with young Indigenous sportsmen was clearly articulated with his appointment as the inaugural Head Coach of the Port Adelaide AFL Academy.

“Young Aboriginal footballers come from South Australia and all over Australia to train with us at the Academy,” he said. Despite the rough and tumble associated “But it’s not just about the development with football “life was good”, Eugene said. of their football skills. It’s also about their education. We expect that each player maintains an acceptable academic level at their school.”

“Playing footy taught me a lot about respect for team mates, leadership and open communication. These are the things that we all need in the workplace as well as on the playing field. ” A sportsman’s life is not infinite and when Eugene realised that the writing was on the wall he moved into coaching. “My life followed the old adage – when you finish playing you take up coaching”. With his strong commitment to developing the skills and values of young players he coached a range of underage teams including the Flying Kangaroos – the Australian Under 15 Indigenous team.

“I see football as providing our young people with a solid platform for life.” While continuing to work with young people Eugene, through his ‘day job’ at Housing SA, also works closely with Indigenous communities around South Australia. His Indigenous Leadership studies have not only made his professional life “easier” he said but they have given expression to much of the experience he has had in life. While his decision to undertake a Certificate II was a “last minute one” he is now contemplating additional study to further his leadership skills.

m for Life

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Leader is the Key

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rior to undertaking study the AILC, Sarah had only had experience with non-accredited Indigenous training with FAHCSIA. Upon learning of the courses the AILC had to offer, she signed up to take part in both the Certificate II and IV in 2009.

The courses served not only to strengthen Sarah’s leadership capacity but also her desire to continue improve herself as a leader – she wanted to do more. After returning to work, Sarah longed to become involved with accredited Indigenous training so that she could continue to advance her leadership training and serve to help others as they look to improve their own leadership skills. 5 years later Sarah began working for the AILC, helping to deliver tailored education to Indigenous Australians across the country. As a program leader, Sarah works closely with students of the AILC as they look to build and strengthen essential leadership skills. With plenty of experience and a desire to continuously improve her leadership skills, Sarah has plenty of knowledge she can pass on to current students of the AILC.


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ership “Leadership is something that I feel strongly about and so I wanted to become more advanced in that area. The courses I did with the AILC provided a great platform for me to develop my leadership skills and have led me to where I am today working with aspiring leaders” Sarah says. “To work with the AILC was really a dream job – for 5 years I had wanted to be a part of the team and to now be able to do that has been amazing. I am now able to work with students and help to guide them on their leadership journeys while I also continue to develop my own leadership skills” Indigenous leadership capacity has been identified by the Federal Government as a key component in Closing the Gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Being the only provider of accredited Indigenous leadership training in Australia, the AILC has an incredibly important job to do – one that Sarah feels passionately about.

EVEN BEFORE THE COMPLETION OF HER STUDY WITH THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE, SARAH LUGNAN HAD A PASSION FOR LEADERSHIP.

“Leadership was really the key word for me in deciding that I wanted to work here. I really have a love for it and I wanted to become a trainer so I could then pass on the skills I have learned to aspiring leaders” Sarah says. “The leadership skills that the students can gain leadership qualities and important skills that they can then take back and incorporate in their communities, family and professional lives. Sarah says the courses the AILC run provide students with key lessons and equip them with essential skills as they embark look to develop greater leadership capacity which can then be utilised in numerous ways.

“The courses encourage the students to take a step outside their comfort zones and become more confident in themselves in a number of ways – first and foremost as an Indigenous Australian but also in their skills and abilities which can be utilised in various settings … whether that be at home or at work”. Sarah says she finds the work she does with the AILC to be enormously rewarding, particularly when the benefits of the education the students are receiving is evident. “Being able to meet all the students on course and hear their stories and assist them with their learning is one of the best parts about my job here. “When you can see that the work we are doing is making a difference in people … that is when I feel that what we do is most rewarding. We have the ability, particularly as the only provider of accredited

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Posi+ive Outcomes for the Bush

A PROUD ARRERNTE MAN AND MEMBER OF THE ORIGINAL GROUP OF AILC GRADUATES FROM THE INAUGURAL CERTIFICATE AND DIPLOMA COURSES IN 2001, GRAEME HAS ALWAYS LOOKED FOR WAYS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE WHEREVER HE GOES. “I’m always looking for outcomes,” says Graeme Smith. “Something I have always thought about wherever work has taken me is how I can make a difference and achieve the best possible outcomes. To me that is the key to being successful in any setting,” Graeme says.

Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights and Development Training at the University of NSW in 2004.

has seen the network grow from its humble beginnings to the over 2000 strong network that it is today.

Graeme says one of the best parts of being on course with the AILC was having the chance to meet with some inspirational Indigenous leaders in Mick Dodson and Lowitja O’Donoghue.

“It is amazing the number of people that I met on course that I still see around today and can have a chat with … The networking that I got out of doing courses with the AILC has stuck around through all this time and I think it is one of the most important things you can get from your time there.”

After graduating from the University “Having the chance to spend some of South Australia with an Associate time with some of the great people Diploma of Arts – Aboriginal Studies, that were there was probably the best Graeme went on to hold a number of part of my time on course. Being different roles both in Tennant Creek able to have some one on one time and Alice Springs. with them is something that I’ll never forget,” Graeme says. While working in senior management at the Central Land Council in Alice “I always remember one of the talks Springs, Graeme was encouraged to Lowitja gave where she spoke about take part in the AILC courses. leadership and how it can be a lonely journey that requires perseverance – “They said it would fit my profile and that was a big highlight for me where I wanted to go,” Graeme says. and something I’ve taken with me ever since.” “What the AILC were offering was relevant to the work I was doing Another aspect of the courses and where I wanted to go so it was Graeme says has remained with a good opportunity for me which I him over the years is the networking really enjoyed.” – he still runs into people that he met on course today. Being one of Graeme also went on to complete a Diplomacy Training Program on the original AILC Alumni, Graeme

Today, Graeme is the CEO of the Manungurra Aboriginal Corporation which was established in 2006 to represent the interests of the Kunapa clan group. Graeme took on the role following his highly successful tenure with the Clontarf Foundation Academy as the Associate Director of their Academy at the Barkly College in Tennant Creek. He also sat on numerous boards including at the Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA) where he spent time as both the Deputy Chairperson and Chairperson. In the role of CEO at Manungurra,


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which he has held since 2011, he oversees their operations which include the establishment of living areas within the Kunapa estate and the formation of a sustainable economic base in order to provide jobs, income and more opportunities to the Kanupa people as well as other Indigenous peoples in the region. Graeme says he is always looking for positive outcomes in his role at Manungurra, as he always has in his previous roles.

