February-March 2019

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Volume 14 • Number 4 •

February-March 2019


Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt, REALTOR®

803.640.4591

Aiken, South Carolina — Southern Charm and Equestrian Sport 1218 STIEFEL RD

• Agnus Forest Farm - 302 corridor • Gated Custom 2800 sq. ft. home • In-ground pool with new pump • Fencing replaced in 2017 • ½ bath in barn, wash stall

MLS # 105212

• 6 stall center aisle barn • 4 large fenced grass fields, 1 run in shed • Room for dressage arena • 8 acres • $750,000

265 FOUR OAKS RD

MLS # 102282

• Remarkable 3000 sq ft timber •~4 acres, flat grass jump field frame 3BD 2BA residence • 10 stall courtyard style barn • 8 grass paddocks with shade w/feed, tack, laundry & trees on 15 acres, 1.3 mile studio apt. • Guest cottage grass perimeter Gallop track • 46+ acres • $1,375,000

525 LAURENS ST

1050 CLEAR CREEK CT

MLS # 97065

MLS # 103247

1063 COLBERT BRIDGE MLS # 102282

• Exceptional training facility • 10 paddocks, fenced grass ring on 67 acres • Euro-walker, 3 storage • 12 stall barn, 4 stall barn buildings, 3 pond w/apt • 4BR 3BA residence, in-ground • Sand exercise track pool • $1,800,000

534 MARION ST SE MLS # 102676

• 8.5 acre Hitchcock Stables • 8 large paddocks • Adjoins The Woods • 27 12x12 stall barn • Original family stable yard dating from 1882 • 2 carriage sheds, bunk house • $2,300,000

• 8.32 acres in the heart of Aiken’s Historic Horse Distr. • Restored 1BR 1BA residence • 11 stall barn w/ separate covered wash stall • 4 large, irrigated, cross-fenced grass paddocks • Multi function carriage bldg • $2,200,000

1064 GRAND PRIX DR

322 RUSHTON RD

MLS # 103839

MLS # 105176

• 2BR 2BA 1730 sq. ft. owner’s residence • 8 stall European style cement block courtyard barn • Tack room; feed room • 4 large grass paddocks 20+ acres • Fox Hollow amenities • $690,000

951 SHELL BLUFF DR

• 14 board fenced acres in coveted Bridle Creek • 4BR 3.5BA Luxury executive estate, 3 car garage • 1800 sq. ft barn apt. over luxurious 9 stall center aisle barn with every amenity

MLS # 104052

• Light By Night Farm built in ‘14 • Attached garage for adding • 11.54 acres Perimeter fenced stalls, housing tractor, etc • Exceptional 4 stall ctr aisle barn • 2008 sq. ft. 3BR 2BA • Tack room with bath & shower house • $735,000

• Tack room, feed stall, wash stall • Large fenced arena w/ professional footing • Multiple grass turnouts • $1,750,000

3 RUNS PLANTATION LOTS

• Exceptional private lots on cul de sac within Aiken’s most established equestrian community • Amenities include: clubhouse, exercise area, swimming pool, xcountry schooling area, 2 dressage arenas, fenced Stadium jumping arena & miles of managed trails for riding or walking • Lot 48 6.33 acres $151,920 • Lot 49 6.27 acres $150,480 • Lot 50 6.55 acres $157,200 • Lot 39 5.5 acres $132,000 • Will consider seller financing with qualified offer

• Updated turnkey horse farm • 11 acres • 3BR 3BA brick home, garage & in-ground pool • 4 stall barn, wash stall, feed & tack room • 3 large grass paddocks w/ water & run-in sheds • Fenced grass riding arena • $599,950

131 LEWIS LANE

MLS # 105660

• 9 acre perimeter fenced horse farm • New neighborhood assoc. that allow trails for riding near 302 Equestrian Corridor & walking on ~200 acres • 3BR 2BA residence on permanent foundation w/significant upgrades • $295,000

www.AikenSCProperties.com 2

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February-March 2019


FOX HALL

$1.99 MILLION

BRIDLEWOOD FARM $1.75 MILLION

FORTUITOUS FARM

$349,000

SOLD Spectacular Aiken Horse District brick manor house renovated in 1999 w/hardwood floors, commercial grade kitchen, fireplaces & 2 master suites, art studio, 4 stalll brick barn & 3.95 acres of lush grass. Organically managed pasture & grounds w/ irrigated pastures, board fencing & 3 run-in sheds. Additional acreage & guest house can be added. Easy access to Hitchcock Woods on the clay roads.

GRAY WOODS

$499,000

Premier state of the art boarding/training facility with 28 stalls, 26 irrigated paddocks, 250 x 160 GGT footing ring, 2 BR/2 BA luxurious owners apartment, grooms quarters & camera monitoring system. Business opportunity with strong client base. Additional 37 +/- acres available for purchase with established trail system.

WOOD’S END WAY

$648,000

13+ acre Southside horse farm w/two homes, Alaglas saltwater pool, 6 stall center aisle barn, hay shed, storage shed w/ electricity, round pen, 3 large & 2 smaller run-ins, horse fencing, incredible pastures, & perimeter fenced. Two story main house has 2 fireplaces, hardwood floors, all appliances & 3 BR/2.5BA. Adorable 1 BR guest house.

CEDAR MEADOWS

$549,500

REDUCED Two story, 4 bedroom/4.5 bath, 3576 sf brick home by Todd Gaul of Designer Builders. Beautiful hardwood floors, tranquil setting and minutes from the heart of Downtown Aiken. Twenty acres located in a premier equestrian corridor ready for selective clearing for a horse farm or may be subdivided by future buyers.

EDISTO LAKE

$279,000

Ride into the Hitchcock Woods from your new construction light filled 3 BR/3.5 BA custom hardiplank home with 3 stall barn, wash stall, tack room, storage & fenced turnout on 3.51 A with the ability to purchase more land. Wood floors, high ceilings, gas fireplace & chef’s kitchen with granite counters. Must see!

CROOKED CREEK

$329,000

Custom brick 4 BR/3 BA 3022 sf Sean Wolf home. Split bedroom plan in established equestrian community offering riding trails & show ring. High ceilings, hardwood floors, fireplace, sun room, eat-in kitchen, 3-stall shedrow barn with tack/feed room, run-in shed and 3-board fenced grass paddocks with hardwood shade trees on 10.97A.

EAST AIKEN COTTAGE

$99,900

REDUCED Enjoy lakefront living in Edisto Lake gated community with easy access to Aiken and Columbia. Spectacular sunsets, dock, and plenty of space for entertaining and outdoor activities. Beautiful views from light filled two bedroom two bath home with wood floors, wood stove and deck. Pontoon boat available with acceptable offer. $

107,400

10.74 ACRES

TWIN SILOS - LOT 2

Privately situated, perimeter dog fenced & gated farmette on 6+ acres w/updated 3 bedroom/two bath brick ranch, 2 car garage, new JD Cooper barn (easily made into 4 stalls) & inground pool on paved road. House has new flooring, updated baths & kitchen & living room w/vaulted ceiling & brick fireplace. Close to all equestrian events. Access to additional pasture.

Totally renovated bright & charming one-story cottage close to downtown & southside. Two bedroom, 1 1⁄2 baths on over half an acre with original heart pine floors, new windows, new wiring, new roof, renovated kitchen and baths (master half bath added) and new insulation. Detached garage recently renovated.

WEXFORD MILL TRACT L

LOT 27 19.89A $210,000

REDUCED $89,900 12.41 A

LOT 1B 7.71A $77,100

Fabulous land & lots available: Twin Silos Farms, Edisto Lake, Wood’s End Way & Fox Hollow

803-215-0153 • www.AikenHorseRealty.com February-March 2018-2019

The Aiken Horse

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your best friend in real-estate

finehomesofaiken.com

THE BALCONY is the most prestigious equestrian estate in Aiken, a comfortable showplace in the heart of Aiken’s “Winter Colony.” Close to all equestrian venues, the 5.85-acre compound is a peaceful sanctuary within tall masonry walls. The elegant slate-roofed residence shows refined craftsmanship in every detail. Stately formal rooms. 6 ensuite bedrooms w/fireplaces. Kitchen, laundry, & utilities are all updated. Exquisite gardens & lawns. 20-stall stable, 3-BR cottage, swimming pool, large paddocks. $2,750,000

TREASURE FARM is a rare downtown gem, within

SHELBORNE FARM is a gracious 4 BR 4.5 BA custom residence on 50 acres with magnificent views. Interior features are 5 fireplaces, granite counter tops, 2nd floor observation deck, wood floors, stunning 2-story great room, and a framed-in apartment over the garage. Six-stall barn with wash rack & feed room, dressage ring, 150x300 huinter-jumper ring. Board-fenced pastures. Three-car garage. $999,989

HIGH COTTON FARM This equestrian estate has a 4 BR/4 BA residence and 4 or 5 stall barn with charming apartment, all on 12.47 acres. Located close to town, the farm has 5 fenced grass paddocks and an electric gate entrance. The home has: new roof, numerous upgrades, tankless water heater, and new interior colors. Gas heat, thermal-pane windows. Extra-large master suite downstairs. $925,000

CHADBOURN FARM offers an idyllic equestrian lifestyle. The 3000 sq.ft. 4 BR 3 BA residence was built in 2005 and extensively updated in 2017. Light-filled interior. Great Room with fireplace. Formal dining room. Wood floors, hickory cabinets, & granite counter tops. Spacious master suite. 12 acres includes a 6-stall centeraisle barn with wash rack and tack room. Large fenced pastures, dressage arena, and 6.5 cleared acres for any equestrian use. $735,000

SNIPES POND is a 4028 sf renovated historic plantation home on 46 acres of beautiful rolling farm land. The top-quality renovation by skilled craftsmen from Reynolds Co. offers modern amenities such as a granite kitchen island, French country sink, walk-in closets, ceiling fans, & security system. multiple porches on both floors, and handsome wood floors. The 46.31 acres are ideal for farming, horses, other recreation or quiet enjoyment. Additional acreage available. $769,900

CENTURY LANE 1-story brick residence on 5.86 acre Aiken horse farm with 6-stall barn. Fireplace in den. New improvements in 2018: roof, Sentricon system for house and barn, HVAC units, siding on the hay barn, paint for house and barn. Oak floors in 2 bedrooms and dining room; tile floors in kitchen breakfast room, den, and laundry room. Ideal for all riding disciplines. Close to major Aiken equestrian competition venues. Close to major shopping and cinema. 15 minutes to downtown Aiken. Perfect for you and your horses. $389,000

CASA LOUISA Charming Old Aiken cottage in fantastic 2/BR Horse District location at Hitchcock Woods. High ceilings, heart pine floors, updated kitchen with granite & stainless appliances. Many updated windows. Plus office/studio. Large pantry. Stack-up washer-dryer is a recent addition, as is the metal roof. Lovely library. Renovated bath, jetted tub. Kitchen’s French doors lead to great outdoor patio space. Beautiful front garden, fenced backyard, detached garage (440 sq.ft. per owner). Location!! Quiet equestrian street 5 blocks from The Willcox. $304,000

MAGNOLIA PLACE Brick 2-story home in walking distance to Whitney Polo Field and Green Boundary Club. Remodeled with oak floors, French doors, expansive kitchen island, and open floor plan. Large living room, music room, and wonderfully large family room-kitchen combination overlooking the swimming pool and patio. Master Suite on ground floor. Laundry room with mud entrance and full bath. Upstairs has two bedrooms, a tiled bathroom, a large studio or playroom, and a quiet sitting area. Fine residence in a fine neighborhood, near all shopping equestrian venues, and private clubs. $495,000

sight of the Coker Spring entrance to Hitchcock Woods. Charming 3-BR cottage with 8-stall barn & 3 paddocks. Beautiful Master Suite. Large screened porch in the rear, plus two covered porches. Wood floors. Fireplaces in the Living & Dining Rooms. Magnificently renovated & beautifully maintained. Barn has 1/2 bath, prep room, sink, temperature-controlled secure tack room, & hayloft. Appliances, water heater, screen porch, & HVAC all within last 4 years. $800,000

The finest farms in Aiken, South Carolina. Call 803-640-0123 for estates, farms, homes & land.

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February-March 2019

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

P.O. Box 332 • Montmorenci, SC 29839-0332 • 803.643.9960 •

www.TheAikenHorse.com • Editor@TheAikenHorse.com

Time Dated Material • Periodicals • Volume 14 • Number 4

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ou can always tell what season it is in Aiken by the kind of horse trailers that you see. In the early fall and later in the spring, there are a noticeable number of polo rigs on the road here. By the middle of November, polo season is over and those long silver goosenecks are supplanted by two-and three-horse tag-alongs belonging to the foxhunters. After Christmas, the number of horse trailers grows exponentially, and you know that the eventers are back in town. Like the polo rigs, these event horse conveyances are very noticeable, especially on the 302 corridor east of town. Eventers seem to be on the road all the time, trucking to and from competitive and schooling opportunities. Judging purely from the number of trailers on Route 302 this January, spring 2019 is going to be a very active season. It’s certainly going to be an exciting one, for the competitors as well as for anyone who loves watching equestrian sport. Aiken has long held its own Triple Crown, which consists of three consecutive Saturdays of spectator friendly activities, starting with the Aiken Trials at the Aiken Training Track (March 16) followed by the Aiken Steeplechase at Bruce’s Field (March 23) and ending with Pacers and Polo at Powderhouse Field (March 30). Harness racing at McGhee’s Mile returned to the Aiken spring calendar in 2015, and it has now claimed the Saturday before the Trials as its date (March 9), giving Aiken four weekends of sport. This year, with the creation of the inaugural

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Eventing Showcase at Bruce’s Field on March 1 and 2, we will have five consecutive Saturday attractions. The Eventing Showcase will feature “Grand-Prix eventing,” which aims to make eventing a more spectator-friendly sport by shortening the cross country course and arranging the jumps in such a way that spectators can actually see them from one spot. This event, sponsored by LiftMaster, is being run at the Advanced Level, and invitations have gone out to the top riders in the world. Preparations are under way now, and the course promises to be pretty spectacular. You can read more about that in section two. Organizers hope that the showcase will be an annual event and that it will help bring more awareness to eventing and give the sport additional prominence in the city of Aiken itself. Aiken may be an eventing Mecca during the winter months, but the action generally takes place 10 to 15 miles from town, and few people who are not already eventing aficionados go out to watch. This issue, we have a selection of articles for you on various different topics and treating several disciplines. We hope you enjoy it. We hope even more that you get out and experience all that the Aiken horse world has to offer in the coming months. In addition to Pacers and Polo, March also ends with the annual Aiken Horse Show in the Woods, which is featured on our cover. This horse show, held in the Hitchcock Woods since 1916, is the most important of Aiken’s equestrian rites of spring. If you have never been to the show, consider dropping by. An old fashioned show, it is unique in this day and age, imparting a real sense of equestrian history in a beautiful, natural setting. As ever, please drop us an email if you have any comments, questions or suggestions, or if you know anything that you think we should know. We want to be your horse newspaper.

The Aiken Horse EDITOR & PUBLISHER Pam Gleason

ART DIRECTOR Gary Knoll

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jean Berko Gleason

LAYOUT & DESIGN Gary Knoll

PHOTOGRAPHERS Pam Gleason Gary Knoll

ADVERTISING

803.643.9960 editor@theaikenhorse.com

Going Out Of Town? Don’t miss future issues of The Aiken Horse. We will send you a one year subscription (6 issues) for $24.00. Send check or CC # & your mailing address: P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 Or sign up on the web at www.TheAikenHorse. com

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

All contents Copyright 2019 The Aiken Horse

Pam Gleason Editor & Publisher

The Aiken Horse Policies: The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers, editors, or the policies of The Aiken Horse, LLC. The Aiken Horse is owned by The Aiken Horse, LLC.

February-March 2019

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SECTION 10 12 16 20 28

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News & Notes Aiken Trials Aiken Horse Show Equus Events in Pictures Ask the Judge

Our cover shows Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt on her horse Eluca competing at the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods 2018. Find out all about the 2019 show on page 16. Photography by Pam Gleason

SECTION

Kaitlin Hartford on Bazillion Bells at Full Gallop this January. Bazillion Bells, an OTTB, finished sixth in the eventing portion of the RRP Thoroughbred Makeove last year. Photography by Gary Knoll

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46 48 50 55 62 64 66

Argentine Sport Horses Secret Lives Land Safe January Eventing Modern Course Design Grand Prix Eventing Tales of Rescue

SECTION

Shawna Harding on Regent wows the crowd in the Prix St. Georges class. Dressage in the Park at Bruce’s Field. Photography by Pam Gleason

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76 80 82 84 88 92 95 95

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Hilltop Farm Mike Keogh Quarter Horses in Aiken Augusta Futurity Dressage in The Park Calendar of Events Directory of Services Index

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News and Notes By Pam Gleason

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s of January 21, 2019, Banks Mill Feeds has a new owner. His name is Jesse Waters and he is a foxhunting enthusiast who lives on a horse farm with his family in Hopeland Farms, just a short distance from the mill on Banks Mill Road. Banks Mill Feeds was started by Charlie Herrick in 1996. Before opening the mill, Charlie had worked as a farrier and as an assistant racehorse trainer and was a founder of Aiken Saddlery. He became interested in

horse feeds while delivering bags of grain to his customers, and became convinced that Aiken’s horsemen would appreciate having a local product, made fresh and with strict quality control. He was right. Banks Mill Feeds was a success and is now available at many feed stores around Aiken as well as all over the Southeast. Jesse Waters, who grew up riding horses, worked most recently as a first mate for an offshore oil drilling company. His job took him to the Gulf of Mexico, Brazil and Korea. It was an exciting life, but his heart was back in Aiken. He and his wife April have two sons, 6 and 9, and Jesse loves riding to hounds. He is a member of the Belle Meade Hunt in Thomson, Georgia, and he is introducing his sons to the foxhunting life as well. “I got tired of being gone,” he said. A few years ago, he decided to start looking for a business to buy in town. Because he loves horses, he was most interested in a business in the horse industry. A mutual friend of his and Charlie Herrick’s suggested that Charlie might be willing to sell the mill, and the two started talking about the possibility. It took two years for them to work out the details and actually complete the sale. Charlie, who is 70, had put a lot of effort and energy

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into the mill, running it for almost 25 years, and he was not immediately ready to sell. “I had fun working,” he said. The transition in ownership has been smooth and seamless. Jesse took over on January 21, but Charlie has been at the mill regularly to show him the ropes and help him in any way necessary. Jesse says that he does not have plans to change anything, but that he will be working actively to promote Banks Mill Feeds in the Aiken area. “I want to focus on the new Aiken residents, the people coming from outside the area, and of course reestablish our presence with everyone else,” he said while sitting with Charlie in the Banks Mill office one afternoon this January. “But I don’t want to do anything to change the brand. We want to maintain the quality of the feed – it’s local, it’s fresh and it has high quality ingredients, so we are not going to change any recipes. Charlie has built a great brand. Charlie, for his part, does not have firm plans for the future, beyond spending more time with horses. After devoting himself to building up his business from scratch, he is understandably attached to it and hopes to see it prosper. But he is confident that Jesse is the right new owner. “If I had to worry about the business succeeding, I wouldn’t be very happy about selling it at all,” he said. “But I am very comfortable with Jesse, and if I can help in any way, I will. If he needs me, he’s got me.” Jesse nodded his head in agreement. “This has been his baby for almost 25 years,” he said. “And I want it to be my baby for the next 25.”

