June-July 2021

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Volume 16 • Number 6 •

June-July 2021


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The Aiken Horse

June-July 2021


SuzyHaslup_TAH_Sept2019.qxp_Layout 1 3/25/21 4:45 PM Page 1

WINSOME FARM $1.1 MILLION

REDUCED

Accredited Land Consultant An Accredited Land Consultant, Suzy achieved the title of Leading Sales Agent in 2013, 2015, 2016 & 2020. Her achievements include Meybohm “Best of the Best” & President’s Club, as well as 2018, 2019 & 2020 RLI APEX award for top producing land real estate agents.

Located in the 302 corridor, this gated 37.7A horse farm has Coastal Bermuda pastures, 8-stall center aisle barn with matted 12 x 12 stalls with fans, 2 tack rooms, 2 wash stalls, a grooming stall, laundry, 2 half baths, office and feed room. There is a 150’ x 220’ arena, grass field for practice polo or jumping, trails through the woods, paddocks & run-in shed. Over 1,900 sf. 2 BR/2 BA hardiplank house with 9’ ceilings & custom kitchen with granite countertops. Drive through 50’ x 74’ metal garage/workshop with 200 AMP service, half bath & office.

$399,000

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Prepared by: Aiken County Government 10/22/2018 JB

Scale: 1 inch = 200 feet

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Priced at $275,000 and $320,000, these lots provide an exceptional opportunity to own a farm Parcel Map bordering the 2200-acre Hitchcock Woods offering 70 miles of riding trails open to the public year round. Lots are cleared and ready for home and barn, paved cul-de-sac, underground utilities with city services and no HOA. Possible owner financing and lots may be combined. Direct access to trails of the Woods. WO OD S

Buyers can customize this 2,270 sf. light filled open floor plan modern hardiplank farmhouse with 3 BR/3 BA, 2 car garage and opt. bonus on over 6 acres in popular Bridle Creek Equestrian. Split bedroom plan, study, fireplace, pantry, walk-in closets in every BR and outdoor barbeque porch. Miles of fabulous trails, 2 arenas with silica sand & fiber, and activity building with workout room.

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$449,000

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AIRPORT ROAD

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$145,000

Wonderful horse property with established pasture, 12 x 32 run-in shed with tongue and groove pine tack/feed room, 2 paddocks with selectively cleared limbed up pines, underground electric and 2 horsepower well. Property is cleared & prepped for ring & home/house site. Bring your horses and have access to dirt roads for riding and driving. Adjacent to Windsor Trace. 088 19 01 001

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$649,000

WINDSOR PROPERTY

Situated on the water in gated King’s Ridge, this 3 BR/2BA brick French Country home boasts a Stephen Fuller floor plan featured in Southern Living. Has vaulted ceilings, hardwood and porcelain floors, fireplace, attached 2+ car garage, patio, and screened porch overlooking the lake. The 7-acre property has spectacular views, 4-board fencing, wonderful plantings, and room for horses! 48

BRIDLE CREEK

$670,000

089 07 03 003

Brick 4 BR/2.5 BA across from entrance to Hitchcock Woods with 2,100 A and 70 miles of sandy trails for pedestrian and equestrian use. Many fine features including fireplace, hardwood and tile floors, 2 car garage, double carport and screened porch overlooking private yard with fire pit & seating area. Over 400 sf. finished lower level.

KINGS RIDGE

089 07 04 010

DIBBLE ROAD

Aiken County IT / GeoServices

Copyright (C) Aiken County Government Aiken County makes no warranty, representation or guaranty as to the content, sequence, accuracy or timeliness of the database information provided herein. Users of this data are hereby notified that public information sources should be consulted for verification of the information contained on these maps. Aiken County assumes no liability for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in the information provided regardless of how caused, OR, for any decision made or action taken or not taken by any person in reliance upon any information or data furnished herein.

Spectacular 10 acre horse property with brand new owners apartment, 4 stall center aisle barn and board fenced pasture. The 2,800 sf. custom owners apartment has 2 master suites with large walk-in closets, 3 baths, kitchen with top of the line appliances, patio & lovely porch with views of the pasture. Easy drive to downtown Aiken. Up to 70 additional acres available.

www.AikenHorseRealty.com (803) 215-0153 • suzy.haslup@gmail.com June-July 2021

The Aiken Horse

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WELCOME TO THE SOUTH YOU’VE ALWAYS DREAMED OF...

finehomesofaiken.com

SOLD

MULBERRY HILL FARM 16-acre equestrian estate in Hatchaway Bridge Farms. Gorgeous views of pond, pool, & pastures. 5 BR, 5.5BA. Magnificent formal rooms. Chef’s kitchen. Elevator. Sunroom. Gas log fireplaces. 4-stall stable w/tack room, art studio, guest apartment, & viewing tower. Community trails, arena, & jump field. $1,495,000

HIGH COTTON FARM Beautiful equestrian oasis in Aiken horse country. 12.47 AC, impressive William Poole 5 BR 4 BA home w/superb 5-stall barn. Large kitchen w/island, quartz counter-tops & bay-window seating. Owners’ suite w/2 X-large closets. $875,000

OAKWOOD PLANTATION: Lot 3 Oakwood Plantation Hilltop 6.71 acre lot on Shell Stone Drive. Oakwood Plantation offers miles of gorgeous riding trails in old hardwood forests.. Gently rolling terrain & Montmorenci water service. $117,215

OAKWOOD PLANTATION: Lot 5 Oakwood Plantation Beautiful 3.05 acre lot on Firetower Road. This equestrian community offers miles of gorgeous riding trails in old hardwood forests.. Gently rolling terrain & Montmorenci water service. $50,325

OAKWOOD PLANTATION: Lot 8 Oakwood Plantation Scenic 3.54 acre lot on Turtle Pond Road. Oakwood Plantation offers miles of gorgeous riding trails in old hardwood forests.. Gently rolling terrain & Montmorenci water service. $58,410

BRIDLE CREEK: Lot 1A Bridle Creek Convenient 2.21 acre lot in Bridle Creek equestrian community. Level lot. Access to community riding arenas and miles of riding trails. Fully fenced. Buyer to install well & septic. $45,500

UNDER CONTRACT

your best friend in real-estate

REALTY AIKEN

803 640 0123

4

The Aiken Horse

The finest farms in Aiken, South Carolina. Call 803-640-0123 for estates, farms, homes & land.

June-July 2021


June-July 2021

The Aiken Horse

5


142+ ACRE RANCH in EDGEFIELD, SC

175+-ACRE STATE OF THE ART EQUESTRIAN FACILITY

1354 audubon | $2.5 Million

25 MooreS road | $3.1 Million

859 old tory trail | $1,995,000

OPPORTUNITY AWAITS ON 12.28 ACRES

WHITEHALL ESTATES - MIDTOWN AIKEN LOCATION

BIG TREE FARM - a FARM For ANY DISCIPLINE

273 reddS brancH road | $327,000

819 calHoun Place Se | $550,000

490 big tree road | $759,900

COTTAGE ON THE RAIL – HORSE DISTRICT

8.64 acreS, 8-Stall center-aiSle barn, great turnout, StePS to HorSe Park renovated HoMe & gueSt HouSe, 6 br & 4½ batHS, SaltWater gunite Pool

12.28 acreS cleared W/lovely oak grove 2 br, 2 batH HoMe, in-ground Pool, garage/SHoP

10-Stall Morton Stable, PeriMeter Fencing, PaSture in tiFton 85 berMuda 3 cuStoM HoMeS, 1500 SF entertainMent area, gueSt aPartMent

SPaciouS 4-br HoMe WitH uPdated kitcHen, uPdated batHS, FabulouS SunrooM & great back yard! Move-in ready near HiStoric HorSe diStrict!

ScHooling areaS, dreSSage arena, derby arena, StadiuM arena W/JuMPS PondS, Wooded trailS & river Frontage For SPorting/nature entHuSiaSt

58+ acreS, 15-Stall barn, ligHted arena, Polo or JuMP Field, PaSture 2 br, 2 batH living QuarterS, SeParate oFFice, 3+ car garage/WorkSHoP

#1 teaM in aiken MlS 2020 leader in luxury SaleS 2020

803-998-0198

HISTORIC HOME on 4½ AC. in HORSE DISTRICT vieWS acroSS bruce’S Field, gueSt HouSe, FitneSS rooM, 3-bay garage 5+ br, 7½ batHS, elevator, coMPletely renovated, iMPeccably Maintained

928 tWo notcH road Se | $2,750,000

THE PINE HOUSE C. 1868 ON 8.27 ACRES

Main HouSe 5 brS 4 batHS & gueSt HouSe 2 brS 2 batHS claSSic greek revival W/4 over 4 rooM FloorPlan; reSidence or b&b

AMAZING 19 ACRES IN TOD’S HILL HAS IT ALL! enJoy tHe lake liFe & WaterFront living! eStabliSHed graSS, Fencing & trailS!

7 kinSey lane | $235,000

133+ ACRES WitH 2 PONDS in EDGEFIELD, SC

STATELY & BEAUTIFUL MARYLAND COTTAGE C. 1929

MooreS road in edgeField | $995,000

1022 SoutH boundary | $1,290,000

irrigated Hay FieldS in eStabliSHed tiFton 85 berMuda PeriMeter Fencing, level acreage ideal For Stick & ball or JuMP Field

5995 edgeField road | $590,000

6 br’S, 4 batHS, 1 HalF batH. generouSly ProPortioned rooMS & reStoration true to tHe HoMe’S cHarM, cHaracter & HiStoric integrity.

Land for Sale barrington FarMS - ParcelS WitH trail acceSS 5+ to 24+ acreS - $58,500 - $157,000 tod’S Hill - 19 acreS - Pond & Partially Fenced - $235,000 lot 8 StorM brancH rd – lovely Pond 19.86 acreS - $198,500

Cissie Sullivan

leWiS lane aSSociation

nonnie’S lot 11.02 acreS | $193,000 Henry’S tranQuil retreat 8.23 acreS | $157,000 Pond MeadoW 13.68 acreS | $250,000 oak grove 11.34 acreS | $215,000 HigH Flat FarM 11.01 acreS | $209,000 tree toP lot 2.81 acreS | Sold

barrington FarMS (tractS under $6,300/acre!) 21+ acreS (lot 9 -1) on cul-de-Sac! $134,875 24+ acreS (lot 7-1) Privately located! $149,500 aviation lotS at WexFord landing 5+ acreS Start at $45,000 on runWay ¾ acre lot on burkelo road $19,700

Tracey Turner

803-998-0198 | SullivanTurnerTeam.com 6

The Aiken Horse

June-July 2021


THE VISTA SCHOOLING & EVENT CENTER 859 OLD TORY TRAIL, AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA

ExcEptional 175 +/- acrE propErty for thE EquEstrian & naturE Enthusiast. EntrEprEnEur rEady for nEw ownErs/invEstors to carry on this passionatEly MaintainEd & lovEd EquinE EvEnt facility and Expand its potEntial with your vision. today, this statE-of-thE-art EquEstrian facility is dEsignEd to accoMModatE a widE rangE of horsE & ridEr abilitiEs froM bEginnEr to intErnational lEvEl coMpEtitors in drEssagE, x-country, huntEr/JuMpErs & conditioning for all EquinE disciplinEs. fEaturEs includE 1 intErMEdiatE & 2 novicE schooling arEas, drEssagE arEna, dErby arEna, stadiuM arEna, x-country JuMps with watEr coMplEx, ditchEs, logs, banks & MorE. in addition to a gallop track & acrEagE for hacking, you will find an ExtEnsivE irrigation systEM on approxiMatEly 30 acrEs, ExpansivE outbuilding to housE EquipMEnt with shEds on EithEr sidE for additional storagE + a thrEE-bEdrooM ManagEr’s hoME/officE. sMallEr ponds, woodEd trails & rivEr frontagE for a truE sportsMan’s paradisE. turn-kEy vEnuE with EquipMEnt & JuMp invEntory to convEy with accEptablE agrEEMEnt.

offErEd for $1,995,000

Cissie Sullivan

Tracey Turner

803-998-0198 | SullivanTurnerTeam.com June-July 2021

The Aiken Horse

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SECTION 10 16 20 24

1

Olympics 2020-2021 Aiken Spring Classic Whitney Kurlan Art News & Notes

Our June-July cover shows Zoe Kotronis aboard her Dutch Warmblood mare, Barcelona. Aiken Spring Classic, Highfields Event Center. Photography by Gary Knoll

SECTION

2

SECTION

3

36 38 44 48 50

Secret Lives: Lucky Ask the Judge Spring Polo Fire at AER Horses & The Law

Our Section Two cover shows Tommy Huber on his 12-year-old mare Rica competing in the Pete Bostwick Memorial. New Bridge Polo & Country Club. Photography by Pam Gleason

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Our Section Three cover shows Justine Wilson on her own Jade, a 7-year-old Dutch Warmblood. Dressage in the Spring, Aiken Horse Park. Photography by Gary Knoll

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59 66 68 70 73 80 81 82

The Aiken Horse

Foals of 2021 Brave Today Ride of Her Life Excerpt Dressage at AHP Calendar Directory Classifieds Index of Advertisers

June-July 2021


June-July 2021

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

P.O. Box 332 • Montmorenci, SC 29839-0332 • 803.643.9960 • TheAikenHorse.com • TheAikenHorse@gmail.com Time Dated Material • Periodicals • Volume 16 • Number 5

I

t’s June, and that means it is time for our annual “Foals of Aiken” feature, which you will find in Section Three. In this piece we have a chance to visit farms across our area, meeting the foals that were born this spring, along with their mothers – and increasingly, their surrogate mothers. Although Aiken is not known for horse breeding the way some other places are, we do have a growing group of breeders producing horses for various disciplines including racing as well as the driving, polo, western and Olympic sports. The quality and variety of Aiken’s foals is impressive, and we have people who are breeding as a business as well as amateur horse owners who breed their mares because they love them and want another, similar horse to carry on their legacy. Not coincidentally, Aiken also has some exceptional horse breeding professionals and facilities, giving our horsemen access to some of the top bloodlines and most advanced breeding technologies in the world. Speaking of the Olympics, final preparations are under way in Tokyo, Japan to welcome equestrian teams from across the globe to compete in the postponed 2020 Olympics. The games are slated to start the last week in July and run through early August. As of this writing, the U.S. dressage and showjumping teams are still in the shortlist phase, but the eventing team has been selected, and all its members are very familiar to Aiken. You can read about them in Section One. Section Two opens with our regular feature, Secret Lives of Horses, in which we meet a retired horse, 20 years and up, who lives in Aiken. We seem to be taking better care of our horses these days: at any rate, while

June-July 2021

a 20-year-old horse once seemed to be quite ancient, there are a growing number of horses in our area who are thriving into their late 20s and early 30s. Our Secret Lives subject this time, Lucky, at 34, is one of those horses. Thinking about these three articles, I realized that this issue can be seen as covering the entirety of a horse’s lifespan, if a horse were to live up to his or her breeder’s greatest dreams. The foals, carefully bred for a specific sport, are imbued with hope: hope for future greatness and athleticism, hope that they will have unlimited potential and the chance to live up to it. Our article about the Olympics deals with horses at the top of their sport; horses who have fulfilled whatever dreams their breeders may have had about creating an athlete with the attitude, ability and opportunity to excel. Then, our Secret Lives feature is an example of a horse that has lived a full and athletic life, and now spends his latter years (and there are a lot of them) in happy retirement, loved and cared for by his owner, even if, in this particular case, that owner is not the same person who enjoyed him during his performance days. And of course, in addition to the Olympic horses in this issue, we also have all the everyday equine athletes, horses competing in dressage at Bruce’s Field, playing polo at New Bridge and Aiken Polo Clubs, or jumping at Highfields. Sometimes things do not go as planned with horses, and bad things happen, such as the barn fire at Aiken Equine Rescue this spring (read about that in Section Two), but in this issue, we have some examples of the ideal equine lifespan. It’s June and summer is on the way. We’re looking forward to those long days and our horses are enjoying the grass that is growing and greening up visibly as I write this. We hope you like this issue. Please let us know if there is something out there that we should know about, or if you have an idea for an article. As ever, we want to be your horse newspaper.