“One of the most rewarding things is getting small wins in difficult areas,” Graeme says. “For me it is about stepping up to the tough challenges, rather than backing away from them. Putting in hard work and affecting positive change with the work that you do is what I find to be the most important and rewarding thing”.

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2015 HAS SEEN THE HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL GOVERNING GIRLS MASTERCLASS SERIES RETURN FOR ITS SECOND YEAR, ONCE AGAIN PROVING AN INVALUABLE EXPERIENCE FOR ALL INVOLVED. THE MASTERCLASSES PROVIDED A WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY FOR ASPIRING LEADERS TO HEAR FROM SOME OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL INDIGENOUS WOMEN IN AUSTRALIA.

Award Winning

Master Classes

Organised by the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC) in partnership with Ernst & Young (EY), Governing Girls was run in two new locations in addition to Melbourne, with Adelaide and Brisbane hosting the program this year. The program is one of a number of projects that the AILC has worked closely on with EY, with whom they have a Memorandum of Understanding which was finalised in August this year. EY Oceania Accounts and Business Development Leader, Lynn Kraus, said it is a pleasure for EY to be involved with the AILC and the Governing Girls program. “EY is proud to be associated with the AILC and the work it does to provide knowledge and skills to enable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to lead in their communities and workplaces. “As a firm dedicated to empowering women in leadership we also recognise that we have much to learn from Indigenous women and their unique perspectives on leadership”, Lynn said. Governing Girls was developed in response to feedback from AILC Alumni for more ongoing leadership development opportunities. It is geared towards emerging leaders, however it is open to people in all stages of their leadership journeys.


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The Masterclasses are designed to assist leaders in developing an understanding of leadership and how the skills they learn can be applied in various settings. This includes how to improve the efficiency, effectiveness and legal compliance in both communities and the workplace. The ultimate goal of the Masterclass series is to assist Indigenous women in moving out of entry-level and middle management positions and into more senior roles. AILC CEO, Rachelle Towart, said the Masterclasses play an important role in the leadership development of emerging leaders.

“We have amazing people come to speak at our Governing Girls events and I think that emerging leaders who come along can learn a great deal from the stories that the panellists have to share. “Leadership and governance are two of the most challenging issues currently facing communities Australia-wide. The entire nation stands to benefit from the work we are doing to build the leadership skills and networks of emerging Indigenous leaders”, Rachelle said. The award winning Masterclasses place a focus the inspiring journeys of successful Indigenous women, giving those in attendance valuable insight into the secrets to leadership success. With a brand-new group of panellists this year, the Governing Girls program was able to offer fresh stories for attendees to engage with. The AILC nominated the program and won an award in the Empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in a community or organisation in Australia section of the Sustaining Women’s Empowerment in Communities and Organisations Awards (SWECO). Rachelle said winning the award was a great way for the success of the Governing Girls Masterclasses to be recognised. “We are delighted to have won an award in the Empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in Community or Organisation in Australia category.

“The Governing Girls program is something that we are very proud of and to be recognised for its success is very pleasing. It is a privilege to share the honour with our Governing Girls partners, EY, and I hope that we can work together again in the near future so that we can continue to build upon the success of this great program. “I think that one of the most exciting things about the Governing Girls concept is that it is still young. What we have achieved with this program in just two years has been amazing and I am very excited to see the program grow in coming years”, Rachelle said. Karen Mundine, Deputy CEO at Reconciliation Australia and panellist at Governing Girls in Brisbane, said she felt that the audience enjoyed the Masterclass and gained valuable insight from the experience. “I thought the audience responded really well, I know that sometimes in a big corporate room it has the potential to feel a little intimidating. When everybody came together afterwards we were able to have some really great conversations that I think they took a lot out of. “The people on the panel all have plenty of experience in both leadership and governance so it was a good opportunity to be able to pass on this knowledge to the audience. “It was nice to share the stage with the other speakers and spend time with people that are doing great work within their communities”, Karen said. The sustained success of the Governing Girls Masterclass series in its second year has provided a platform for the program to continue on into the future. Additional Masterclasses with a focus on the stories of successful Indigenous men are currently being developed to be implemented in the near future. “Governing Girls was great networking for the people that came, everyone got to meet each other and share experiences. I think one of the best parts about that is when the audience hear the stories of the panellists and realise that they aren’t so different from themselves” – Karen Mundine – Deputy CEO at Reconciliation Australia and Panellist at Governing Girls Brisbane. “I really enjoyed my involvement with Governing Girls, I thought it was a good setup and I think the people who came along took plenty away from the experience. I had quite a few women come up and talk to me afterwards, some of whom still touch base with me” – Jacki Turfrey – Director of Koori Justice at Department of Justice, Victoria and Panellist at Governing Girls Melbourne.

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Living for

ALAN COE MAKES NO BONES ABOUT THE BAD YEARS. HE’S LIVED IN DOZENS OF PLACES AND HAS HAD AN ON-AGAIN OFF AGAIN AFFAIR WITH BOOZE, DRUGS AND THE WRONG SIDE OF THE LAW FOR ABOUT FOUR DECADES.


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ut when he realised in 2012 that he was not likely to see his granddaughter turn 21 unless he changed his ways, he transformed his life – and now works to pass on his life lessons to others.

Alan was the second of seven children, growing up in Sydney, central NSW and then Gippsland in Victoria, where he started smoking marijuana at the age of 13. After a succession of jobs on the railways and the docks, Alan moved to Adelaide in 1988 to remove himself from the substances that were plaguing his life and promptly met the love of his life. They enjoyed four years as husband and wife, taking their nephew as a son, until his wife died from heart failure in 1992. A succession of jobs, towns and dalliances with “It gives you the insight and discernment to make a alcohol and drugs followed, until he spent five days conscious decision about the impact of what you do. drunk at an Aunty’s funeral in Sydney and, upon returning to Gippsland, decided enough was enough. “I finally realised that I was going to die if I didn’t change things quickly, but also I began to realise that for every action, there is a reaction – and my behaviour had been having negative consequences on a whole range of people for many years,” Alan said. “I resolved to stop drinking there and then and haven’t touched it since. I am studying a Cert IV in Alcohol and Drug Management at TAFE so that I can help other people who are in the situation I was and have been volunteering at the Yoowinna Wurnalong Healing Service in Gippsland, helping to run men’s programs there.” When the AILC Certificate II program in Indigenous leadership came along, Alan decided it was an opportunity to improve his capacity to give back to the community. “I believe I got a lot out of the AILC course. It gave me the skills and the knowledge to be able to sit down and look at things and analyse the big picture,” Alan said.