Aiken Trained OTTB of the Year On Sunday, March 17, the day after the Aiken Trials, Still Having Fun, trained in Aiken by Cary Frommer in 2016 and 2017 will be honored as the 2018 Aiken Trained Horse of the Year at the Aiken Racing Hall of Fame and Museum. This award, established in 2002, celebrates horses that have excelled on the racetrack. To be eligible, the horse must have spent part of its racing career training in Aiken County, and must have won at least one graded stakes race or exceeded $1 million in career earnings. Past winners have included the Belmont Stakes winner Palace Malice, who won in 2013 and 2014; Wando, who won the Canadian Triple Crown in 2003; and

The Aiken Horse

Midshipman, who won an Eclipse Award in 2008 and was also inducted into the Aiken Racing Hall of Fame. This year, Thoroughbreds will have a new award to compete for. The new honor will be for off-the-track Thoroughbreds, horses that

Rock’s Dream, a 17.1 hand OTTB at Equine Rescue, getting ready for the TB Makeover. have retired from the racetrack and moved on to other endeavors. This new Aiken Trained OTTB of the Year award will go to the highest placed Aiken trained OTTB competing in the Retired Racehorse Project’s $100,000 Thoroughbred Makeover competition. To qualify for the award, the horse must have trained, competed or lived in Aiken County, whether on the racetrack itself, or after the track on the hunt or polo field, event course or show ring. (Verification of this will be required.) The Thoroughbred Makeover competition is a popular national contest, the flagship event of the Maryland-based Retired Racehorse Project. The makeover provides an opportunity for amateur and professional trainers to compete in one or two of ten different disciplines on horses that they recently acquired off the racetrack. To be eligible this year, horses must have had a race or a published work on or after July 1, 2007 and must not have had more than a maximum of 15 training rides before December 1, 2018. Trainers then have ten months to ready their horses for the competition, held from October 2-5 at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. The Thoroughbred Makeover gives separate prizes to the winners of each of the disciplines. (These include barrel racing, competitive trail,

February-March 2019


dressage, eventing, field hunters, freestyle, polo, ranch work, show hunter and show jumper.) Then, the top horses in each discipline compete in the finale, vying for the title of America’s Most Wanted OTTB, which is chosen by popular acclaim. For this year’s competition,

trainers had to apply between December 15, 2018 and January 15, 2019, and had to demonstrate the ability and the knowledge to retrain a racehorse for a new career. Six hundred and seventy three trainers were accepted, including 20 from South Carolina. Although some trainers already have their horses picked out, many are now in the process of finding their perfect makeover candidates. The Aiken Trained OTTB award is sponsored jointly by The Aiken Horse and Equine Rescue of Aiken. It will consist of cash and other prizes and will include an awards presentation in Aiken in the fall of 2019. The goal of offering the award is to promote Aiken’s Thoroughbreds while at the same time promoting Aiken as an ideal place to train, or retrain, a horse. In fact, the Aiken area offers ample schooling and competition opportunities for green horses in all ten RRP disciplines. Aiken has a solid history with the Retired Racehorse Project, with many contestants and several top finishers over the competition’s history. For instance, Phillip Dutton, who has a winter training base at Bridle Creek, rode Graham Motion’s Icabad Crane (third in the Preakness) to the top honors in the 2014 makeover competition (Eventing.) Charlie Caldwell, who comes from Tennessee but now has a home in Aiken and attends USC Aiken,

February-March 2018-2019

won in 2017 aboard Old Tavern (Polo.) The 2018 winner, Elisa Wallace, who bested all comers in Eventing with Reloaded, lives in Jasper, Georgia and is a familiar presence at Aiken’s horse trials. Both Wallace and Caldwell are registered as trainers again this year. For more information about the RRP, visit retiredracehorseproject.org. Shopping for an OTTB? Visit Equine Rescue of Aiken, which has a good selection of quality young Thoroughbreds, many of them RRP eligible, that are ready to go and available for adoption now. (www.aikenequinerescue.org) More information about the Aiken Trained OTTB Award will be available soon. Stay tuned.

Gerald Balding to Polo Hall of Fame Gerald Balding, a regular player on Aiken’s fields in the 1930s, is being inducted into the Museum of Polo Hall of Fame in Lake Worth, Florida this February. Balding was born in Leicestershire, England in 1909. A racehorse trainer by profession, his passion was polo – he took up the sport at the age of 14 and he was a natural rider and a skilled hitter. In 1926, Robert Strawbridge, then the president of

the United States Polo Association, invited him to come to America to “train our boys how to play the game.” He went first to New Jersey, where he became a polo instructor at the Rumson Polo Club, and later became a fixture on Long Island where he often played with famous Aiken winter residents such as Tommy Hitchcock and Pete Bostwick on John Hay Whitney’s Greentree team. Gerald and two of his brothers, Ivor and Barney, all played polo in the United States, where they participated at the highest levels of the sport. Ivor and Barney were both rated 7 goals while Gerald was 9 in America and 10 back in England. As the captain of the British national team, Gerald played in the Westchester Cup against America in 1930, 1936 and 1939. When World War II broke out, Balding returned to England to serve as a captain in the Royal Horse Guards. After the war, he remained in his native country where he trained race horses for John Hay Whitney and for the stables of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt and Joseph Roebling. Gerald Balding was the last player to be rated 10 goals in England. According to his obituary in the New York Times in 1957, “In polo competition before World War II Mr. Balding ranked second only to Thomas Hitchcock Jr.” According to his daughter, Gail King, who lives in Aiken and has been a driving force behind the Aiken Horse Show for decades, what really set him apart was his horsemanship. “He was a consummate horseman,” she said. “Tommy Hitchcock was regarded as a better player, but my father was known for his horsemanship. He was a beautiful rider.” continued on page 32

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Aiken Trials

Celebrating Aiken Racing By Mary Jane Howell

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arch in Aiken is all about horses, whatever the discipline. Among other things, the town plays host to its own “Triple Crown” during the month. The Aiken Trials starts the action off on Saturday, March 16 and is followed on consecutive weekends by the Aiken Steeplechase and then Pacers and Polo, a polo game to benefit the University of South Carolina Aiken’s Pacers baseball team. For Thoroughbred enthusiasts, the Aiken Trials is the main draw. Not just a day of racing, it also offers an opportunity to connect with Thoroughbred history: in 1956 Buddy Raines ran Brandywine Farm’s Countermand at The Trials as a prep for the Kentucky Derby that year. In 1989 Ron Stevens sent Dogwood Stable’s Summer Squall to the gate as a 2-year-old, and the strapping colt finished third, after gazing at the infield crowd when the race began. He went on to have an undefeated 2-year-old season and then to win the Preakness at 3. This year marks the 77th running of the Trials, an entertaining day at the races for fans and an educational one for participants. From the first, trainers used the Trials as a springboard for their young horses: they ran in the Trials here, then were usually sent to Kentucky or New York for their official racing debuts. Older horses who had come to Aiken for a winter tune-up ran in the longer races, as a rehearsal before the new season at the pari-mutuel tracks. The sport of Thoroughbred racing has changed over the last eight decades. There was a time when pari-mutuel racing was not a year-long enterprise and there were owners who bred and raced their own horses and gave them winters off to rest and relax. Aiken was fortunate to have many of the big outfits in residence at the track through the colder months– Greentree, Rokeby and Claiborne, to name a few – and Hall of Fame trainers to match. James Maloney, Pete Bostwick, Scotty

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Schulhofer, John Gaver, Mack Miller, Woody Stephens, Elliott Burch, Henry Clark, and Buddy Hirsch all had barns here. Not all these trainers ran horses in the Trials, but just having them in Aiken gave the track a certain luster. A Greentree colt named Hall of Fame won his race at the Aiken Trials in 1951 for the trainer John Gaver and went on to run in the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness. This year, a former charge of Cary Frommer’s named Maximus Mischief is on the Kentucky Derby Trail. Yes, the track and the Trials are both still relevant. The Trials today is a mixture of ¼ mile races for 2-year-olds and longer races for older horses – these are about four and a half furlongs, a little over half a mile. Local exercise riders are the jockeys of the day, wearing polished boots and colorful silks. Horses from other South Carolina Thoroughbred training centers now make the trek to Aiken to participate in the Trials, helping to make full fields, and there are even pony races to jump-start the day. These races, organized by U.S. Pony Racing, an organization based in Maryland, include leadline races for the youngest jockeys, and flat-out gallops for the older and more professional juniors, most of whom ship in from the mid-Atlantic along with their speedster ponies.

Breakfast at the Gallops

Trials weekend includes more than just the Saturday afternoon races. On Friday morning (March 15) there is Breakfast at the Gallops, now in its 13th year. This event, a breakfast at the track during morning training sessions, gives spectators the opportunity not only to watch horses train but also to hear from local trainers about the process. This year’s guest speaker is the Hall of Fame jockey Eddie Maple, who retired from racing in 1998 with $106 million in purses and 4,398

February-March 2019


wins in a career that spanned 32 years. Maple began riding at 12 and won his first professional race at 17 in West Virginia. In 1971 he was riding in New York, facing what was one of the toughest jockey colonies in the country. Angel Cordero, Jean Cruguet, Jacinto Vasquez, Jorge Velasquez, and Ron Turcotte were household names in those days. The turning point in Maple’s career came before his 25th birthday, when he was asked to ride the great Secretariat in the 1973 Canadian International at Woodbine Racetrack in Toronto, the Triple Crown winner’s final race. Secretariat’s regular jockey, Ron Turcotte, was sitting out a five-day suspension. Maple was not an unknown entity to Secretariat’s owner Penny Chenery and his trainer Lucien Lauren – after all, he had ridden their other top horse Riva Ridge to a second-place finish in the inaugural Marlboro Cup Invitational Handicap at Belmont Park in September of that year (Secretariat won). In a perfect ending to his storybook career, Secretariat shipped to Canada and won the 1 5/8ths turf stakes by six and a half lengths. Suddenly Maple was in demand back in New York. Over the next three decades, Maple rode some of the country’s best horses, including the Belmont winners Temperance Hill (1980) and Crème Fraîche (1985.) He won nearly every major stakes race in New York aboard such horses as Awad, De la Rose, Alydar, Sky Beauty, Slew o’Gold, Swale, Forty-Niner, Conquistador Cielo, Devil’s Bag, and Majesty’s Prince. Maple received the George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award, the Mike Venezia Memorial Award and was inducted into the National Museum of Racing’s Hall of Fame in 2009. These days Maple and his wife Kate manage Rose Hill Equestrian Center in Bluffton, South Carolina. A focal point at both Breakfast at the Gallops and the Trials is the clocker’s stand, where on quieter mornings trainers gather to watch and

February-March 2018-2019

time their horses’ works. The building was one of the favorite places of the late Cot Campbell, the founder and president of the Aiken based horseracing syndicate Dogwood Stable. Campbell died last fall at the age of 91, and to honor his legacy, the stand is being renovated and will bear his name. “The clockers’ stand was home to Cot and I think it is wonderful that the track and community have chosen to honor him in such a way,” said his widow, Anne Campbell “His passion for racehorses was always on display – excitement when one of the Dogwood horses breezed well over the track, and of course the flip side when something didn’t quite work out,” she mused. “So much over the years has played out on the porch of that building.”

Aiken Trained Horse of The Year

When the excitement of the races themselves is over, there is still one more event for Thoroughbred enthusiasts on Trials weekend. That is the ceremony honoring the 2018 Aiken Trained Horse of the Year on Sunday, March 17. This year’s honoree, Still Having Fun, was trained by Cary Frommer in Aiken from the fall of 2017 through the following spring. The 4-year-old colt won three stakes in his career, including the Grade 2 Woody Stephens Stakes in 2018. From 11 career starts, Still Having Fun tallied three wins, a second, and two thirds, for earnings of $472,200. The ceremony is scheduled for 1:30 at the Aiken Thoroughbred Museum and Racing Hall of Fame in Hopelands Gardens . For more information about the Trials, visit www.aikentrainingtrack.org. To learn about the Aiken Trained Horse of the Year or to purchase tickets to Breakfast at the Gallops, visit www.aikenracinghalloffame.com. For information about U.S. Pony Racing, visit www.usponyracing.com

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aikenhorseLEFT2-19_aikenhorseLEFT 1/30/2019 1:02 PM Page 1

Courtney Conger

Randy Wolcott

Suzan McHugh

Thomas Bossard Brian Cavanaugh Jane Page Thompson Donnita Harmon

803.645.3308

803.292.8525

.

803.507.1142

803.640.2845

Lee Hedlund

803.221.6831 803.624.6072

Mike Hosang

Frank Starcher

803.270.6358

803.270.6623

803.215.8232

803.508.1936

.

Jack Roth

Alex Tyrteos

803.341.8787

203.249.3071

Barb Uskup

Melissa Major

HOMES . HORSES HISTORY . HOSPITALITY

803.295.3199 Broker In Charge

.648.8660

www CarolinaHorseProperties com . 803

Old Buckland Barn . Equestrian training facility in

.

Aiken’s historic downtown Horse District has spacious 2,787 square foot main residence, combining 2 original cottages with central great room. Cottage is delightfully renovated with wood floors, granite countertops and all appliances. There are 2 converted race barns with 15 expanded stalls total, board fenced paddocks, grooms’ apartment, dressage arena with mirror. Call Courtney Conger $1, 425,000

Polo Vista Stables at New Bridge Polo . Beautifully

constructed center aisle barn in like-new condition offers 18 large, matted stalls on 22.47 acres overlooking polo field. Included are wash stall, spacious tack room/lounge combo, 2 bunk rooms, laundry room and full bath. There is also an 1800 square foot, insulated equipment shed and 13 four-board fenced paddocks and pastures. New Bridge Polo amenities include riding trails, clubhouse and pool. May be purchased in conjunction with charming 4bedroom residence across polo field (see below). Call Courtney Conger $695,400

Scott’s Estate This landmark 63.85 acre property, conveniently located only 6 miles from downtown Aiken, includes a spectacular 7 acre pond, fed by Shaw's Creek with natural swimming pool. Beautifully planted hardwood trees and extensive lawns sweep down from the house to the pond and a backdrop of mature pines behind the pond complete the dramatic landscape. The house has 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths, large farmhouse kitchen with eat-in alcove & wood burning fireplace, and large Florida room with second fireplace. Call Alex Tyrteos $1, 100,000

.

Three Runs Plantation Aiken’s most desirable equestrian community is the setting for this delightful home on over 5 fully fenced acres. Custom home features wood floors, high ceilings and extensive millwork with formal living room with fireplace, formal dining, custom kitchen with granite, 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, screened porch and oversized garage. Call Courtney Conger $569,000

The Polo Club . Location, Location, Location! "Polo Club" is an

early century charmer, which was originally built as a clubhouse for Whitney Polo Field. Directly across from Aiken's Training Track in Historic Horse District, the property has easy access to downtown Aiken and south side shopping. Enjoy the wraparound porch with picturesque views. Keep cozy in front of the 5 fireplaces. Beautiful hardwood floors and original details enhance this historic property that also boasts ample paddock space. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $1,075,000

.

Wadmalaw Island Equestrian This Charleston equestrian property offers proximity, privacy and possibilities! Renovated main residence has 5 bedrooms (2 master suites!), 3.5 baths, huge walk-in closets with built-ins, home office and gym. Property includes nearly 17 acres, with 15 acres of fenced pasture and riding arena. Large 8-stall barn with kitchen, bath, laundry, wash area and detached tack room. The 4-stall barn has hay loft & storage. Call Jack Roth $1,150,000

CULLUM

Farms

Polo Vista . Comfort and craftsmanship are the hallmarks of this delightful cottage with 2929 square feet. Features include open floor plan with 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths, cathedral ceilings, stone fireplace, wood floors and window walls overlooking one of New Bridge Polo’s beautifully maintained polo fields. Combine with Polo Vista Stables (above) for a fabulous farm! Call Courtney Conger $454,000

Oak Tree Farm . Country contemporary with 3 bedrooms

and 3 full baths is nestled among live oaks on over 48 acres of board fenced pastures. All new baths and kitchen with stainless steel appliances, granite counters, and all new wood & tile floors throughout. Sunlit great room and master bedroom feature cathedral ceilings and window walls with sweeping views of in ground pool and coastal fields. Center aisle barn has 3 stalls with room for more, tack & feed room, run-in and storage space. Call Courtney Conger $699,000

RARE undeveloped 5 acre lot in an established equestrian community! Located on a cul-de-sac, the lot’s gentle slope offers the potential for a two-level home, with main living quarters on the ground floor and walk-out entertainment areas below, all with magnificent views.

$72,000

Call ALEX TYRTEOS or DONNITA HARMON

New Bridge Polo Club . Possibly

the best 6.85 acre building lot now available in an exceptional location at New Bridge Polo. A short walk away from the clubhouse, tennis court and swimming pool, it has direct access to Polo Field One and overlooks Field Three. The lot is perimeter fenced with established coastal Bermuda grass and a well and electrical service have already been installed. Call Alex Tyrteos $280,000

BRIDLE

Creek

C’est La Vie Farm . Located on over 60 acres of

fenced fields & woods, this fully developed horse farm includes brick 3 bedroom home, 2-car garage, center aisle barn, dressage arena, 6 large paddocks, 2 run-in sheds, round pen and dog run. The custom barn has 8-10 stalls with rubber pavers, tack room/lounge with Mexican tile floors, half bath, feed room, wash stall, fly spray system, and large unfinished apartment with enclosed stairs to loft. Call Courtney Conger or Randy Wolcott $550,000

Equestrian lots range from 5 acres to 11.77 acres. Community amenities to include miles of groomed trails, gallop, stadium jumps, cross-country jump field and dressage ring. New fitness center planned! Call JACK ROTH

$18,000 per acre

Equestrian Corridor . In the heart of Aiken’s east side Highway 302 horse country is this beautiful parcel with 34 acres of gently rolling pasture planted in well established grass, complete with fencing and gate. Property adjoins Shellhouse Lake Farm, available at $480,000 (see separate listing at right). Call Mike Hosang $255,000

SOLSTICE

TIMSHEL

Meadow

Gardens

Level, partially cleared lots in developing equestrian area with easy access to Aiken, Edgefield and I-20. Riding rings and trails are underway, and homeowners with interests in eventing, hunter jumpers, driving and trail riding are in residence. Best of all, lots from 12.25 to over 14 acres are available for only $4,500 per acre!

Call COURTNEY CONGER

14

.

Bridle Creek Trail Immaculate 3 year old home has 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths yet measures just under 1300 square feet. Main floor master, all hardwood & tile floors. Stainless appliances, granite counters in kitchen. Home has alarm, wood burning fireplace, and barn has 4 stalls, tack room, feed room and wash stall. Beautiful pastures and fencing complete this equestrian property on nearly 4 acres. Call Jack Roth $399,000

.

Woolworth House Historic Winter Colony cottage with stables in downtown Aiken just steps from Hitchcock Woods, Aiken’s 2,200-acre riding reserve! Delightful 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath home, updated in recent years, features high ceilings, wood floors, fireplace, and wall of windows overlooking patio & paddocks. For horses, there is a 3-stall shed row barn. Call Courtney Conger $675,000

The Aiken Horse

Two partly cleared tracts ready for you to have horses at home! Direct access to trail system with miles of dedicated trails, including the 61 acre Freeman preserve, which has a wonderful pond. Ask about owner financing! These 5-acre parcels offered at just $85,000 PER PARCEL

Call RANDY WOLCOTT

.

Three Runs Plantation Beautiful NEW Wolf Construction home on a great lot in Phase 7 has 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths on main floor, with bedroom/bonus room and full bath upstairs. Property has 5.2 acres and 2-bay garage. Flooring throughout entire house is either oak hardwood, ceramic tile or carpet in bedrooms. Natural gas and hi-speed fiber optic internet available. Miles of groomed trails, schooling areas, dressage ring, pool, clubhouse and fitness center. CallJack Roth $579,000

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aikenhorseRIGHT2-19_aikenhorseRIGHT 1/30/2019 5:17 PM Page 1

Calvary Training Center . Picture-perfect property with a host of potential Steeplechase Cottage . Beautiful 3-acre parcel in Aiken's Horse District

uses in Bluffton, SC includes 43+ acres, beautiful lake, Low Country home with 7 bedrooms and 4.5 baths, education center with offices and classrooms, and extensive infrastructure that could handle a 100-unit development. The world class equestrian facility includes 25 stalls, tack rooms, grooms’ lounge and baths, wash stalls, storage and 42,000 square foot covered arena. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $4,900,000

Magnolia Blossom Ranch . Beautiful equestrian

has magnificent views of the steeplechase track and horse show grounds. The 3458 square foot main residence has open floor plan that includes 4 bedrooms and 3 full baths. Kitchen boasts top of the line appliances, and gracious screened porch overlooks salt water pool. Charming guest house has 2 bedrooms and 2 baths. Call Thomas Bossard $1,599,000

Red Top Estate . Historic Aiken estate with grand

estate at Three Runs Plantation on two lots, over 13 acres of established grass with majestic views! The quality built huntbox has 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, custom kitchen in 1638 square feet of living space, and includes 5 stalls with automatic waterers, wash stall, tack/grooming stall and storage. There are 3 large paddocks, irrigation, security system, and stone entry with custom gate. Call Jack Roth $735,000

rooms for entertaining, 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, and classic original architectural elements throughout. This Gilded Age residence with modern updates includes an apartment, formal gardens, carport on 1.22 acres. Call Jane Page Thompson or Alex Tyrteos $998,500

Three Runs Plantation . Beautiful new Donnie

Shaffer Construction home on a great lot in Phase 7A in Three Runs Plantation! Comfortable floor plan with 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths on main floor, upstairs bedroom/bonus room with full bath. Property has 5.12 acres, two car garage. Entire house is either reclaimed pine wood floors, ceramic tile or carpet in bedrooms. Call Jack Roth $575,000

The Wilrose . Stunning private country estate on 12 lovely acres with beautiful live oaks! Custom home features 5 bedrooms & 4 baths, well-appointed kitchen with granite counters, high ceilings and wood flooring throughout. Attached 4 car garage plus finished basement space. Additional 18 acres with 2 large metal buildings available — complete 30 acres offered at $1,300,000. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $999,000

GOODSPRINGS

Plantation

Build the home of your dreams! Two lots available in small, private, gated equestrian community that's close to Stable View with easy access to the interstate, downtown Aiken and Augusta

LOT 13 $41,000 3.41 acres

LOT 22 $57,000 4.68 acres Call MIKE HOSANG or BRIAN CAVANAUGH

.