The Aiken Horse EDITOR & PUBLISHER Pam Gleason

ART DIRECTOR Gary Knoll

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jean Berko Gleason

LAYOUT & DESIGN Gary Knoll

PHOTOGRAPHERS Pam Gleason Gary Knoll

ADVERTISING

803.643.9960 theaikenhorse@gmail.com

Going Out Of Town? Don’t miss future issues of The Aiken Horse. We will send you a one year subscription (6 issues) for $24.00, or $36 for First Class. Send check or CC # & your mailing address: P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 Or sign up on the web at TheAikenHorse.com

All contents Copyright 2021 The Aiken Horse

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

Pam Gleason Editor & Publisher

The Aiken Horse Policies: The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers, editors, or the policies of The Aiken Horse, LLC. The Aiken Horse is owned by The Aiken Horse, LLC.

The Aiken Horse

9


Olympics 2020-2021 Horsemen Ready for Tokyo

Story and Photography by By Pam Gleason

I

t may be a year late, but the 2020 Olympics look like they are finally going to happen. The Games were shut down last year because of COVID-19, and when they do take place, they will be noticeably affected by the pandemic. It’s not just that there will be social distancing or that the athletes will be subjected to daily testing. There will also be a different atmosphere: the Tokyo Olympic committee has announced that there will be no foreign spectators, and possibly no spectators at all.

Each team may have a traveling reserve, who can step in and take over for a team member in certain circumstances. So, for instance, if a team horse is not quite right after cross country, the traveling reserve may be substituted in showjumping the next day. There is a price to pay for this – 20 penalty points – but it is better than the alternative. Introducing the U.S. 2020 Olympic Eventing Team.

Phillip Dutton

Phillip Dutton will ride Z, a 13-year-old Zangersheide gelding owned by Thomas Tierney, Ann Jones, Caroline Moran, Simon Roosevelt, and Suzanne Lacy. Phillip needs no introduction in Aiken, since he has been training here since the mid-1990s. It was partially through his influence that the Australian eventing team (of which he was a member) chose Aiken as their pre-competition training camp before they went to Atlanta to win the gold medal in the 1996 Olympics. Since that time, Phillip became an American citizen and established True Prospect Farm in West Grove, Pennsylvania as well as Red Oak Farm, his winter training base, at Bridle Creek Equestrian in Aiken. Phillip is one of about only 100 people in history who have competed in more than five Olympic games. He has already gone to the Olympics six times: three as an Australian and three as an American. He won two team gold medals while riding for Australia, and one individual bronze while riding for America. Competing in his seventh games at the age of 57, he will be one of the most (if not the most) experienced riders in Tokyo. Phillip’s mount, Z, is also familiar in Aiken, since Phillip has been paired with him since 2015. Together, the two won the inaugural Advanced Horse Trial at Stable View in 2016, as well as the CCI4* at Stable View’s Oktoberfest in 2019. Z was Phillip’s mount at the 2018 World Equestrian Games in Tryon, and at the Grand Prix Eventing Showcase at Bruce’s Field in 2020 and 2021. They competed in Aiken most recently at the Stable View Spring CCI4* in March 2021, where they finished second by three tenths of a point.

Boyd Martin

Phillip Dutton on Z The equestrian events will run sequentially. Dressage comes first ( July 24-28) followed by eventing ( July 30-August 2) and finally showjumping (August 3-August 7.) Dressage and showjumping will be held at Baji Koen Equestrian Park west of Tokyo, a 45-acre facility owned by the Japan Racing Association. The venue was originally constructed for the 1964 Olympics and is totally updated and topclass in every way. Eventing cross country will be at the Sea Forest Cross Country course, built specifically for the Games on a man-made island in the bay. The course was designed by Derek di Grazia, and is praised for its spectacular views of the Tokyo skyline, though with no spectators, these may be seen only by the riders. As of early June, the U.S. dressage and showjumping teams have announced their short lists of horses and riders, which will be winnowed down in the coming month. The U.S. Eventing Team, however, has already declared its team, and the squad has a pronounced Aiken flavor. All four horse and rider pairs have spent significant time in Aiken, and three of the four make Aiken their winter home. The equestrian events will run following a new format this year. In the past, each team had four riders, but the lowest score was dropped from consideration for team medals. This meant if one of the riders had a bad day, as long as the other three did all right, the team’s chances of medalling might not be affected. This year, only three horse and rider combinations are permitted to compete, and there is no drop score.

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The Aiken Horse

Boyd Martin will ride Luke 140, a 10-year-old Holsteiner gelding owned by the Luke 140 Syndicate. Luke 140, who competed through the CCI2* level in Europe, has been in Boyd’s string for a little over two years, and has only recently stepped up to the international level. But what Luke 140 lacks in experience, he makes up for in talent, courage and energy. He and Boyd won their first CCI4*-L together in October 2020 at Galway Downs in California. Their second CCI4*-L win at Jersey Fresh International in early May was likely a major factor in Luke 140’s selection for the team: Boyd has a remarkable string of international horses to choose from. Luke 140 has recently benefitted from extra dressage training with Boyd’s wife Silva Martin, a Grand Prix dressage rider, who competed him at Third and Fourth level dressage last year. Fit and strong, he is definitely an up-and-coming horse peaking at just the right time for the games. Two of Martin’s other top horses Tsetserleg (with whom he won team and individual gold medals at the 2019 Pan Am Games in Lima Peru) and On Cue, (with whom he won the American championship this spring at the LandRover Kentucky CCI5*) were named First and Second Direct Reserve for the team. Boyd, 44, like Phillip, is an Boyd Martin and Luke 140

June-July 2021


Australian who took American citizenship: he first came to Aiken as one of Dutton’s protégés, and has developed a following here, as well as at his Pennsylvania base of operations, Windurra USA in Cochranville. While in Aiken, Boyd rides and trains at Stable View. This will be his third time to represent the United States in Olympic competition.

Elisabeth Halliday-Sharp

Elisabeth Halliday-Sharp, 43, rides Deniro Z, a 13-year-old KWPN gelding owned by Ocala Horse Properties. The only one on the team who does not stay in Aiken during the winter, Liz has certainly made a name for herself here. In her first high profile appearance in the city, she came to the inaugural Grand Prix Eventing Showcase at Bruce’s Field in 2019 and won aboard Fernhill by Night. She returned to win the competition again in 2020 with Deniro Z, and the pair were second there this year.

Liz’s energy and passion are unmatched: in 2020 she competed 13 different horses at 22 events – and the competition year was only six months long due to COVID-19. She also won nine FEI events in that time and was named the USEA rider of the year, the first woman to earn that title since Karen Stives in 1981. Liz has an interesting background. Before she devoted herself 100% to eventing, she was also a racecar driver: she counts six American Le Mans victories among her accomplishments, making her the most successful female driver in American Le Mans history. Born and raised in California, she relocated to England in her 20s, where she worked for the top-ranked eventing rider William Fox-Pitt. Now that she is back in the United States full time, she has a farm in Kentucky and in Ocala, Florida. This will be her first Olympic outing.

June-July 2021

Doug Payne

Doug Payne, 40, who has been based here during the winter for many years, is definitely one of Aiken’s favorite sons. He can be seen at all the top eventing competitions in the area, as well as in the jumper ring at our horse shows. He is also a regular at the Tryon International Equestrian Center in North Carolina, and he has a farm near Durham, NC. Doug was selected as the traveling reserve with Vandiver, a 17-year-old Trakehner gelding owned by Doug and his wife Jessica, along with Debi Crowley. Doug and another horse, Starr Witness, traveled to Peru as part of the gold-medal-winning Pan Am team in 2019. Aiken eventing aficionados will recognize Doug’s Olympic mount, Vandiver as one of the horses that Doug rode in the Grand Prix Eventing competitions at Bruce’s Field. Vandiver likely got the nod over Doug’s other international horses, and secured him his ticket to Tokyo, after his win at The Fork CCI4* in April. It is also likely that the horse’s solid showjumping performance factored into the decision. Given the new Olympic format, if one of the three team riders cannot complete the event and Doug does get to ride, it would most likely be in the final, showjumping phase of the competition. It makes sense to have a showjumping specialist in that position. The Olympics are weeks away, and, with the COVID-19 pandemic raging in Japan, there are some people predicting that they will

Doug Payne on Vandiver not actually happen. For U.S. riders however, this can’t even be a consideration. From now until July 30, they will be focused on one thing: preparing to represent their country in Tokyo the best they possibly can. Want to watch? Stay tuned for the equestrian events coverage schedule on usef.org and nbcolympics.com closer to the event

The Aiken Horse

11


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The Aiken Horse

June-July 2021


Help us make 2021 our best year yet, every property sold is $50 to SPCA!

$2,250,000

$699,000

June-July 2021

$699,000

The Aiken Horse

13


Now Available

Offered through New Bridge Realty

Contact Raza Kazmi, 888-4NB-POLO, info@newbridgepolo.com

Rare Opportunity to Own One of the Largest Barns in New Bridge Centrally Located Property in Close Proximity to Amenities Paloma Farm: $695,000 This is a rare opportunity to own one of the largest barns in New Bridge Polo Club. Situated on 28.52 acres and close to Field #3, clubhouse, swimming pool and clay tennis court. Spacious 16-stall barn with 12x12 stalls and 16-foot wide center aisle. Separate feed room with sliding door perfect for deliveries. Nicely laid out two bedroom apartment offers housing for caretakers or owners. Large, detached storage building for hay and equipment. Four generous paddocks.

Prime Property with Gorgeous Views Well Established in Grass and Ready for Horses Highgrove: $280,000 UNDER CONTRACT

Pete Bostwick Memorial 8 Goal May 19 - June 6, 2021 Tommy Hitchcock Memorial 8 Goal Single Elimination June 7 - 13, 2021

About New Bridge (visit newbridgepolo.com or call 1-888-4NB-POLO)

Prime property with gorgeous views. Direct access off New Bridge or Farmfield Roads. 15.52 acres, perimeter fenced with a well. Maximim usability on this lot. Entire parcel is high and dry with a lovely grove of hardwood shade trees, mature pines, and live oaks. No clearing required, parcel is well established in grass perfect for grazing and has several ideal building sites.

Now booking weddings and special events at the New Bridge Clubhouse! Call Katie at (803) 341-8800

The centerpiece of New Bridge Polo & Country Club is a rustic, colonial-style clubhouse, made of century-old wood from Argentina. It is a unique special occasion rental facility available year-round for weddings, receptions, rehearsal dinners, parties and meetings. With both indoor and outdoor spaces, expansive front and back porches, and a second floor balcony, the clubhouse offers 1,700 square feet of flexible space, including a window-filled bar with stunning views of championship Field #1.

#newbridgepolo / #newbridgelife / newbridgepolo.com

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Congratulations Peachtree

2021 Regional President’s Cup 8 Goal Winner

The Aiken Horse

New Bridge is an 860-acre gated equestrian community nestled among rolling pasture lands on New Bridge Road just 15 minutes from downtown Aiken, South Carolina. Born from the excitement, intensity and tradition of polo, New Bridge is the home of New Bridge Polo & Country Club and of Aiken Youth Polo. It embraces equestrians of all disciplines as well as those who simply love the outdoors. Residents enjoy an array of equestrian amenities including five meticulously groomed polo fields, stick and ball areas, an exercise track, polo arena, riding trails, all-weather GGT dressage and jumping arenas, miles of groomed roads made for riding and The Stables, our full-care, premier 24-stall boarding facility. A swimming pool with lounge area, a clay tennis court, and an Argentinian colonial-style Clubhouse with restaurant/bar (open spring and fall), balcony, porch, and outdoor spaces round out the perfect setting for everyone from families to empty nesters, casual riders to competitive athletes, and those simply seeking solace from a busy world.