“I want to know what I do in future is positive. I don’t want to do anything with negative impacts – and I need to use the skills I learned from the AILC course to analyse the situation. “Going down to Melbourne to do the Cert II course enhanced my skills and enabled me to plan better on what I am going to do, thinking about the implications. Being able to look and assess enables you to see the whole forest and all the trees.” The other good thing about the course was the networks that I have now. I have people all over the country that I can talk to – people I can stay with, share ideas with. Because of the people that do these courses, if we are all working towards the same goal then sooner or later we are going to get there.

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MICHAEL WEIR KNEW FIRST-HAND THE VALUE OF THE LEADERSHIP TRAINING THE AILC HAS ON OFFER.


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former student of the AILC, Michael’s decision to pursue a career with the organisation was inspired by his time on course. Now working as the Curriculum Development Leader and also as a facilitator on courses, Michael has taken plenty of valuable lessons with him after earning his Certificate II in Indigenous Leadership.

Michael decided to take the course back in 2012 after it was recommended to him by a friend who had completed a course with the AILC previously. Two years later in August 2014, Michael began working with the AILC, passing on his knowledge and experience to new groups of aspiring Indigenous leaders.

“I did the course and got my Certificate II back in 2012 and at the time I was thinking it seemed like it would be a good place to work and so I looked for an opportunity here. “I thought that the work the AILC does would be pretty rewarding so it was something I was very interested in being a part of. I’ve now been here for a little over a year and have found that the job is exactly what I’d hoped it would be”. As the Curriculum Development Leader, Michael’s job is to review and update both accredited and nonaccredited training resources to ensure the content remains fresh and relevant to the communities the AILC travels to. As an occasional facilitator on courses, Michael also works closely with students during the face-to-face components of their study. Michael says there are plenty of lessons and skills that students can take from the courses the AILC runs – the same ones that he learned back when he too was a student. “Confidence and self-belief are some of the more important things the students can take away from the courses” he says.

“I think the students also learn to become more goaloriented and focused, which are two things that can be really beneficial when they take them back and apply them in the workplace after they graduate”. It is these skills that are helping to move those who graduate from the courses out of entry-level positions and moving onwards and upwards in their careers. Michael says he enjoys playing a role in developing students in this area. “These are really important skills for them to have … to be in this job and be able to help students make these changes is really rewarding. Having been able to learn these skills and more back when I was doing my course was a big part of why I wanted to come and work here. I wanted to be able to help do the same thing for other people” Michael says. As AILC courses are culturally-tailored to ensure participants can get maximum value from their study, building cultural awareness is also on the agenda for the aspiring leaders. As a facilitator, Michael is there to guide students through this, assisting them as they embark on their journeys as an Indigenous leader. “Being able to facilitate cultural awareness and creating a better understanding of Indigenous culture amongst the students I believe is one of the most valuable things we do for them here” Michael says. “To deliver this content, particularly when for many students it will be the first time they are learning about some of the topics that we cover, is something that I find to be really rewarding”. It is the students, Michael says, that make the work that he and the AILC do so worthwhile. “I enjoy the way the students respond to the course content and seeing them grow during their time with us on course” he says. “Having the chance to provide them with the knowledge they need to grow as leaders and build confidence in themselves is definitely one of the best parts about working here”.

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A PROUD WIRADJURI WOMAN, KATE THOMANN (NÉE GILBERT) HAS 20 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORKING IN THE AUSTRALIAN PUBLIC SERVICE, WORKING IN NUMEROUS ROLES INCLUDING AT THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND AGEING, (OFFICE FOR ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH) AND IN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET.

I

n this time, Kate was involved in the management of the secretariat teams supporting the Minister of Health’s National Indigenous Health Equity Council and the Minister for Environment’s Indigenous Advisory Committee.

Today, she is the CEO of the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) – a national not-for-profit professional organisation dedicated to facilitating positive health and life outcomes and cultural wellbeing amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. AIDA represents Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Doctors and medical students and aims to reach population parity of Indigenous people in the medical professions. Kate was part of the original cohort of students who took part in the inaugural AILC Certificate and Diploma leadership courses in 2001 and 2004. “Attending the courses was a really invaluable experience and one that helped facilitate my leadership journey,” Kate says.

Although Kate had completed courses in leadership before, the AILC courses were the first courses she had participated in with an Indigenous focus. Kate says the culturally-tailored and culturally-safe environment of the AILC courses provided a unique experience that proved to be a foundational stepping stone in her leadership journey.

“For me the AILC course really set the foundation for growth. The reason why the courses were so important was because Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were teaching the course and participating in the course.

“You are in a culturally safe space surrounded by your own people and you get to undertake an amazing leadership journey delivered by high quality professionals who are experts in their field. It is a really empowering experience”. Kate has won a number of awards including two Australia Day Achievement Awards – one in 2011 and one in 2015, recognising her for her outstanding achievements while working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs. In addition, Kate was recently rewarded a Roberta Sykes Indigenous Education Foundation bursary through the Chief Executive Women and the Aurora Project. Through this scholarship, Kate attended the Leading for Results Program in Singapore in 2015. The five day program for Executive Leaders was delivered by INSEAD – one of the largest and globally renowned international business schools.


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Appointed to her current role at AIDA in mid-2014, Kate also represents the organisation at the National Health Leadership Forum and the Close the Gap Steering Committee. “Becoming a CEO was more accidental than aspirational … I was encouraged to apply and ended up winning the job. Learning to run a national organisation has been a pretty intense journey. Thankfully I have the support of a good board, a fantastic professional team in the AIDA Secretariat and the support of my husband, family and close friends,” Kate says.

“It helps to give me the resilience that I need to get up and go to work every day knowing that I’m working for a cause that I believe in” says Kate. “For me it is about stepping up to the tough challenges, rather than backing away from them. Putting in hard work and affecting positive change with the work that you do is what I find to be the most important and rewarding thing”.