Black Sheep Farm Dine al fresco in the breezeway of this classic European courtyard farmhouse, overlooking koi pond and heated pool. Perfect for the Aiken lifestyle, this beautiful property melds outdoor & indoor living with 3 en suite bedrooms, 2 wood-burning stoves, huge kitchen & greatroom with hardwood floors. Adjoining office, family room, laundry, workshop, 4 stalls, tack & feed room with paddocks beyond. Over 8 acres with 3-bay garage. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $649,000

Honeycomb Cottage .

Minutes from downtown, this cozy 3 bedroom, 2 bath cottage has equestrian accommodations including paddock with run-in shed, building with extra storage, tack room and hay loft. Built in 2013, the home features hardwood and tile floors, solid surface counters, vaulted ceilings and fireplace. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $229,000

Magnolia Cottage . Well appointed bungalow with 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths. Adding to the charm are the spacious front porch, side deck, solid-surface counters, vaulted ceiling, cozy fireplace, and tile & wood floors throughout. Equestrian amenities include 4-stall barn with cozy hayloft living suite, 2 paddocks with run-in shed in each, and storage shed, all on 9 grassy acres. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $349,000

NEW BRIDGE

Polo Club

Shellhouse Lake Farm . Sportsman's

retreat located in Aiken’s east side equestrian corridor less than 10 miles from downtown! Drive through the gated entrance and past grassy fenced pasture to the sparkling 11 acre lake. Parcel Two offers approximately 43 acres mostly cleared and grassed with Shaw's Creek at the back border. The brick 2 bedroom, 1 bath country cabin has spacious kitchen/family room, fireplace and full length porch, with wonderful views overlooking lake. Call Mike Hosang $480,000

Large lot (8.71 acres) complete with fencing, well & septic across from endline of Field 2. World class polo community with polo fields, clubhouse, tennis & swimming pool.

.

Thirty Oaks Farm Charming 2 bedroom, 2 bath cottage with fireplace surrounded by horse country 12.38 acres. Equestrian amenities include 6-stall barn with feed/tack room, separate workshop, hay storage building, 10 turnouts, lay-up field, and 5 run-ins in perimeter fenced established pasture. Call Mike Hosang $389,900

$99,900 Call MIKE HOSANG

.

Three Runs Plantation Beautiful Phase 1 lot offered with NEW hunt box combo to be constructed by Farmfield Builders. Includes 700 square foot apartment, 3 stalls, tack room, feed room and wash stall. Close to community amenities including clubhouse, riding arenas, pool, and direct access to the 30mile riding trail system! Call Alex Tyrteos $320,000

BLUFFWOOD

TALATHA

Large trees abound on these TWO adjoining level lots approximately 16 acres each, with plenty of road frontage and beautiful home sites. Many horse farms and large estates surround this east side horse country community.

Planning your ideal Aiken horse farm? Here’s 2.5 wooded acres in south side equestrian community just minutes to shopping and dining!

East

Three Runs Plantation . Pristine, low-maintenance

home boasts high ceilings, hardwood floors, wainscoting & crown molding. Fabulous kitchen features island, farmhouse sink, granite counters, pantry and stainless steel appliances. Spacious owners’ suite has room-sized bath and TWO walk-in closets. Separate den/office, laundry/mudroom, bonus room with full bath above 3-bay garage, screened porch, security and irrigation systems. Call Jack Roth $579,000

Call RANDY WOLCOTT JUST $3,200 per acre!

Farms

Wexford Mill . Southern Living at its finest! This 4-

bedroom, 2.5 bath home sits on over an acre with amazing views of the lake from the rocking chair front porch. Plenty of room for entertaining with bright & spacious living room and family room, crown molding, smooth ceilings and calming colors. Lots of storage in walk-out attic and the finished garage with workshop. Call Donnita Harmon $299,500

Courtney Conger

Randy Wolcott

Suzan McHugh

Thomas Bossard Brian Cavanaugh Jane Page Thompson Donnita Harmon

803.645.3308

803.292.8525

.

803.507.1142

803.640.2845

Lee Hedlund

803.221.6831 803.624.6072

Mike Hosang

803.270.6358 803.215.8232

Frank Starcher

803.270.6623 803.508.1936

.

Jack Roth

JANE PAGE THOMPSON

$46,000

Alex Tyrteos

803.341.8787

203.249.3071

Barb Uskup

Melissa Major

803.295.3199 Broker In Charge

.648.8660

www CarolinaHorseProperties com . 803

February-March 2018-2019

The Aiken Horse

15


The Aiken Horse Show in the Woods A Tradition Continues by Pam Gleason

I

f it is spring in Aiken, this means it is time for the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods. Aiken has many horse shows, of course, including several that draw top riders from around the region to compete on modern, perfectly groomed footing, racking up points for regional and national awards. We also have informal schooling shows, where the object is to expose horses and riders to competitive situations, preparing them for recognized shows in the future. But we have only one show like the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods. It is not sanctioned by any organization and there are no points to win. But it is definitely not a schooling show. Instead, it is

place in April, May and June. Finally, it gives all members of the Aiken community a reason to take an excursion into the Woods, where they have a chance to appreciate the athleticism of the horses and the natural beauty of the setting. The Aiken Horse Show is the one time in the year that cars are allowed into the Woods – this has been true from the very first show up until the modern day. This makes the Woods accessible to many people who would not be able to enjoy them otherwise.

an old fashioned hunter show, where riders gather in a grass ring with natural fences, each striving for the ribbon and the championship. The show hearkens back to the “old days,” before hunter shows were such a professional enterprise, when they were more likely to be a competition for horses that actually hunted, rather than horses trained specifically for showing. The Aiken Horse Show tradition goes back to March 18, 1916, when the first show was held in the very same ring in the middle of the Hitchcock Woods. Show organizers advertised the event as a “Gala day – Society event. Unexcelled Exhibition of Thoroughbred Horses.” They commissioned a train from Southern Railway to bring spectators from Augusta to Aiken. Throngs of onlookers came, witnessing the start of an annual tradition. The Aiken Horse Show is one of the oldest continuing equestrian events in Aiken, rivaled only by polo on Whitney Field (this started in1882) and the Aiken Hounds, which started in 1914, but was recognized by the Masters of Foxhounds Association in 1916. Today, the horse show marks the end of the winter foxhunting season in the Woods, giving hunt enthusiasts a chance to prove their horses in the show ring. It is also the beginning of the Aiken spring horse show season, serving as a precursor to USEF approved events that will take

ring is about a mile into the Hitchcock Woods, a 2,100 acre woodland preserve. The ring itself is always beautifully decorated with flowers. There are natural obstacles, and perhaps most important, lush green grass. This is rye grass, planted in the fall and carefully nurtured so that it is an emerald carpet by early spring. Approaching the ring down the trail from Memorial Gate on show days, it can look almost unreal. To add to all this natural beauty, there is a large flowering dogwood tree in one corner of the ring opposite the luncheon tent that consistently blooms at just the right time. The show’s setting makes it special, but it also poses some challenges. Spectators are allowed to drive their cars down the trail from the South Boundary entrance and to park in a designated parking area near the ring. But horse trailers are not allowed in the Woods. Exhibitors park their trailers at the Old Dibble Road entrance near the Stable on the Woods and then hack to the show grounds. It is not a short ride! As an old fashioned hunter show, the Aiken Horse Show has some strong family traditions. From the beginning, it was a show with an emphasis on junior exhibitors, and today children’s classes dominate on Saturday. In addition to children’s hunter classes, there are leadline classes and a costume class, giving the youngest children a chance

16

The Aiken Horse

Riding at the Show

Competitors in the Aiken Horse Show are unanimous in their praise for it. There are many things that make it special. One thing is certainly its location. The horse show

February-March 2019


to compete. The family class can involve two, three and even four generations of riders. Families also compete together in the hunter pairs and the hunt teams class. The show has a real sense of community. This was particularly true last year, when its dates happened to fall on Easter. To celebrate, show organizers held an Easter egg hunt in the ring for the younger children, and the Easter Bunny even made an appearance. New this year, the show will be presenting an off the track Thoroughbred award to the high point OTTB of each day. This award is fitting in Aiken, where there are long Thoroughbred traditions not just in racing, steeplechasing and polo, but also on the hunt field. Back when the Mr. and Mrs. Hitchcock led the hunt, they were always mounted on “clean bred” Thoroughbreds (chestnut was their favorite color) and first flight had something of the air of a steeplechase. Although many of Aiken’s riders today hunt on warmbloods and crossbreds, Thoroughbreds are definitely making a comeback, here and across the country.

Supporting the Woods

Proceeds from the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods go the Hitchcock Woods Foundation, which owns and manages the Woods. In addition to the lunches and sponsorship opportunities, the show also holds a silent auction that always includes some interesting items, especially hardto-find historical books and artwork that pertain to the history of Aiken. The silent auction is located in the luncheon tent, and there is a preview of the items for sale at the annual Thursday afternoon cocktail party the day before the show begins. The Hitchcock Woods is often described as the heart of Aiken, and the Hitchcock Woods Foundation is responsible for maintaining its woods and trails. Beyond that, the foundation also has a number of ambitious projects that it is working on. One is the successful reintroduction of the endangered Red Cockaded Woodpecker (RCW) to the area. This project has been bringing pairs of young woodpeckers to the woods every November, thus reestablishing the RCW population that died out here in the 1980s. Another project is the identification,

February-March 2018-2019

mapping and exploration of the various archeological sites in the woods. This has uncovered such things as ancient Native American settlements and the well-preserved tracks of what was once the longest railroad in the country.

Aiken Horse Show Particulars

The 103rd annual Aiken Horse Show in the Woods takes place from March 29-31, 2019. Starting time is 9 a.m. every day. The competition starts with the $750 Aiken Hounds Welcome Stakes on Friday morning. There are eight classes on Friday’s schedule, including jumping and flat classes in the adult amateur and open hunter division. Saturday is traditionally the day for children and families. There will be a full complement of children’s and junior classes, along with the family class, the open pleasure division and future hunter divisions for juniors and adults. There is also a therapeutic riding class and the everpopular costume class. Sunday is foxhunter day. Action starts off with separate hunter under

saddle challenges for ladies and gentlemen, and then moves on to the hilltopper division followed by the foxhunter division, which is limited to horse and rider combinations that have actually followed the hounds together this season. Everything wraps up with the sidesaddle division, which includes both flat and over fences classes. If you would like to be a part of the Aiken Horse Show experience but you are not riding, you can plan to come to the woods and watch. General admission is free, but if you want to drive down and park near the ring, there is a $10 parking charge. If you would like to support the show in a bigger way, you can reserve railside parking (this is quite limited) for $100 per day, or buy any number of different packages that will get you admission to the ringside tent, lunch each day, and admission to the sponsors’ cocktail party on Thursday night. See you there! For more information, to reserve lunch, to become a sponsor, or to enter the show, visit the website www.aikenhorseshow.org, or call 803-642-0528.

The Aiken Horse

17


18

The Aiken Horse

February-March 2019


February-March 2018-2019

The Aiken Horse

19



Equus Events at Bruce’s Field

Photography by Gary Knoll


22

The Aiken Horse

February-March 2019


TrouT walK farm | suPerb 90 acre equesTrian ProPerTy

one of THe PreTTiesT farms in aiKen wiTH access To 142+ acres of conservancy land; farm is suiTable for all disciPlines! well-designed 8-sTall courTyard sTyle sTable; gorgeous Hay fields, PasTure wiTH run-ins, Trails; equiPmenT sTorage, Pool, Pond & 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 baTH manager’s Home. offered for $1,695,000

HaTcHaway House & barn on 30+ acres

souTHern HisToric 3 bedroom, 2 baTH Home siTuaTed PrivaTely. Hay fields, 1/4 acre Pond. 4-sTall barn w/wasH sTall & TacK room, Hay barn & equiPmenT building, fenced PaddocK w/run-in. mls 105274 | offered for $655,000

oaK Knoll - sTePs To aiKen’s Horse disTricT

HisToric willis irvin designed, 3804 sf Home wiTH lovely Pool & gardens. fully fenced/walled 1+ acre, renovaTed KiTcHen/ laundry, seParaTe garage; 4 bedrooms; 3 full & 2 Half baTHs. mls 102602 | $935,000

barringTon farms - besT loT values on souTHside 5 To 26 acre loTs wiTH PerimeTer walKing/riding Trails naTural gas & u-verse available, counTy Taxes only loTs sTarTing from $52,500

Cissie Sullivan

summerfield | equesTrian esTaTe wiTH covered arena

easy access To boTH aiKen, sc & augusTa, ga, THis 74+ acre esTaTe Has iT all! well-aPPoinTed 4 bedroom, 4,761 sf Home Has sTunning PasToral & Pond views. 9-sTall sTable; TacK room w/ full KiTcHen & baTH; ligHTed & irrigaTed covered arena; Hay & equiPmenT building w/ sTudio aParTmenT. offered for $1,990,000

Horse ready on 5+ acres in THree runs PlanTaTion

THougHTfully designed Home & new 4-sTall sTable. oPen living, sPecTacular KiTcHen & cusTom deTails. sTable w/TacK room, wasHer/dryer & Half baTH. ride Trails To arenas & Training area. mls 104701 | offered for $699,000

crossways - lovely HisToric esTaTe on 4.2 acres

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wexford mill - ride, fly, fisH or sail!

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cielo doraTo | 142+ acre edgefield counTy farm

close To edgefield en rouTe To greenwood, sc, THis farm offers a unique oPPorTuniTy. gorgeous, Terraced land wiTH esTablisHed TifTon PasTure; 10-sTall morTon sTable; seParaTe covered equiPmenT sTorage & 3 cusTom Homes wiTH sPecTacular views. addiTional land available. offered for $3,295,000

Two magnolia - 7+ acre income-Producing farm

versaTile ProPerTy w/sHed row barn w/TacK room, guesT barn w/3 sTalls, TacKroom, office & Half baTH. 10 PaddocKs, 4 wiTH runins, cHarming 4 bedroom, 3 baTH Home. easy access locaTion. mls 104024 | now $430,000

rond PoinT - 2+ acres in HisToric Horse disTricT

lovely willis irvin residence offers graceful ProPorTions, beauTiful deTails & PrivaTe in-Town locaTion. sTunning Pool & Terrace, lawn & esTablisHed gardens; Zoned for Horses 5 bedrooms | 6 1/2 baTHs | mls 101391 | $1,395,000

land oPPorTuniTies in 302 Horse counTry

56+ acres w/Pond view - uPPer Pond road - $3600/acre 12+ acre TracT ParTially cleared - angela road - $88,000 19+ acre wooded TracTs off new Holland road - $4000/acre

Tracey Turner

803-998-0198 | SullivanTurnerTeam.com February-March 2018-2019

The Aiken Horse

23


TRADITION CHAMPIONS BEGINS WITH

SEE HORSES FLY

March 23rd

est. 1930

803-648-9641 24

The Aiken Horse

AikenSteeplechase.com February-March 2019


GROWTH AVAILABLE IN PELLETED AND TEXTURED FORMS

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February-March 2018-2019

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Ask the Judge

Questions about Dressage With Amy McElroy

Amy McElroy is an FEI competitor, and a USEF S judge. She is qualified to officiate at any USEF recognized national show at all dressage levels. She rides, trains and teaches at Fair Lane Farm in Aiken and judges between 15 and 20 dressage and eventing shows each year. In her popular Ask the Judge column, she answers readers’ questions about dressage. Do you have a question for Amy? Send her an email at McElroyDRM@aol.com, or visit her website: www.amymcelroy.com.

Dear Amy, When I was at a dressage show recently, one of the riders ahead of me was allowed to go around the arena at least five times before she entered for her test, so that her horse was well acclimated to the arena when they finally competed. When it was my turn, I was barely given one time around before I needed to go in, so my horse did not have the same advantage. This doesn’t seem fair or correct to me. Can you explain?

Feeling Hurried Dear Hurried, You bring up a very interesting question. I don’t think most judges have given this situation much thought. In dressage, there is only one rule regarding how much time you might have to ride outside the arena before you have to go in. This rule governs how quickly you must enter the ring once your judge has signaled for you to start your test. According to DR122K, “After the sound of the bell, the competitor should enter the arena at A as soon as possible. Exceeding 45 seconds before entering the arena after the bell has sounded will entail elimination.” Forty-five seconds does not sound like a very long time, but it should be sufficient to get around the arena, unless you are walking. As a competitor, you should always be ready at the in-gate before your assigned ride time. As soon as the rider ahead of you has completed his or her final salute, you will be allowed to enter the apron of the arena – you do not have to wait for the rider ahead of you to exit the arena. This will give you the optimal amount of time to familiarize your horse and yourself with the surroundings and to prepare for your entry at A. What you do at this time is up to you: you may walk, trot or canter, and you may go in either direction. Judges do not have time, nor are they required, to calculate equal tours around the arena for every competitor. In fact, in most cases your judge will be finishing scoring the previous rider and won’t be paying attention to you at this time. Judges work hard to stay on schedule, keeping riders’ actual start times as close to the assigned times as possible. In most cases, you will have enough time to go at least once around the outside of the arena, and sometimes more than that. There are no rules or regulations about this. Sometimes the arena can be running slightly behind for a variety of reasons. When a rider has completed his or her test, the judge will need time to fill out the collectives and the further remarks on the test sheet before being ready to signal for the next rider to come in. Sometimes this can take longer than expected, and may exceed the time allotted for the task. For instance, there might be a problem with a test sheet, or corrections need to be made. The judge might have a lot to say. The arena might run behind for other reasons: There might be a problem with a ride, such as a ride that goes off course, or has some errors. Sometimes a test might take a long time because a horse is moving slowly. There might be problems related to the weather. There are any number of reasons why there might be extra time before a particular

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competitor can enter the arena. When judges realize that they are running behind, they will be working hard to catch up and get back on schedule. In this case, you might not have much time at all to ride around the outside of the arena. In your case, it sounds as if there might have been something going on with riders ahead of you that took up enough time that it allowed the rider you noticed to go around so many times. When it was your turn, they were probably trying to catch back up and signaled you as soon as you presented yourself at the in-gate. This is allowed. Bear in mind also, that although you are never required to present yourself before your scheduled time, this does not mean that you will automatically have any extra opportunities to ride around the arena if the arena happens to be running early. Once you have presented yourself to the judge, even if the arena is running ahead and you are well ahead of your assigned time, you may be signaled in at any point. If you feel as if you need extra time at the arena before your test, you have some other options. At most dressage shows, you are allowed to go to the showgrounds the day before and to hand walk or ride around the outside of the arena. At some shows they might even allow you to school inside the competition arena. This is a good way to familiarize yourself and your horse with the surroundings. As another option, with permission, you may be allowed to hand walk your horse around the outside of the arena on the day of the show itself, before the competition begins. You often see people taking advantage of this opportunity. My advice for the future is to be ready at the in-gate, so you will get as many chances to go around the arena as time allows. Remember that your judge will give you equal attention and treat you fairly inside the arena, no matter how many tours you have taken outside it. I know it might not seem fair to you if other competitors get more prep time around the arena before their test, but be assured that if this happens, it is not intentional. I do not know any judge that counts how many times a rider circumnavigates the arena, and I didn’t realize that it could be an issue. Although a ride around the arena can be beneficial, ultimately, you and your horse should be ready to compete when you present yourself to the judge. All the prep work should be completed in the warm-up, so that you are polished and ready to go. So be well schooled and go have a great ride!