June-July 2021


BARBfull-AikenHorse6-21_aikenhorse 6/2/2021 2:55 PM Page 1

WELCOME HOME TO

AIKEN , South Carolina

An authentic equestrian town rich in historic charm, fine homes, horse farms & Southern hospitality

www.FindAikenHomesandFarms.com | BARB GOULD USKUP | 803.295.3199

S Y C A M O R E L A N E FA R M

Perfect horse farm set on 5.08 lush acres in the heart of Three Runs Plantation equestrian community. The farm features a stunning 3-bedroom home plus barn & horse facility designed for efficient & easy horse care. Stunning Hardiplank home features open floor plan, chef's kitchen with stainless steel appliances, great room with inviting fireplace, & exquisite master suite. The 4-stall barn has tack room, wash stall, hay/feed storage and equipment storage. Thoughtful layout includes interconnected paddocks with run-in capabilities, 210 x 115 grass arena with superb footing. Community amenities include elegant clubhouse, fitness center, pool with cabana, jump rings, schooling area, 2 dressage arenas with mirrors, cross-country course, and 30 miles of groomed trails. $975,000

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This efficiently designed farm in Shaw Estates of Mount Vintage Plantation set on 7.88 peaceful, partly wooded acres bordered by a stream offers a darling 1 bedroom, 1 bath Hunt Box with an inviting open floor plan set above a wonderful center aisle barn. Enjoy your morning coffee or a beverage after a long day at work, the fox hunt or the show from your deck! Barn is suitable for many disciplines, and features 4 matted stalls, 1 additional stall, tack, feed storage, hot & cold water wash stall, and large carport for vehicle & trailer parking. Large board fenced pasture, smaller electric fenced pasture. $310,000

UNDER CONTRACT G O O D H O P E FA R M

Set on 33 acres of serenity only minutes from downtown Aiken in highly desirable Hopeland F arms equestrian community. This exceptional equestrian estate leaves no detail unaddressed. Just past the grass arena with incredible footing and pastures sits a highly functional 8-stall barn with rubber mat center aisle, oversized tack room with laundry and half bath. Two run-in sheds, hay barn and storage building are located in close proximity to the stable. The residence is a masterpiece of understated elegance with soaring ceilings, exquisite finishes and every detail imaginable throughout. A gourmet cook's dream kitchen with 2 pantries, custom cabinetry, granite counter tops and Thermador and Miele appliances. Master suite features en-suite bath with heated floors and dual closets. There are 2 identical guest suites each with bath and walk in closet. a music room, an office, a mudroom/second office, and a laundry complex completes the package. Pastoral views from every room and stunning outdoor living space. $2,399,000

www.FindAikenHomesandFarms.com | BARB GOULD USKUP | 803.295.3199 June-July 2021 2021

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Aiken Spring Classic at Highfield Event Center


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From Endangered to Equine Whitney Kurlan Paints her Passions By Nancy Johnson

Whitney Kurlan is gifted in art, but unfortunately, not in timing. “I moved to Aiken just a few months before COVID hit, so no one really knows me yet,” she says. But as the pandemic is waning, that is beginning to change. Recently her paintings were prominent at “going…going…gone,” an exhibition supporting wildlife conservation at Aiken Center for the Arts. “I painted for almost three months straight to prepare for this exhibit,” she says. In all, she painted 15 pieces for the show, several of which were very large. “For this exhibit I decided to focus solely on wild dogs, which are a highly endangered species, especially in Africa.” While she says her heart lies in conservation and endangered species, Kurlan is equally as talented painting something that is much more

it was time to switch gears and devote more time to her art. “I’ve always painted,” she says. “My mother was a watercolorist, so I started in watercolor as a child.” At age 18 she won a Congressional Art Award for a painting she did of two polo ponies. “But my mother wanted me to do more than just watercolor,” she explains. So, she took private lessons with a renowned pastel artist and has now been working with pastels for 35 years. “I love the medium,” she says. “Pastel is really interesting because it is pure pigment and, depending upon the surface and your markmaking, it has three dimensions. At the end, when you are adding your softest pastel to create highlights, you are creating a relief, so it catches the light. Plus, you are actually holding the pigment whereas with oil, watercolor, or acrylic you are holding the brush and are not in direct contact with the pigment. It’s a very intimate connection with your painting and that’s why I love it.” While she clearly excels as a pastel artist (as evidenced by her recent acceptance by jury into the American Pastel Society) Kurlan is equally

common in Aiken – horses. Currently, her pastel “Morning Sun” can be viewed at Aiken Artists Guild Annual Member Show. “I don’t like static poses,” she begins. “While the horse in this painting is standing still as he looks over his shoulder, you can feel an anticipation of movement at any second – like he is about to turn and walk away.” Kurlan grew up in Connecticut riding ponies, then went on to do the big equitation (Medal and Maclay) and hunters. At one point she was so busy in her career that she stopped riding for a while. “I was still very involved with horses through my job in nutrition and then in nutraceuticals for horses, which was so eye-opening. It was a gift to have that job. I got to work with some of the top racetrack and sporthorse trainers in the country.” After working in the equine nutrition field for 10 years, an accident (not horse-related) necessitated two spinal fusions, leaving her unable to ride or meet the physical demands of her job. Then Kurlan decided

comfortable and talented in other mediums. In addition to pastels, she works in watercolors, oils, and acrylics. Plus, she recently taught herself how to do digital work. Now that she is happily settled in Aiken and able to ride her own horse in the Hitchcock Woods, Kurlan is eager to expand both her commission work and her teaching. Clearly, she is passionate about painting. This coupled with her ability to explain in detail makes her a natural teacher. “I love to teach, and my studio is well-equipped with lots of space,” she says. Whitney says she starts new students out with drawing. “While students are always eager to get on to painting, drawing is important as the foundation of everything.” Then they progress to whichever medium they choose – watercolor, acrylic, pastels, or oils. While she offers both private lessons and group classes, Kurlan notes, “I don’t offer something like a ‘paint and sip’ class. I teach people who really want

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to learn and gain a sense of themselves.” Most of her current students are adults, but she will teach teenagers if they are focused. “Painting is all about shapes. Anyone can paint if you just learn to break down everything you see into shapes. Then other things go with it like color theory and why certain colors work together and seeing light and dark, but shapes come first.” Kurlan is ecstatic to announce that she just learned that a painting of hers has been chosen among 2,300 entries from 70 countries submitted for the David Shepard Wildlife Foundation Wildlife Artist of the Year competition. Her painting, a small pastel, was one of the pieces she did for the “going…going…gone” show at Aiken Center for the Arts. “This competition equates to the Oscars for wildlife artists,” she explains. “I would be planning to fly to London for the opening if it wasn’t for

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COVID.” Whitney has also been invited to be part of an art exhibit of endangered species in North America, specifically open to woman artists in the U.S. “They asked me to represent South Carolina. I readily agreed and selected the red-cockaded woodpecker as my subject because it is a bird they are trying to re-establish in our state. I chose Hitchcock Woods Foundation as my beneficiary as I feel they are a great organization, and it is an opportunity for me to support the Aiken community.” See more of Kurlan’s work at whitneykurlan.com. To discuss commission work or inquire about private or group painting classes, contact her at: info@whitneykurlan.com or 860-508-4997.

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News & Notes By Pam Gleason

Thoroughbred Country

Aiken has a long history with Thoroughbred racehorses, and the area is gaining a reputation for its off-the-trackThoroughbreds (OTTBs) as well. This fall, Aiken will have two major national competitions for former racehorses. The first is the New Vocations All Thoroughbred show, and the second is the Thoroughbred Incentive Program (TIP) Championship. Both shows have normally been at the Kentucky Horse Park, though both were canceled last year due to the pandemic. New Vocations Charity Horse show, which comes to Highfieds Event Center September 3-5, is probably the oldest all-Thoroughbred show in the country. Run annually since 2001, it has an enthusiastic following and organizers hope to attract new exhibitors from the Southeast with the change of venue. Entries are open now through horseshowsonline.com. The second event, the TIP Championships at Stable View, October 8-10, are sponsored by the Jockey Club, which is the organization that registers racing Thoroughbreds. The Thoroughbred Incentive Program was created in 2011 to “encourage the retraining of Thoroughbreds into other disciplines upon completion of their careers in racing or breeding.” Equestrian competitions (horse shows, horse trials, etc.) around the country may apply to have TIP classes and divisions at their shows, or to give out TIP high point awards. The TIP program is reserved for registered Thoroughbreds. In order to obtain a TIP number and card, owners must know their horse’s registered name. This can often be discovered through tattoo research on the Jockey Club website, which is now free. The TIP card is also free. The TIP Championships will have 30 divisions in various disciplines: hunters, jumpers, dressage, Western dressage, combined test and English and Western pleasure and so on. Horses must be qualified and declared in order to be eligible to enter. In order to qualify, horses must first have a TIP number. Then they must “(1) participate in a show offering TIP high point awards, classes or divisions beginning August 1, 2020 through September 5, 2021; or (2) participate in Take2 divisions beginning August 1, 2020 through September 5, 2021; or (3) be entered in the 2021 RRP Mega Makeover; or (4) have been qualified and declared for the 2020 Championships; or (5) have participated in the 2020 Performance Awards; or (6) be accepted through a hardship request.” Since the cut-off date to participate in a

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qualifying show is September 5, the last day of the New Vocations show, Thoroughbred owners may use that show as their championship qualifier, if they have not already qualified. “We’re very happy that the TIP Championships are coming to Stable View. More important is that they are coming to Aiken,” said Barry Olliff, who owns Stable View along with his wife Cyndy. Barry notes that Stable View has been approached to hold many new and interesting competitions, including the Area III eventing championships, which will take place June 25-27. For more information about the TIP Championships, visit https://tjctip.com.

Great Oak in Need

Great Oak is looking for a few good horses. Great Oak, which offers equine assisted therapy to individuals with disabilities, is a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) International member center, one of 11 in South Carolina and 873 worldwide. Located less than two miles from downtown Aiken on Edgefield Highway, the program occupies a tranquil 40-acre farm. It has been growing rapidly since its opening in 2018 and today offers services to 80 families each week, with the help of three PATH Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructors and a herd of awardwinning “GO” Ponies. “Riding has many benefits to the physical body and to our mental health. We help make connections that will carry our students through life and we love doing it,” said Eva Finnan, one of Great Oak’s instructors. “At Great Oak, we take pride in our horses and students.” The recent rapid growth of the program has brought new challenges, however, especially on the equine side of the equation. Great Oak needs more volunteers, and it especially needs more “GO” Ponies. Suitable horses must be sound, sane, currently in work and able to carry up to 225 pounds, among other things. An unflappable nature and a pleasant personality are both important requirements. The organization is currently accepting applications for horse donations through its website. The horse inquiry form can be found here: greatoakeap.org/ newpony. For more information, please email: info@greatoakeap.org. “Community service and volunteering is an important part of any thriving community,” said Nicole Pioli, who is the director of Great Oak. “While Aiken offers a variety of charitable organizations to dedicate your time, talents, and/or treasures to, we invite you to see what sets Great Oak apart; the opportunity to support horses, human growth and leadership, and the preservation of Aiken’s natural resources on one farm.”

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To become a Great Oak Volunteer, please email Grace Flanders at grace@greatoakeap. org or call the barn office at 803-226-0056.

The Vista is for Sale

Another one of Aiken’s quality eventing facilities is up for sale this summer. This time it is The Vista, a 175-acre property complete with dressage and jumping arenas as well as gallop tracks and a manicured cross country course with a full complement of training and competition obstacles from Starter to Preliminary. The Vista opened in late 2015 as Aiken’s first dedicated schooling facility for eventing horses. Featuring a website where riders can sign up for time slots on the various areas of the course as well as convenient online payment options, The Vista quickly became a fixture in the eventing community, attracting horses and riders six days a week from early morning to late afternoon. In addition to paying for single schooling sessions, riders can also join for two levels of yearly membership, giving them unlimited access to the facility for one or two horses. During the winter season, the facility could see up to 90 horses a day, with a smaller group, 50-100 a week, during the summer. There are close to 100 year-round members. Although the original intention was to reserve The Vista for schooling only, within a few years the facility started offering derby crosses, hunter paces, SCDCTA sanctioned combined tests and dressage shows and eventually schooling horse trials. Horses and riders could earn points at these shows, culminating in year-end awards. The facility also opened for various other events, including banquets and weddings, which can be held indoors or out. This May, the owners of The Vista, who are not horse people, announced that it was for sale. Schooling opportunities and shows will continue to be held as planned. According to a statement sent to their email list and then posted on FaceBook: “The Vista Event Group has offered to sell the Vista in hopes to find a viable steward to invest in this beautiful property and world class schooling and training facility. They are hopeful the new owner(s) will continue its growth forward in a way that is amenable to Aiken’s equestrian community.” Equipment and jumps will “convey with acceptable agreement.” “There are already a few people interested in buying it and keeping it just as it is or even improving it,” says Brooke Burgess who manages The Vista. “For our members and the people who come here to school, we hope it will be a smooth transition.” Although The Vista is a turnkey business opportunity, it could also be a private farm. In addition to the jumping and schooling courses, it also has trails going down to the

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river, small ponds, a three-bedroom home, equipment buildings and sheds, three wells and irrigation on 30 of its acres. Asking price? Just south of $2 million. (https:// sullivanturnerteam.com)

AHP Gift to Steeplechase

Construction on the new Aiken Steeplechase track on Richland Avenue has been progressing smoothly this spring. The land has been cleared, the fences and irrigation are installed and the grass (Tifton 419 Bermuda) goes in this month. The project has been blessed with immense community support, as well as with the help of the City of Aiken. On May 15, representatives of the Aiken Steeplechase Association assembled at Bruce’s Field at the Aiken Horse Park to receive a check from the Aiken Horse Park Foundation for $271,000. Bruce’s Field is named for Bruce Duchossois, who bought the land that is now the Aiken Horse Park in 2000. The property was the long-time home of the Aiken Steeplechase Association which holds National Steeplechase Association sanctioned meets twice a year. After Bruce’s death in 2014 at the age of 64, the Aiken Horse Park Foundation was created to fulfill Bruce’s dream of creating a world-class horse show facility on the property. That dream has been realized: the Aiken Horse Park now has five all-weather show rings, two schooling areas and 224 permanent stalls. It has a full calendar of horse shows, and is the site of the Aiken’s annual Grand Prix Eventing Showcase competition. Meanwhile, over the past two decades, the Aiken Steeplechase, which has continued to use the track surrounding the show rings, has been growing. The association spent many years looking for a new home that would better accommodate the crowds of spectators that it attracts. It finally found the ideal location in 2019. The Duchossois final gift to the Aiken Steeplechase Association fulfills Bruce’s promise to support steeplechasing in Aiken: one of the main reasons he bought the property in 2000 was to ensure the sport’s

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future. “The Duchossois’ love of Bruce and admiration for Aiken shines through with this generous gift, and brings full circle, Bruce’s desire to support the sport of steeplechasing here in Aiken,” said Tara Bostwick, when she presented the check. Tara is the vice president and treasurer of the Aiken Horse Park Foundation. Paul Sauerborn, who is the Aiken Steeplechase Association board president, said that the association was very happy with the gift. “This generous donation from the Duchossois Family will go a long way towards helping the ASA realize their vision. This gift is a tribute to Bruce and his character. That’s why our community is so great, we share everything.”

Western Horse Sale

If you want to buy a quality horse from the great American West, you are in luck because the Best of the West horse sale is coming to the Aiken Training Track October 1-2, 2021. Best of the West Horses is a sales company that specializes in “fancy broke” western horses from top trainers and breeders in the western states. They will bring 50 head of “gentle, beautiful, well-rounded horses with a western background.” Potential buyers will have the opportunity to test ride horses ahead of the sale, get all their questions answered by the consignors and have pre-purchase exams done. Viewing and test rides will be on Friday, October 1, with the actual sale on Saturday, October 2. “We specialize in walking new buyers through the bidding process and making them feel comfortable,” says Ryan Sankey, who runs the company with her father, Ike. “Through our other sales we have heard from several buyers on the East coast that there is a need for gentle, safe horses with real world experience,” says Ryan. “Seeing that type of horse is hard to find in the East, we have put in the leg work to find those horses and assemble them in Aiken.” Why Aiken? For one thing, it is centrally located on the East Coast. For another,

people from Aiken have been making their Western horse needs known – at a recent Best of the West sale in Arizona, there were three bidders from Aiken! For more information visit www. BestoftheWestHorses.com. Potential buyers can contact Ike any time at 406.671.7238

Grant to Aiken Thoroughbred Hall of Fame

The Aiken Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame and Museum, in partnership with Dr. Elisabeth Gabrielle Kuenzli, an Associate Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, recently received a grant to study the role of Latino jockeys in the South. The fellowship, one of 12 given out across the country, comes from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), and is made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Dr. Kuenzli’s project is called “Jockeying Into Position: Race, Ethnicity, and the Rise of the Latino Jockey in the American South, XX-XXI Centuries.” Dr. Kuenzli will work in partnership with Lisa J. Hall, who is the coordinator of the Aiken Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame and Museum to create an exhibit that will explore the role of the Latino jockey and illuminate the place of Latinos in a rural southern community. “This case study will illuminate the experience of the growing Latino population through the exhibit’s central themes of race, immigration, and power in the U.S.,” according to a press release. The Hall of Fame will receive a $10,000 grant that will be used to fund an upgrade to the museum. This will include interactive equipment and software that will highlight this project and be used for current and future exhibits. “The Hall of Fame is grateful and excited to be a part of this program and for the funding that will help to upgrade our exhibits,” said Lisa Hall in a press release. For more information, visit www. aikenracinghalloffame.com.