Kate is passionate about her work with the organisation, pushing for positive outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and working to increase the number of Indigenous doctors across all medical professions and specialities.

“I’ve always worked really hard throughout my life to contribute towards improving the health and life outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and that’s where I get my passion and enthusiasm from.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Double the Double recognition 2015 HAS BEEN ANOTHER OUTSTANDING YEAR FOR THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE, WITH THE ORGANISATION BEING RECOGNISED FOR ITS CONTINUED SUCCESS. This year the AILC was once again a proud winner at the ACT Training Excellence Awards. These awards celebrate the efforts and achievements of organisations which deliver vocational training from within the ACT. The AILC was recognised for its excellence in delivering accredited Indigenous training to communities around Australia with the ACT Small Registered Training Organisation of Year award. This is the second time in just three years that the AILC has won the award, having been the recipient at the 2013 awards as well. AILC CEO, Rachelle Towart says,

“To win this award once was a fantastic achievement but a second time just confirms the success of the work we do at the AILC.” Indigenous leadership and governance capacity has been identified by successive Federal Governments as critically important to ‘Closing the Gap’. The AILC is able to fulfil this need through flexible teaching models which can be catered to people from a wide range of backgrounds.

The AILC currently offers three accredited courses which include a Certificate II and IV in Indigenous Leadership and Certificate IV in Business (Governance). These courses are designed to improve the leadership and governance skills of students and give them a platform to move onwards and upwards in their careers. The skills that students take away from the AILC’s courses are not limited to use only in the workplace, however. They can also be utilised in family and community settings, meaning graduates can become leaders in every sense of the word. With a specialisation in place-based education, the AILC is able to run courses throughout Australia including in remote locations. This broadens the reach of the AILC; rather than students having to travel to Canberra, the AILC can come to them. The success at the ACT Training Awards is recognition of the importance of the work that the AILC does and excellence in delivering vocational leadership training. As a result of winning the award, the AILC had the opportunity to take out the award at the Australian Training Awards for Best Small Registered Training Organisation in Australia in Hobart in November 2015. Rachelle says, “If the AILC won a National award, it would be a true testament to the hard work of the team AILC.” “Working in this space is a truly rewarding experience and winning a National award would be the icing on the cake.”


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

KEEPING

P A C E FOR JUNE WALLEY, SHARING INFORMATION IS VITAL TO ONE’S JOURNEY IN LIFE.

F

rom the beginning of her working days she has wanted to link, refer and share her knowledge and experiences with others.

“I have always wanted people to know,” she said. “Gaps need to be closed”. Brought up in a small country town in Western Australia, she saw or experienced discrimination, ridicule and domestic violence. “My family was a very proud family, they were always acknowledged and respected. They stood out within our community because of their sporting abilities and work ethic,” she said. But caring, nurturing and an irrepressible energy are the key facets of a personality that has shaped June’s personal journey. “My Mum, one of the Stolen Generation, was very caring, but equally strong-


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

willed. She instilled in me powerful nurturing values while my Dad taught me to grab every opportunity that came my way – opportunities which he did not have. Together, they encouraged me to become a worthy person as I made my way along my individual path. “I was not going to let those barriers stand in my way.” June’s caring for others was initially expressed in her work as a nurse. After qualifying as a Mothercraft nurse, she studied further to become an Enrolled Nurse, taking positions in Perth, Sydney and finally Broome, where she arrived in 1985. But her need for intellectual stimulation was stronger than any complacent acceptance of things as they are.

“Being stuck in the one place or not moving quickly enough is not where I want to be for my personal and professional growth”.

With very few colleagues scattered around Australia doing similar work she undertook, in quick succession, her Cert II in Indigenous Leadership in Darwin in December 2014 and her Cert IV in Business (Governance) in Coffs Harbour in April 2015. June found the study quite inspirational. She admitted that when it came to organisational processes she was “a few paces behind” but with the mixed dynamics and interactivity of her study group she caught up.

So, in 2008, after resigning from the WA Country Health Services after 20 years, she recognised another opportunity and joined the “The course really spelled out how Department of Human Services in Broome as a Medicare Liaison officer. corporate Indigenous organisations should operate,” she said. After a few years, however, June felt “While your experience and intuition that there was still a great deal that give you a sense of what should be she didn’t know. She realised that done, the Cert IV gives you the all her remote location was not helping the important theory and structures”. her to grow, to excel and to use her intelligence to its full capacity.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

AILC partnership with

EY

THE PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE (AILC) AND ERNST & YOUNG (EY) WAS FORMALISED THROUGH A MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) SIGNED THIS YEAR IN AUGUST.

T

he MoU solidifies the long standing relationship between the AILC and EY, taking the partnership between the organisations to the next level.

The partnership places a focus on leadership, governance and workforce development and will ensure both organisations are in a stronger position to secure opportunities in the Indigenous sector. The AILC and EY have worked closely together on a number of projects over the past two years including the award winning Governing Girls program. AILC CEO Rachelle Towart says the AILC is excited about the opportunities that the MoU with EY will bring for both organisations. “We felt it was time to formalise our partnership so we can tackle the issues surrounding Indigenous disadvantage from a number of levels and in a number of states with both companies having a national presence”, Rachelle said.

“As a training organisation we are here to give Indigenous people the skills to be able to take control and lead their own lives. “Having an MoU with EY allows us to access further opportunities for our clients as well as the sharing of cultures not just from an Indigenous perspective but from a corporate and non for profit perspective also.” Director at EY, Mark Dingle, says the MoU signing is a sign of both EY and the AILC’s long-term commitment to their relationship. “Having a formalised commitment with the AILC makes the partnership more tangible and demonstrates both our and the AILC’s clients that we are committed to a long term relationship”, Mark said. “It shows that it is not just about moving along and working with each other, but about making it sustainable. The MoU signing opened up dialogue about what we really wanted in terms of a partnership and examine our relationship and think about what we could do more of together”.


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

27

Orica invest in

Indigenous leaders ORICA IS INVESTING IN THE INDIGENOUS LEADERS OF TODAY AND TOMORROW THROUGH A THREE-YEAR PARTNERSHIP WITH THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE (AILC), WHICH HAS DELIVERED THE FIRST OF SIX ORICA SPONSORED LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE WORKSHOPS. Orica’s Perth office hosted the inaugural two-day course for 20 participants from a range of organisations including Rio Tinto, the University of Western Australia and state government departments.