February-March 2019


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Dover Saddlery Opens in Aiken Grand Opening on February 9 By Nancy Johnson

D

over Saddlery, a national equestrian retail supplier, opens its 35th store in Aiken this month. The new store is located at 2575 Whiskey Road, in the building formerly occupied by Prestige Appliance. Although the store will have its official grand opening on February 9, it will be open for business as soon as the shelves are stocked and everything is in place. “We’re so excited to be joining the Aiken community!” said Whitney Keeley, who is Dover Saddlery’s director of corporate communications. “Aiken’s always been on the map for us. It is true horse heritage, and the lifestyle is all about the right things. So, when this space became available, we jumped on it. It is a great location and fits well to our model.” “We look forward to opening this Dover Saddlery store in the heart of horse country steeped in tradition,” said Brad Wolansky the CEO of

Dover Saddlery, in a press release. “It’s ideally located to suit the needs of riders of many disciplines in the Aiken area, whether they are here for the winter season or year round.” According to Whitney Keeley, the 5,800 square foot retail space will allow for display and stocking of many of the more than 25,000 products Dover supplies through its stores, catalog, and website. “Our retail locations are just one more option for our customers to access the large selection of merchandise Dover Saddlery offers. Plus, the stores provide the customer the ability to touch and feel the products, along with the support of our equine knowledgeable product advisors.” She added that Dover’s product advisors are especially helpful when it comes to fitting items like helmets, vests, and riding boots and they also consult on saddle fittings. “We’re all riders, so we get it,” she said. “For our team, it’s a passion working to help our riders with their needs. I’ve heard story after story about how our people have gone the extra mile to help a customer. Like the woman who delivered a turnout blanket to a farm on a freezing cold night because the farm owner’s truck broke down.” Whitney noted that other Dover retail stores have become gathering places for horse enthusiasts and hopes the same will occur with the

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Aiken location. “It’s not just about selling product. Dover has been dedicated to supporting the horse community for 45 years,” she said. “We have a grassroots sponsorship program to support the local riding community with their events, silent auctions, and association needs. It’s important to give back to the community that supports us.” Dover Saddlery traditionally carries products geared toward riders in the hunter/jumper, eventing and dressage disciplines. However, Whitney said that as the Aiken area is home to numerous foxhunts, the new store will expand their line to include products specific to hunting enthusiasts. “We look to our customers to tell us what they want and need.” Dover Saddlery was founded in 1975 by Jim and David Powers, event riders and former members of the United States Equestrian Team, who opened their first store in Wellesley, Massachusetts. Focusing on quality equestrian tack, apparel, and horse care items, they soon started a catalog store and this was followed by additional retail locations. Today there are Dover stores as far west as California, as far south as Texas and Florida and as far north as Minnesota. There are also Dover locations

in Alpharetta, Georgia; Charlotte, North Carolina; Mill Spring, North Carolina and Raleigh, North Carolina. A grand opening celebration at the Aiken store, beginning with a ribbon cutting at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, February 9 will run throughout the weekend. It will include door prizes and giveaways as well grand opening specials. There will also be numerous raffle prizes – one being a $500 shopping spree. A complimentary lunch will be hosted by Noble Outfitters on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and representatives from various top brands will be on site. The store will be open seven days a week with convenient hours; Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Monday through Wednesday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday 9 a.m. – 8 p.m. For more information, or to apply to be part of the Dover team in Aiken, visit www.doversaddlery.com.

February-March 2019


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News & Notes continued from 11

Eventing Organizer of the Year

Joannah Glass, who is the owner of Sporting Days Farm in Aiken, was honored as the event organizer of the year at the 2018 USEA annual convention in New Orleans. Joannah won the Andrew H. Popiel Memorial Trophy which is given “in recognition of the role of event organizers and their commitment to the sport.” The award has been around since 2007 – it was donated by the Popiel family who created and ran the Trojan Horse Trials in Cave Creek, Arizona from the 1970s until 2002. Joannah was chosen by the USEA Board of Governors. Joannah Glass, who splits her time between Aiken and Pennsylvania was a pioneer for the sport of eventing here in Aiken. She was one of the organizers of Aiken’s very first combined test in 1981, held on Powder House polo field. Six years later, in 1987, she ran the first “Sporting Days in Aiken,” (a combined test) at the Ramblewood Show grounds on Citadel Road. The next year, after the construction of a full cross country course on Marshall Lamb’s Outaways Farm, which was adjacent to Ramblewood, Sporting Days became Aiken’s first three day horse trial, and thereafter, it was a popular annual event, held first at Ramblewood and then in Hopeland Farms. In 1993, the event moved to the current location, Sporting Days Farm. This was a large farm on Route 78 (in those days very much “out in the country,) which Joannah had purchased and started turning into an eventing facility in 1989. These days, Sporting Days holds three recognized (and many unrecognized) horse trials, which are among the most popular events on the Aiken winter and spring calendars, drawing as many as 400 entries in some years.

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Event Horse of the Month: Eluca

This year, the United States Eventing Association has initiated a new award intended to celebrate event horses. Each month, the association will name the event horse of the month, based on statistics and results for that

is a kind horse with a friendly demeanor and a willing attitude. And of course it helps that he is a beautiful mover and a careful jumper with athletic ability to boot. Eluca will be featured on the USEA website and on USEA social media during the month of February. Who will be the USEA event horse of the month in March? With so many recognized horse trials here in Aiken throughout the next month, there is an excellent chance that it will be another Aiken horse.

Pockets Exhibit

month. The February horse of the month is Eluca, a 2009 Dutch Warmblood gelding owned and competed by Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt. Deirdre and Eluca competed in the first horse trials of 2019 at the Stable View opener here in Aiken this January. They won the Beginner Novice division, finishing on their dressage score of 23.6, which was the lowest score of the event and of the year so far. This is what earned them the USEA honor. Deirdre says that she originally obtained Eluca as a dressage horse. Darrell and Melissa Vaughn of Vaughn Equestrian and the Stable on the Woods imported him from Belgium in 2015 when he was 6. Deirdre bought him soon thereafter, leaving him in training with the Vaughns. After Eluca demonstrated his love for jumping, both Deirdre and Darrell started competing in the jumper classes at Aiken shows. In 2017, Eluca made a successful transition to eventing, ending up the reserve champion in the Beginner Novice division of the American Eventing Championships in that year with Darrell in the irons. According to Deirdre, the best thing about Eluca is really his temperament. He

The Aiken Horse

An exhibit is being planned to honor James Carter, known to all as Pockets, at the Aiken Racing Hall of Fame in Hopeland Gardens. Pockets, who came to Aiken as an exercise rider and a groom in the 1950s, purchased the Track Kitchen on Mead Avenue when he retired from riding in 1978. He and his wife ran the restaurant for decades, and Pockets also had a highly successful food truck business. As was reported in the December-January issue of The Aiken Horse, Pockets died last November at the age of 79. Everyone knew Pockets and Pockets knew everyone. To try to capture his life as fully as possible, the Hall of Fame is asking for help collecting photographs of him for inclusion in the exhibit. If you have any photographs of Pockets that you would like to share with the public, please send an email to halloffame@ cityofaikensc.gov, or call 803-643-2121. The exhibit is expected to open in midFebruary. Keep up with the latest news by following Fans of the Aiken Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame & Museum on Facebook.

Aiken Polo Club Membership

Aiken Polo Club has announced that it is offering some new membership and practice opportunities in 2019, sure to entice more Aiken-based players to its historic fields. Aiken Polo Club, which was recognized by the Polo Association (now the United States Polo Association) way back in 1899, is the oldest club in the area, but these days it is not the only place where polo enthusiasts swing their mallets in Aiken. In addition to Aiken Polo Club, players may elect to play at New Bridge and Wagener Polo Club as well as at a number of other smaller clubs and on private fields throughout the county. Until recent years, Aiken Polo Club was a members-based club, where players paid yearly

February-March 2019


dues that entitled them to practice games three times per week, occasional white pants Sunday games on historic Whitney Field, and discounts on the entry fees to the tournaments that the club offers throughout the spring and fall seasons. Over the past few years, however, although tournament participation has been strong, membership has dwindled and practice games have disappeared. This is partly due to competition from other places to play, partly due to the way the tournament fees have been structured, and partly due to changes in the polo population in Aiken. The older players, who were the mainstays of APC, have mostly left the game, and the current generation of established players, for the most part, has no particular allegiance to the club itself and will practice and play wherever it is least expensive and most convenient. That has not, generally, been at Aiken Polo Club, or not for practices, at any rate. All that is changing now that there is a new generation of players coming into the sport through Aiken Youth Polo, organized by Tiger and Susie Kneece. Just a few years ago, the youth players were fairly small children who played occasional exhibition chukkers at Whitney Field, going at a trot or slow canter. This year, those kids have their own strings of ponies along with the ability to the hit the ball long and straight aboard a galloping horse. They can ride, run, hit, ride off and hook – in short, they are full fledged polo players. The Aiken youth players have been practicing in regularly scheduled chukkers on APC fields for about three years now. Last fall, Tiger opened up the twice-weekly practices to adult players through a pilot practice membership. It was so successful, the club has decided to expand the program and is now offering a membership package that includes unlimited practice games on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, unlimited stick and ball privileges on Winthrop Field, entrance to the social pavilion every Sunday and a $500 per team discount on tournament fees. Any way you slice it, this is a good deal. Pavilion admission alone costs $320 per person, and an active player can make up the cost of the membership by playing in just two tournaments per season. To further encourage participation, APC will offer practice chukkers on a per chukker basis at the going rate of $10 per chukker. Tiger Kneece recently took over the manager duties at APC from Billy Raab, who has been running both Aiken Polo and his own Wagener Polo Club for the past two years – a Herculean task if there ever was one. The spring polo season is shaping up to be an active one. Aiken Polo is offering five tournaments between April 12 and June 9. Wagener Polo will have four tournaments starting April 24 and ending June 1. New Bridge Polo Club will have four: two 12 goals and two 8 goals starting April 25 and ending

February-March 2018-2019

on June 2. Players have been practicing all winter, both on private fields and at the new polo arena that was built for Aiken Youth Polo at New Bridge Polo Club last year. The practice season starts in earnest in April and will heat up by the middle of the month when all the players who wintered in Florida are back home. Before that, of course, polo will have its first official game of the season, Pacers and Polo, which is the third leg of the Aiken Triple Crown. This year, the game, held on Powder House Polo Field, takes place on Saturday, March 30. It is a benefit for the University of South Carolina Aiken’s baseball team, the Pacers. Players who are interested in the new Aiken Polo membership options are encouraged to contact Tiger Kneece at 803-646-3301. (Those who are interested in learning to play should call him too, since he has a thriving lesson program for youth and adults.) To find out more about APC or any of the other clubs, visit the appropriate website (www.aikenpolo.org; www.wagenerpolo.com; www.newbridgepolo. com) and be sure to follow everyone on Facebook. More and more information in the polo and horse worlds is being shared to social network platforms, and if you are not on top of them, you might be left out.

Shopping In Aiken

It’s no secret that horse people like to shop. They shop for themselves, they shop for their horses, and they shop for stuff to wear when they are with their horses. Aiken has long had a variety of shops and boutiques that cater to horse people, from tack and feed stores such as Aiken Saddlery and Aiken County Farm Supply to dedicated tack shops such as Oak Manor Saddlery and consignment shops such as Aiken Tack Exchange. Downtown also offers specialty stores that appeal to horse people, including Equine Divine, Aiken Dry Goods and Epona. We even have one of the top saddlers in the country, Custom Saddlery, which creates custom saddles for dressage and jumping riders. Aiken can now add two new categories of equestrian store to its roster. With Dover Saddlery opening a branch on Whiskey Road this February, we now have a national retail chain. (More about that elsewhere in this section.) And last fall Aiken got its own outlet store when FITS Equestrian opened the FITS Outlet at 111 Warehouse Road near Highfields Event Center. Lida Bard and her father Nick Bard purchased FITS Equestrian apparel, a Portland, Oregon-based riding clothes business, three years ago. They headquartered the business in an attractive shop in downtown Aiken, where they kept samples of their items on display, but they had nothing for sale, which confused some people.

“We had customers coming into our office looking to purchase items and we were turning people away,” Lida explained last fall. “There was no store – only an office – and we carried very little wholesale inventory. We hoped they would go to some of the retail stores here in town where they could find what they wanted.” The majority of FITS inventory was shipped out of a Richmond, Virginia warehouse to 2900 retailers, mostly along the East Coast. But the Bards had been looking for land and a building where they could store more inventory and have a showroom to display current fashion lines. They ended up finding that they needed on Warehouse Road, set back from Richland Avenue. There they built what they thought would be a showroom. But it was not long before they decided to convert the showroom into an outlet store for older styles as well as for current breeches and their trendy shirts. The FITS Outlet had a grand opening on November 9 and 10, and the store found its niche right away. “We had lots of friends, neighbors, strangers, everybody coming in,” said Lida. “For the entire week after the opening people kept streaming in to buy.” And demand has not slacked off. Though the store is set far back from the road and it certainly could be easy to drive right past it if you were not looking carefully, horse people are a persistent lot when it comes to shopping, especially if they think they may get a deal. Business has been good. The outlet itself has the elegant feel of an upscale boutique where one might be afraid to ask the cost of the wares. But the selection and the prices are both excellent. You can buy current styles as well as last year’s closeouts at a surprisingly affordable rate, especially considering the high quality of the merchandise, which incorporates the latest fabric technologies into flattering designs. There are even attractive and comfortable coats for dogs. There is something for everyone. The FITS Outlet is open Monday through

Friday 9 to 5 and Saturday 10 to 2. For more information, visit www.FitsRidingLtd.com, 888-360-3487 or 803-226-0195. Facebook. com/FitsRiding -Diana Hunt contributed to this article

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“Breakfast at the Gallops” to benefit the

Aiken Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame and Museum

Aiken Training Track in Aiken, South Carolina Friday, March 15, 2019 8 a.m. Come and enjoy breakfast at the Aiken Training Track, meet the trainers and watch Aiken’s future racing stars work out!

$20 in advance* $25 at the gate*

Breakfast begins at 8 am Sponsored by: The Aiken Training Track  Mosaic Racing Stable  The Aiken Horse Larlee Construction  Suzy Haslup - Meybohm Realtors Aiken County Farm Supply  Folly

Tickets available at the Aiken Training Track Office, Odell Weeks Center, Meybohm Realty (downtown Aiken) Aiken Visitors Center & Train Museum (406 Park Avenue SE), Folly (downtown Aiken), and online at www.aikentrainingtrack.com.

For more information call 803-642-7631.

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Camden SC I-20 Exit 101 February-March 2019


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ABOUT NEW BRIDGE (visit newbridgepolo.com or call 1-888-4NB-POLO)

presents

Surrey Cottage

New Bridge is an 860-acre gated equestrian community nestled among rolling pasture lands on New Bridge Road just 15 minutes from downtown Aiken. Born from the excitement, intensity and tradition of polo, New Bridge is the home of New Bridge Polo & Country Club and of Aiken Youth Polo, but also embraces equestrians of all disciplines as well as those who simply love the outdoors, with all sharing the essential joy of a life that celebrates horses, people and land - in a place that connects them. Residents enjoy an array of equestrian amenities including five meticulously groomed polo fields, stick and ball areas, an exercise track, polo arena, riding trails, all-weather GGT dressage and jumping arenas, miles of groomed roads made for riding and The Stables, our full-care, premier 24-stall boarding facility. A swimming pool with lounge area, a clay tennis court, and an Argentinian colonial-style Clubhouse with restaurant/bar (open spring and fall), balcony, porch, and outdoor spaces round out the perfect setting for everyone from families to empty nesters, casual riders to competitive athletes, and those simply seeking solace from a busy world. The New Bridge world is one where all can revel in the luxury of leisure, the excitement of sport, the abiding beauty of horse country, and the deep connections of a close-knit ! community. New Bridge: room to play; room to ride; room to live, all in a place you will want to call home. The Surrey Cottage is located on an extra-large homesite in a quiet, serene setting that backs up to a tributary of Shaw’s Creek. This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath cottage has a spacious front veranda, porch and a rear grill area and patio. It offers 2,118 square feet of heated and cooled living space plus an attached, over-sized 2 car garage with storage area. Downstairs; entry foyer, master suite, custom kitchen with stainless steel appliances and custom stone countertops; separate pantry; laundry area and covered breezeway to the garage. Dining room, expanded living room with fireplace, and spacious sunroom. Second floor features two bedrooms, a full bathroom and a loft.

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Exterior siding of long lasting Hardie Board in neutral Cobblestone with Arctic White trim, double pane windows, landscaped yard with sprinkler system, individual septic and well. Price of $365,900 includes a membership certificate in New Bridge Polo and Country Club and access to all the amenities that New Bridge offers.

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AIKEN HORSE 3Runs 012919.qxp_Layout 1 1/31/19 10:46 AM Page 2

Lose yourself here.

You won’t find a neighborhood more popular than Three Runs Plantation. We’d love to save your place in this neighborhood of custom-built homes, barns and equestrian amenities. All in the heart of horse country in picturesque Aiken, South Carolina. To find out more, click on ThreeRunsPlantation.com.

AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA

2400 Acres • 30 miles of groomed and marked trails • Competition level jump & dressage arenas • X-Country schooling complex Clubhouse & outdoor pavilion • Pool & cabana • Activity/Fitness Center • Homesites from 5+ acres • Spec homes available or build to suit HOMESITES INDIVIDUALLY PRICED • DEVELOPER FINANCING AVAILABLE Marketed by The Carolina Real Estate Company, Aiken, SC. Plans and prices subject to change without notice. This does not constitute an offer in any state where prohibited by law. No time requirement to begin construction.


Inside 46 48 50 55 62 64 66

Argentine Sport Horses Secret Lives Land Safe January Eventing Modern Course Design Grand Prix Eventing Tales of Rescue


Featured Listing featured listing

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two trees estate

Extraordinary opportunity to own one of Aiken's landmark historic properties located on a private park like setting overlooking your horses. This 9 acre original Winter Colony grand estate is offered in it’s totality or may be sold separately into three parcels. The estate includes a distinctive 1989 Palladian style home nestled amidst a master landscaped garden filled with multiple native plants and trees; a notable courtyard stable with a total of nine 14x14 loose boxes, six paddocks, separate paneled tack room, two wash stalls with hot and cold running water, laundry room and additional storage; and a collection of 4 stunning estate cottages with 5 separate living spaces restored to the highest standard of renovation. The cottages have a strong seasonal and long-term rental history. Rare and unique residence opportunity to convert part of the stable complex into a residence or custom build your dream pied-a-Terre in the heart of Aiken's horse district. Parcel "A" MLS #105355 $1,999,000

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©ESI 2018

TRAINING ~ SHOWING ~ SALES CATHY GEITNER (803) 270-0574

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Argentine Sport Horses in Aiken Martin Videla Promotes the Breed By Sarah Eakin, Photography by Gary Knoll

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raining horses is not an exact science. Instead, it is something that has to be learned on the job. In the case of Martin Videla, an Aiken resident and Argentine-born sport horse trainer, his insight into training arose from his experience at a riding school in northern France. Martin, 44, who first rode as a young child on his grandfather’s farm in Argentina, was sent to learn “proper English” riding by his parents at the age of 9. In his 20s, compulsory military service took him to Belgium and that is where he stumbled upon something unusual. He was attending a small riding school in Chantilly in the north of France, run by a French trainer out of the French National Riding School in Saumur. “It was a place where if you didn’t want your horse, you donated it there. We had all shapes and sizes, including a carriage horse, a Selle Francais with one eye and a Thoroughbred. It was very helpful and gave me a different vision of riding and training. “That little school put a bug in me,” he continued. “The trainer would ride those horses and have them ready for us to learn and they would all ride in the same way. That woke me up and I started looking for

that effectiveness by going out and working with different trainers and professionals. I started looking for that same perfection that I found sitting on those horses from that little school in Northern France.” When Martin came back to Argentina he wanted to learn from everyone. “The Cavalry has the HorseMaster and it’s open to civilians so I did that for an intensive year in 1996,” he said. “Our instructors were from the military team and one was an eventer from the Atlanta Olympics. When he left for the event, he asked me to sit on his horses while he was gone. I rode horses for him and some of the top riders in Argentina and none of those horses would do those things that the little horses in the little riding school in north of France would do. The key I realized, was method and discipline.” From that moment of revelation, Martin’s method of training was conceived. He continued to expand his experience and learning and took a year’s sabbatical, working with Portugal’s Manuel Malta da Costa

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and Haras des Rouges in France as well as spending some time working for David O’Connor in the U.S.A. Working with Argentine sport horses, he has seen them evolve over the years to respond to the demands of the marketplace. This evolution has been helped by the fact that the one of the missions of the Argentine cavalry is to promote horse breeding in Argentina. Up until recently there was money budgeted for the army to buy horses from Europe to put them in their breeding program and then rent them out to breeders for very little. This, coupled with a tax exemption on the sale of foals, made breeding an attractive undertaking. “I’ve been breeding horses for clients and sending them over to the U.S. for at least 18 years,” Martin said. He came to Aiken through his clients Johnny Atkinson and Jeff Walker who imported horses through his operation. He also met Susan Novotny who was delighted to find a trainer that shared her philosophy. “I was looking for a quality trainer. I like that European influence that he has - horses have to be able to do dressage as well as do hunter/ jumper. I also liked the fact that Martin is very, very good with young horses. He doesn’t push a horse. He lets the horse be a horse - and then he asks it do more.” She says she found the Argentine Sport Horse, also known as the Argentine Saddle Horse, a cooperative breed. “Because they were raised in the wild they are a lot easier to work with,” Susan said of her five yearlings imported last year. Martin had picked them for her in Argentina and she approved them through video. “They know how to take care of themselves,” she said. But she said that degree of ‘streetsmart’ thankfully doesn’t translate into attitude. “Wild mustangs, they are different. If you say ‘no’ to a wild mustang you’re going to have a fight. I can tell these horses ‘no’ and they won’t fight with me,” she said. “They are quality horses with a good, kind disposition. Anybody can ride them.” Martin will train horses to go on to any sport and is aware that the American market has certain requirements. “My niche has always been to prepare young horses for the sport. Not the performance part,” he said. “Usually America doesn’t look at the breeding. They look at conformation, technique and character. They have to have very clean x rays. We are establishing ourselves with a barn in Aiken. I bring horses, train them and sell them. “I’m in Aiken because for 20 years I came to the U.S. to promote auctions, mainly on the East Coast. Aiken has always been very welcoming to us,” said Martin who lives with his American wife and dual-citizen children. “So far I’m trying to be on good footing here before traveling to too many shows. It’s all about relationships. The process is really slow. In our Latin countries things move faster. People have a limit to the number of horses they can have. They don’t do it as an investment. In America the important thing is always make the client happy.” As Martin establishes himself in the U.S. he has found Aiken to be extremely conducive to achieving his objectives. “Aiken has nice facilities and it is not expensive to train your horses. There are shows everywhere – a show every weekend with good footing, decent organization and nice course designing. Aiken is super for the young horses.”