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developed with lots of imagination and plenty of Horse sense.

BRIDLE CREEK EQUESTR I AN COMMUN I T Y

From the developer of Three Runs Plantation comes another wonderful equestrian neighborhood in Aiken, South Carolina. Bridle Creek meanders across 600 wooded acres, featuring five-acre lots and larger. Amenities include a dressage arena, jump arena, X-Country Schooling area and an activity center with meeting, social and fitness space. All this plus miles of scenic trails. Phase One is already sold out, with more to come. Inquire today by calling 1-888-297-8881 or email info@bridlecreekaiken.com 600 Acres • Miles of groomed and marked trails • Jump arena • Dressage arena with mirrors • X-Country schooling area Activity/Fitness Center • Homesites from 5+ acres • From the developer of Three Runs Plantation HOMESITES INDIVIDUALLY PRICED • DEVELOPER FINANCING AVAILABLE • BRIDLECREEKAIKEN.COM Marketed by The Carolina Real Estate Company, Aiken, SC. Plans and prices subject to change without notice. This does not constitute an offer in any state where prohibited by law. No time requirement to begin construction.


Inside 36 38 44 48 50

Secret Lives: Lucky Ask the Judge Spring Polo Fire at AER Horses & The Law


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Secret Lives

‘Lucky’ to be Loved in His Later Years By Nancy Johnson

I

t is difficult to determine who the word fits better – “Lucky,” the 34-year-old gelding who has a wonderfully comfortable loving home for the rest of his days; or his owner, Beth Boston, who feels lucky to be the one to give him the retirement he deserves. Beth recalls meeting the palomino Quarter Horse, who was 28-yearsold at the time, and immediately being taken by him. She was living in Florida and kept her own horse and a couple of boarders at her farm. “Through a friend, I met a woman who was looking to move her retired horse that was currently boarded at a show barn. I had a stall opening up, so I offered to take Lucky as a boarder,” she explains. It quickly became apparent that the owner had little interest in the horse, who had been her partner through years of showing in a variety of disciplines. “She basically would stop by once a month and drop off a check,” Beth says. “She wouldn’t even take the time to brush him or spend a half hour hand grazing him. I guess once she couldn’t ride him anymore, he was just nothing.” The owner had told Beth that she no longer rode Lucky because about two years prior he began dumping her when she did so. Most likely this was a reaction to pain, which is not surprising since he was obviously quite arthritic. “I just fell in love with him,” Beth says, adding, “He’s such an easy-going guy; plus, my horse, Backdraft, and he became best buddies right from the start.” Beth had been caring for Lucky as if he were her own for two years when she began preparations for her move to Aiken. During that time, Lucky’s owner had bought another horse that she was boarding at a show stable. “When I told her of my plans to move, she flat out told me she didn’t want to pay for him anymore and was going to put him on Craigslist!” Beth remembers. Horrified at the prospect of Lucky being abused or even winding up on someone’s dinner plate, Beth told the owner she wanted to take Lucky with her. “This horse deserves to have a beautiful life for whatever time he has left. He should be loved and cared for, so I brought him with me and Backdraft,” she explains. Although he is a registered Quarter Horse, Beth does not have Lucky’s papers, so the details of his early years are vague. “I can’t remember his registered name; only that it is weird and the word ‘lucky’ is nowhere in it, so I have no idea where that came from,” she says with a laugh. “He came from southeast Florida where there are huge cattle ranches, so I am guessing he was bred there. I was told he started off as a cow pony and then competed in western pleasure and barrel racing.” He further proved his versatility as the woman who boarded him with Beth went on to show him in both English and western pleasure, then jumped and

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foxhunted him. She and Lucky even did some dressage. “How could anyone discard a horse that did all that for you?” Beth wonders. Lucky and his buddy Backdraft adjusted well to life in Aiken where they have been for the past four years. They live on five and a half acres and are out 24/7 with access to run-ins and the ability to come into the barn anytime they choose. Although the two horses are quite attached, Lucky is accustomed to Beth taking Backdraft out for a ride and leaving him behind. “He’ll call to him for a few minutes and then just gives up, knowing he will come back,” she says. “Lucky is very hardy and smart. And he’s very calm,” Beth says, relaying an experience. “We had a large round bale hay feeder and a board had come off one side, so I put up two pieces of rope temporarily to keep the horses out of it. The next morning, when I went out to feed, Backdraft came right over but there was no sign of Lucky.” Because the two are always together, Beth was concerned and immediately started calling him. “I have to use a high-pitched voice because he is a bit hard of hearing,” she notes. “Still no response, so I went around the corner and saw him at the hay feeder. He looked at me, but still wouldn’t come”. As she got closer, Beth could see he had gotten his left front and hind leg on the other side of the rope and was basically trapped. “He didn’t have a single rope burn or cut. He had just stood there and waited for someone to come and find him. Not many horses would have been that smart!” Like many older horses, Lucky does have Cushings disease (a disorder of the pituitary gland), for which he is on medication, and his coat is affected by the condition. “I could have made two horses with the hair that has come off of him this spring, and he’s still shedding!” Beth says, laughing. “Fortunately, he loves to be groomed and washed. When he is shed out and clean, he looks like a gold coin.” Beth says Lucky’s favorite treat is apple wafers. He has no trouble eating nor does he require a special diet. “My vet has just confirmed that he still has all his teeth. I do wet his hay and he gets soaked beet pulp, but other than that he eats a regular 12% sweet feed, hay, and plenty of grass in the pasture. “Lucky still has the most beautiful lope in the pasture,” Beth continues. “He’s so graceful. It makes me wish I had had the opportunity to ride him. Even at his advanced age, he looks great; I bet you when he was showing he looked like a million bucks. . . . He is just such a joy. I can’t even imagine not having him around. I will take care of him until his last breath because he deserves that.”

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Ask the Judge

Questions about Dressage With Amy McElroy

Amy McElroy is an FEI competitor, and a USEF S judge. She is qualified to officiate at any USEF recognized national show at all dressage levels. She rides, trains and teaches at Fair Lane Farm in Aiken and judges between 15 and 20 dressage and eventing shows each year. In her popular Ask the Judge column, she answers readers’ questions about dressage. Do you have a question for Amy? Send her an email at McElroyDRM@aol.com, or visit her website: www.amymcelroy.com.

Dear Amy,

At several of our local USDF dressage shows there have been two or three judges’ booths with judges in them for some of the dressage classes. I wanted to know if these classes are judged differently from ones with a single judge? If you have three judges, do you receive all of the scoresheets afterwards? What class would I need to compete in to have this opportunity? I am still newer to dressage and ride at Training Level.

Getting Started Dear Getting Started,

This is a good observation! Many shows now, even our local shows, are offering classes that do require multiple judges. All dressage shows need at least one judge to be positioned on the centerline at the letter C, directly opposite A where you enter. Dressage judges earn different ratings, depending on their experience and expertise. An ‘r’ judge can officiate classes through the Second Level. An ‘R’ judge may officiate through the Fourth Level. An ‘S’ judge may officiate at all levels at a national show. FEI judges, who are sanctioned by the international governing body of equestrian sport, may officiate at all levels at a national or an international show. The judge sitting at C is considered the president of the ground jury for that competition arena. If there are two judges, the second judge would be placed on the middle of the long side in front of either the letter E or B: this decision is at the discretion of management. If three judges are required, in addition to the judge at C and a judge either at E or B, the next judge would be based at either M or H. The third judge’s booth will actually be on the short side, near the corner, to either side of the judge at C. When there are three judges, the second and third judges are placed diagonally to each other – If judge number two is at E, judge number three will be at H. If judge number two is at E, judge number three will be at M. Whether you have one judge or three judges, all of their scoring will have equal effect. Final numbers and percentages will be divided equally to come up with one final score and percentage. Each of the officials will evaluate the ride in the standard way. It is quite rewarding and informative to receive feedback from more than one judge. You should take note that these classes often will cost more to enter, depending on the number of judges. The purpose of multiple judges is to give you a more complete and accurate assessment of your ride. Wherever scores are posted, each judge’s score will visible, but only the combined percentage score is official. It is to be hoped that all the judges’ scores will be similar so that the final scores will be close, and that the class will be placed in the approximately same order from one judge to the next. However, each judge will have a different view and will perhaps make different comments. After you have completed your ride, you are able to view all of your judges’ test sheets. When competing in an arena with multiple judges, it is correct to halt and salute only your C judge in your entry and exit. This is the only judge who is allowed to signal you to start your test, who can eliminate you, and is the one who decides if you have made an error – in this case

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all the other judges will agree with the C judge. If you feel you need to excuse yourself from the ring for any reason, the C judge is the only one who can give you permission. However, you may acknowledge the other judges as you go around the apron of the arena as well as at your exit. Most USDF tests (at national shows) will only have one judge. One type of competition where you would always see two judges is the USDF Regional Championships, which happen one time a year in the fall. All championship classes require two judges, one placed at C and one either at E or at B. You must be qualified to participate in these classes. If you compete at the U.S.National Finals (for which you also must qualify) there would always be three judges: C, B or E, and M or H. This competition occurs once a year and is in the fall. So in what classes are you seeing multiple judges locally? These would be USEF qualifying classes, not to be confused with USDF qualifying classes: these are separate systems with different championships. In 2021, USEF competitors who want to qualify for the USEF Dressage Festival of Champions or the North American Young Rider Championships, which occur once a year usually in July, will need to earn scores from USEF qualifying classes. USEF qualifying tests can require two or three FEI or S judges to be counted. Qualifying classes at the Prix St. Georges, Intermediare 1, Intermediare II, Grand Prix and Grand Prix Special require three judges. The following levels require a panel of two FEI or S judges: FEI Children’s Tests, FEI Pony Rider Tests, FEI Grand Prix 16-25 Tests, FEI Intermediare II Test (Bretina Cup), USEF Developing Horse Prix St Georges Test, USEF Developing Horse Grand Prix Test, USEF Four Year Old Test, FEI Young Horse Tests for Five, Six, and Seven year olds. More and more riders in our area are interested in these tests and luckily we have show organizers and secretaries willing to offer them. As you can see there are many different classes and opportunities to be evaluated by a panel of judges. If you would like to have this opportunity at your level, one goal might be to try to qualify for a USDF regional championship. Regional championship tests are offered at all levels, including Training level. You would be required to ride the qualifying test, which is the highest test of the level. If you want to qualify for the Training level championship, for example, you need to compete at Training level test three. You need to obtain minimum scores from two tests with two different judges and from two different shows. To qualify as an adult amateur at this level, the minimum score is 63%. There are additional membership requirements and often a modest fee that go along with being able to qualify. If you do qualify and compete at the USDF regionals you will have two judges and will receive expertise and commentary from two officials. As you progress further in dressage competition there are many additional opportunities to be judged from a panel. Until then, keep enjoying your dressage journey and supporting our shows and riders by watching these classes. If you have the opportunity to attend High Performance shows, such as CDIs, World Cups and Olympics, classes can have five, six, and even seven judges – sometimes there will even be a judge at A.

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Girls Interscholastic Nationals A Big Win for Aiken

Story and Photography by Pam Gleason

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to wait an entire year – a year in which they only became older, stronger and more skilled. Aiken and Maryland each got a bye to the semifinals, where they met the quarterfinal winners, Gardnertown (New York) and Sutter Buttes (California) respectively. Both had decisive victories, with Maryland besting Sutter Buttes 14-5 and Aiken downing Gardnertown 18-4. The finals were held at New Bridge on Saturday evening at 6:00 p.m. in front of an attentive crowd. Although both teams had proven themselves skilled and capable, the Aiken team was always at least a step ahead. Arena polo, especially low goal arena polo, rewards quickness in getting back to the play and a dogged ability to follow up one’s teammates to pick up dropped balls and create scoring opportunities. Higher goal polo and grass polo relies more on an ability to hit the ball hard and pass it up to, or back to, teammates already on the offensive. The Aiken team’s comfort with the more open style of play that they were accustomed to through regular, higher goal games at Aiken’s outdoor clubs gave them velocity and added more speed to the play overall. Anyone who expected to be bored watching high school girls play polo would have been surprised by the level, and impressed by the solid hitting and defensive strategies displayed by both teams. Aiken dominated from the first throw-in. Aiken’s Reagan Leitner drew first blood, quickly followed by two goals from Summer Kneece. Just as the chukker closed, Sierra Blevins put one in for Maryland to make the scoreboard read 3-1 at the end of the first. In the second, Aiken delivered a shut out, with three more successive goals from Kneece one from Sophie Grant, and a pony goal. With the score at 8-1 going into halftime, it looked at first as though Aiken was going to have another cakewalk. But Maryland had not given up fighting. In the third chukker, Jordan Peterson, a 5’10” all-around athlete and skilled ball handler from Maryland, tallied four times for her team. While Aiken also added four to their score, it did look like Maryland was not going to go down without a fight. Coming into the fourth and final chukker, Aiken was still ahead by seven goals. Anyone who has played or watched arena polo knows that even a seven-goal lead can evaporate quickly if the momentum changes and leader starts making mistakes. Above: Reagan Leitner; Right: Summer Kneece ahead of Kylie Beard. Maryland had an opportunity, and the Aiken team knew it. And so, they came out stronger than ever. Summer started things Maryland teams, she had already won the interscholastics three times off with a natural hat trick, bouncing the ball off Maryland’s goal with while playing with her older sisters. Summer Kneece, an aggressive goal confident strokes. Sophie Grant scored on a foul shot and then from the scorer, is Tiger Kneece’s daughter and has been completely immersed in field. Maryland was unable to connect at all. The final score was 17-5, the polo world from early childhood on. The Leitner sisters, Reagan and giving Aiken their first national title. Robyn, a pair of identical twins who split a position, have been playing In an unusual format, the tournament all-stars and are voted on by the in, and winning, the majority of the low goal tournaments in Aiken for players themselves. This year, Summer Kneece and Sophie Grant were the past year. honored, along with Gardnertown’s Saralyn Painter and Maryland’s In addition to these advantages, the Aiken team had been practicing Jordan Peterson. Summer Kneece, the tournament’s high scorer with 19 hard together for over a year, and it was hungry. In 2019, the team, goals total, also won the horsemanship award, while the sportsmanship still new and finding its groove, had lost to Maryland in the regionals, award went to Maryland’s Kylie Beard. UVA won the best string award, and then seen Maryland go on to win the Nationals. Last year, the while UVA’s Chunky Monkey was deemed the best playing pony. Southeast regional finals were at New Bridge, and the Aiken team The Aiken team was ecstatic following their win. In addition to the scored a decisive 15-9 victory over Maryland. This should have sent USPA accolades, they were also commended by the city of Aiken: at them to the Nationals in Houston, where they were favored to win. But halftime during the May 30 Sunday game at Aiken Polo Club, Andrew it was March 2020, the month that COVID-19 hit, shutting down the Siders, an Aiken City Council member, read them a proclamation and country, and with it any official playing opportunities. The Nationals presented them and Tiger and Susie Kneece with a plaque. The girls will were postponed until the summer, and then they were canceled. Aiken’s celebrate, how else, by playing more polo. team, excited about their prospects of taking home the title, would have oing in to the 2021 United States Polo Association Girls Interscholastic National Championships, everyone knew that Aiken was the team to beat. The tournament, played at the Aiken Youth Polo arena at New Bridge Polo and Country Club from May 18-22, and attracted five other teams from Texas, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania and California. (A team from Hawaii had qualified but was unable to come.) After an “unconventional” interscholastic qualifying season due to pandemic restrictions, the traditional format that normally sends regional champions to the nationals was scuttled in favor of one that attempted to select the best teams in the country. This left two favorites, both from the Southeast region: Maryland, a ninetime winner and the defending champions, and Aiken, a relatively new team looking for its first Nationals win. Despite the fact that the Aiken team has only been in existence for a few years, it had some distinct advantages. Coached by Tiger Kneece, a former 7-goal player and the manager of Aiken Polo Club, it featured four strong players with deep experience playing in the arena and on the grass. The captain, Sophie Grant, had come to Aiken from Maryland specifically to play polo for her senior year in high school. Playing on

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484 - 356 - 3173 info@stableviewfarm.com svfequestrian.com

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Spring Polo at Aiken and New Bridge Polo Clubs


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We have some lofty goals for the Park and we are kicking off our “Make a Mark on the Park” campaign! We would love for you to join us. NAME A STALL We will provide the name plaque to honor your horse.

