December-January 2020-2021

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Volume 16 • Number 3 •

December 2020- January 2021


Now Available

Offered through New Bridge Realty

Thank you fall season Sponsors and Teams

Contact Raza Kazmi, 888-4NB-POLO, info@newbridgepolo.com

USPA Northrup Knox Cup® 12 Goal Winners: SD Farms

Rare Opportunity to Own One of the Largest Barns in New Bridge

USPA National President’s Cup 8 Goal Winners: Bottega

Centrally Located Property in Close Proximity to Amenities

Paloma Farm: º$695,000 This is a rare opportunity to own one of the largest barns in New Bridge Polo Club. Situated on 28.52 acres and close to Field #3, clubhouse, swimming pool and clay tennis court. Spacious 16-stall barn with 12x12 stalls and 16-foot wide center aisle. Separate feed room with sliding door perfect for deliveries. Nicely laid out two bedroom apartment offers housing for caretakers or owners. Large, detached storage building for hay and equipment. Four generous paddocks.

About New Bridge (visit newbridgepolo.com or call 1-888-4NB-POLO)

New Bridge is an 860-acre gated equestrian community nestled among rolling pasture lands on New Bridge Road just 15 minutes from Perimeter Fenced Lot Ready for Horses downtown Aiken, South Carolina. Born from the High and Dry Prime Property excitement, intensity and tradition of polo, New Bridge is the home of New Bridge Polo & 1266 New Bridge Road: $227,100 Country Club and of Aiken Youth Polo. It embraces Prime property with motivated seller. equestrians of all disciplines as well as those who 15.14 acres, perimeter fenced with a well. simply love the outdoors, with all sharing the Maximim usability on this lot. Entire parcel essential joy of a life that celebrates horses, people is high and dry with hardwood shade trees and land - in a place that connects them. towards the front. This property is part of New Bridge Polo & Country Club. Residents enjoy an array of equestrian amenities including five meticulously groomed polo fields, stick and ball areas, an exercise track, polo arena, riding trails, all-weather GGT dressage and jumping arenas, miles of groomed roads made Cleared and Fenced Lots on Fields 4 & 5 for riding and The Stables, our full-care, premier 24-stall boarding facility. Horse Friendly Homesites

Located on Fields 4 & 5 (marked in purple in map to left)

Cleared and fenced lots perfectly suited for home, barn, and pasture. Start building your dream farm today. Sizes range from 4.0 to 5.61 acres. Prices range from $128,000 to $174,000. Some lots can be combined with additional adjacent acreage. Lots are located in a quiet corner of New Bridge, yet still provide quick access to all amenities.

#newbridgelife / newbridgepolo.com

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The Aiken Horse

A swimming pool with lounge area, a clay tennis court, and an Argentinian colonial-style Clubhouse with restaurant/bar (open spring and fall), balcony, porch, and outdoor spaces round out the perfect setting for everyone from families to empty nesters, casual riders to competitive athletes, and those simply seeking solace from a busy world. The New Bridge world is one where all can revel in the luxury of leisure, the excitement of sport, the abiding beauty of horse country, and the deep connections of a close-knit community. New Bridge: room to play; room to ride; room to live, all in a place you will want to call home.

December-January 2020-2021


SuzyHaslup_TAH_Sept2019.qxp_Layout 1 4/5/20 5:46 PM Page 1

JOHNSTON FARM $899,000 Accredited Land Consultant An Accredited Land Consultant, Suzy achieved the title of Leading Sales Agent in 2013, 2015 & 2016. Her 2018 & 2019 achievements include Meybohm’s “Best of the Best” & President’s Club, as well as 2018 & 2019 RLI APEX award for top producing land real estate agents.

SUZY Rare opportunity to own a professional equestrian property with lush coastal turnout fields twenty minutes from Aiken. Custom 4 BR/3.5 bath light filled home with heart pine floors, cathedral ceiling, updated kitchen, fireplace, new workout room, and views of your horses grazing. This 87A property includes a pond, 14-stall training barn with storage and grooming/wash stalls, paddocks, run-ins, derby jump field, 190 x 100 sand arena, round pen, free jumping chute, large turnout fields & mobile home. 2 additional 4-stall barns. More acreage is available.