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Secret Lives of Horses Raleigh, All-Around Horse

By Ragan Morehouse, Photography by Gary Knoll

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razing peacefully on the side of a hill at Equine Rescue of Aiken, Raleigh, a 16 hand, 23-year old bay Percheron-Thoroughbred cross, seems to revel in Southern retirement. Unlike most of his pasture-mates at the rescue, Raleigh has led a good, safe life. Caroline Mulstay, who owns him in partnership with her mother, Jennifer, is the rescue manager at the facility. She brought him down from her former home in New Hampshire for his retirement, boarding him where she works so that she can keep an eye on him. Raleigh was born at Smoke House Farm in Morgantown, Pennsylvania in 1996. He was bred by the farm’s owners, John and Patricia Wilkoski, who are well-known and respected foxhunters and breeders. Trained to follow the hounds, as a young horse Raleigh hunted with several Pennsylvania and Virginia hunts before being sold to Eileen Peterson of Canterbury, New Hampshire. Eileen was an active member of the Granite State Carriage Driving Club, and she broke Raleigh to drive and enjoyed driving him for many years. Unfortunately, his driving career ended after a frightening experience in 2005, when he was 9 years old. “I don’t know much about the accident,” says Caroline. “Apparently, the cart was not hooked up properly or it was broken. When Raleigh tried to stop, the cart would crash into his hind end and it terrified him. He ran with the cart until he was exhausted. It scared him to death. He couldn’t drive anymore after that because he was too scared of the cart.” Unable to drive him and with little interest in riding, Eileen put Raleigh up for sale online. Luckily for the Mulstays and for Raleigh, Caroline found his ad. Caroline was 17 at the time and a green event rider, but she instantly felt a connection with Raleigh and was convinced that he was the horse for her. “We were looking for something that had a bit more schooling but I absolutely just fell in love with him,” recalls Caroline. “He was so sweet and had the best face and best personality, and he was absolutely gorgeous.” To begin his third career as an event horse, the Mulstays sent Raleigh to Caroline’s trainer, Lelo Reeves. “He couldn’t even canter a circle inside the ring,” says Jennifer Mulstay. Caroline laughs, agreeing with her mother. “He was very green but like the typical drafty type, you could do whatever with him and so it didn’t really matter. He would plod around and was happy to do so. He was just thrilled to have attention.” After a few months with Lelo Reeves, Caroline began regularly riding Raleigh and attended a few small events. For the next few years, the pair moved up the levels, competing solidly at Novice and moving up to Training in Caroline’s last year in high school. In 2008, Caroline and Raleigh went off to college at the University of New Hampshire in Durham. Raleigh was boarded at a farm near the coast which was close both to the college and to Caroline’s parents’ home. Jennifer, who had never ridden formally, began trail riding Raleigh to help keep him fit for Caroline. When Caroline was in her freshman year at UNH, she began schooling at the Preliminary level. That was when she realized that she had gone as far with Raleigh as she could. “He really didn’t have the scope or ability to go any further than Training,” says Caroline. “He basically just trotted over everything in one big stride. He rarely actually jumped over anything.” While Caroline looked for another horse, she and her mother debated selling Raleigh, but eventually decided that he was too wonderful to part with. “We had friends talking in our ears telling us that we would never find another horse like him,” remembers Caroline. “Mom was riding some at the time and we didn’t know what she was going to ride if we sold him. So we decided to keep him and that was the best decision we ever made.” Caroline found a new horse and was able to ride with her mom,

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who started taking lessons. Jennifer was soon spending more and more time at the barn, enjoying the fellowship and the saddle time. In 2009, Jennifer made some friends who hunted with the Wentworth Hunt in New Hampshire and decided to ‘cap in’ as their guest. After her first hunt, she was hooked and joined the group later that year. She and Raleigh were stalwart members of the Wentworth Hunt for three years during which Raleigh was twice named ‘Hunt Horse of the Year.’ “I guess he went back to his roots,” Caroline says. “He really was the perfect horse for my mom because she was kind of timid and she doesn’t bounce. Raleigh is the type of horse that when another horse is melting down, he just stands there. He will look at the other horse like, ‘What’s the problem? That takes way too much energy to do that.’ He has never put a foot wrong a day in his life. My mom had an absolute ball hunting him. She did way more on him than she could have on a lot of other horses.” In 2012, Jennifer decided to give up hunting in order to ride on the beach, participate in hunter paces, and event at the Novice level. Raleigh helped pay for his own board by acting as a lesson horse when Jennifer wasn’t riding him. Jennifer’s Facebook page shows pictures of him with tiny girls atop his big frame as he strides over cross-rails and small verticals. There are pictures of him with a hula hoop festooned with streamers around his neck; pictures of Jennifer talking on her phone while riding him on the trail; pictures of him out on the hunt field and on the cross country course. In all of them, He has an expression of saintly patience on his face. “This horse never said no to anything,” remarks Caroline as she scrolls through the photographs. As Raleigh neared his 20s, he was still perfectly sound and willing to work but Jennifer felt that he needed to slow down. In 2016, she planned to send him to Caroline, who had moved to Aiken, so that he could avoid the snowy winters of New Hampshire. Days before he was to ship, he went mysteriously lame. The vet came out and diagnosed him with a mild tendon strain and a case of ringbone, and suggested that he postpone his trip until he was more comfortable, but that still he go to Aiken as soon as he was able to travel. Once in the South, Raleigh was assessed by Dr. Sabrina Jacobs of Performance Equine Veterinary Clinic. She suggested that he be injected with the inflammation blocker, IRAP (IL-1 receptor antagonist), and PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma), which has been shown to accelerate tissue repair. Within a few weeks, Raleigh was trotting around sound again. Then, almost immediately, he developed an ulcer in his eye. Caroline rushed him to the clinic. “Everyone knows you don’t mess around with eye injuries,” she says. Raleigh spent two weeks at the clinic before returning to the rescue, where he was treated for an additional two months. Today, he has a small white spot on his cornea to show for the ordeal but his eye was saved and he can see. “It was a nightmare to treat that ulcer,” Caroline says. “I don’t wish it on anyone.” For the next two years, Raleigh came to Aiken for the winter and in the summer returned to New Hampshire where he and Jennifer continued to enjoy beach and trail rides and the occasional hunter pace. This spring, however, Raleigh will stay at the rescue for good, entering the ranks of the officially retired. “Raleigh gives me great pleasure, balance, and solace in my life,” says Jennifer. “He provides a great connection with my daughter and has introduced me to the wonderment of equine sports and some wonderful people.” “He is just the best horse,” Caroline adds. “He is a good babysitter for other horses, was a good babysitter for me, and a good instructor for me. I grew up on him. I learned everything on him. For that I will always be grateful and we will always take care of him.”

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As Easy as Falling off a Horse LandSafe Shows How By Sarah Eakin

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here is a saying that you need to fall off a horse at least seven times before you can say you’ve learned to ride. Falling off is an unwelcome event, but a likely one for any rider. And yet, while the average horseman spends hours perfecting how to be in the saddle, he is unlikely to spend a lot of time pondering the best way to fall out of it. Danny Warrington is not that horseman. A former steeplechase jockey and international event rider, he launched the LandSafe program several years ago in partnership with his wife, Keli, a former nationally ranked gymnast. By conducting clinics nationwide he has been teaching riders the best way to fall while minimizing injury. LandSafe is coming to Aiken at JH Eventing from March 25 to 26. All are welcome, from the professional event rider to the horse owner who saddles up for the occasional trail ride through the Hitchcock Woods. “In all honesty we think that anybody who’s ever going to ride should take the program,” said Danny.

Falls are a common occurrence in equestrian pursuit. Unfortunately, you don’t have to be riding around an Advanced Level course to be at risk: there are plenty of examples of devastating injuries sustained from falling off a horse that is simply walking; or even being thrown from a spooked horse that was quietly standing still. “Anybody who sits on a horse is involved in an extreme sport and should be prepared for all possible outcomes,” said Danny, If word of mouth stories of riders suffering from a bad fall are not enough to convince riders of the danger, there are statistics allowing you to calculate the risk. On the landsafeequestrian.com web site, the home page shares the following: “FEI Research shows that the risk of a fall with injury ranges from one in every 250 starts for low impact falls to one in every 520 starters for serious injuries. The type of fall also correlates to the risk of injury

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or death. The risk of having a serious injury is once in every 55 falls. A rotational fall, however, increases the risk to once every 5 falls.” The LandSafe clinic accommodates 20 riders and takes place over two days, totalling eight hours of instruction. Live horses are replaced with a custom-made mechanical version and riders are trained ‘to defend themselves on impact.’ If it sounds like a combat exercise, Danny – whose father was in the Marines – points out that gymnastics and the cavalry are both rooted in the military. “There is a lot of history of equestrian sport and gymnastics combined. Gymnastics was militarybased so we look at that training.” Techniques are taught “to prevent catastrophic injury. To disperse energy better than a direct impact.” And this is not classroom-based instruction. “You do fall,” Danny explained. “But it is done in a very educational manner. We assume you know nothing about rolling, and by the end of the first day, people are doing dive rolls. Then we put you on the [mechanical] horse and get you to roll off of the horse and away from the horse. And then on the second day we come back and do some more exercises trying to teach you how to find your feet, as well as more rolling.” Danny and Keli have welcomed clients from all sectors of the horse industry to their clinics over the past two years. Those who have attended speak of retraining their responses both mentally and physically. According to Danny, one of the toughest instincts for a rider to overcome is not wanting to let go of the reins. There is a popular sentiment among horseman that keeping hold of your horse after a fall is a heroic feat that should be applauded – even celebrated with a case of beer. But holding on to the reins generates a few unwelcome consequences, such as the possibility of pulling the horse off balance and causing it to fall on top of you. “Having the reins in our hands creates a human rationale to hold on and not defend ourselves,” said Danny. “Reins can be a hindrance during a fall.” Another common response during a fall is to reach out with your arms, resulting in such injuries as broken wrists, collarbones and dislocated shoulders. If used correctly, however, arms can help prevent injuries to the neck and head. If the clinic sounds challenging, Danny reassures us that “it’s a physical program but it’s not an abusive program.” The objective is to cushion the blow of a fall through having the knowledge to respond the right way in an instant. “There are a lot of things we can do in that split second to reduce catastrophic injury,” Danny said. “We educate clients so that they won’t go back to instincts – they will go back to techniques.” For more information, visit www.landsafeequestrian.com

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Great Oak Aiken Therapeutic Riding Center Mission: to provide equine assisted activities that promote the physical, emotional, and psychological health of individuals with special needs.

Great Oak is excited to offer new programs in addition to our diverse therapeutic riding lessons. Silver Saddles Great Oak’s Silver Saddles are a group of mature women who seek to increase their balance, coordination, flexibility and strength while in the saddle. Next session begins March 20th.

Fun Fillies Great Oak’s Fun Fillies is an after school program for young girls to develop communication strategies, problem solving skills, horsemanship, and teamwork. Coming Spring 2019.

How You Can Help Great Oak Aiken Therapeutic Riding Center is a registered 501(c)(3). All contributions to our scholarship fund are tax-deductible and can be made online at www.greatoakatrc.org/donate.

Contact Us Telephone: 803-226-0056 Email: Nicole@greatoakatrc.org Physical Address: 1123 Edgefield Highway, Aiken, SC 29801 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1288, Aiken, SC 29802

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January 2019 Eventing: Sta


able View and Full Gallop

Photography by Gary Knoll and Pam Gleason


The Aiken Horse Park Foundation is pleased to welcome Michel Vaillancourt to Bruce’s Field. A lifelong horseman, Michel became one of Canada’s top showjumping contenders. He won the individual silver medal in the 1976 Olympics in Toronto; team bronze at the Pan American Games in 1975; team silver at the 1979 Pan Am Games and team gold at the 1980 alternate Olympics in Rotterdam. He has

served as the national coach for National Coach for the Canadian equestrian delegations to the 1994 World Equestrian Games and 1996 Summer Olympics and was inducted into the Jump Canada Hall of Fame in 2009. He holds a level 4 Coaching certificate and is a level 4 course designer with the International Equestrian Federation (FEI), one of only 5 North Americans that hold that ranking. Revered as one of North America’s greatest course designers, Michel continues to excel at the forefront of his chosen sport. • $200 per horse and rider for the one-day clinic. • Auditors $25 • Beginner Novice to Preliminary

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Aiken Dressage Challenge Series 2019 Stable View and The Aiken Horse Park Foundation are pleased to offer a season long (Six USEF/USDF Dressage Show) series for the second year. Challenge Series High Point awards will be presented at the final show. Winners will be chosen based on best average score for each level and must have competed in at least three shows of the series. Average must be higher than 57.000% to be eligible for an award.

February 9 - 10 “I LOVE Dressage” Judges: Tami Batts & Sandy Osborn March 16 - 17 “Southern Comfort” Judges: Beverly Rogers & Jodi Lees “A G athering Pl ace” Aiken, South Carolina

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February-March 2018-2019

April 6 - 7 “Spring Fever” Judges: Lisa El-Ramey & Pamela Wooding

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The Modern Course Showjumping Evolution

By Michel Vaillancourt, Photography by Pam Gleason

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how jumping, like all other professional sports, is constantly evolving. In all sports, the rules of engagement are tweaked regularly to improve the quality of the game, increase the safety of the participants and of course to make it more spectator-friendly. It is always interesting to me, as a senior course designer, former international show jumper and trainer, to follow the evolution of our extraordinary sport. As a course designer, my job is to provide competitors with the most current, up-to-date courses while remaining true to my signature classic style. My goal is to stay on top of what changes are occurring around the world so that my work produces the best results for human and equine athletes. Courses must be challenging enough that most horses and riders will incur faults, and yet they must not be so difficult that they are impossible for the best horse and rider combinations to complete cleanly on a good day. We have just concluded an important cycle in 2018: the FEI World Equestrian Games in Tryon, NC, which provided us with an important snapshot of what show jumping is all about today. The WEG is a major championship held every four years in the middle of the Olympic cycle. Last year, the show jumping format was changed for the first time since the WEG competition began. The final “Round Robin” segment, where the top four riders switch horses with one another, was removed altogether. On the one hand, it was sad to lose this element, an incredible finale, unique to this particular championship. On the other hand, it was the right decision. The last leg was deemed to be too stressful for the horses, and the welfare of the horse must always come first. This year’s WEG showjumping remained a true championship test in which the winner was determined after five rigorous rounds of competition. We witnessed incredible sport. The USA ultimately claimed the team gold medal after in an epic team final, the most exciting that I have ever experienced! Simone Blum, a 29-yearold rider from Germany, became the second woman in the World Championship’s history (behind Canada’s Gail Greenough in 1986) ever to win the individual championship with a flawless performance after five rounds on her chestnut mare DSP Alice. The major takeaways of the 2018 WEG as they relate to a discussion of new trends in modern course design can be put into four categories: material, time allowed, distances, and dimensions. “Material” is course-designer terminology for the jumps themselves and how they are put together. The quality of the horses and riders keeps improving all the time – it would be alarming if it didn’t. Therefore in order for course designers to create the appropriate number of faults, they have elected to use lighter materials rather than build bigger, heavier jumps. Jump construction now is more delicate than in the past: fewer rails, smaller “fill” (for instance, gates, hurdles and planks) and shallower jump cups are now used on almost every jump. Solid colors on rails are used more often today instead of yesterday’s striped poles with their sharp color contrasts. Liverpools and water are still standard obstacles. One of the biggest changes in Tryon was the use of narrow jumps, specifically using 10-foot rails instead of 12-foot rails. These shorter, lighter rails require more precise approaches. Short rails were first used indoors for space reasons, but now they have migrated to outdoor arenas as course designers seek new ways to build more technical tracks. The speed which creates the “time allowed” for courses is becoming more of an issue. It is not enough to leave all the rails up; competitors must complete the course within a specified time or they will incur time faults. At the highest levels, the time can be very difficult to make: simply adding a stride in a line could cost you a clear round. This forces the rider to stay at a strong pace all the way around the course without

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a break. The horse must demonstrate perfect rideability from flag to flag. Although clear rounds that are too slow will incur time faults, this is not the purpose of “time allowed.” Time allowed is used to create jumping faults by putting extra pressure on the horse and rider to negotiate the course quickly. One of the factors that has changed the most recently is the distances used on course, including in combinations. It should not come as a surprise that radical footing improvements across the globe along with requirements for greater speed have made the showjumping horse’s average stride measurably longer. The current trend is for course designers to try to catch horses off balance, by requiring an occasional longer stride especially in a combination where feet or inches make a difference. Spectators may not notice these changes in competitions, but course designers have actively adjusted distances to modern times. As you can imagine, some of the challenging distances that I had in my

Above: Michel Vaillancourt in the stadium at WEG, Tryon , NC. Left: Simone Blum on DSP Alice at WEG bag of tricks in years past are no longer applicable in today’s sport. When course designers talk about dimensions, they mean height and spread. There was a time when I used to say with pride that “in my time riding, the jumps were much bigger!” Well, this many have been true when the courses first became more technical, requiring a more careful ride. But the fences at WEG were tall, very tall, not to mention big and wide! Above all, a modern showjumping course requires discipline. Riders must have the ability to adjust their horses’ strides without ever losing their balance and rhythm. They must be able to recover quickly from jumping efforts and be ready for the next element in the blink of an eye. Everything happens much faster on every sports field now, pressuring athletes to respond with no hesitation. Showjumping is the same. You can say “He who hesitates is lost.” Horses and riders must have instant reaction times without sacrificing forward momentum. I can’t say I always agree with all of these changes, but this is what characterizes today’s best courses. Michel Vaillancourt is one of just five Level 4 course designers on the North American continent. A native of Montreal, he is a former member of the Canadian national showjumping team and the winner of the individual silver at the 1976 Olympics. Riding for Canada, he also won team silver and bronze at the Pan Am Games and team gold at the 1980 alternate Olympics in Rotterdam. He was inducted into the Jump Canada Hall of Fame in 2009. He lives in Aiken with his wife, Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt, who is an active eventing competitor and a realtor at Meybohm.