Reach out to us via PM on FB to discuss this highly affordable option. We also have tons of other options for you, like NAME A BARN. We would love to see our visitors showcased across the property! Thanks for moving the Park forward. We look forward to seeing you ringside!

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Surviving the Fire

Aiken Equine Rescue Perseveres By Pam Gleason

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pril 3, 2021 had been an ordinary Saturday at Aiken Equine Rescue, a 90-acre nonprofit horse rescue farm located on Aiken’s Southside. The day had been bright and sunny with highs in the 60s during an unusually cool and dry South Carolina spring. Volunteers had been on the property to care for the horses; a few people had been in for tours. Caroline Mulstay, the rescue manager, fed the horses and went home at around 6 o’clock. Debbie Rhodes, a board member who is married to Jim Rhodes, the rescue’s president, had spent most of the afternoon riding and doing outdoor things around the farm. Nothing seemed different or out-of-place. A little before 7, Debbie decided to go in and get ready for dinner. She and Jim have a home on the property, and she had just gotten inside and taken off her boots when she heard an explosion. “I can’t even tell you how loud it was,” she said. “It was much louder than fireworks or anything like that.” She pulled the blinds back in her house and looked out at the stable. To her shock, it was totally engulfed in flames. Without stopping to put on her boots, she ran out, barefoot, calling 911 on her cellphone. She had one thing on her mind. While the horses at the rescue generally live outside in spacious paddocks with run-in sheds, there was one animal in the stable. This was a miniature pinto pony named Whistle. Whistle had recently been taken in by the rescue after being mauled by a dog. He had needed extensive surgery to repair his muzzle and had spent time in the clinic at Performance Equine Vets. Now that he was home, he was living in a corner stall. Debbie’s only thought was that he needed to get out. The stable at AER was a concrete block structure with concrete aisles, but wooden struts and a wooden, shingled roof. It was a shedrow style with an office, and every stall had two doors, back and front. Only three of the stalls were normally used for horses, while the others were used for tack and equipment storage. Debbie ran around the back of the barn to the paddock that connected to Whistle’s stall. “Thankfully he was in that stall, because that was literally the only one I could have gotten to – the others were so engulfed that I couldn’t have gotten to them from either side,” she said. “His stall was already on fire: the roof was on fire, the shavings were on fire, and there was so much smoke you couldn’t see a thing. So I couldn’t see him.” She couldn’t hear him either. She had no personal experience with stable fires: she had only seen them portrayed in the movies and on TV. In the movies, horses trapped in burning stables are frantic and whinnying. Whistle was doing none of that. Debbie was afraid that he was already dead. But she put her shirt over her face to filter the smoke and went into the stall anyway. Feeling around, she found him still alive and standing, and so she wrapped her arm around his neck, since she had no halter or lead rope, and she led him out of the barn and into the adjoining field and she set him loose. “There was nothing else I could do.” “He didn’t seem panicked or anything like that,” she continued. “But when he came out his mane was on fire, and the hair on his back was singeing, so he definitely had some burns on him.” Whistle did not seem to recognize his predicament at all; nor did he seem to be clinging to the perceived safety of his stall. “I wouldn’t say he was reluctant to come with me, but he was certainly in no hurry to come.” Once outside, Whistle trotted off – recently gelded, his first thought seemed to have been that he wanted to find some mares to breed or some other male horses to fight with. With him safe, Debbie called her husband Jim and she called Caroline Mulstay.

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“I didn’t think there were any other horses in the barn, but we move horses around all the time. So I called her to say ‘Please Caroline, tell me there were no other horses in the barn.’” Fortunately, there were not. Within moments, neighbors showed up to help, and before ten minutes had passed, fire trucks and firefighters arrived to douse the flames. There was no chance of saving the structure as it was already essentially gutted when Debbie called 911. The rescue lost pallets of feed, many bales of hay, all its tack and equipment, and thousands of dollars worth of donated medical supplies. The fire jumped to a trailer full of tack. The office and all its equipment went up in flames. “For weeks, we discovered more things we had lost,” said Caroline. When Caroline got back to the rescue that evening, the firemen were already at work, and her main priority was to get Whistle back to Dr. Sabrina Jacobs at Performance Equine Vets for a full evaluation and treatment. “He seemed like he was fine, and I already had a vet on the way to check him out, but Dr. Jacobs said that the effects of a fire can take time to show up,” said Caroline. When she trailered the pony to the clinic,

she saw that this was true. “He looked burnt like a marshmallow: his hair was brown where it had been white. When they shaved it off, you could literally see the burn developing on his back: he started blistering and if you touched him you could feel that the flesh was not healthy.” Dr. Jacobs advised that thermal burns on a horse can take 24 to 36 hours to fully manifest themselves, much like a sunburn on human skin. Fortunately, Whistle’s burns did not end up being very deep, and after a few days of treatment his wounds scabbed over and he was on his way to a full recovery. The news of the fire spread rapidly through the Aiken and equestrian communities, and immediately the rescue was showered with offers of help. Monetary donations poured in through the website and Facebook page. Amy Hebert and Charles Doremus, who own Aiken Saddlery, opened up their store on Sunday – it was Easter Sunday – so that the rescue could get whatever feed and supplies it needed that day. Lowes

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and Home Depot offered to help rebuild. Members of the community showed up with donations of tack and equipment – there were so many people coming to drop things off that the rescue stayed open into the afternoons (it was normally closed), manned by volunteers to accept all the donations. This went on for at least two weeks. And although the fire was devastating, Caroline Mulstay and Debbie and Jim Rhodes agree that it could have been much worse. Not only were no horses lost in the blaze, but some things were miraculously saved. For instance, the office computers melted but the hard drives in them were retrieved, and Staples in Aiken was able to restore all the data to new computers that they donated to the rescue. “We got back all our records, all our pictures, everything,” said Jim Rhodes. “It was incredible.” By June, two months after the fire, most of the debris from the barn had been cleaned up and hauled away – it took several weeks and five dumpsters. The remains of the office were still standing, but were finally ready to be taken down. After several investigations – from the fire marshal and then from the insurance company – no cause for the fire had yet been discovered.

“They think it was most likely electrical or chemical,” said Caroline, explaining that chemical reactions are an underappreciated cause of barn fires. Sometimes, chemicals stored near one another, even in closed containers, can react and catch on fire. Hay that is baled with too much moisture in it has been known to spontaneously combust. Storing flammable chemicals such as gasoline or kerosene in a barn is obviously dangerous, but there are some other items, such as fertilizers, paint, alcohol-based products, and even liniments and shampoos that can also combust or act as accelerants once there is a spark. “One thing we learned is that it is a good idea to keep an inventory of all the medical supplies and chemicals in your barn,” said Debbie. The fire marshal also recommended obtaining and reading the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for any chemicals you have to make sure you are not courting disaster. “It’s also a good idea to have halters and leads available outside the barn,” continued Debbie. When she rescued

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Whistle, she was able to coax him out without any of those things, but this may not have worked if he had been a big horse rather than a mini pony. Another lesson was that, despite their reputation for safety, concrete barns do not necessarily have much advantage over wooden structures when it comes to fire, and they may even have some disadvantages. “A cinderblock barn is very, very safe for hurricanes and tornadoes. It’s not safe for fires,” said Caroline. “What happens in a fire is that a concrete barn acts like an oven, raising the temperature inside. That’s one reason they haven’t been able to find out where the fire started and why: the damage was so bad that there was no place inside where the damage was worse than anywhere else.” The fire was so hot, it even destroyed the cinderblock walls. They did not catch on fire, but they lost their structural integrity and crumbled easily. “It was almost as if they were turning back into sand,” said Caroline. The rescue has plans to rebuild and has set up a special fund for the rebuilding project and a capital campaign is in its planning stages. Although the stable was insured, with the current high cost of lumber, it turned out to be significantly under insured, and the contents were mostly not insured at all. But Jim Rhodes says they are in no hurry, and have yet to determine exactly what type of barn they will have. In addition to needing funds to help rebuild the barn, the rescue also needs donations to help feed and care for the horses in its care, since all the regular maintenance, feed and veterinary costs are still there. And despite everything, the rescue’s mission has not faltered. They have adopted out horses, including one on Monday, just two days after the fire. They have sent another horse that they took in, an off-the-track Thoroughbred, to have an operation to repair a hernia. They held their annual fundraising auction.On June 19, they will hold a tack sale. Although they have lowered the number of horses on the farm, they are still taking in some difficult cases, even though they have had to turn many away. “The need is still out there, the need is tremendous,” said Jim. Everyone involved with the rescue is extremely grateful for the support and well-wishes of the community. In recent years, Jim has often volunteered to help out in other parts of the country where there were horses in need – bringing feed and hay to flood-ravaged Texas, offering assistance to horsemen in Florida after a hurricane. So it is not really a surprise that in addition to local donations, funds have also come in from both of those states, as well as from Canada and as far away as France. “It just shows that if you pay it forward you get it back,” said Jim. “A long time ago, someone told me that when you hit an obstacle, you have a choice,” he continued. “You can make it a brick wall, or you can make it a speed bump. When this happened, I thought at first that it was a brick wall. But I have decided that it isn’t. It’s a speed bump . . . a little speed bump. We’ll be back.” For more information or to make a donation to help the horses, visit aikenequinerescue.org.

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Horses and the Law Horses and Hospitality By Jim Ritchie

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questrian competitions and events are hitting their stride this summer, and that means more travel for horses and riders. Finding a good location for short-term stall and paddock rentals can be daunting and unpredictable. Because of the challenges that come with using stalls at show venues, many private farm owners and commercial barns are getting involved with stall rentals for short-term stays during horse shows, or simply for vacationing horse people. While this trend is not new, it is becoming increasingly popular in our region. The growth in “airbnb for horses” helps local barn and farm owners generate extra income with little additional investment and enables traveling equestrians to board their horses in a safe and secure environment. The market for the short-term horse hospitality business has matured and now supports online brokers using the same model as VRBO® or Airbnb®. Sites such as staller.com match host farms and travelers for specific dates, boarding services, amenities and payment. However, the terms and conditions of the stall rental are left to the parties to work out. Because of this, both the host and the visitor need to address these details in a separate written agreement. If you are considering offering hospitality for horses, or if you are planning to keep your horses at a private farm for a show or event, remember that a well-written and enforceable rental agreement is essential to protecting each party’s interests and assuring a successful experience. In this article we explore the important issues to include in a rental contract and the risks each party needs to consider. As a practical matter, the parties should approach short-term boarding just as they would a regular boarding relationship. The issues are very similar, but because of the need for quick solutions to any problems that may arise, there are critical terms that need to be included in the rental contract.

From the Host’s Perspective

Before embarking on a short term boarding venture, make sure your local zoning, land use or HOA regulations permit this type of activity. Assuming you can legally host boarders, the key issues to focus on when renting your stalls, pastures or other amenities are protecting your assets, reducing risk, providing a quality experience, enforcement, and getting paid. • Managing Risk. It is essential that you secure the right insurance for boarding horses. A Comprehensive General Liability (CGL) policy will protect you for claims by the public if they are injured on your property. However, CGL insurance may not cover claims, injury or death involving horses that are boarded on your property. To insure against those risks you should obtain a “Care, Custody or Control” endorsement to your policy. “Care, Custody or Control” endorsements cover claims arising from incidents involving boarded horses while on your property. If you do not have that complete coverage, you may be at significant risk. • All written rental agreements should include a comprehensive Waiver of Liability Agreement and the South Carolina statutory equine warning language. You should post the state-approved Equine Liability Warning Sign in a proper location. These are fundamental action items to protect you from liability claims. • Many hosts require that all boarded horses be insured and that their owner provide proof of coverage. This becomes more important with higher value horses. • Every horse to be boarded should have proof of a Negative Coggins and be up-to-date in vaccines. • What type of horses will you accept? Consider the horses currently on the property and what type of visiting horses would be compatible. The temperament and personalities of your horses and

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the prevailing riding discipline at your barn are important factors to consider when taking on boarders. It is common for hosts to not allow stallions or mares in foal to participate in a short-term rental. You should also require the short-term renter to disclose if their horse has any lameness or medical issues, as well as any medications the horse is taking. • Boarding services and amenities. Will you offer full board, dry stall, turnout service, access to arenas and trails? Do you have a secure area for the boarder to store feed, tack and equipment? Will you allow the boarder to park a trailer, RV or other vehicles on the property? All of these issues should be addressed in the agreement. • Practical terms to include in the rental agreement. The rental agreement should address practical operational points that will make the experience better for all parties. These include: vet, farrier and emergency care policies, rules on unaccompanied minors, barn hours and rules, helmet and safety requirements, use of your equipment and facilities, enforcement and termination terms for violations, and responsibility for damage or injury caused by the renter or their horse. • Getting Paid. If you are working with a service like staller.com, payment is included in the process. You receive that service with the fees you pay the broker. If you are billing and collecting with your customer directly, you will need to set up a payment system and reservation policy. It is best to get full payment at the time of reservation. Requiring a damage deposit or authority to charge the renter’s credit card for damages is a good practice to avoid financial losses.