KATYDID FARM

$1.1 MILLION

KINGS RIDGE

$685,000

BUTTON DOWN FARM

REDUCED

SOLD

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Prepared by: Aiken County Government 10/22/2018 JB

Scale: 1 inch = 200 feet

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Priced at $275,000 and $320,000, these lots provide an exceptional opportunity to own a farm Parcel Map bordering the 2200-acre Hitchcock Woods offering 70 miles of riding trails open to the public year round. Lots are cleared and ready for home and barn, paved cul-de-sac, underground utilities with city services and no HOA. Possible owner financing and lots may be combined. Direct access to trails of the Woods. WO OD S

Spectacular Aiken Horse District brick manor house renovated in 1999 with hardwood floors, commercial grade kitchen, fireplaces, 2 master suites, art/workout studio, 4 stall brick barn, 5.43 A. & newly sided guest house. Organically managed pasture & grounds with irrigated pastures, new board fencing & run-in sheds. Easy access to Hitchcock Woods on the clay roads.

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Bridle Creek farm has hardiplank 3 BR /2 BA home on 12.48 A completely fenced w/no climb wire & top board, 4 paddocks, large turnout field, 4 stall barn w/tack-room, feed room, wash stall, in/out stalls & fabulous 80 X 200 irrigated synthetic footing dressage ring.Extensive community trails, new jump & dressage ring & recreation center.

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$1.99 MILLION

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FOX HALL

Situated on the water in gated King’s Ridge, this 3 BR/2BA brick French Country home boasts a Stephen Fuller floor plan featured in Southern Living. Inside are vaulted ceilings, hardwood and porcelain floors, fireplace, attached 2+ car garage, patio, and screened porch overlooking the lake. The 7-acre property has spectacular views, 4-board fencing, wonderful plantings, and room for horses!

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Former home to international driving competitions, this farm is suitable for any equestrian. Property has over 108 A w/hay fields, pastures, 2 center aisle barns (18 stalls), 5 run-in sheds, equipment shed & hay barn. Stickbuilt home w/3 BR/2 BA, hardwood floors & fireplace. Additional contiguous 105 A with trails available. Sellers will consider subdividing.

Aiken County IT / GeoServices

Copyright (C) Aiken County Government Aiken County makes no warranty, representation or guaranty as to the content, sequence, accuracy or timeliness of the database information provided herein. Users of this data are hereby notified that public information sources should be consulted for verification of the information contained on these maps. Aiken County assumes no liability for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in the information provided regardless of how caused, OR, for any decision made or action taken or not taken by any person in reliance upon any information or data furnished herein.

Spectacular 10 acre horse property with upscale owners apartment, four stall center aisle barn, board fenced pasture and run-in shed. The 2800 sq. ft. custom owners apartment that is under construction has 2 bedrooms, 3 baths, kitchen with granite, master suite on the first floor and lovely porch with views of the pasture. Easy drive to downtown Aiken. More acreage is available.

www.AikenHorseRealty.com (803) 215-0153 • suzy.haslup@gmail.com December-January 2020-2021

The Aiken Horse

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PRESENTING

MULBERRY HILL FARM Mulberry Hill Farm is literally the pinnacle of Aiken horse farms. Beautifully sited at the top of Folly Hill in Hatchaway Bridge Farms, this luxurious equestrian estate has the opulent design of an Italian villa. Hatchaway Bridge Farms equestrian subdivision offers its residents a private gated road, as well as community riding trails, a dressage arena and a jump field. The four stalls and wash rack at Mulberry Hill are located between the kitchen and The Tower. Each large stall has front and back Dutch doors, allowing easy access to mounting and to the grazing paddocks. The board-fenced paddocks are carpeted with lush grass and bordered by dense forested hedge rows.