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A Tribute to Aiken

Grand-Prix Course of Aiken Landmarks By Pam Gleason

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n March 1-2, 2019, Grand-Prix Eventing is coming to Bruce’s Field on Powderhouse Road in Aiken. This is a spectator-friendly version of eventing designed so that all parts of the cross country course can be seen from a single viewing area. The competition will take place over two days, with dressage and stadium running on the morning and evening of Friday, March 1. Cross country will be on Saturday afternoon, March 2. The event is presented by LiftMaster and will offer $50,000 of purse money. The LiftMaster Grand Prix was conceived as a way to bring eventing downtown and to present it to the same people who enjoy attending the Aiken Triple Crown events - the Aiken Trials, the Aiken Steeplechase,

and Pacers and Polo. The course is being built at the Advanced level, and invitations were send out to the top 40 event riders in the world. Aiken’s own marquee riders are planning to compete, including members of the U.S. team like Phillip Dutton and Boyd Martin. They will be joined by Lauren Kieffer, Allison Springer, Buck Davidson and Colleen Rutledge (among others) from the U.S. side. International riders who have accepted the invitation include Clayton Fredericks, Andrew Hoy, Dom Schramm and Ryan Wood from Australia. Waylon Roberts, Colleen Loach, Selena O’Hanlon and Holly Jacks-Smithers will form a Canadian contingent. Felix Vogg from Switzerland and Ronald Zabala-Goetschel of Ecuador have also accepted the invitation. More international riders are likely going to come too, once horse arrangements have been completed: William Fox-Pitt from England and Astier Nicolas from France to name a few. It will be an international eventing showcase of the highest order. The showcase will take over the showgrounds at Bruce’s Field. Stadium and dressage will be in the arenas, while the cross country course is being installed on the grassy areas surrounding the rings. Dressage will use USEF 2018 Advanced Test B. Aiken’s own international course designer, Michel Vaillancourt, is setting the stadium course. The cross country course has been designed by Captain Mark Phillips and is being created by Eric Bull, the owner of ETB construction. Phillips and Bull have worked together for over 20 years and have built courses for some of the most important eventing competitions in the United States. These include Southern Pines, the original Fork and the 2018 World Equestrian Games at the Tryon International Equestrian Center. The new Aiken course, which includes both permanent and portable

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jumps, has been conceived as a tribute to Aiken, with obstacles designed to look like iconic Aiken landmarks and natural features. The water jump is modeled after a Carolina bay; the bank mimics the curved wall surrounding the Winter Colony estate Banksia, where the Aiken County Historical Museum is housed. One jump is a replica of the old post office in downtown Aiken. Another is the Palmetto Golf Club clubhouse. There is a jump that represents the Aiken Train Depot (the “Passenger Drop”) and one in the shape of a squirrel. This jump is similar to one that was used at the World Equestrian Games in Tryon; the difference is that this squirrel will be finished to resemble a fox squirrel, a common creature in the Hitchcock Woods and elsewhere in Aiken. There is even a jump that replicates St. Mary of Help Christian Church, which stands on the corner of Park Avenue and York Street. There are 22 jumping efforts in all. “It’s very true to Aiken,” said Eric Bull, describing the course. “Everything is Aiken-specific or Bruce’s Field specific. There are no generic horse jumps.” Although the course will look unique to the spectators, Bull says that if they have done their job right, the jumps will not surprise the horses at all. “Horses jump only a few different kinds of jumps,” he said. “So the challenge is to take those traditional shapes that horses jump well and then turn them into Aiken landmarks. It isn’t to take Aiken landmarks and turn them into horse jumps.” As an example, the Passenger Drop will look, superficially, much like the old Aiken Train Depot (now a museum) on Park Avenue. But to the horses, the jump design is similar to the “chicken feeder” type jumps often seen on cross country courses. “All the jumps are pretty standard fare,” said Eric. “The post office has two “corners” on either side of it. To build it is a huge challenge, but if we have done a good job, what we have done is on one side presented the crowd with a jump that looks very much like a building in downtown Aiken, and on the other side we have presented the horses with a very traditional looking horse jump.” The portable jumps were constructed in the ETB workshop in Virginia and started coming down to Aiken in late January. They will be finished and decorated on site and then installed on the course shortly before the event. The course, which winds around the arenas in cloverleaf patterns, has already been set, but has not yet been published. Shelley Page, who also organized eventing at the WEG, is in charge of running the showcase. She also ran similar Grand-Prix eventing contests in Palm Beach, Florida and in New York City’s Central Park last year. She says that everyone is excited about competing in the showcase and that the upper level riders appreciate this new eventing format as an excellent preparation for horses that compete at high profile horse trials around the world. “The cross country course is really coming together. Eric Bull and his team do an amazing job and Mark Phillips is a genius,” said Shelley. “These competitions are a great prep for horses that need an electric atmosphere. With everything being condensed into a small space the horses really get their blood up and get excited. With all the spectators and all the commotion, it’s a really good education for the big atmospheres in World Games and Olympic Games.” For Eric Bull, building the jumps for the course has been both a challenge and a pleasure. “Being asked to build a church into a horse jump isn’t something that everybody lets you do every day,” he said. General admission tickets are now on sale and sponsorship opportunities are available. Visit www.aikenhorsepark.org.

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Tales of Rescue

Saving the Orangeburg Six By Pam Gleason

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hen Jim Rhodes, the president of Equine Rescue of Aiken, got the call from Orangeburg County Animal Control, he knew that he had to help. In late November 2018, animal control officers there had discovered an appalling case of horse cruelty and neglect. Six Orangeburg County horses, two of them stallions, were living in muddy paddocks full of trash and debris. Their water troughs were empty or full of mud. They were so hungry that they had resorted to eating scraps of plastic – you could see it in their manure. One of them, a pretty palomino mare, was chained to the back of an SUV. They were all not much more than skin and bones.

at least two of the mares were determined to be pregnant. They needed somewhere to go. Once at the rescue, the horses were installed in paddocks with run-in sheds. They were then put on the rescue’s rehabilitation program for malnourished horses, which starts out with high quality alfalfa hay. Within a few weeks, the stallions were healthy enough to be gelded, and two of the mares were confirmed to be in foal. A few weeks later, one of the geldings was adopted to be a companion horse. “We don’t know if they ride; we don’t really know anything about them,” said Caroline Mulstay who is the rescue manager. “We just want to see them healthy.” Equine Rescue of Aiken, located on a 90-acre farm on Aiken’s Southside, specializes in rehoming rideable, adoptable horses. One of their primary focuses is off the track Thoroughbreds that they get from various tracks and then adopt out to Aiken’s horsemen. (They have about two dozen there now.) But when there is a dire case like this one, they feel they have no choice but to get involved. “We can only take so many of these cases a year,” said Caroline. “These cases take up a lot of resources and we don’t always have the room. We are a private rescue and we rely on donations. We can’t take in difficult cases like this one if we don’t have the resources to care for them.” And there is no getting around the fact that rescuing neglected horses is an expensive proposition. Not only is there the cost of feed, there is also vetting, which can sometimes be extensive. Having mares that are pregnant adds a whole additional layer of expenses.

Leaving Orangeburg Count Animal Control, December 22 Back in April 2018, Equine Rescue of Aiken had partnered with the Humane Society of the United States to put on a weekend long seminar for law and animal control officers to help them learn about handling large animal cruelty cases. The seminar focused on two things: 1) how to care for horses that have suffered from neglect and abuse; and 2) how to handle these cases so that everything is done correctly and in accordance with South Carolina state laws. It sometimes happens that animals are returned to their abusive owners because proper procedures are not followed. It also can happen that the actions of people trying to help (giving hay to a hungry horse, for instance) can make it more difficult to prove to a judge that the animals are in danger and need to be removed from the property. Officers from Orangeburg County animal control had attended the seminar, and so they were well-equipped to make a strong case to seize these six horses from their paddocks. By early December, the horses were moved to the relative safety of the animal control facility, where they were housed in dry paddocks with shelters. While their case went through the legal system, they were treated by a veterinarian and a farrier, and were started back on the road to health. By the third week of December, they had been legally surrendered. But Orangeburg Animal Control did not have the means to rehabilitate them long term. And that is when they called Jim Rhodes. Of course, having spent time at the rescue in April, they knew that Equine Rescue of Aiken would be the ideal place to nurse these starved and neglected horses back to health. And so it was that the Orangeburg Six arrived at the rescue on December 22. The herd consisted of two medium-sized bay stallions, one bay mare, one palomino mare and two large white ponies. It was Christmas season, and the rescue was already pretty full, but these horses could not be turned away. Not only were they starvation cases,

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Happy at Equine Rescue of Aiken one month later Today, the Orangeburg horses are happy and well-fed. The two ponies, which had acted feral when they arrived, are learning to trust people and be handled. The mares are well-mannered and have expressions of contentment on their faces. Their bones are starting to be covered with flesh; they look like horses again and they seem happy. Perhaps they know that they will never fall on hard times again. Equine Rescue of Aiken is a 501c3 nonprofit registered in the state of South Carolina. They rely on donations to be able to help horses in need. Visit their website to donate or learn more. www.aikenequinerescue.org.

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50,000 SQUARE FEET OF FUN FOR SALE. Why do so many equestrians worship Aiken, South Carolina? Its temperate climate, footing that never freezes, and year-round equestrian activities top the list. Now comes the opportunity to acquire your own piece of training paradise within the oasis of Aiken. Fully covered, lit, and irrigated, the 50,000 square foot arena at Tod’s Hill allows for all-weather, around-the-clock jumping, polo, dressage and more – just minutes from downtown Aiken – and even closer to home should you choose. The arena at Tod’s Hill is offered with an option of 15 to 50 residential acres within the gated equestrian community of Tod’s Hill.

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Inside 76 80 82 84 88 92 95 95

Hilltop Farm Mike Keogh Quarter Horses in Aiken Augusta Futurity Dressage in Pictures Calendar of Events Directory of Services Index


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A Full Life

Carolyn McGaughey of Hilltop Farm By Pam Gleason

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arolyn McGaughey, the new owner of Hilltop Farm of Aiken, laughs when she says that she has always lived her life by an interesting motto: “Anything worth doing is worth overdoing.” “My husband used to threaten to make me a sweatshirt that had those words printed on it,” she says. “It would have pictures on it, too. In one corner would be horses, in another airplanes. Then there were roses and dogs, and cattle, and . . . I can’t remember what else.” Carolyn can be forgiven for forgetting all the things that she has been passionate about in her life, since there has been so much. She has piloted airplanes, raised cattle, showed dogs and bred roses. She has even been a folk-singer. (“That’s another story for another time,” she said.) But, although she has done many different things, the one overriding theme of her life has always been horses. It was when she was a small child, and it is today. And, like many people who love horses, she has always been attracted to Aiken. She recently moved here with her herd of Paint and Quarter Horse broodmares along with a small collection of weanlings and yearlings, and she is excited about making Aiken her home. Carolyn’s story with horses has many different chapters. She was born in Charleston and she grew up in Savannah, Georgia. Her father managed a chain of dress shops and her mother was an old fashioned Southern lady, who hoped to turn her daughter into a Southern Belle. But Carolyn would have none of it. “I hated dolls,” she said. “I would throw them out of the crib – I was very opinionated. I was literally one of those people who was born loving horses.” Carolyn and her family lived in a subdivision, not on a farm, and her family had nothing to do with horses. But there were riding stables nearby, and so she started to ride at various places when she was a small child. By the time she was approaching her teen years she was riding regularly at Gildea’s Stable, a 40-stall show barn that specialized in Tennessee Walking Horses and American Saddlebreds. “We only lived about a mile from Gildea’s, but it was across a very busy road called Victory Drive, that was narrow and very dangerous,” she remembered. “I was a bad girl because I would tell fibs. I would tell my mother I was going to play with another little girl in our subdivision. But I would really go across Victory Drive and go hang out in the stables. I became very close to the trainers, and pretty soon they started putting me on babies to break.” Carolyn’s horse obsession only grew. She thought about horses and dreamed about them. She read all the Walter Farley Black Stallion books, and loved them. When she came in contact with real stallions for the first time at Gildea’s, she was entranced. “When I was 7 or 8, I was just starting to understand the difference between geldings and stallions, but I knew that stallions had just a little bit brighter colors, sometimes a crested neck, and they just had a special presence about them. I became hooked on stallions. I tried to get my hands on them whenever I could.”

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This was in the 1950s, and it was not considered appropriate (or safe) for women to handle stallions. The idea of a little girl handling a stallion was out of the question. But Carolyn had a quiet way about her; she could read a horse, and the stallions responded to her. Even though she was warned to keep away from them, by the trainers and by her parents, she just would not. “I was riding quite a lot by this time and I had a little glue in my pants and I got a bit of a reputation,” she said. “A lot of people would have me ride their horses, trail ride them, even show them.” There was a 2-year-old Tennessee Walking Horse colt at the stable who threw his owner (“Mr. Jenkins: I never will forget his name”) and put him in the hospital so he couldn’t come to the stable any more. Carolyn approached the man’s wife, asking if she could care for the colt, lunge him and groom him. Mrs. Jenkins asked her husband and he said that she could, if she brought a note from her parents saying they permitted it. Once again, Carolyn was headstrong. “Now I could forge just about anyone’s signature,” she said, with another laugh. “And so I did, and the note that I wrote went back to Mr. Jenkins. Now that colt became my pride and joy. I just could not wait until school let out so I could fool with him.” One day, while she was out lunging him, on a whim, she climbed on him bareback. She rode him down dirt roads all the way to a nearby park, and had a wonderful time. Gildea’s had a breeding operation, and Carolyn was fascinated by it. They had a Shetland pony stallion and pretty soon Carolyn was allowed to handle this stud in the breeding shed. “All of this goes to what my life was about,” she said. “That is how I developed my interest in stallions and how I first became involved in horse breeding.” By the time she was in her mid teens, Carolyn had also sampled new styles of riding beyond the saddleseat style she had grown up with. First came Western. There was a Quarter Horse that came to Gildea’s and she started riding him and fell in love with Western riding. She did some barrel racing and she joined a professional mounted drill team that performed at half-time in rodeos. They traveled to Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. “They would come pick up our horses in these big tractor trailers to haul them to the rodeo,” she said. “I don’t think they gave us any money, but all our expenses were paid, and it was fun!” Second came huntseat. She had a good friend whose parents sent her to a boarding school in Maryland where they hunted and jumped. When this friend came back from school, she brought her jumping horse home, set up her own small outside course of jumps and started practicing. One day she invited Carolyn to give it a try, and so she did. She ended up jumping every fence on the course. “When I finished, I said to myself this is it. This is how I want to ride.” And from then on, she was devoted to hunt seat riding. After graduating from high school she went to the University of Georgia at Athens where she studied animal science with the goal of becoming a vet. But life had other plans for her. She married; she had her

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two children, and she continued to work with horses. She trained horses for people and she showed them and she bred them. In her early 20s, she had a husband who was in the military, and when he was transferred to Newport News, Virginia, she found herself in the middle of hunt country. “I was in horse heaven and I loved it,” she said. She was totally immersed in Virginia horse life, becoming friendly with prominent people in the business, including Dr. Olive Britt who was Secretariat’s personal veterinarian. After a few years, her husband decided he wanted to quit the military and go back to school, and so the family moved back to Georgia so he could attend UGA. Carolyn enrolled, too: she still dreamed of becoming a vet. But once again, life had other plans. While she was in school, she became involved with two women who wanted to breed Thoroughbreds, and she helped them to select and buy 30 broodmares. When those broodmares started having their babies, things really got hectic. “That is when I really started learning about foaling,” she said, in an understatement. “We kept the vet school pretty busy.” Meanwhile, she was raising her two young children and getting divorced. “I was going to school and taking care of my children and working at the farm. It was a busy time.” And then she met Frank McGaughey. Frank, known to all as Mac, was four years younger than her and in law school. He came to her as a riding student and fell in love, not with riding but with her. At first she was not receptive, having just gone through a divorce. “At that time, I hated men. I had had enough of them,” she said. But Mac was persistent. He was about to graduate from law school and he already had a job lined up in Atlanta. It did not have a high salary. Meanwhile, Carolyn had been invited to interview for an assistant manager job at a prestigious Thoroughbred farm in Virginia, that would have paid almost twice as much. “I think he would have hog-tied me to get me to marry him. But what he did was he said to me, I know you love Thoroughbreds and if you marry me, you will have a Thoroughbred farm and we will live in a white house on top of a hill.” Carolyn never did go to that interview in Virginia. She and Mac were married, beginning a 44 year adventure together. They started out with a 60-acre horse farm. At first, they lived in a single-wide mobile home, but had horses galore and enjoyed foxhunting. Carolyn had ended up with 21 of the Thoroughbred broodmares that she had helped her friends purchase when she was back at UGA. She leased a stallion and continued to breed Thoroughbreds. She also trained, showed and taught lessons, and immersed herself in the equestrian life and supporting her horse habit. Meanwhile,Mac’s law career took off. Soon, they were able to buy a bigger farm with the house that Mac had promised. There, Carolyn ran a thriving stable. She developed other interests, too, growing roses and breeding champion Jack Russell Terriers. Then she took up flying, getting her pilot’s license and learning aircraft mechanics. She eventually owed four airplanes, including a 1946 Piper and a 1952 DeHavilland Chipmunk. Riding as much as she did and breeding horses, Carolyn had a horseman’s inevitable injuries, but nothing too serious. Then, about 15 years ago, she had a bad accident that ended her riding career. She and Mac decided to sell the farm and give up horses entirely. Fortunately, Carolyn had her passion for flying to replace her passion for horses. The couple moved to a fly-in community, where they had their own aircraft hangar and kept their planes at home. But it wasn’t long before Mac said he wanted to have a little farm, maybe five or six acres, and a horse, just for pleasure riding. And so they bought another farm. Not five or six acres, but 50. And once they had that, and a few pleasure horses, Carolyn thought it might be fun to have

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a few cattle. “And I ended up with 250 head!” she says, recalling her motto: “Anything that is worth doing is worth overdoing!” The cattle brought her back to her early love of Western and Quarter Horses. Although she no longer rode, she could still handle horses, and she could still breed them. And so she started buying and breeding Quarter Horses and Paints. She had always loved going to horse shows, and she realized that she could show her horses in hand in the Quarter Horse shows, and that is what she did. Meanwhile, she and Mac had started coming to Aiken occasionally and they loved it. Carolyn remembers musing to him about retiring to

Aiken when they were old, buying a little cottage in the historic district and hiring someone to drive them around to the horse shows and polo games. “I think that would be a lovely way to end my life, I said, and he agreed.” But then, in 2016, Mac unexpectedly died, throwing Carolyn’s life into a tailspin. “Things got really bad,” she said. “Some days I wouldn’t even go out on the porch.” Her children were worried about her, and wanted her to get out of the house. Eventually they convinced her to come to Aiken to look at property, an activity which she enjoyed. At first she was not serious about buying, but pretty soon things changed. When she came to Hilltop Farm, she knew she had found her place. “We drove up this long driveway, and I had no idea how high up we were. But I stepped out of the car and something happened. I looked around and my first thought was ‘It’s so peaceful here.’ I was just flushed with it. Then I went around the back of the house, and I swooned. I have always been a view person.” Hilltop Farm sits on a high point overlooking the 302 equestrian corridor, with expansive views in all directions. It is also set up perfectly for Carolyn’s breeding operation, and has ample stabling, riding areas and even a polo arena. Now that she owns farm, she plans to use it for her breeding operation. She also hopes to have some boarders and seasonal renters, and to start a little horse business again. Meanwhile, her old love of stallions, particularly of black stallions, has returned. At the American Quarter Horse World Show in Oklahoma City last November, she found Epic, a huge black Quarter Horse stud and multiple World and Congress champion. She fell in love and bought him, leaving him with her trainer, Chris Arentsen in Illinois where he is currently at stud. She plans to keep him there for three years and then bring him home to Hilltop. Although Carolyn has not been in Aiken long, she is already at home, surrounded by a community of horse people as passionate about the animals as she is. “I love Aiken,” she said. “It’s a Mecca for horse people. What is not to love about it?”