From the Renter’s Perspective

When seeking a short-term rental for a competition, visiting a hunt or other event, renters need to learn about the host farm and be confident that the barn meets their needs and expectations before signing up. • If the host is a commercial barn, check out its website or Facebook page. If it is a private farm, get good photos and a detailed description of the facilities from the owner. In either situation, make inquiries about the host with online groups or local equestrians you know. Once you find a good candidate, here are some important points you want to address in the rental agreement: • Are the services and facilities clearly spelled out? Be sure the contract accurately describes the level of care your horse will receive and the size and location of the rented stall. If you need access to an arena, lunging area, trailer parking or other amenity, put it in the agreement. • What are my rights if the host breaches the contract? The last problem you need upon arriving at the host farm is a problem with the facility. Maybe the stall you reserved is not available and or the facilities are not as represented. Perhaps the host failed to disclose ongoing construction on the property that will stress your horse. Issues like these can arise and you should protect your rights by including effective remedies in the rental agreement. • Can I get my money back if I cancel? In the event you are not able to attend the event for some reason, you should include a refund provision in the rental agreement. Fellow equestrian hosts will usually work with you if the event is canceled or if you or your horse is injured and cannot travel. Short-term boarding arrangements are a growing solution to the travel challenges facing many equestrians. By using well-crafted rental agreements that address the key legal and operational issues, all parties can have a reliable and successful experience. Jim Ritchie is head of Ritchie & Associates, LLC and an avid horseman. He represents business and equine law clients across the Carolinas. For more information visit tryonequinelaw.com or call 864.527.5955. ©

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Wanted: a FeW Good Geldings

Our rapidly expanding program needs a few new horses. Do you have a horse available that: Sound and currently in work Unfazed by the toys and games used by side walkers and riders. Tolerant of unsteady or noisy riders Capable of carrying 225 lbs of weight Ridden indoors, outdoors and on trails

reward: quality care, ample turnout, and unlimited love and attention from riders, volunteers and staff.

For more information, please visit: greatoakeap.org/newpony June-July 2021

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We have over 30 years experience assisting competitive horses and riders with custom riding attire, saddle fitting and horse wear.

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Inside 59 66 68 70 73 80 81 82

Foals of 2021 Brave Today Ride of Her Life Excerpt Dressage at AHP Calendar Directory Classifieds Index of Advertisers


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Foals of 2021

Photography by Pam Gleason & Gary Knoll

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verywhere around the world in horse country, springtime brings the same thing: fresh green grass, warm weather, and new foals. After almost a year of waiting, mare owners finally get to meet the impossibly long-legged creatures that they have planned for and dreamed about. Mares, even first time mothers, generally welcome these babies with unaccustomed tenderness, maternal instincts stirring awake. Within hours of their birth these foals are already running in the pasture, carrying the dreams of their owners on their short backs. Foals are all about hope: hope for the future, and the renewal of life. It is something we could all use, especially now after such a difficult and uncertain year. On the following pages, meet a few of the foals that were born this year in Aiken. They are a special group. June-July 2021

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Imfreakinwickedguys Seis Guy x SoFreakinSpecial Quarter Horse Filly Owner: Caitlin Brady and Cory Nickles Birthday: May 15, 2021 Career Goal: Barrel Racing

Caitlin Brady and Cory Nickles bought the mare SoFreakinSpecial chiefly because she was in foal to the palomino Quarter Horse stallion Seis Guy. “We already had a Seis Guy foal, and knew they have great minds,” explained Caitlin. “Plus, the mare was bred well and would make great future barrel horse prospects for us.’ Caitlin and Cory recently started CB Wicked Performance Horses to produce quality-bred barrel horses for performance homes. Caitlin, who switched to barrel racing from eventing, says that she had originally

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intended to sell this year’s foal, but when the baby hit the ground midMay, and she saw it was not just a filly but a beautiful buckskin, she knew she would have to keep her. Top barrel horses have to love to run and they need to have some attitude, and this filly checks both boxes. From the very first day, she has enjoyed racing around her paddock, and Caitlin says she is definitely full of sass. “This foal is the start to the future of our program,” she said.

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Timeless

Tempest W x Shiraz by Donates Breed: Danish Warmblood Owner: Natalie Cwik, Tenacious Acres Birthday: April 30, 2021 Career Goal: Dressage or Eventing Timeless is special and she knows it. Long legged and bursting with athleticism, at just a few weeks old, she already has an eye-catching long stride and a way of carrying herself that commands attention. Timeless was bred by Natalie Cwik from Tenacious Acres to be a dressage or an event horse. Natalie has been breeding sport horses for decades, and Timeless is one of four foals on her farm this year: the

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others include two more warmbloods and a German Riding Pony sired by her own stallion Beaujolais. Today Timeless is enjoying her days romping with her dam and her pasture mates at Tenacious Acres. She was bred to be a sales horse, and is currently for sale and available. Wherever she ends up, she is pretty sure to stand out. (Tenacious Acres on Facebook.)

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Cairo

Halo (QH) x Cyclops (Argentine Polo) Breed: American Polo Pony Owner: Liv Stringer Birthday: March 9, 2021 Career Goal: Polo Liv Stringer, who is a polo professional based in Aiken, bred Cairo to be part of her personal playing string. His mother was a good playing Argentine polo mare, who sadly lost an eye in an accident and could not be played any longer. His sire is a palomino Quarter Horse, who is owned and played by Jewel and Ben Gregoncza, both familiar faces on Aiken’s polo fields. Cairo was foaled out at Julie Boyle’s farm (another local polo professional with a world of breeding experience) and then came home when he was about two weeks old. Liv was hoping to get a foal with “color” and she is thrilled that

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Cairo came out a buckskin. He and his mother live with another polo pony mare and foal that Liv bred this spring, but Cairo tends to get all the attention. It’s not just because of his color, it’s also because of his outgoing personality and his undeniable charisma. “He is brave and curious, which should make him solid for polo,” says Liv. Her plans for him this summer are to let him grow and play and learn some basic ground manners that will make him easy to train in the future.

June-July 2021


Lennon HH

Lord Ferragamo (Rhinelander) x Selkie (Hanoverian) by Schroeder Breed: Rhinelander Owner: Melissa Adkison Birthday: May 17, 2021 Career Goal: Dressage Lennon HH was bred from Melissa Adkison’s beloved dressage mare Selkie, who suffered a career-ending injury a few years ago. This is the second foal that Melissa has bred: last year she had a filly by Justine Wilson’s stallion Special D. This year’s foal was bred and born at Andrea Seig’s farm in Jackson, SC Lennon is a leggy chestnut with plenty of chrome and a bright and inquisitive personality. June-July 2021 He will attend his inspection and branding later

in the summer, and complete his weaning and early ground training at Andrea’s. Melissa hopes that he will be a dressage horse for her, or for another amateur rider. His sire, Lord Ferragamo, earns top marks for his temperament and character, and is known for throwing foals with excellent minds and exceptional rideability. “I really appreciate the local stallion owners assisting and guiding me in my ambitions to breed my future sportThe horses, ” said Melissa. Aiken Horse 63


Rainbow Connection (“Kermit”) Numero Uno x Summer by Calvados Breed: KWPN Owner: Jessica Bongers Birthday: April 13, 2021 Career Goal: Showjumping

Kermit was conceived at the Equine Fertility Institute at Performance Equine Clinic in Aiken using ICSI (Intracytoplasmic sperm injection, but usually just pronounced “ick-see.”). ICSI is one of the most advanced reproductive technologies used in horses, which is significantly extending the breeding success of both mares and stallions. The resultant embryo was implanted into Addie, a surrogate mare at PEVS, and she carried him to term and now acts as his mother. Mare and foal live at the Bongers’ farm in Windsor. Jessica Bongers, who is Kermit’s owner, is especially excited about the colt because he is a full brother to Wish, a KWPN showjumping mare

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campaigned by the international competitor Jessica Springsteen. Wish is known for her incredible heart and wonderful attitude as well as for her talent in the jumper ring. These qualities are not unique to Kermit’s sister. In fact, many members of his extended family are famous for their courage and ability, earning praise from Olympic riders and trainers in Europe and the United States. Jessie Bongers said that Kermit was originally supposed to be a sales horse, “But with his personality and charisma, you can’t help but get attached to him, so we’re keeping him for now. . . He’s very people oriented and too smart for his own good!”

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Stable View Supports Local Youth Brave Today: Building Trust, Life Skills By Nancy Johnson

“I’ve been very lucky; America has been very kind to me,” says Barry Olliff, who, with his wife Cyndy owns Stable View in Aiken. “When Cyndy and I lived in Pennsylvania, we wanted to give back, especially to youth, and we looked for a way to create an environment that is a little bit more caring, giving, and generous.” In 2010, the couple, who now reside at Stable View, launched the Newlin Foundation in Coatesville, Pennsylvania to help children who were living at the poverty level to attain higher education. “The idea was not just to get them to college, but to get them to the right college and keep them there,” Barry explains. It took some time and re-evaluations of the program, but today the Newlin Foundation boasts a 75% college graduation rate. “When we moved here, we decided to look into the local needs and found that Aiken clearly has a lot of social needs,” Barry says. The couple was kicking around ideas of how they might be able to help and use their spacious farm in the process. Barry mentioned his thoughts to Sammy Keats, a young intern at Stable View, who said her mother would love to get involved with a program to aid youth with social challenges. Barry and Cyndy approached Janice Keats, who is a longtime riding instructor, and she confirmed what her daughter had said; she had always wanted to assist with a program like the one they described. “I have worked with kids for 30 years and really enjoy being around them. I am always trying to encourage them to be more confident and better people,” Janice says. Janice promptly outlined Brave Today, a program for children and teens who are underprivileged or having a hard time dealing with normal social issues. In the peaceful, friendly outdoor environment of Stable View, participants engage in horse-related activities that stimulate their tactile senses to improve life skills. No prior riding or horse experience is necessary and there is no fee. Barry notes that in designing the Brave Today program, he, Cyndy, and Janice researched a number of successful programs for underserved youth and people with social challenges, such as Detroit Horse Power in Michigan, Work to Ride in Philadelphia, and the Saratoga War Horse program. “We just wanted to get it started,” Barry says. “All we needed was a round pen, which Aiken County Farm Supply generously donated, Janice’s expertise and time, and a couple of horses.” Janice brought her seasoned large pony, Lollypop, and they borrowed Soli, a big chestnut dressage horse that resides at Stable View. “We are learning our way,” Barry continues. “Let’s see where it takes us. At Stable View, we don’t overpromise anything and are open to making adjustments.” Janice coined an acronym to describe the program’s focus: DRESS4TLC – Decision Making, Relationship Skills/Respect, Empathy, Self-Awareness, Social-Awareness, Trustworthy, Leadership, and Communication. She set up the program, consisting of six weekly sessions, each two-hours long, to concentrate on these important life skills. The first group of participants completed the program in May, 2021. “We work through all of the letters in DRESS4TLC, discuss their role in humans and then relate them to the horses,” she says. “As a group we talk about how we can work on the various skills with the horses in the round pen.” The participants found that their body language and

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communication were big factors in getting through to the horses. “Trust has been a big issue for this first group of participants, so we focused a lot on that with the horses,” Janice explains. While working in the round pen, the participants developed a relationship with the horses and could see how they were gaining the animals’ trust more and more with each session. In the first five sessions, the participants worked with the horses in the barn and round pen. The final session included some riding. Lollypop and Soli have quite different personalities, so Janice used this to illustrate the importance of dealing with differences. “Remember what we learned about leadership roles?” she asks the group. “Soli is more sensitive; he doesn’t need a strong leader, though you need to gain his trust. But Lollypop kept trying us in the round pen, right? She’s a bit pushy and dominant, so you have to be more of a leader to keep her in line.” Janice was pleased with first group of Brave Today participants and is eager to welcome the next group soon. She notes that the next six-week program will be for younger participants and that one of the girls from the first group will be acting as a mentor to the next group. “That’s really what I wanted from this initial group and why I started with older kids,” Janice says. “I wanted to find a mentor for the next group.” Barry agrees, “We found this worked well in the Newlin Foundation. If you get youngsters to buy into what you are doing, they will come back and mentor future groups. There is nothing better than that generation to help that generation.” Janice is asking the community to recommend potential participants for future Brave Today sessions and mentions a few other ways to assist with the program. “We are in need of a couple of small or medium ponies to use with the younger kids and could also use help with transportation for some of the participants.” In addition, she would love to have grooming kits donated for future participants. Janice sums up her goal for Brave Today. “The biggest thing for me is to get kids to gain confidence in themselves and to manage in this world,” she says. “It takes a whole community and that’s what I want -- the community to work as a team to help these kids. There is an epidemic today of kids struggling in different ways and for different reasons. I am excited that this may lead to opportunities to work with other people to offer support for the kids in this community.” “We need more of these types of initiatives,” Barry agrees. Although Brave Today is hosted at a state-of-the-art equestrian facility, riding is not the focus of the program. The Olliff ’s vision for Stable View is that of a ‘gathering place,’ for a larger community than just the horse community. “We are hoping that we can find other local organizations where we could sponsor the children once they complete Brave Today. The kids should have something else to move into; any program that would fit their passion,” he says.

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67


The Ride of Her Life An Excerpt

by Elizabeth Letts

H

er nickname was Jackass Annie. No matter what else they said about her, everyone agreed on this. She got her nickname when she worked as a stitcher in a shoe factory and was so poor she had to ride a donkey to work. In a 1958 history of her hometown of Minot, Maine, she was described as “one of the so-called characters that provide the humor that makes towns of this type interesting.” Some said she had run off as a teenager and joined the circus, become a bareback rider, only returning home when she heard that her mother was sick. Others swore she’d lived in and around Minot all her life, a life that hadn’t amounted to much. She’d been married once, at least, and people said she’d sent the man packing when he’d tried to get the title to her farm. Her given name was Annie. Around Minot, Maine, it was Jackass Annie that stuck. In November 1954, Annie took her dog and got on a horse and started riding. Destination: California. From a modern perspective, her journey seems almost bewildering—imagine trying to navigate without the benefit of GPS, to travel with no cellphone, no credit or debit card, not even a bank account to draw from. In fact, when she first set off, Annie didn’t even have the kinds of tools that were available in 1954: road maps, a flashlight and batteries, a waterproof raincoat. Annie headed south, a Quixote in the company of her Rocinante, a run-down ex-racehorse, and her Sancho Panza, a little mutt. Society has called these people by different names: vagabonds and drifters, pilgrims, hoboes, and hippies. She called herself a tramp. Had she been a man, perhaps her independence, her eccentricities, her free spirit would have won her admirers, but the citizens of Minot, like much of small-town America in that era, valued outward conformity.