ABOUT THE AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE (AILC) The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC) courses unlock opportunities for Indigenous people of all ages to develop their careers and expand the ways they contribute to the community. Visit ailc.org.au

The AILC’s CEO, Rachelle Towart, attended on Day 2 to lend personal support to the partnership that will also see Orica support three Advanced Diploma scholarships. “The AILC is very excited to partner with Orica on this initiative,” Rachelle said. “Participants in Orica sponsored workshops will benefit from a better understanding of applied leadership, governance and how to make things happen on the ground, and in the background, Orica and the AILC can learn from each other.” Orica’s Perth-based Regional Environmental Manager – AusPac, Leon Staude, said that hosting the group on site meant that local staff could become familiar with the Program, and the group could ask questions about Orica and the broader mining industry. “Having the opportunity to host the group provided staff with an insider’s view on the AILC’s unique and powerful approach to developing Indigenous leaders,” Leon said. “The group was really interested in Orica’s business and some robust discussions were had around the industry’s environmental, sustainable development and product stewardship challenges.” The AILC’s mission “to empower Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples through unique educational opportunities to be inspirational leaders of today and tomorrow” is realised through delivering accredited courses in Indigenous Leadership, and non-accredited short courses in specific leadership skills and diversity mentoring. Orica sponsored workshops were held in locations relevant to Orica operations with the last workshop held in Newcastle in September.

ABOUT ORICA’S COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Launched in July 2014, the Community Partnerships Program provides corporate funding for initiatives that demonstrate Orica’s commitment to corporate social responsibility and provide tangible results for host communities. A key objective of the program is to channel funds to regions proportionally to reflect Orica’s operational footprint. Orica is committed to effective and targeted engagement with the communities that host the Company’s operations.


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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

The Board

Charles Prouse, Chair

Professor Tom Calma AO

Natalie Walker

Charles Prouse is a Nyikina man and former CEO of the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy (NASCA) in Redfern. Prior to that, he was the Indigenous Employment Program Manager with DEEWR in Sydney. Charles has worked with Aboriginal groups across Australia and has been involved in the delivery of Federal Environmental Management and Employment Programs for Aboriginal communities.

Professor Calma is an Aboriginal elder from the Kungarakan tribal group and a member of the Iwaidja tribal group in the Northern Territory. He joined the AILC Board in 2009 and served as Chair from 2011-2014. Professor Calma is Chancellor of the University of Canberra, a former Social Justice and Race Discrimination Commissioner and senior diplomat and has been involved in Indigenous affairs at a local, community, and state, national and international level. He has worked in the public sector for over 40 years. Tom is the National Coordinator and Tackling Indigenous Smoking, a consultant, patron of three national organisations, Co-chair of Reconciliation Australia, and was awarded an Order of Australia, General Division (AO) in 2012, as well as a member of numerous boards and committees. He holds honorary doctorates from Charles Darwin, Curtin and Flinders universities.

Natalie has over 15 years experience across government, not for profit and corporate sectors in various management and non-executive roles. Working predominately in the area of economic development, Natalie has extensive knowledge in economic development and supplier diversity initiatives both domestically and internationally.

Charles has broad experience in community capacity building and governance and is proud to be part of assisting Aboriginal people with harnessing further opportunities. He is the Chairman of the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC) and has significant networks with Indigenous community leaders across the country. Charles says “As Aboriginal people, we continue to build on the achievements of our Elders. In the 21st Century, the time has come for Indigenous people to be on equal footing with our nonIndigenous brothers and sisters and to share in the social and economic benefits of our country.”

In 2013, Natalie founded Inside Policy, which is a national collaboration of policy wonks, political operatives and technical geeks who love making the world a better place by solving complex policy challenges in the social and economic development space. Inside Policy’s current clients include Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet, Indigenous Business Australia, Reconciliation Australia, Supply Nation and City of Sydney. Prior to founding Inside Policy, Natalie established Supply Nation, an organisation designed to integrate Indigenous Australian owned, controlled and managed businesses into the supply chains of Australia’s largest companies and government agencies. In 2012, Natalie was named as one of Australia’s 100 Women of Influence.


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Jason Glanville

Prof. Colleen Hayward AM

Jason Mifsud

Jason is a member of the Wiradjuri peoples from south-western New South Wales. He is the Chair of the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute – a national centre of governance excellence, connecting Indigenous Australians to worldclass governance practice.

Professor Colleen Hayward is Head of Kurongkurl Katitjin, Edith Cowan University’s Centre for Indigenous Education and Research. In addition to this role, in 2012 she also became Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Equity and Indigenous). Prior to joining ECU, Colleen was Manager of the Kulunga Research Network at the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research.

Jason Mifsud has been leading cultural transformation across numerous sectors for over 20 years, delivering significant organisational change and development in Aboriginal Affairs.

Jason was the inaugural CEO of the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence (NCIE) – a powerhouse based in the community of Redfern that is transforming the lives and prospects of the next generation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children by fostering aspiration, achievement and excellence. The driving force behind Jason’s determined leadership is to see an Australia that believes in the power and necessity of Indigenous-led decision making, driven by a focus on strengths and excellence, rather than disadvantage. In addition to the AILC, Jason is a board member of the National Australia Day Council, Reconciliation Australia, and leading edge creative arts organisation, Carriageworks in Sydney. He is a member of both the AFL Aboriginal Advisory Council and the editorial board for the Journal of Indigenous Policy. Until recently he was also a Trustee of the Australian Museum and was a member of the Steering Committee for the creation of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples.

For more than 30 years, Colleen has provided significant input to policies and programs on a wide range of issues, reflecting the needs of minority groups at community, state and national levels. She has an extensive background in a range of areas including health, education, training, employment, housing, child protection and law & justice as well as significant experience in policy and management. In much of this work, she draws on her qualifications including Bachelor of Education (Murdoch University), Bachelor of Applied Science (Aboriginal Community Management and Development) (Curtin University), and a Post Graduate Certificate in CrossSector Partnerships (Cambridge University).