exceptional views of the surrounding valleys, forests and farms. The many tower ‘extras’ include an art studio, a tack room, a private guest suite, and a covered sky-high viewing patio. The kitchen is spacious and well-equipped, with a flexible faucet at the cooktop, two wall ovens, granite countertops, and a large prep island with sink. The kitchen is open to the den, a relaxing room with gorgeous views, custom library shelves and a gas-log fireplace. The kitchen is open to the entertainment room, which has gorgeous views and new custom library cabinetry around the gas fireplace. The kitchen space includes an extensive pantry area and a wine cellar.

Mulberry Hill Farm is a 15.91-acre horse-lover’s estate with 5680 heated square feet of living space, including 5 bedrooms and 5.5 bathrooms. The 2008 residence is designed to allow a maximum of cool natural light, especially in the sunroom overlooking the pond and the family room overlooking the paddocks and swimming pool. Each bedroom has a tremendous amount of privacy. An elevator from the living room to the Master Suite offers accessibility to all owner residents. The three-story viewing tower offers

For information or for a private tour, call David Stinson and the Fine Homes of Aiken Team 803-640-0123. Financial pre-qualification required.

803 / 640 / 0123

The Aiken Horse

added in the pasture. And an elegant bookcase was recently built around the entertainment room fireplace. All 4 HVAC systems have recently been replaced with new Carrier units. Other recent improvements include a fountain added to the pond, remodeling of the chic tack room, and new carpeting installed on the 2nd floor. YOU CAN’T BUILD THIS STUNNING PROPERTY FOR THE $1,595,000 ASKING PRICE.

KELLER WILLIAMS AIKEN PARTNERS

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This farm has enjoyed exceptional maintenance by both owners. Since 2014, the current owners have added a new 3-car garage with epoxy floor and separate mower parking and workshop. A stone patio has been added to pool, as well as stone facing to the swimming pool wall. A special landscaping addition was the rainproof pergola beside the swimming pool. Downhill from the house and pool is a lovely new fern garden with attractive seating and gorgeous floral plantings. A second well has been installed just to feed the irrigation system. A new run-in shed was lately

The finest farms in Aiken, South Carolina. Call 803-640-0123 for estates, farms, homes & land.

December-January 2020-2021


HISTORIC HOME & STABLE in HORSE DISTRICT

8.64 acreS, 8-Stall center-aiSle barn, great turnout, StePS to HorSe Park renovated HoMe & gueSt HouSe, 6 br & 4½ batHS, SaltWater gunite Pool

1354 audubon | $2.845 Million

142+ ACRE RANCH in EDGEFIELD, SC

CALICO COTTAGE - 10.67 AC on HITCHCOCK WOODS

25 MooreS road | $3.1 Million

504 berrie road | $2,900,000

10-Stall Morton Stable, PeriMeter Fencing, PaSture in tiFton 85 berMuda 3 cuStoM HoMeS, 1500 SF entertainMent area, gueSt aPartMent

eMbrace HiStory & liFe on tHe WoodS! Zoned For HorSeS. WilliS irvin deSign, 7 bedrooMS, 5.5 batHS, gunite Pool & gardenS.

u/c WitH contingencieS – conSidering oFFerS tHat do not reQuire tHe Sale oF a HoMe.

1.89 PRIVATE AC. ON LAKE CARROL

CLOSE to DOWNTOWN AIKEN – 24+ AC. HORSE FARM

BIG TREE FARM - a FARM For ANY DISCIPLINE

118 FloWing Well road | $545,000

331 vintage vale road | $434,000

490 big tree road | $769,000

Stunning lake vieWS WitH your oWn dock & neigHborHood trailS. PriStine 5 br, 4 batH HoMe W/2-car & great outdoor living SPace!