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In the postwar years, women’s roles were tightly circumscribed and largely defined by their relation to others—wife, mother, widow. The cult of domesticity was in full swing. A single older woman didn’t have much leeway if she wanted to be seen as respectable. The ideal unmarried older woman was devout, docile, and a bit dull. Annie was none of these. Her real personality—funny, quirky, and bold— had been buffed and sanded in memory to make her appear more conventional, more palatable to those who would judge a woman for any deviation from the straitlaced norm. Forgotten was her fondness for a good party, her two divorces, her stint as a vaudeville performer, the fact that she never set foot in a church. In its place was the respectable Widow Wilkins—folksy, kindhearted, and maybe a bit simpleminded. When I traveled to Minot and met people who had known her, that was how her former neighbors described her. They were proud of their famous citizen. They hesitated to tell me how poor she was, how mean her circumstances, how she’d never been considered part of polite society. They didn’t want to say a word against her. What struck me, though, was that in spite of their pride in her grand adventure, folks still remembered her as Jackass Annie. The pejorative had stuck like a burr on a shaggy dog’s coat. Annie deserved better. So this is her true story, and in this story I call her by the name she was born with—just plain Annie. Excerpted from THE RIDE OF HER LIFE copyright © 2021 by Elizabeth Letts. Used by permission of Ballantine Books, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, New York. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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69


Dressage in the Spring, Aiken Horse Park


Photography by Gary Knoll


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June-July 2021


Aiken Area Calendar of Events JUNE

Tryon Spring V. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com 2 Schooling HJ Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 3-6 HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 4-6 Camden Classic HJ Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 4-5 GDHA Better-Late-Than-Never Spring Draft Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 5 CT and Dressage Show. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com 5 Atlanta Youth Dressage Challenge. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 5-6 USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 6 Schooling Horse Trial. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com 7-13 Tommy Hitchcock Memorial Single Elimination. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. Haley Bryan: 803.215.3577, hbryan2485@gmail.com. Newbridgepolo.com 8-13 Tryon Spring VI. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com 9 Twilight Jumpers. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 9 CEC HJ Show. Springdale at Pine Tree Stables, 1265 Sanders Creek Road, Camden, SC. Candi Cocks: 803.243.4417, springdale47@gmail.com, camdenequinecircuit.com 1-6

June-July 2021

12

12

12-13

12-13 12-13

12-13

13

16

16-27

17 17-20 18-20

Schooling Eventing and Dressage. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Cats on the Mat Yoga. SPCA Albrecht Center’ s Marr Education Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org WHES June Schooling and Horse Trials, CT, & Dressage. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Mullet Hall PSJ Show. Mullet Hall, Johns Island, SC. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com GHF/Massey Ferguson Annual Dressage Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com Horse Show Ventures - The Southeastern Hunter/ Jumper Series. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com Hunter Pace. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Twilight Hunters. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Aiken Summer Classic I&II Horse Show. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Sunset Jumpers #2. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com Tryon Summer Dressage I&II. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com Sedgefield at the Park Memorial Day Classic NCHJA “C” Horse Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com

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18-20 SCQHA Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 18-20 Tryon Summer I. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com 19 Tack Sale at Aiken Equine Rescue, 9am-12pm. Buy tack or sell your own: $20 per table. 532 Glenwood Drive, Aiken. aikenequinerescue.org. 19 USEF/USDF “Summer Solstice” Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm. com, stableviewfarm.com 19 Summer Solstice Classic. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 19 Radway Show. Radway Eventing, 4627 Whiskey Road, Aiken. Kim Davies: 803.998.6059, radwayeventing@yahoo.com, radwayeventing.com 19 Dressage Test-of-choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com 19 Jungle Drive Scavenger Hunt. Relyea Farm, 359 State Park Road, Windsor, SC. aikendrivingclub.com 19-20 HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 19-20 HJ Fox Summer Classic Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 20 USEF Horse Trial. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com 23 Twilight Hunters. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 24-27 Stars & Stripes Circuit (GQHA). Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 25 USEF/USEF Summer Horse Trials and Area III Championship. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 25-27 Tryon Summer II. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com 25-27 SCDCTA Youth Dressage Clinic. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 26 Pups n’Suds Dog Wash. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org 26-27 Dressage at the Park I&II. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 26-27 Dressage. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 26-27 Highfields PSJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 28-Jul 4 GQHA Big A Circuit. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 30-Jul 4 Tryon Summer III. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com

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JULY 1

3-4

6-11 7

7

9-11

10

10-11

10-11

10-11

13-18 15 16-18

16-18

17

17

17-18 18

20-25 23-25

23-25

Stable View HJ Summer Classic. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Horse Trials. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Tryon Summer IV. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com Stableview Schooling HJ Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Twilight Jumpers. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com HJ Fox Summer Fox USEF Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com Cats on the Mat Yoga. SPCA Albrecht Center’ s Marr Education Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org Stableview Eventing Academy. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com WHES June Schooling and Horse Trials, CT, & Dressage. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Horse Trials. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Tryon Summer V. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com Sunset Jumpers #3. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com HJ Fox Wounded Warrior Classic Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com Sedgefield at the Park Memorial Day Classic NCHJA “C” Horse Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Stable View USEF/USDF “Only in America” Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Freedom Classic Schooling Show. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm. com Highfields PSJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com July Schooling CT, HT, Dressage Tests. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com, Fullgallopfarm.com Tryon Summer VI. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com Camden Summer Classic HJ Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com GQHA Novice Show Series II&III. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com

June-July 2021


Derby Cross and Clear Round Show Jump Day. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com 24-25 Cheryl & Co. HJ Show. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 24-28 OLYMPIC DRESSAGE. Baji Koen Equestrian Park, Tokyo, Japan. olympics.com/tokyo 27-Aug 1 Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show I. Blowing Rock Equestrian Preserve, Blowing Rock, NC. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 29-Aug 1 Stable View HJ Summer Classic II. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 30-Aug 2 OLYMPIC EVENTING Baji Koen Equestrian Park & Sea Forest Cross Country, Tokyo, Japan. olympics.com/ tokyo 31 Pups n’Suds Dog Wash. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org 31- Aug 1 GHF/Massey Ferguson Dressage Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 31-Aug 1 Horse Show Ventures - The Southeastern Hunter/ Jumper Series. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 24

7-8

7-8

7-8 8

12-29

13-15 14

14

14-15

14-15

18-19

19 20-21

20-21

AUGUST 1

3-7 4

4

4-8

7

August Schooling CT, HT, Dressage Tests. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com, Fullgallopfarm.com OLYMPIC SHOWJUMPING Baji Koen Equestrian Park, Tokyo, Japan. olympics.com/tokyo Stable View Schooling HJ Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Twilight Jumpers. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show II. Blowing Rock Equestrian Preserve, Blowing Rock, NC. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Schooling Eventing and Dressage Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com

June-July 2021

20-21

21 21

21

22

27-29

28 28-29

Peace at Poplar sanctioned by Southern Hunter Jumper of Georgia. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com Stable View Eventing Academy. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Highfields PSJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Hunter Pace. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Equus Event HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Tryon August I. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com Cats on the Mat Yoga. SPCA Albrecht Center’ s Marr Education Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org CT and Dressage Show. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com Tryon Summer Dressage III&IV. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. tryon.coth.com Made in the Shade I&II Performance and Breed Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Stable View USEF/USDF “Too Hot to Trot I” Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Sunset Jumpers #4. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com Blast from the Past Barrel Racing. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com Stable View USEF/USDF “Too Hot to Trot II” Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Sedgefield at the Park Memorial Day Classic NCHJA “C” Horse Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com Highfields Just For Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Dressage Test-of-Choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com Fall Classic Schooling Show. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm. com USEF Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com Southeastern Reining Horse Association Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com Pups n’Suds Dog Wash. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org Highfields PSJ Show. Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, John’s Island, SC. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com

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Business Cards

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The Aiken Horse

June-July 2021


Outfitting Southeastern Farriers for Over 30 years

GREAT SERVICE AND QUALITY FARRIER SUPPLIES ARE OUR PRIORITY

Aiken, SC

803.685.5101

Columbus, NC 828.894.0280

www.monettafarrier.com

June-July 2021

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The Aiken Horse

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June-July 2021

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Directory of Services BLANKET CLEANING & REPAIR Aiken Horse Blanket Couture. Please see our business card ad on page 81. Elisa: 803-640-3211; elisa@aikenhorseblanket.com BOARDING/TURNOUT/TRAINING/SALES Chime Ridge Stables. 803-508-3760. Heart Horse Stables has roomy individual pasture boarding with 12 x 12 run-in shelters. Owners on site. Just over the Aiken line in Windsor. Arena, round pen, trails. $350/mo 704-288-7385 Horse boarding in Windsor, SC carriage driving community. Lovely, low country setting. 12x12 stalls connected to 2 acre fields and a short term paddock with shelter available. Jog’lin Board Farm Contact Lisa Whitcomb 414-477-9419 www.Sporting Days Farm.com. 3549 Charleston Hwy, Aiken, SC 29801 - 5.5 miles from Aiken By-Pass. Offers year round, seasonal or short term board as well as dry stalls. 150 acres with trails and practice areas. USEF/USEA Horse Trials in the winter, schooling shows. Visit our website to see all that it offers in 2021. sdaikenht@ aol.com The Stable On The Woods: Elite boarding & training facility and home to trainers Darrell and Melissa Vaughn. With access to Hitchcock Woods, our barn sits on 70 acres and boasts a full size dressage arena with mirrors, show jumping arena and highquality grass pastures making this the ideal place for you and your horse. Training program to meet your needs, whether your discipline is Dressage, Eventing, Hunters, Jumpers or Foxhunting. thestableonthewoods.com 603.785.0435 Vaughn Equestrian: offering training, sales, and boarding. Professionalism is the guiding principle of owners Darrell and Melissa Vaughn in shaping every component of Vaughn Equestrian. Dressage, Jumpers, Eventing & Young Horses. training and sales. vaughnequestrian.com (603)-785-0435 COMPANION ANIMALS, CARE & SERVICES Trinity Farms Terriers: Irish Russell Terriers & Norfolk Terriers. Old World, Healthy 100 year old Bloodlines with proven calmer dispositions. Health & Dispositions guaranteed. Preservation breeders for 48 years. Donna Fitzpatrick 803-648-3137 easyjacks. com, trinityfarmskennel.com CONSTRUCTION & GRADING G. L. Williams & Daughter. Serving the CSRA for over 54 years. Specializing in hauling, grading, clearing, property maintenance, and excavation. We provide everything from several types of fill dirt, top soil, compost, mortar sands, crushed asphalt/concrete, to screenings and a variety of rocks. Roll-off containers and manure removal available. (803) 663-3715. Certified DBE. WOSB. www. glwdtrucking.com Southern Ridge Excavation. Drainage, grading, small clearing, pad prep, utility ditching, pond mowing. Third generation family operated; Licensed & insured. Member Aiken Chamber of Commerce. Call Alex Koegel. 803-522-5752. southernridgex@ gmail.com. DENTISTRY MidAtlantic Equine Dentistry: Mike Cissell DVM, MS, DACVS-LA: Excellence in equine oral health. midatlanticequinedentistry.com; maed.aiken@gmail.com. (928) 458-4529. FEED, SUPPLEMENTS & SUPPLIES Aiken County Farm Supply. 1933 Park Ave., Aiken. 803.649.2987. Aiken Saddlery & Supply. Full service tack & feed store. 1044 E. Pine Log Rd., Aiken. 803.649.6583. aikensaddlery.com

Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver statewide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803. Moorefield Farms. Premium Ohio Hay. Now in Aiken! Regularly scheduled reliable delivery direct from our farm to you. Large or small quantities, no middleman. Consistent quality. Alfalfa, timothy, orchard and mixes. Quality guaranteed. MoorefieldHayFarms.com. 330-201-1700. INSURANCE Betsy Minton, Sterling Thompson Equine, 803-617-8353. Now writing homeowners insurance for private residences. No horses required but certainly welcomed. Access to top-notch underwriters offering customized, affordable coverage. Still delivering excellent competitive insurance options for your horses and farms. betsyminton@sterlingthompson.com. Sterling Thompson Equine: 800 942 4258 Hutson-Etherredge Company. Insuring Aiken farms since 1876. Your hometown independent insurance agency can customize your equine property coverage by choosing the best company to fit your needs. We are a full service insurance agency. Call Sandi Vogus for a quote! 803-649-5141 INSTRUCTION/LESSONS Amy McElroy. USDF Gold Medalist and USEF S judge. Instruction and training at all levels. Visit amymcelroy.com or call 803.6404207. Aiken Horsemanship Academy. Your naturally inspired adult learning resource! Offering Clinics, Courses, Starting Young Horses, Evaluations, and Lessons. JulieRobins.com 803-220-1768. Jodi Hemry Eventing. Three-Star Eventer offering professional training, sales, boarding, instruction, horse shows, located in the heart of Aiken. 803-640-6691 JodiHemryEventing@gmail.com JodiHemryEventing.com REAL ESTATE/ RENTALS Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 29 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803-439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. Carolina Real Estate Company. Fine homes, estates and horse properties in Aiken, South Carolina. Let us welcome you home to AIKEN, Home of Horses, History & Hospitality! carolinahorseproperties.com. (803) 648-8660 Sharer Dale, Meybohm. “Where town meets country.” sharerdale@ gmail.com. 803.522.3648. Suzy Haslup, Meybohm. “Your Aiken Horse Real Estate Specialist.” Buying or selling in the most celebrated equine community in the South. ww.aikenhorserealty.com; 803-215-0153 Tracey Kenworthy Turner, Meybohm. Specializing in marketing & selling Aiken’s horse country properties for 15+ years. southernhorsefarms.com. 803-215-4734. TACK & TACK CLEANING/REPAIR The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 544 Two Notch Rd. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166.

HAY

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June-July 2021


Classifieds Very nice retired polo pony mare. 12 years old; 16 hands. Nice on trails; no spook. Has an old injury but sound and nice enough to pursue low levels of a different career. $2,500. Call for more details. 803-295-8687.

BOARDING/TURNOUT/ TRAINING Chime Ridge Stables. 803-5083760. Heart Horse Stables has roomy individual pasture boarding with 12 x 12 run-in shelters. Owners on site. Just over the Aiken line in Windsor. Arena, round pen, trails. $350/mo 704-288-7385 www.Sporting Days Farm.com. 3549 Charleston Hwy, Aiken, SC 29801 - 5.5 miles from Aiken By-Pass. Offers year round, seasonal or short term boarding as well as dry stalls. 150 acres with trails and practice areas. USEF/ USEA Horse Trials in the winter, schooling shows. Visit our website to see all that it offers in 2021. sportingdaysfarmcom sdaikenht@ aol.com Horse boarding in Windsor, SC carriage driving community. Lovely, low country setting. 12x12 stalls connected to 2 acre fields and a short term paddock with shelter available. Jog’lin Board Farm Contact Lisa Whitcomb 414-4779419 FARM SERVICES Southern Ridge Excavation. Drainage, grading, small clearing, pad prep, utility ditching, pond mowing. Third generation family operated; Licensed & insured.