On his mother side, he is a member of the Kirrae and Peek Whurrong peoples’ of the Gunditjmara nation in southwest Victoria and his father migrated from Malta, providing him with a rich sense of cultural pride and integrity. Jason has a unique and broad skill set in business, community and sport, holding senior management and executive roles as well as playing and coaching at AFL level with the St Kilda Football Club and Western Bulldogs Football Club. He currently sits on the Board for the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre, the NAB Indigenous Advisory Group and the national reference group for Recognise, supporting constitutional change. He previously sat on the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission. He has held representative roles on the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation’s Suicide Prevention Taskforce and the Victorian Government - Ministerial Advisory Council for Indigenous Affairs and Economic development.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Appendix – financials


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Contents

For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

Page Financial Statements Directors' Report Auditors Independence Declaration under Section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001 Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income Statement of Financial Position Statement of Changes in Equity Statement of Cash Flows Notes to the Financial Statements Directors' Declaration Independent Audit Report

1 4 5 6 7 8 9 18 19


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Directors' Report 30 June 2015

The directors present their report on Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited for the financial year ended 30 June 2015. 1.

General information Information on directors The names of each person who has been a director during the year and to the date of this report are: Dr Thomas Calma Jason Glanville Colleen Hayward Jason Misfud Charles Prouse Natalie Walker Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated. Principal activities The principal activities of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited during the financial year the promotion and development of Indigenous leadership and the delivery of accredited and non-accredited Indigenous Leadership courses in Australia. The Company is a registered training organisation providing a unique suite of accredited courses in Indigenous leadership and governance, as well as non-accredited short courses in leadership, cultural awareness and mentoring. The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre aims to foster an nurture the next generation of Indigenous leaders by: Delivering high quality programs that equip Indigenous leaders with skills, knowledge and opportunities in leadership and governance; Connecting and supporting Indigenous leaders by linking them with mentors in their chosen fields, and by providing opportunities to network and to learn from other graduates; Researching what makes effective leadership in an Indigenous context, so that deeper knowledge and understanding can be reached about how to support Indigenous people to move forward and tackle current disadvantages; Creating a national 'space' that encourages conversation and learning about what makes effective Indigenous leadership; Promoting the value of fostering Indigenous leadership as a key strategy for addressing the issues that confront Indigenous communities today; and Raising the profile of the value and positive impact of Indigenous leaders across Australia. The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre is self-funding, gaining income from fee for service courses, course sponsors (Government departments, companies and not-for-profit organisations) and from grants and donations. Most courses are sponsored, so that Indigenous students are able to attend at no cost. No significant changes in the nature of the Company's activity occurred during the financial year.

1

33


34

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Directors' Report 30 June 2015

Members guarantee Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is a company limited by guarantee. In the event of, and for the purpose of winding up of the company, the amount capable of being called up from each members and any person or association who ceased to be a member in the year prior to the winding up, is limited to $ 300 for members that are corporations and $ 300 for all other members, subject to the provisions of the company's constitution. 2.

Other items Future developments and results The Vision - Towards a critical mass of Indigenous leaders The Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre is Australia's pre-eminent provider of Indigenous leadership training and faces tremendous unmet need for Indigenous leadership education. By 2017, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre should be recognised as the leading authority on Indigenous leadership in Australia, providing advice and expertise on Indigenous leadership to Government, large corporations and communities. Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre will set the benchmark for Indigenous education quality, delivering tailored and evidence-based programs. The curriculum will be informed and enhances through an extensive research program. For the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre to deliver transformational change which can deliver solutions for all Australians and mobilise leaders to inspire social and political change, the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre must aim to deliver accredited courses to a minimum of 1000 individuals each year by 2017. If the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre graduates 1000 Indigenous leaders each year, we could confidently say that we would be building a critical mass of leaders able to inspire and mobilise a generation - ensuring one per cent of the Indigenous population are trained Indigenous leaders within five years of achieving enrolment level. Meetings of directors During the financial year, 3 meetings of directors (including committees of directors) were held. Attendances by each director during the year were as follows: Directors' Meetings Number eligible to Number attend attended

Dr Thomas Calma

3

Jason Glanville

3

3 1

Colleen Hayward

3

2

Jason Misfud

3

2

Charles Prouse

3

3

Natalie Walker

3

3

Auditor's independence declaration The lead auditor's independence declaration in accordance with section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001, for the year ended 30 June 2015 has been received and can be found on page 4 of the financial report.

2


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Directors' Report 30 June 2015

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors:

Director: ...............................................................

Director: ................................................................

Dated this 28th day of October 2015

3

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36

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Auditors Independence Declaration under Section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001 to the Directors of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, during the year ended 30 June 2015, there have been: (i)

no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements as set out in the Corporations Act 2001 in relation to the audit; and

(ii)

no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

Hardwickes Chartered Accountants

Amanda O'Reilly CA Partner 28 October 2015 Deakin, ACT

4


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

2015 Note

$

2014 $

2,653,563 (880,073)

2,702,725 (1,369,614)

1,773,490 48,090 (65,484) (21,637) (1,338,577) (230,369) (613)

1,333,111 52,060 (79,258) (18,493) (1,094,973) (206,533) (8,043)

Profit before income tax Income tax expense

164,900 -

(22,129) -

Profit for the year

164,900

(22,129)

Total comprehensive income for the year

164,900

(22,129)

Revenue Cost of sales

2

Gross profit Other income Marketing expenses Occupancy costs Administrative expenses Other expenses Finance costs

2

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 5

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38

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Statement of Financial Position 30 June 2015

Note ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other assets

3 4 6

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment

5

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

2015

2014

$

$

300,426 594,313 41,623

537,699 12,320 4,352

936,362

554,371

100,462

55,501

100,462

55,501

1,036,824

609,872

182,557 11,393 38,140 602,291

69,505 15,602 26,236 463,512

834,381

574,855

9,010

6,484

9,010

6,484

TOTAL LIABILITIES

843,391

581,339

NET ASSETS

193,433

28,533

193,433

28,533

193,433

28,533

TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables Borrowings Employee benefits Other financial liabilities

7 8 10 9

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Employee benefits

10

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

EQUITY Retained earnings TOTAL EQUITY

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 6


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Statement of Changes in Equity For the Year Ended 30 June 2015 2015 Retained Earnings

Total

$

$

Balance at 1 July 2014 Profit attributable to members of the entity

28,533 164,900

28,533 164,900

Balance at 30 June 2015

193,433

193,433

2014

Balance at 1 July 2013 Profit attributable to members of the entity Balance at 30 June 2014

Retained Earnings

Total

$

$

50,662 (22,129)

50,662 (22,129)