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A Snowbird in Aiken

Mike Keogh, Racehorse Trainer

By Mary Jane Howell, Photography by Gary Knoll

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ike Keogh has been a regular at the Aiken Training Track each winter since the early 1990s, his Thoroughbreds easily recognizable by the black saddle pads with the “M K” monogrammed on their sides. Whether he is by the rail, shank in hand, watching his horses gallop, or at the barn watching them cool out, his quiet demeanor belies the fact that he misses nothing. This season in Aiken, Keogh and his wife Lou have 21 horses in training, along with their two stable ponies. Most of the racing stable is made up of older horses, but

Schickedanz, now in his 90s, is a successful Canadian businessman who immigrated to Canada from Lithuania in 1950. There, his family bred and raised Trakehners on a farm near the Baltic, and it is a breed that is still close to his heart. Thoroughbreds, however, are his passion and he is one of the top racehorse owners in Canada. The first major stakes horse that Mike conditioned for Schickedanz was Langfuhr, a three-time Grade 1 winner (1996: Vosburgh and 1997: Met Mile and Carter Handicap) and winner of the Sovereign Award as Canada’s Top Sprinter in 1996. Many other high-profile horses followed, but in 2002 Schickedanz suffered a stroke and thus planned on cutting back on both his breeding and racing operations. He urged Keogh to open a public stable. As fortune would have it, at that time Keogh had a pair of talented 3-year-olds in his barn for Schickedanz – Wando and Mobile. Wando was a product of Schickedanz’s long-crafted breeding program. He was the son of Langfuhr and the stakes-winning mare Katie’s Colleen. The three races that make up the Canadian Triple Crown are the Queen’s Plate at Woodbine, the Prince of Wales at Fort Erie and the Breeders’ Stakes at Woodbine. Wando swept all three races on his way to becoming Horse of the Year and Champion Three-Year-Old of 2003. Keogh had managed to keep Wando and Mobile apart for all their starts leading up to the Queen’s Plate, but in they both ran in that race. Mobile was fast, but he couldn’t catch his stablemate, finishing second to make a memorable day for both owner and trainer.

there are also six 2-year-olds that are getting their early education over a track and in a town that Keogh loves. “This is a very good track,” explained Keogh. “But just as important are the dirt roads and fields and general peacefulness. Our horses relax here – and that does them a world of good.” The Keoghs have 13 employees in Aiken. Exercise riders Kaitlin Montgomery and Kent Ransom come down from Canada with the horses each season. Victor Huerte is the assistant trainer and Lou keeps the whole operation moving smoothly. Mike was born in England and was raised in the shadows of Epsom Downs, the grand historic racecourse in Surrey that is home to the Derby, Oaks and Coronation Cup. His father, Norm, was a respected horseman, and Mike left school at 15 with the goal of being a jockey. Although he grew too tall to become a professional rider, Keogh served a six-year apprenticeship with Ron Smyth, whose famed training yard – Clear Heights Stable – was equidistant between the track and the famed natural landscape called the Downs. It was during a vacation to Canada to visit his sister that Keogh saw that there was a different system to training racehorses. “It was a culture shock, in a way,” laughed Keogh. “In England the lads do everything – groom, ride, hot walk!” Keogh decided to emigrate to Canada. It took a few attempts for him to pass the stiff immigration requirements, but finally in 1977 everything worked in his favor and he had his feet firmly on Canadian soil. Over the next 15 years, he worked for several of that country’s top trainers – Roger Attfield, John Tammaro, Jr., and Mike Doyle – all of whom trained at some point for the powerful Kinghaven Farms. Keogh would travel between Canada and Florida with the stakes horses, perhaps stopping to win some races at Keeneland or Belmont. In 1993, Keogh became the private trainer for Gustav (Gus) Schickedanz. A powerful partnership was born.

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“That win gave Gus a new lease of life,” recalled Keogh. Wando retired at age 5 with $2,563,038 in earnings from 11 wins (eight of them stakes races) out of 23 starts. He went on to stand stud at Lane’s End Farm in Kentucky in 2006, and then relocated to the Schickedanz’s Schonberg Farm in Ontario in 2011. For all their Grade 1 wins, Keogh and Schickedanz love to run and win in Aiken as well. Woodbridge, who was bred by Schickedanz and owned in partnership with Don Howard, captured last year’s City of Aiken race at the Aiken Trials. (Keogh says he will sit the race out this year. It is too early to tell who else might take his place.) From Epsom to Ontario to Aiken, Thoroughbreds have taken Mike Keogh on a journey that is happily still going strong. The race he still dreams of winning? The Derby, of course. Not the Kentucky Derby. The one in Epsom. How fitting that would be.

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Quarter Horses in SC Growing in Popularity

Trent Searles of Scottsdale, Arizona and the Pait team with Shes That Radiant: 2018 Youth World Champion Yearling Filly.

By Pam Gleason

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ccording to Jeffrey Pait, the Quarter Horse world in South Carolina is getting bigger. Jeffrey owns and runs Pait Quarter Horses on Aiken’s Southside and is the current president of the South Carolina Quarter Horse Association. He is also an 11-time World Champion, an American Quarter Horse Association judge who sits on the AQHA judge’s committee, and he was the 2009 AQHA Professional Horseman of the Year. “Our shows are growing,” he says. “It’s not a lot, but it is an increase. I’m also seeing more people just here in the Aiken area coming out to our shows. The majority are people who have been into Quarter Horses all along, but there are a couple of new folks too. There are some who are coming back to horses; maybe their kids have grown and they have the time now. It’s encouraging to see.” Some of the Quarter Horse growth in the Aiken area over the past few years is due to Jeffrey himself, who has enticed at least one other Quarter Horse professional and at least one of his clients to move to Aiken. Jeffrey and his wife Bronwyn came here from New Jersey in 2013. Shortly afterwards, Jeffrey’s associate Chris Thompson, also a Quarter Horse judge and trainer, came down to join them. Two years later, Jeffrey’s client Ina Ginsburg moved to Aiken too. In addition to bringing in new Quarter Horse enthusiasts, the Paits have also put Aiken on the QH map through their breeding program. They breed only a small number of halter horses every year, but their foals have been highly successful on a national level. Quarter Horses are often called America’s horse, and not just because they are one of the oldest truly American breeds of horses. Developed for all around ranch work and for racing – the name refers to the fact that they were bred to be sprinters who ran a quarter mile – Quarter Horses gained a reputation for being athletic, tractable, sensible, friendly, and, most of all, versatile. This versatility comes in two varieties: first, individual horses themselves are often able to perform and compete in disparate (and very different) disciplines at the same time. Second, the breed itself encompasses a wide range of different types of horse that excel in various areas. For all of these reasons, Quarter Horses are the number one horse in America and the American

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Quarter Horse Association is the largest breed registry in the world, with over five million registered horses worldwide. “Quarter Horses are great all around horses,” says Jeffrey. “If you are interested in showing, there is something for every member of the family to do. At our SCQHA shows there are enough classes in different disciplines that everybody in the family can show in something without competing against one another. If you are interested in the English side we have English type horses; if you are interested in the Western side, we have Western type horses. Their dispositions are wonderful. They are very relaxed, quiet, gentle horses.” The South Carolina Quarter Horse Association has regular shows at the South Carolina Equine Park in Camden, and Aiken always has a group of people who go to compete in various events or to watch and cheer one another on. The most popular class at SCQHA shows these days is ranch riding, which is growing in popularity all over the country. The shows also include halter, English events, speed events such as barrel racing, pole bending and even cutting. On the English side, hunter on the flat and over fences is very popular and there are even driving classes. “That’s another thing that’s great about the Quarter Horse shows,” says Jeffrey. “After you have done your own class at the show, you can go and spectate and see all the different disciplines. You can always see a good variety.” In order to participate in Quarter Horse shows, your horse must be registered with the American Quarter Horse Association and you must be a member yourself. To compete in SCQHA shows you also have to join the state association. But once you do, Jeffrey says you will be in a great group. “Our shows have a family-friendly atmosphere that has something for everyone. Come out and enjoy it. There is great socializing too, especially with our Aiken group. They work really hard to get together some kind of social gathering at the shows and they all support each other and support the association. We welcome everyone with open arms.” For more information about the SCQHA: scqhaonline.com

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Augusta Futurity 2019

40th Annual Event is Family Affair by Pam Gleason, Photography by S. Slyvester

T

he Shepard family, from Summerdale, Alabama turned the 40th annual Augusta Futurity finals into a family affair. First, 17-yearold Cade Shepard won the Non-Pro on his family’s homebred filly Lite Headed. Then, Cade’s dad Austin Shepard (42) won the Open on Joel Colgrove’s Bama Jelly. And if that wasn’t enough, Austin’s dad, Sam Shepard (72), was right there behind his son, taking the reserve championship in the Open aboard Barney Ross, owned by Austin’s

professional and an amateur division. Another change for this year was that organizers reconfigured the arena. They removed the bottom row of seating, allowing the working area to expand by 20 feet. This made the arena conform to the size of the other major competition venues in the cutting discipline. Augusta Futurity week 2019 kicked off with professional bull riding on Saturday, January 12. It ended with the Open and the Non-Pro

Above: Cade Shepard on Lite Headed. Right: Austin and Sam Shepard on Bama Jelly and Barney Ross family. Austin Shepard also took third in the class, on another one of Colgrove’s horses, Hammer Hughes. The Shepards have had strong showings in Augusta for years, but this was exceptional. It was the first time ever that a father and son pair won the Open and the Non-Pro on the same night. The Augusta Futurity, which takes over the James Brown Arena in Augusta each January, is the largest cutting horse event east of the Mississippi. Founded in 1980 by the newly-formed Atlantic Coast Cutting Horse Association, the show has grown steadily in size and prestige. This year, it ran for eight days and included divisions for youth, amateurs and professionals, as well as a new pair of competitions created to celebrate the show’s 40th anniversary. These two new classes, called “The 40” offered $40,000 in prize money, split evenly between a

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4-year-old finals on Saturday, January 20. In addition to the cutting, the show held its annual horse auction and sponsored the Wrangler Family Fun Fest at the Seventh Street Plaza adjacent to the James Brown Arena. Of course, there were also vendors galore, selling boots, hats, western wear, décor items and all kinds of tack. As always, it provided the area an eight-day-long immersion in Western equestrian culture Although the Shepard family sweep of the 4-year-old division on Saturday night was certainly exceptional, it was not really that surprising. The family has been involved with the Futurity since its inception and has supported the show in many different ways. Sam Shepard has been showing there since 1980, missing just one of the show’s 40 years. Sam’s son Austin has now won the Futurity Open title five times, starting with his first win in 2008 aboard High Brow CD

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and including a three-year tour de force between 2014 and 2016. This means he now holds the record for the number of Futurity Open wins, surpassing Phil Rapp who won four times between 2002 and 2011. Cade Shepard, Austin’s son, for his part, has grown up around cutting, and anyone who has attended the Futurity over the past decade has probably watched him go from a small boy watching the action to a talented young rider who gets the most out of his horses. Cade had three horses in the Non-Pro finals (he also finished fourth and eighth). But he still found time to help his father, warning up Bama Jelly for him before that horse’s spectacular run. Last year Cade won the Classic Non-Pro title. Among them, the Shepard family has a total of 13 Augusta Futurity titles, nine for Austin and two apiece for his father and son. Cutting is a sport that tends to attract celebrity (and semi-celebrity) figures, who try to compete “under the radar,” though word often gets out to their fans. Famous people who have competed at the Augusta

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Futurity include Mel Blount, a former Pittsburgh Steeler cornerback and NFL Hall of Famer, who currently serves on the Augusta Futurity board of directors. The professional trainer Brad Mitchell won the Futurity Open in 2010, aboard Cat A Rey, who came from Painted Springs Farm, owned by Barbara and Kix Brooks, the “Brooks” of the country duo Brooks and Dunn. Another celebrity in the horse world who has been drawn to Augusta is Pat Parelli, the famous natural horsemanship guru, who also showed here in 2017. Parelli came from Colorado to compete on his two “super horses” Corn Royal (Elvis) and My Rockin Date (Priscilla), scoring 207 and 212.5 respectively in the first go round – not quite good enough to get him into the finals. While he was here, he found the time to give an unadvertised clinic to some of his fans and followers at Adam and Shelley Snow’s New Haven farm east of Aiken.

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Aiken Area Calendar of Events FEBRUARY 1-3 2 2 3

3 5 5 6 6 6 6 6-12 7-10 7-8 8 8-10 8-10 9

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Equus Events Winter Encore. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org PSJ Just For Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Small but Mighty HDT. Courage to Lead Farm, 1060 Curb Chain La. Windsor,SC. aikendrivingclub.com USEA/USEF Horse Trial. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass: 803.648.0100 or 610.613.2010, jhallglass@aol.com, sportingdaysfarm.com

FENCE Hunter Pace. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@ fence.org, wchpace.org Tuesdays In The Park: Stadium and Dressage Schooling Days. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Dressage Test of Choice Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com Stable View HJ Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Winter Schooling Day. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Michel Vaillancourt Clinic. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Whiskey Road Foxhounds Hunt Week. Various fixtures. Hon. Sec. Betsy Minton, 803.617.8353, elizabethminton@att.net, whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com Cupid Classic. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Apple Tree Farm 3 Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, appletreefarm.homestead.com/ Aiken-2-Phases Whiskey Road Hunt Ball. Details TBA. Hon. Sec. Betsy Minton, 803.617.8353, elizabethminton@att.net, whiskeyroadfoxhounds. com USEA/USEF Intermediate Horse Trials. Pine Top Farm, 1432 Augusta Highway, Thomson, GA. pinetopeventing@gmail.com, pinetopfarm.com Lakeview Plantation Valentine’s Trail Ride. Lakeview Plantation, 875 Cedar Knoll Road, Fairfax, SC. 855.280.7121, info@cedarknoll. com, lakeviewplantation.com Backstretch Experience: Behind the Scenes at the Aiken Training Track. 8:45-11:15am. Rye Patch parking lot, 100 Berrie Road, Aiken. 803.642.7631, halloffame@cityofaikensc.gov, aikenracinghalloffame. com CEC HJ Show. Pine Tree Stables, 1265 Sanders Creek Road, Camden, SC. Candi Cocks: 803.243.4417, springdale47@gmail. com. camdenequinecircuit.com

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9 9 9-10

15-17 16 16 16 16-17 17 17 19 20-22 21 21-24 22-24 23 23 23 23

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Chat Hills Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Schooling GDCTA Dressage, Show Jumping, 3-Phase. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com Rolling Hills Saddle Club Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. 770.338.0143, willspark.com Stable View USEF/USDF “I Love Dressage” Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm. com, stableviewfarm.com 10 Foothills Riding Club Hunter Pace & Trail Ride. Details TBA. wchpace.org 10-16 Belle Meade Hunt Hunt Week. Various locations. Hon. Sec. Mrs. Angela Smith: 706.833.3104, ke4nnr@classicsouth.net. Hunt Office: 706.595.2525, bellemeadehounds.com. 10-17 Saxonburg Hunt Festival. Various fixtures. Hon. Hunt Sec. Ms. Donna Wine, 412.741.5597, djwine@comcast.net 12 Tuesdays In The Park: Stadium and Dressage Schooling Days. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 13 Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com. fullgallopfarm.com 14 Apple Tree Farm 2 Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, appletreefarm. homestead.com/Aiken-2-Phases 14-17 Carolina Classic. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 15-16 Ranch Sorting Event. BSC Arena, Waynesboro, GA. Johnny Lovett: 706.551.2190 or Cliff Chancey: 706.840.3971, rsnc.us USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com GDCTA Schooling Show. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com Pipe Opener II CT. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com FENCE Dressage Clinic. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@ fence.org, wchpace.org Dressage at Bruce’s Field I and II. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Belle Meade Hunt Ball. Location TBA. Hon. Sec. Mrs. Angela Smith: 706.833.3104, ke4nnr@classicsouth.net. Hunt Office: 706.595.2525, bellemeadehounds.com. Winter Audubon Drive. Audubon’s Silver Bluff Center and Sanctuary, 4542 Silver Bluff Rd, Jackson, SC. 803.471.0291, aikendrivingclub.com Tuesdays In The Park: Stadium and Dressage Schooling Days. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Koos DE Ronde Clinic. Courage to Lead Farm, 1060 Curb Chain La. Windsor,SC. aikendrivingclub.com Apple Tree Farm 2 Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, appletreefarm.homestead.com/ Aiken-2-Phases Chat Hills HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com USEA/USEF Advanced Horse Trials. Pine Top Farm, 1432 Augusta Highway, Thomson, GA. pinetopeventing@gmail.com, pinetopfarm. com Jumping Branch Farm Horse Trials. Jumping Branch Farm, 179 Fox Pond Road, Aiken. Julie Zappapas: 803.645.1098, ZapapasJ@ bellsouth.net, jbfarm.com Eventing Academy Schooling Day. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Aiken Hounds Hunt Ball. Location TBA. Aiken. Hon. Sec. Dr. Linda C. Hickey: 803.270.7392, lchickey63@gmail.com. Hotline: 803.643.3724, facebook.com/aikenhounds. Rolling Hills Saddle Club Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. 770.338.0143, willspark.com

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23-24 Ride Better Clinic. Stono River Stables, Charleston, SC. Laura Quarles: 843 813 5506, paradisefarmaiken.com 23-24 PSJ Series Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 24 Cannon Equine Hunter Pace & Trail Ride. wchpace.org 24 Eventing Academy Schooling Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 24 CT/Dressage Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 26 Tuesdays In The Park: Stadium and Dressage Schooling Days. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 27 Dressage Test of Choice Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 27 USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 27 Dog Ears: Read to a shelter pet. Aiken County Animal Shelter, 333 Wire Road, Aiken. 803.642.1537, shelter@aikencountysc.gov, fotasaiken.org/dog-ears/ 28 Apple Tree Farm 2 Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, appletreefarm.homestead.com/ Aiken-2-Phases 28-Mar.3 March Madness I. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com

MARCH 1-2 1-3 1-3 2 2-3

2-3 3 2-3 3 3 5 5-11 6 7-8 7-9 7-10 7-10 8-10

Grand-Prix Eventing Invitational. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org NBHA Dixie Super Show. Hippodrome, 5540 Jefferson Davis Highway, North Augusta, SC. 706.823.3728, wnbha.com Four Beats for Pleasure Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com CEC HJ Show. Long Creek Equestrian, 2000 Longtown Road East, Blythewood, SC KatelynBlackwell, 803.786.8400, LongCreekEques@aol.com, camdenequinecircuit.com USEA/USEF Chat Hills Horse Trials. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing. com, Chatthillseventing.com Cheryl & Co. (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Cheryl Sims: 404.518.9198, willspark.com USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass: 803.648.0100 or 610.613.2010, jhallglass@aol.com, sportingdaysfarm.com Horse Show Ventures - The Southeastern Hunter/Jumper Series. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com FENCE FRH CT. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@ fence.org, wchpace.org FENCE FRH XC Schooling. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence.org, wchpace.org Paradise CT and Dressage Show. Stono River Stables, Charleston, SC. Laura Quarles: 843 813 5506, paradisefarmaiken.com Eric Smiley Clinic. MPE South, 1624 Shaws Fork Road, Aiken. Megan Perry: 508.901.1505, mpeventing@me.com Stable View HJ Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Apple Tree Farm 3 Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, appletreefarm.homestead.com/ Aiken-2-Phases ASAC Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Keels Kirby: 843.598.0535, clemson. edu/extension/garrison March Madness II. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Chat Hills HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Southern Gold Classic SCQHA Show. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com

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9-10 9-10 13 13 14 14-17 15 15-16 15-16 15-17 15-19 16 16-17 16-17 16-17 16-17 19 20-24 21-22 22-24

22-24 22-25 23 23 23 23-24 23-24

McGhee’s Mile Harness Races. McGhee’s Mile, 620 Banks Mill Road, Aiken. 803.617.8511, facebook.com/mcgheesmiletraining Schooling GDCTA Dressage, Show Jumping, 3-Phase. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com Back to Back Clinic with FEI**** judge Jayne Ayers on the importance of the back in dressage. Pre-register by March 4. Suitable for all levels. Breezy Hill Farm, Beech Island SC. Registration & directions: www. scdcta.com. Southern Pines Horse Trials. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Cheryl & Co. (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Cheryl Sims: 404.518.9198, willspark.com Schooling Horse Trials/CT. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com Schooling Dressage Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm. com Apple Tree Farm 2 Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, appletreefarm.homestead.com/ Aiken-2-Phases Chat Hills HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Breakfast at the Gallops. 8am. Two Notch Road entrance, Aiken. 803.642.7631, halloffame@cityofaikensc.gov, aikenracinghalloffame. com Ranch Sorting Event. BSC Arena, Waynesboro, GA. Johnny Lovett: 706.551.2190 or Cliff Chancey: 706.840.3971, rsnc.us USEA/USEF Spring Horse Trials. Pine Top Farm, 1432 Augusta Hwy, Thomson, GA. pinetopeventing@gmail.com, pinetopfarm.com PPHC Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com Eric Smiley Clinic. MPE South, 1624 Shaws Fork Road, Aiken. Megan Perry: 508.901.1505, mpeventing@me.com Aiken Trials. Aiken Training Track. 538 Two Notch Road SE, Aiken SC. Nikki Bargeloh, 803.648.4631, aikentrials.com PSJ Ashley Hall Benefit. Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, Johns Island, SC. psjshows.com Newton County Saddle Club Open Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com USEF/USDF “Southern Comfort” Dressage Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm. com, stableviewfarm.com Brownwood Farms (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Roger Brown: 770.312.4473, willspark.com USEF/USEA Spring Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Carolina International Horse Trials. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Apple Tree Farm 3 Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, appletreefarm.homestead.com/ Aiken-2-Phases GHF/Massey Ferguson Spring Dressage Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing. com, Chatthillseventing.com Harmon Classic HJ Show. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Rd, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com Ranch Sorting National Championships. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Keels Kirby: 843.598.0535, clemson.edu/extension/garrison Aiken Steeplechase Association Imperial Cup. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, ww.aikensteeplechase.com PSJ Just For Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Rolling Hills Saddle Club Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. 770.338.0143, willspark.com USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com H. J. Fox Spring Premiere Classics I & II. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA.