Member Aiken Chamber of Commerce. Call Alex Koegel. 803522-5752. southernridgex@gmail. com. G. L. Williams & Daughter. Serving the CSRA for over 54 years. Specializing in hauling, grading, clearing, property maintenance, and excavation. We provide everything from several types of fill dirt, top soil, compost, mortar sands, crushed asphalt/concrete, to screenings and a variety of rocks. Roll-off containers and manure removal available. (803) 663-3715. Certified DBE. WOSB. www. glwdtrucking.com HAY Hoss Luva Hay. Exceptional quality local Coastal Bermuda Hay and Alfalfa mix from out of state. Competitively priced. Will deliver state-wide. Satisfaction Guaranteed. Jim McClain: 803.247.4803 Round and Square Bales. Oakwood Farms: 3593 Silver Bluff Road, Aiken SC 29803. $60 per bale round hay bales. $70 per bale round bales kept inside. Square bales at $7.00 per bale. Will deliver for a small fee. Please call 706-830-2600 or 803-8270864. email garymcelmurray@ glmconstruction.net

Moorefield Farms. Premium Ohio Hay. Now in Aiken! Regularly scheduled reliable delivery direct from our farm to you. Large or small quantities, no middleman. Consistent quality. Alfalfa, timothy, orchard and mixes. Quality guaranteed. MoorefieldHayFarms.com. 330201-1700. HELP WANTED Part-time work on horse farm. Includes horse care, mowing, painting and tractor work. Ideal for semi retired. Apply by email to: jobs@theaikenhorse.com. HORSES/PETS & SERVICES Trinity Farms Terriers: Irish Russell Terriers & Norfolk Terriers. Old World, Healthy 100 year old Bloodlines with proven calmer dispositions. Health & Dispositions guaranteed. Preservation breeders for 48 years. Donna Fitzpatrick 803-648-3137 easyjacks.com, trinityfarmskennel. com RENTALS Aiken Luxury Rentals. Fully furnished cottages; wak to downtown. Perfect for temporary assignments, or housing while you build. Work-from-home ready; high speed internet. Antique finishes & modern convenience.

info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803-6482804. Cozy, cute carriage house for rent on Hitchcock Woods on iconic equestrian estate. 1BR/1BA. Sleeps 4. $125/night. European style barn with soaring ceilings. 3 stalls available (self care) $20/night per horse. 5 min to downtown Aiken and close to all horse venues. Perfect for female solo travelers. Monthly discounts avail. www.StayAiken.com Equestrian Farm close to Aiken has 3 bedrooms, 2 bath. For Rent 6 months or year round. Rent with stalls if needed. Contact: classifieds@theaikenhorse.com. TACK & APPAREL Aiken Horse Blanket Couture. Creative coolers; your colors. Creative equine-ware. Tack covers/carry bags Saddle pad enhancements. Blanket wash/ waterproof . Blanket repair. AikenHorseBlanket.com. Elisa Denaburg. 803-640-3211 The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 544 Two Notch Rd. at the Aiken Training Track. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166.

Advertising in The Aiken Horse

CLASSIFIED ADS are $25 for the first 30 DIRECTORY LISTING ADS: $25 per issue words & 40 cents for every word or $90 for the year (6 issues.) thereafter. Add $5 for blind classified. BUSINESS CARDS: $65 per issue or $280 for the year (6 issues.) PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for horses: $35; Limit 30 words & one picture DISPLAY ADS are available in a range of PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for real estate, etc. sizes. For a detailed rate sheet and $45; Limit 60 words & one picture. publication schedule, visit our website: BOXED CLASSIFIEDS: add $5 to your total TheAikenHorse.com

June-July 2021

MAILING ADDRESS: The Aiken Horse, P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 EMAIL: theAikenHorse@gmail.com We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

Pay online: TheAikenHorse.com or call us: 803.643.9960

Advertise in the August-September issue! Deadline July 16, 2021 Publication date August 3, 2021

The Aiken Horse

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Index of Advertisers ADVERTISER

SECTION

ADVERTISER

PAGE

SECTION

Aiken County Farm Supply

83

3

Highfields

55

2

Aiken Fine Homes and Land

19

1

Jack Groover

25

1

Aiken Horse Park Foundation

23

1

Jill Diaz Polo

69

3

Aiken Horsemanship Academy

38

2

Keller Williams Stinson

4

1

Aiken Luxury Rentals

27

1

Lightning Protection Systems

53

2

Aiken Polo Club

54

2

LOC Equestrian

47

2

Aiken Saddlery, Inc.

30

1

Mark Lexton

27

1

Aiken Tack Exchange

25

1

Meybohm RE (Sullivan/Turner)

6

1

Aiken TB Hall of Fame

65

3

Meybohm RE Haslup

3

1

Auto Tech

53

2

Meybohm RE Taylor

56

2

Banixx

47

2

Meybohm RE The Vista

7

1

Barnware

44

2

Meybohm RE Vaillancourt

2

1

Be Fly Free

46

2

Moorefield Farm

44

2

5

1

New Bridge Polo Club

14

1

Biddle Realty

31

1

NibbleNet

46

2

Bridle Creek

32

1

Oak Manor Saddlery

53

2

Carolina Company RE

84

3

Progressive Show Jumping, Inc

22

1

Carolina Company Uskup

15

1

Redman Int.l Horse Transport

53

2

CHAPS

44

2

South Carolina Equine Park

46

2

D & M Partners

12

1

Southern Equine Service

39

2

DFG Stables

34

2

Southland Hay

47

2

Epona

29

1

SPCA Albrecht Center

26

1

Equine Divine

18

1

Stable View, LLC

45

2

Equine Rescue of Aiken

28

1

Subscribe

67

3

Estrella Equine

29

1

Tack Sale

67

3

FITS Equestrian

29

1

Teddi Ismond

44

2

FOTAS Aiken

58

3

The Kneaded Edge

18

1

G L Williams and Daughter

18

1

The Kneaded Edge

38

2

Gary Knoll Photography

72

3

The Tack Room

51

2

Great Oak ATRC

51

2

The Willcox

27

1

Greystone Properties

13

1

Thoroughbred Retirement Fund

52

2

Greystone Properties

45

2

Tryon Equine Law

18

1

Best of the West

82

PAGE

The Aiken Horse

June-July 2021


AIKEN COUNTY FARM SUPPLY

SERVING AIKEN COUNTY FOR OVER 50 YEARS

803-649-2987

1933 Park Ave. Aiken, South Carolina 29801

June-July 2021

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CarolinaCo-AikenHorse6-21_aikenhorseRIGHT 6/1/2021 4:08 PM Page 1

Courtney Conger

803.645.3308

Randy Wolcott

Jack Roth

Mike Hosang

803.507.1142 803.341.8787 803.270.6358 803.640.2845 803.215.8232

Brian Cavanaugh

Donnita Harmon

Tom Murray

Lee Hedlund

803.624.6072

Thomas Bossard Jane Page Thompson Alex Tyrteos

Barb Gould Uskup

803.508.1936 626.644.3008 803.221.6831 203.249.3071 803.295.3199

www.CarolinaCompany.com | Office: 803.648.8660

River Oaks Farm Custom wrought iron gates open to welcome visitors to 113 acres of fields and woods on the Edisto River. This beautifully maintained traditional home offers 4,560 square feet of living space on 3 fully finished floors with oak and tile flooring, formal living and dining rooms, den with fireplace, custom kitchen with granite, breakfast bay and all stainless appliances, 7 bedrooms including main floor master suite, 3.5 baths and media room. Shady fenced pastures, lighted riding ring and several barns including 8-stall Barnmaster center aisle stable with tack room & dog kennel. Call COURTNEY CONGER or RANDY WOLCOTT $815,000

Fire Light Farm at THREE RUNS PLANTATION | Welcome Home to comfort and luxury in this

beautiful move-in ready 3600+ sq. ft. home on over 5 fully irrigated acres. Enjoy the open floor plan with hardwood floors, and quartzite countertops. Great room with elegant fireplace, formal dining, beautiful kitchen with breakfast bay & island, office/study, den, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths. Large master suite with sitting room. Upstairs bonus area offers in-law suite with full bath & galley kitchen. Includes 3-car garage, gunite salt water pool, patio with outdoor fireplace. Barn includes four 12X12 stalls, center aisle wash bay, 2 large tack rooms, full bath with apartment potential. Hay/equipment storage, automatic waterer, established pastures, riding ring. Call DONNITA HARMON $1,250,000

Historic Horse District | Buckland Barn, an historic training facility in Aiken’s downtown Horse District, has spacious 2,787 square foot main residence, combining 2 original cottages with central great room. Cottage is delightfully renovated with wood floors, granite counter tops and all appliances. There are 2 converted race barns with 15 expanded stalls total, board fenced paddocks, grooms’ apartment, dressage arena with mirror. Easy access on sandy clay roads to downtown equestrian venues and Hitchcock Woods, Aiken’s 2,200 acre riding reserve with 60 miles of riding trails. Call COURTNEY CONGER $1,425,000

Willow Oak Farm | Turn-key equestrian facility on over 43

acres of board fenced fields includes handsome 16-stall barn with tack & feed rooms, wash stall, and spacious lounge. Well-appointed owner’s apartment features open floor plan with 2 bedrooms, custom kitchen, living room with fireplace. Arena with professional footing for dressage or jumping, trail riding around spring fed pond. Call COURTNEY CONGER or RANDY WOLCOTT $595,000

Timshel Gardens | Two lovely level parcels available in equestrian community. Both lots have been cleared, stumped and is perimeter fenced in non-climb wire with a board on top. Timshel Gardens amenities include a community riding area with dressage and cross country course, and there are miles of riding trails. Located on Pottery Mill Road, about 3 miles from Stable View equestrian facility. Call COURTNEY CONGER Timshel Gardens Tract includes 12.49 acres | $132,000 Pottery Mill Parcel includes 10.38 acres | $113,000

Three Runs Plantation | Beautiful corner

lot offers 5.78 acres to build your dream home on! Located in the last phase of Aiken’s premier equestrian community, with natural gas and high speed internet available. New owners of this cleared lot may enjoy community amenities including clubhouse, pool & picnic area, activity center with fitness room, riding arenas, and over 30 miles of trails. Call DONNITA HARMON $199,500

Whimborne Farm at THREE RUNS PLANTATION | Custom built to feature the owner’s unique collection of architectural elements throughout the 3,321 square foot residence, this elegant property includes a 2-stall barn with separate apartment above, tranquil courtyard, landscaped gardens and 5 acres of immaculate fenced pasture in Three Runs equestrian community. Amenities include clubhouse, fitness center, pool, jump rings, dressage arenas with mirrors, crosscountry course, and 30 miles of groomed trails. Call TOM MURRAY $1,110,000

The Paddocks | Equestrian lots now available in popular south side horse country — build a home for you and your horses in this friendly community! The 21 lots offered in Section One range from 5.34 acres to 13.83 acres. Community amenities include arena and miles of perimeter riding trails. Call MIKE HOSANG | Wooded lots offered at just $16,000 per acre, cleared lots are $18,000 per acre.

La Parrilla | Well appointed, open loft floor plan above multi-

purpose space. Ground level includes garage/storage area and heated & cooled office with half bath. Adjoining covered storage area (open on 3 sides) easily converts to stabling. Already on the property is a large fenced paddock with run-in shed, loft storage and tack room. Separate guest quarters provides room for guests, friends or family. Covered patio area features the "parrilla" (Latin American style grill). Call MIKE HOSANG $365,000

Aiken County Horse Farm | 18 Foley Circle is a working horse farm with a 5 bedroom, 4 bath farm house built in 2005 with 4,800 square feet of living space and porches that overlook round pen, schooling ring and fenced paddocks that roll towards McTier Creek. The courtyard barn has tackroom, feedroom, office and stalls that can be configured for breeding or for boarding. The 88 acre farm is situated off of a quiet dirt road and functions well with run-in sheds, covered pole equipment building and many other equestrian amenities. Call JANE PAGE THOMPSON $1,245,000

Three Runs Plantation | Elegant spacious home with a 72 x 192 covered arena! This 4 bedroom/3 bath home has 2 fireplaces: one in Living Room and one in Owner's Bedroom. It is located on one of the most beautiful streets in Three Runs. The 5 stall barn, built by Matt Yoder, is wood paneled with a whole house fan and run-outs to the pastures. There is a separate equipment/hay building, also built by Matt Yoder, private gunite pool and abundant irrigated pastures. Located midway between both North and South Complexes, with easy trail access to anywhere in Three Runs! Call TOM MURRAY $1,300,000 Additional 5 fenced acres across the street with two 2-stall barns (each with tack room) & well $350,000

Lakeview Farm | Stately gated entrance leads you into Lakeview Farm.

This sportsman's retreat includes approximately 77 gently rolling acres mostly in grass, an 11 acre fishing/skiing lake with a country lakehouse set right on the shoreline. 2 bedroom, 1 bath cottage boasts a full length porch overlooking lake, large, open kitchen, family room with fireplace. Large, separate den with fireplace. Unique property located in Aiken’s popular Highway 302 equestrian corridor! Call MIKE HOSANG $884,000

Hopeland Farms | Lovely cleared lot in Lane’s End section of Hopeland Farms has cleared 5.52 acres. This lot is up on high ground with privacy. The seller has installed a 3 hp well. The property is adjacent to the trail system of Hopeland Farms and has power along this property line. Stunning lot in one of Aiken's most sought after equestrian neighborhoods. Call RANDY WOLCOTT $161,000

Smith Farm | Here’s nearly 79 acres (78.93 ac.) of absolutely beautiful

fields of grass, shaded with large mature oaks and pine trees. The farm cabin, nestled in a shady grove surrounded by many ornamental plants and trees, has 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, and soaring ceilings with fireplace in open living area. There is a large 12-acre hay field which could be converted to use as a polo practice field. This stunning property is a must-see! Call RANDY WOLCOTT $450,000

Shaws Fork Acreage | Rolling tract with 23.22 acres in Aiken’s eastside equestrian area. Gorgeous tract is planted for grazing, and is ready for your fencing and other improvements. Call MIKE HOSANG $185,000

Three Runs Plantation | Amazing home on 4.6 acres with over

2100 square feet, open floor plan, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2-car garage, and large laundry room with included washer and dryer. House has loads of storage, 9’ ceilings and all floors are either oak or ceramic tile (no carpet), garage holds 2 cars plus extra storage. Kitchen has all stainless steel appliances and custom cabinetry with gorgeous upgraded granite. Master bath has walk in shower & whirlpool tub. Permanent finished wood stairs to attic with lots of storage or future 288 sq ft bedroom or bonus room. Easy access to trails. Call JACK ROTH $625,000

Chime Bell Chase | Beautiful gently rolling lot in

equestrian community encompasses 15.41 acres. Amenities include professionally designed cross country course, jumping field, dressage arena and miles of groomed trails & carriageways for riding, driving or walking. Convenient to equestrian venues, downtown shopping & dining, and Hitchcock Woods. Call MIKE HOSANG $225,000

Bridle Creek | From the developer of Three Runs Plantation, Bridle Creek meanders across 600 wooded acres of Aiken’s horse country, featuring equestrian homesites of 5 acres or more. Community amenities include dressage arena, jump arena, cross-country schooling area and NEW activity center with fitness equipment and kitchen. Financing available! Call JACK ROTH Pricing starts at just $19,500 per acre

Call agents or office: 803.648.8660 | Visit www.CarolinaCompany.com