28,533

28,533

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 7

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40

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Statement of Cash Flows

For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

Note CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES: Receipts from customers Payments to suppliers and employees Interest received Interest paid Net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities

12

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES: Proceeds from sale of plant and equipment Purchase of property, plant and equipment Net cash used by investing activities Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year Cash and cash equivalents at end of financial year

3

2015

2014

$

$

2,529,698 (2,723,099) 21,297 (613)

2,985,756 (3,041,364) 3,386 -

(172,717)

(52,222)

(64,555)

7,000 (50,360)

(64,555)

(43,360)

(237,272) 537,698

(95,582) 633,280

300,426

537,698

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 8


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

The financial report covers Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited as an individual entity. Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is a not-for-for profit Company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. The functional and presentation currency of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is Australian dollars. The financial report was authorised for issue by the Directors on . Comparatives are consistent with prior years, unless otherwise stated. The Company is an entity to which ASIC Class Order 98/100 applies and, accordingly amounts in the financial statements and Directors' Report have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars. Basis of Preparation The financial statements are general purpose financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements, Australian Accounting Interpretations, other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board and the Corporations Act 2001. The financial statements have been prepared on an accruals basis and are based on historical costs modified, where applicable, by the measurement at fair value of selected non-current assets, financial assets and financial liabilities. Significant accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements are presented below and are consistent with prior reporting periods unless otherwise stated. 1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (a)

Income Tax The Company is exempt from income tax under Division 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.

(b)

Revenue and other income Revenue is recognised when the amount of the revenue can be measured reliably, it is probable that economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Company and specific criteria relating to the type of revenue as noted below, has been satisfied. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable and is presented net of returns, discounts and rebates. All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST). Grant revenue Grant revenue is recognised in the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income when the entity obtains control of the grant, it is probable that the economic benefits gained from the grant will flow to the entity and the amount of the grant can be measured reliably. When grant revenue is received whereby the entity incurs an obligation to deliver economic value directly back to the contributor, this is considered a reciprocal transaction and the grant revenue is recognised in the statement of financial position as a liability until the service has been delivered to the contributor, otherwise the grant is recognised as income on receipt.

9

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42

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies continued Donations Donations and bequests are recognised as revenue when received. Interest revenue Interest is recognised using the effective interest method. Rendering of services Revenue in relation to rendering of services is recognised depending on whether the outcome of the services can be estimated reliably. If the outcome can be estimated reliably then the stage of completion of the services is used to determine the appropriate level of revenue to be recognised in the period. If the outcome cannot be reliably estimated then revenue is recognised to the extent of expenses recognised that are recoverable. Other income Other income is recognised on an accruals basis when the Company is entitled to it. (c)

Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenue, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST), except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). Receivables and payable are stated inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows in the statement of cash flows are included on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as operating cash flows.

(d)

Property, Plant and Equipment Each class of property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or fair value less, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment of losses. Items of property, plant and equipment acquired for nil or nominal consideration have been recorded at the acquisition date fair value. Where the cost model is used, the asset is carried at its cost less any accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses. Costs include purchase price, other directly attributable costs and the initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and restoring the asset, where applicable. Assets measured using the revaluation model are carried at fair value at the revaluation date less any subsequent accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. Revaluations are performed whenever there is a material movement in the value of an asset under the revaluation model.

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AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies continued (d)

Property, Plant and Equipment continued Plant and equipment Plant and equipment are measured using the cost model. Depreciation Property, plant and equipment is depreciated using both straight-line & diminishing value methods over the assets useful life to the Company, commencing when the asset is ready for use. The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable asset are shown below: Fixed asset class Depreciation rate Furniture, Fixtures and Fittings 20% - 100% Motor Vehicles 12.5% Office Equipment 15% - 100% Computer Software 40% - 100% At the end of each annual reporting period, the depreciation method, useful life and residual value of each asset is reviewed. Any revisions are accounted for prospectively as a change in estimate.

(e)

Financial instruments Financial instruments are recognised initially using trade date accounting, i.e. on the date that the Company becomes party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. On initial recognition, all financial instruments are measured at fair value plus transaction costs (except for instruments measured at fair value through profit or loss where transaction costs are expensed as incurred). Impairment of financial assets At the end of the reporting period the Company assesses whether there is any objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. Financial assets at amortised cost If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss on financial assets carried at amortised cost has been incurred, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the financial assets original effective interest rate. Impairment on loans and receivables is reduced through the use of an allowance accounts, all other impairment losses on financial assets at amortised cost are taken directly to the asset. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against other expenses in profit or loss. Available-for-sale financial assets A significant or prolonged decline in value of an available-for-sale asset below its cost is objective evidence of impairment, in this case, the cumulative loss that has been recognised in other comprehensive income is

11

43


44

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies continued reclassified from equity to profit or loss as a reclassification adjustment. Any subsequent increase in the value of the asset is taken directly to other comprehensive income. (f)

Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprises cash on hand, demand deposits and short-term investments which are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value. Bank overdrafts also form part of cash equivalents for the purpose of the statement of cash flows and are presented within current liabilities on the statement of financial position.

(g)

Employee benefits Provision is made for the Company's liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting period. Employee benefits that are expected to be wholly settled within one year have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled. Employee benefits expected to be settled more than twelve months after the end of the reporting period have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. In determining the liability, consideration is given to employee wage increases and the probability that the employee may satisfy vesting requirements. Cashflows are discounted using market yields on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match the expected timing of cashflows. Changes in the measurement of the liability are recognised in profit or loss. Employee benefits are presented as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the Company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date regardless of the classification of the liability for measurement purposes under AASB 119.

(h)

Economic dependence Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is dependent on the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet for the majority of its revenue used to operate the business. At the date of this report the directors have no reason to believe the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet will not continue to support Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited.