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770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com Schooling Horse Trials/CT. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 27 Dog Ears: Read to a shelter pet. Aiken County Animal Shelter, 333 Wire Road, Aiken. 803.642.1537, shelter@aikencountysc.gov, fotasaiken.org/dog-ears/ 28 Apple Tree Farm 2 Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, appletreefarm.homestead.com/ Aiken-2-Phases 29-31 Spring Fling Dressage Show. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark. com 30 Dressage Test of Choice Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 30 Pacers and Polo. Powder House Polo Field, Powder House Road SE, Aiken. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org 30 Carolina Cup. Springdale Race Course, 200 Knights Hill Rd, Camden, SC. carolina-cup.org 30 Chat Hills Hunter Pace. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing. com 30 FENCE FRH Dressage Show. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence.org, wchpace.org 30-31 Ride Better Clinic. Stono River Stables, Charleston, SC. Laura Quarles: 843 813 5506, paradisefarmaiken.com 30-31 Elite Show Jumping (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Vic Russell: 678.858.7192, willspark.com 31 USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 31 Serena’s Star. SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, 199 Willow Run Road Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org 24

APRIL 3

tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org Backstretch Experience: Behind the Scenes at the Aiken Training Track. 8:45-11:15am. Rye Patch parking lot, 100 Berrie Road, Aiken. 803.642.7631, halloffame@cityofaikensc.gov, aikenracinghalloffame. com 13 Eventing Academy Schooling Day. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 13 Schooling GDCTA Dressage, Show Jumping, 3-Phase. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 13 Extreme Cowboy Race. Green River Farm, 623 North Green River Road, Gaffney, SC. southernobstaclechallenges.com 13 73rd Annual Tryon Block House Races. 6881 NC Highway 9, Columbus, NC. tryon.com 13-14 USEA/USEF FENCE Horse Trials. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence.org, wchpace.org 13-14 Ride Better Clinic. Stono River Stables, Charleston, SC. Laura Quarles: 843 813 5506, paradisefarmaiken.com 13-14 Brownwood Farms (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Roger Brown: 770.312.4473, willspark.com 14 Eventing Academy Schooling Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 17-20 JD Massey Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Keels Kirby: 843.598.0535, clemson. edu/extension/garrison 17-21 Aiken Spring Classic Masters. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 18-28 Jake Kneece Memorial 4 Goal. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org 19-21 PPHC Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 20 Spring Hunter Pace. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 20 CEC HJ Show. Toopler Branch Farm, 1035 Lee Lane, Lugoff, SC. Rebecca Hudson, 803.699.2282, Tooplerbranch@hotmail.com, camdenequinecircuit.com 20 Chat Hills Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 20 USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass: 803.648.0100 or 610.613.2010, jhallglass@aol.com, sportingdaysfarm.com 20-21 Dressage Spring Series I&II USEF/USDF. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 21-22 Longleaf Pine Horse Trials. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 24-28 Aiken Spring Classic Finale. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 24- May 5 Wagener 4 Goal. New Bridge Polo, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. 803.664.7706, wagenerpolo.com/schedule 26-28 USPA NYTS. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth. net. aikenpolo.org 26-28 Carolina Classic Paso Fino Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Keels Kirby: 843.598.0535, clemson.edu/extension/garrison 26-28 Mini Circuit SCQHA Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 26-29 Buster And Sheryl Mclaury Clinic. Double J Arena, 501 Lockaby Road, Pendleton, SC. Dorothy M Davis: 828.891.4372 27 FENCE Open Horse Show. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence.org, wchpace.org 27-28 Primetime Dressage Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 27-28 GHF/Massey Ferguson Dressage at the Horse Park. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 27-28 Newton County Saddle Club Open Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 27-28 Horse Show Ventures (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Morgan Taylor: 770.827.0175, willspark. com 13

12-21

Schooling HJ Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Camden Spring Classic. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, psjshows.com USEA/USEF Chat Hills Horse Trials. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing. com, Chatthillseventing.com Lakeview Plantation Trail Ride. Lakeview Plantation, 875 Cedar Knoll Road, Fairfax, SC. 855.280.7121, info@cedarknoll.com, lakeviewplantation.com Georgia On My Mind HQHA Stock Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com CEC HJ Show. Southern Comfort Farm, 58 Hickory Hill Road, Camden SC. Penny Elliott, 803.432.0745, scfarmcamden@aol.com, camdenequinecircuit.com Purrs and Paws. SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, 199 Willow Run Road Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org Paradise Farm Schooling Horse Trials. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail. com, paradisefarmaiken.com USEF/USDF “Spring Fever” Dressage Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Spring Fling Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Keels Kirby: 843.598.0535, clemson. edu/extension/garrison Cheryl & Co. (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Cheryl Sims: 404.518.9198, willspark.com Southern Pines CDE. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Ranch Sorting Event. BSC Arena, Waynesboro, GA. Johnny Lovett: 706.551.2190 or Cliff Chancey: 706.840.3971, rsnc.us PSJ Camden Spring. South Carolina Equine Park , 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, psjshows.com Chat Hills HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Dogwood Cup 2 Goal. 4 Chukker. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301,

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Directory of Services BARNS,CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING Cooper Home and Stable. For Equestrians by Equestrians. A unique design and build general contractor specializing in equestrian construction and farm development, architecturally designed custom homes, historic renovations, remodeling and additions. Contact J. D. Cooper, cell 502-417-2307, office 803-335-3527, cooperhs.com. Larlee Construction, LLC. Fine Equestrian Facilities. 1096 Toolebeck Road, Aiken SC 29803. 803.642.9096. larleeconstruction.com. BLANKET CLEANING & REPAIR Introducing Aiken Horse Blanket Couture! Welcome one, welcome all! Finally, you can have your favorite equine creation designed and made just for you and your horse. Fine material, fine sewing, fine products. For your consultation and initial fitting, contact Elisa at 803-640-3211. On the other side of things; washing, waterproofing and repairing blankets, sheets and fly sheets still exists. Same cell number as above. Email: elisa@aikenhorseblanket.com BOARDING/TURNOUT/TRAINING/SALES Chime Ridge Stables. Stalls available, full, partial or self care. Fun, friendly, adult atmosphere. Convenient to town, South Aiken 803-508-3760. The Stable On The Woods: Elite boarding & training facility and home to trainers Darrell and Melissa Vaughn. With access to Hitchcock Woods, our barn sits on 70 acres and boasts a full size dressage arena with mirrors, show jumping arena and high-quality grass pastures making this the ideal place for you and your horse. Training program to meet your needs, whether your discipline is Dressage, Eventing, Hunters, Jumpers or Foxhunting. thestableonthewoods.com 603.785.0435 Vaughn Equestrian: offering training, sales, and boarding. Professionalism is the guiding principle of owners Darrell and Melissa Vaughn in shaping every component of Vaughn Equestrian. Dressage, Jumpers, Eventing & Young Horses. training and sales. vaughnequestrian.com (603)-785-0435 CATERING The Neigh Gourmet: Serving delicious meals in Aiken, SC. From intimate gatherings to boxed lunches for events. Signature cocktails & decadent desserts. Please visit us @ neighgourmet.com. Judy Boles: 203-964-7707; Eileen Wilkinson: 203-321-9923 COMPANION ANIMALS, CARE & SERVICES Trinity Farms Terriers: Norfolk Terriers & Russell Terriers. Quality family dogs with proven calmer dispositions. Generations of great temperaments. Health/dispositions guaranteed. Breeder of terriers for 30+ years. Donna Fitzpatrick. 803.648.3137. easyjacks.com & trinityfarmskennel.com & trinitynorfolkterriers.com. FEED, SUPPLEMENTS & SUPPLIES Aiken County Farm Supply. 1933 Park Ave., Aiken. 803.649.2987. Aiken Saddlery & Supply. Full service tack & feed store. 1044 E. Pine Log Rd., Aiken. 803.649.6583. aikensaddlery.com HAY Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver statewide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803. HOME & FARM SERVICES Be Fly Free. Automatic fly systems for barns and sheds. No unpleasant odor, no synthetic insecticides, no petroleum distillates. Call Carlos: 803-645-0361. beflyfree.com; carlos@beflyfree.com.

Excellent professional and personal service always delivered with a smile. betsyminton.com. 800 942 4258 Hutson-Etherredge Company. Insuring Aiken farms since 1876. Your hometown independent insurance agency can customize your equine property coverage by choosing the best company to fit your needs. We are a full service insurance agency. Call Sandi Vogus for a quote! 803-649-5141 INSTRUCTION/LESSONS Amy McElroy. USDF Gold Medalist and USEF S judge. Instruction and training at all levels. Visit amymcelroy.com or call 803.640-4207. Aiken Horsemanship Academy. Your naturally inspired adult learning resource! Offering Clinics, Courses, Starting Young Horses, Evaluations, and Lessons. JulieRobins.com 803-641-4715. B & E Stables. Elite Training and Sales Facility for all levels of horse and rider. Visit classicaldressagetraining.com or call Elaine: 803-2571949. Jodi Hemry Eventing. Three-Star Eventer offering professional training, sales, boarding, instruction, horse shows, located in the heart of Aiken, SC. 803-640-6691 JodiHemryEventing@gmail.com JodiHemryEventing.com PHOTOGRAPHY & DESIGN SERVICES Gary Knoll Photography.com. Commercial, portrait, weddings, advertising. Pet portraits. Complete wide-format video service. 803.643.9960 410.812.4037. garyknollphotography.com REAL ESTATE/ RENTALS Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 28 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803-439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. Aiken Luxury Rentals. Distinctive accommodations for horse & rider in beautiful Aiken, SC. Downtown fully furnished cottages, historic stables. Executive relocation; corporate housing. Short & long term. aikenluxuryrentals.com; info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803.648.2804. Carolina Real Estate Company. Fine homes, estates and horse properties in Aiken, South Carolina. Let us welcome you home to AIKEN, Home of Horses, History & Hospitality! carolinahorseproperties.com. (803) 648-8660 Sharer Dale, Meybohm RE “Where town meets country.” sharerdale@ gmail.com. 803.522.3648. Suzy Haslup, Meybohm. “Your Aiken Horse Real Estate Specialist.” Buying or selling in the most celebrated equine community in the South. ww.aikenhorserealty.com; 803-215-0153 Tracey Kenworthy Turner, Meybohm. Specializing in marketing & selling Aiken’s horse country properties for 15+ years. southernhorsefarms.com. 803-215-4734. TACK & TACK CLEANING/REPAIR The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 538 Two Notch Rd. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166. YOGA/FITNESS Aiken Yoga: At Aiken Yoga we are passionate about sharing the benefits that regular yoga practice has on one’s physical and mental well-being. We offer Yoga classes, Yoga for Equestrians, Pilates, Barre, Cycle and Functional Fitness -- helping people to keep fit for daily living. Sarah Accord, RN, 116B Pendleton St. SW Aiken. 803-524-8833 or sarah@aikenyoga.com; for schedule go to aikenyoga.com.

INSURANCE Betsy Minton, Dietrich Insurance Company, 803. 617. 8353. Providing competitive comprehensive insurance for horses and farms.

February-March 2019

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Classifieds 1890’s Auto Surrey

Amish refurbished Padded Patent leather fenders and dash, convertible top and rubberized wheels. Paint and seat refurbished by antique auto restorer. Single and double shafts included.

Mill Race Farm, Aiken, SC. Warm weather luxury horse retirement, breaking, training, layups. 803-640-1818

$8,995.00

803-599-6605

BOARDING/ TURNOUT Chime Ridge Stables. Come join us! Fun group of mature riders at Chime Ridge Stables. Space available full, partial or DIY. 803508-3760; please leave message. Pasture board or dry stalls at Hilltop Farm of Aiken. Beautiful property in 302 corridor, close to town. Under new ownership. anguslady2@hotmail.com or 770468-5760.

BUILDING/REPAIRS/ PAINT Building & Repair: Carpentry, Doors, Windows, Decks, Cabinets, Trim, Stairs, Railings, Gates, Wood Siding, Floors, Framing, Repairs. Licensed, bonded, insured. Contact Paul Dyches. paul.t.dyches@gmail. com. 803-645-6645.

PETS&SERVICES

CATERING The Neigh Gourmet: Serving delicious meals in Aiken, SC. From intimate gatherings to boxed lunches for events. Signature cocktails & decadent desserts. Please visit us @ neighgourmet. com. Judy Boles: 203-964-7707; Eileen Wilkinson: 203-321-9923

HAY Round and Square Bales. Oakwood Farms: 3593 Silver

Bluff Road, Aiken SC 29803. $60 per bale round hay bales. $70 per bale round bales kept inside. Square bales at $7.00 per bale. Will deliver for a small fee. Please call 706-830-2600 or 803-8270864. email garymcelmurray@ glmconstruction.net Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver state-wide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803. Trinity Farms Terriers: Norfolk Terriers & Russell Terriers. Quality family dogs with proven calmer dispositions. Generations of great temperaments. Health/ dispositions guaranteed. Breeder of terriers for 30+ years. Donna Fitzpatrick. 803.648.3137. easyjacks.com & trinityfarmskennel.com & trinitynorfolkterriers.com.

REAL ESTATE & RENTALS Aiken Luxury Rentals. Distinctive accommodations for horse & rider in beautiful Aiken, SC. Downtown fully furnished cottages, historic

stables. Executive relocation; corporate housing. Short & long term. aikenluxuryrentals.com; info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803.648.2804. Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 28 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803-439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. For Rent: 10 acres; 10 stalls. 2-bedroom, 2-bath Close in to town. 803-474-5194. For Rent: Nice mobile home in quiet setting on horse farm in 302 area. Pet friendly, new appliances being installed, furnished. Short term rental only: by the week, weekend or month. Available starting in January. 803643-9960.

SHAVINGS Shaving Saver: Delivering you bulk shavings the economical & convenient way! Large, durable bags (950 lbs.) of pine shavings delivered to your stable. Reusable, eco-friendly bags make storage neat and simple; bulk pricing makes your bedding affordable. Quality blended easy sift & large

flake shavings that your horse will love! Call or text Claudia White 410-303-4617 or email scshavingsaver@gmail.com

TACK Four polo saddles, custom made in Walsall England by Prince Phillip’s saddler. Used but in excellent condition. All fittings, including overgirths. $500 apiece. 803-474-5194

TRAILERS 2014 TRAILERS USA, low mileage trailer, 6’8” X 7’6” X 18. 3-horse, slant load. All aluminum. Insulation all around sides up to and including roof radius --- good for long distance hauls. Steel belted radial tires. Brakes on both axels. Dressing room side plus 3 Saddle racks in rear compartment. Email: Ltichenor1@gmail.com Phone: 479.422.1597 2008 Brenderup Royal HB trailer for sale $7,500. Clean, in excellent condition in Charleston. 5 new (2017) tires, inc. spareRubber mats, ramp, rear loading, 2 venting windows, 2 doors, 2 stalls; Head divider and hitch lock included. Phone Meta 843 766-2545 or 670-9957 no texts, please

Advertising in The Aiken Horse

CLASSIFIED ADS are $25 for the first 30 DIRECTORY LISTING ADS: $25 per issue words & 40 cents for every word or $90 for the year (6 issues.) thereafter. BUSINESS CARDS: $60 per issue or $240 PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for horses: $35; for the year (6 issues.) Limit 30 words & one picture DISPLAY ADS are available in a range of PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for real estate, etc. sizes. For a detailed rate sheet and $45; Limit 60 words & one picture. publication schedule, visit our website: BOXED CLASSIFIEDS: add $5 to your total TheAikenHorse.com

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MAILING ADDRESS: The Aiken Horse, P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 EMAIL: theAikenHorse@gmail.com We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

Advertise in the April-May issue! Deadline March 18, 2019 Publication date: April 2019

Pay online: TheAikenHorse.com or call us: 803.643.9960

The Aiken Horse

February-March 2019


Business Cards

February-March 2019

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Monetta Farrier Specialties

TWO GREAT LOCATIONS

GREAT SERVICE AND BROAD RANGE OF QUALITY FARRIER SUPPLIES

Aiken, SC

803.685.5101

Columbus, NC

828.894.0280

www.monettafarrier.com

MalvernFederal.com Serving Aiken year round

EAST COAST EQUINE DENTISTRY Lou Heffner

Quality work at an affordable price.

20+ years experience

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803.649.9343 home 610.960.2405 for immediate response

The Aiken Horse

February-March 2019


Mortality FarM liability Care/Custody/Control shawna dietriCh

800-942-4258

Louisville, KY

•

Aiken, SC

betsy Minton

803-617-8353

www.dietrich-insurance.com

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Index of Advertisers Advertiser

Page Section

Advertiser

Page Section

Advertiser

Page Section

Adams Horse and Pet

59

2

Downtown Dog

35

1

Michel Vaillancourt

58

2

Aiken County Farm Supply

71

2

Epona

37

1

Nancy Johnson

59

2

Aiken Farrier Services

65

2

Equine Divine

35

1

New Bridge Polo Club

38

1

Aiken Fine Homes and Land

25

1

Equine Rescue of Aiken

86

3

New Era Farm

55

2

Aiken Horse Park Foundation 43

2

Equus Film Festival, Camden

54

2

Oak Manor Saddlery

51

2

Aiken Horsemanship Academy

65

2

Estancia La Victoria

79

3

Pait Show Horses

74

3

Aiken Ice Cream

60

2

Estrella Equine

55

2

Palmetto Feed Exchange

29

1

Aiken Luxury Rentals

26

1

Fencing Solutions

65

2

Paradise Farm

51

2

Aiken Pet Fitness & Rehabilita- 60 tion

2

FITS Equestrian

61

2

Patty Merli Saddles

53

2

FOTAS Aiken

68

2

Performance Equine Vets

34

1

Aiken Polo Club

91

3

Gary Knoll Photography

90

3

Polysols/GGT Footing

45

2

Aiken Saddlery, Inc.

27

1

Great Oak ATRC

54

2

Progressive Show Jumping, Inc 70

2

Aiken Steeplechase

24

1

Harrison K-9

87

3

Red Horse Stable

59

2

Artisan Market

37

1

Herbal Solutions

51

2

RRP

67

2

Hilltop farm of Aiken

75

3

Sandy Hills RE

53

2

Hitchcock Woods

39

1

SCQHA

58

2

Home for Good Dogs

83

3

Shadow Trailer World Inc.

103

3

Jensen Communities

37

1

Shane Doyle

22

1

Keller Williams- Gutierrez

59

2

South Carolina Equine Park

36

1

Larlee Construction

5

1

Southern Equine Service

31

1

Legends

25

1

SPCA Albrecht Center

102

3

Lightning Protection Systems

65

2

Sporting Days Farm

51

2

Lisa Seger Insurance

37

1

Stable View Farm, LLC

61

2

Marrinson Stables

60

2

Sweet PDZ (PDZ Co. LLC)

58

2

Mary Crane Properties

69

2

The Kneaded Edge

11

1

Meybohm - Dale

19

1

The Kneaded Edge

60

2

Meybohm (Houck)

18

1

The Tack Room

29

1

Meybohm (Sullivan/Turner)

23

1

The Willcox

26

1

Meybohm RE Haslup

3

1

Three Runs Plantation

40

1

Meybohm RE Vaillancourt

2

1

Tod’s Hill/ReMax

72

2

Meybohm RE Vaillancourt

42

2

Warneke Cleaners

65

2

Meybohm Realtors Stinson

4

1

WRFH Hunter Pace

53

2

Attwood Equestrian Surfaces 104

3

Auto Tech

85

3

Back in Balance

60

2

Banks Mill Feeds

52

2

Barnware

58

2

Be Fly Free

54

2

Bill Ryan

29

1

Breakfast at The Gallops

36

1

Breakfast at The Gallops

36

1

Camp Wayfairer

53

2

Carolina Cup Steeplechase

26

1

Carolina Real Estate

15

1

Carolina Real Estate

14

1

Carolina Real Estate (Uskup)

55

2

Carolina Real Estate (Uskup)

75

3

CHAPS

65

2

Coldwell Banker Thompson

7

1

DFG Stables

44

2

Dover Saddlery

6

1

February-March 2019

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FULL-SERVICE

AFFORDABLE

VETERINARY CARE

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SPCAVETCARE.ORG

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February-March 2019


FAST - EASY - SIMPLE Sales Processing

Horse folks helping Horse folks NATIONWIDE WARRANTY PROGRAM

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February-March 2019

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