(i)

Adoption of new and revised accounting standards During the current year, the following standards became mandatory and have been adopted retrospectively by the Company: •

AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement

AASB 119 Employee Benefits

AASB 127 Separate Financial Statements

AASB 2012-9 Amendments to AASB 1048 arising from the Withdrawal of Australian Interpretation 1039

AASB 2012-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Disclosures - Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities

The accounting policies have been updated to reflect changes in the recognition and measurement of assets, 12


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies continued (i)

Adoption of new and revised accounting standards continued liabilities, income and expenses and the impact of adoption of these standards is discussed below. AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement does not change what and when assets or liabilities are recorded at fair value. It provides guidance on how to measure assets and liabilities at fair value, including the concept of highest and best use for non-financial assets. AASB 13 has not changed the fair value measurement basis for any assets or liabilities held at fair value, however additional disclosures on the methodology and fair value hierarchy have been included in the financial statements. AASB 119 Employee benefits changes the basis for determining the income or expense relating to defined benefit plans and introduces revised definitions for short-term employee benefits and termination benefits. The Company reviewed the annual leave liability to determine the level of annual leave which is expected to be paid more than 12 months after the end of the reporting period. Whilst this has been considered to be a long-term employee benefits for the purpose of measuring the leave under AASB 119, the effect of discounting was not considered to be material and therefore has not been performed. In accordance with the transition provisions in the standard, the comparative figures have been restated, where applicable.

2

Revenue and Other Income Revenue from continuing operations Finance income includes all interest-related income, other than those arising from financial assets at fair value through profit or loss. The following amounts have been included in the finance income line in the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income for the reporting periods presented: 2015 2014 $ Sales revenue - Grants and course funding - Donations and consulting

$

2,653,563 26,792

2,702,725 39,016

2,680,355

2,741,741

Finance income - Other interest received

21,297

3,386

Finance income

21,297

3,386

Other revenue - Loss on sale of non-current assets - Other income

Total Revenue

21,297

13,044

2,701,652

2,754,785

2015

2014

$ Other income

(6,688) 16,346

$ -

16,346

13

45


46

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015 Loss on sale of non-current assets Donations and consulting

3

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand Cash at bank

4

Trade and other receivables

26,792

(6,688) 39,016

26,792

48,674

2015

2014

$

$

377 300,049

381 537,318

300,426

537,699

2015

2014

$

$

CURRENT Trade receivables Other receivables

592,681 1,632

12,320 -

Total current trade and other receivables

594,313

12,320

The carrying value of trade receivables is considered a reasonable approximation of fair value due to the short-term nature of the balances. 5

Property, plant and equipment PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Furniture, fixtures and fittings At cost Accumulated depreciation Total furniture, fixtures and fittings

12,029 (8,139)

10,691 (6,159)

3,890

4,532

Motor vehicles At cost Accumulated depreciation

51,954 (4,666)

23,891 (1,661)

Total motor vehicles

47,288

22,230

111,962 (69,461)

79,264 (61,485)

42,501

17,779

Office equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Total office equipment

14


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

5

Property, plant and equipment continued Software At cost Accumulated depreciation

28,685 (21,902)

26,229 (15,269)

6,783

10,960

100,462

55,501

Total software Total property, plant and equipment (a)

Movements in Carrying Amounts Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: Furniture, Fixtures and Motor Office Fittings Vehicles Equipment Software $

$

$

$

Year ended 30 June 2015 Balance at the beginning of year Additions Depreciation expense

4,532 1,338 (1,980)

22,230 28,063 (3,005)

17,779 32,698 (7,976)

10,960 2,456 (6,633)

Balance at the end of the year

3,890

47,288

42,501

6,783 Total $

6

Year ended 30 June 2015 Balance at the beginning of year Additions Depreciation expense

55,501 64,555 (19,594)

Balance at the end of the year

100,462

Other non-financial assets

CURRENT Prepayments 7

Trade and other payables

CURRENT Trade payables

2015

2014

$

$

41,623

4,352

2015

2014

$

$ 1,686

16,278

15

47


48

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

7

8

9

Trade and other payables continued Accrued expenses Other payables

Borrowings

53,226

182,557

69,504

2015

2014

$

$

CURRENT Secured liabilities: Bank overdraft

11,393

15,602

Total current borrowings

11,393

15,602

Other Financial Liabilities

CURRENT Income in advance 10

89,173 91,698

Employee Benefits

Current liabilities Provision for employee benefits

2015

2014

$

$

602,291

463,512

2015

2014

$

$

38,140

26,236

38,140

Non-current liabilities Long service leave 11

26,236

2015

2014

$

$ 9,010

6,484

Members' Guarantee The Company is incorporated under the Corporations Act 2001 and is a Company limited by guarantee. If the Company is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $ 300 each towards meeting any outstandings and obligations of the Company.

16


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2015

12

Cash Flow Information (a)

Reconciliation of cash

Cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the statement of cash flows is reconciled to items in the statement of financial position as follows: Cash and cash equivalents Bank overdrafts

(b)

2015

2014

$

$

300,426 (11,393)

537,698 (15,602)

289,033

522,096

Reconciliation of result for the year to cashflows from operating activities Reconciliation of net income to net cash provided by operating activities: 2015 Profit for the year Cash flows excluded from profit attributable to operating activities Non-cash flows in profit: - depreciation - net gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment Changes in assets and liabilities, net of the effects of purchase and disposal of subsidiaries: - (increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables - (increase)/decrease in prepayments - increase/(decrease) in income in advance - increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables - increase/(decrease) in employee benefits Cashflow from operations

2014

$ 164,899

$ (22,129)

19,594 -

25,940 6,688

(581,993) (37,271) 138,779 108,845 14,430

13,510 2,488 (46,638) (22,503) (9,578)

(172,717)

(52,222)

17

49


50

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited ABN 68 091 455 551

Directors' Declaration The directors of the Company declare that: 1.

2.

The financial statements and notes, as set out on pages 6 to 17, are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 and: a.

comply with Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements; and

b.

give a true and fair view of the financial position as at 30 June 2015 and of the performance for the year ended on that date of the Company.

In the directors' opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Director ................................................................................................................................................

Director ................................................................................................................................................

Dated this 28th day of October

2015

18


AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Independent Audit Report to the members of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited Report on the Financial Report We have audited the accompanying financial report of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited, which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2015, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, and the directors' declaration. Directors' Responsibility for the Financial Report The directors of the Company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Company’s preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Independence In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the directors of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited, would be in the same terms if given to the directors as at the time of this auditor’s report.

19

51


52

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP CENTRE

Independent Audit Report to the members of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited Opinion In our opinion the financial report of Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre Limited is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including: (a) giving a true and fair view of the Company’s financial position as at 30 June 2015 and of its performance for the year ended on that date; and (b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Regulations 2001. Hardwickes Chartered Accountants

Amanda O'Reilly CA Partner Deakin ACT Dated this 28th day of October 2015

20


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