EXCEPTIONALLY PRIVACY; WALK TO DOWNTOWN JaSMine cottage: beautiFully renovated W/SuPerb kitcHen & batHS encHanting gardenS, Pool & Fountain. 3 br, 3 ½ batHS & garage

129 colleton avenue SW | $1,150,000

LANE’S END in HOPELAND FARMS

6 acre Parcel - idyllic Setting For Hobby FarM or Private retreat eaSy acceSS to riding trailS; MinuteS to tack StoreS, vetS & training venueS

6 acreS on iMPleMent road | $175,000

6 Stall barn, WorkSHoP & 3-bay Pole barn 2 bedrooM reSidence attacHed to tHe barn & rv Hook uP

30+ AC. W/POND SITES, CREEKS & TIMBER FOREST enJoy Fig, Pecan & olive treeS, MuScadine & ScuPPernong vineyard & blueberrieS. 3 br, 2 ba FarM HouSe W/carPortS & MiSc. out buildingS

3578 Wagener road | $460,000

133+ ACRES WitH 2 PONDS in EDGEFIELD, SC

irrigated Hay FieldS in eStabliSHed tiFton 85 berMuda PeriMeter Fencing, level acreage ideal For Stick & ball or JuMP Field

MooreS road in edgeField | $995,000

58+ acreS, 15-Stall barn, ligHted arena, Polo or JuMP Field, PaSture 2 br, 2 batH living QuarterS, SeParate oFFice, 3+ car garage/WorkSHoP

AMBIANCE w/GREEN SPACE = SUPERB LIVING

Main level SoPHiSticated living: 2 br, 2½ ba W/outStanding kitcHen/

living W/FP, uPStairS cHarM: 2 br, 2 ba, Full oPen kitcHen/living rooM W/FP

enJoy courtyardS at 203 arbor terrace | $1,195,000

FOX HOLLOW on tHe LAKE

enJoy WaterFront living coMbined WitH tHe eQueStrian liFeStyle aMenitieS include riding trailS, dreSSage & JuMP arenaS & xc courSe

5+ acre ParcelS on lake ForeSt dr. | $90,540 & $91,080

Land for Sale barrington FarMS - ParcelS WitH trail acceSS 5+ to 24+ acreS - $57,000 - $157,000 tod’S Hill - 19 acreS - Pond & Partially Fenced - $235,000 aviation lotS at WexFord landing 5+ acreS Start at $44,000 on runWay

Cissie Sullivan

leWiS lane aSSociation ParcelS WitH trail acceSS neW layout – neW PriceS! HiStoric oakS, PondS, Fenced PaSture! 11+ acre tractS available

23+ acreS on linler lane cloSe to toWn $177,700 Wild oakS lane – 2.31 ac lot under contract Wild oakS lane – 3.58 ac lot under contract

Tracey Turner

803-998-0198 | SullivanTurnerTeam.com December-January 2020-2021

The Aiken Horse

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The Aiken Horse

December-January 2020-2021


BARBARA

December-January 2020-2021

The Aiken Horse

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SECTION 10 16 18 28

News & Notes Equestrian Murals FEI Showjumping 2020 in Review

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Our cover shows Andrea Torres Guerriero riding her own Anastasia in the FEI CSI** at Bruce’s Field. Split Rock Jumping Tour, November. Photography by Gary Knoll

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SECTION 40 44 48 52 54 56

Secret Lives: PJ Driving in Aiken Windsor Fall HDT H/J Trainer Teddi Ismond New Helmets for Polo Ask the Judge

Cathy Thomas with her navigator husband Peter Thomas pilot JD’s Fario out of the water. Windsor Fall HDT, Katydid Farm. Photography by Gary Knoll

`

SECTION

Galloping at the Aiken Training Track: Running Man, a 2018 gelding by Runhappy owned by Mark Grier under his rider, Jose Martinez. Photography by Gary Knoll

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64 66 69 70 72 75 82

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Kelso Breyer Horses Classifieds Directory Aiken Training Track Calendar Index of Advertisers

December-January 2020-2021


December-January 2020-2021

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

P.O. Box 332 • Montmorenci, SC 29839-0332 • 803.643.9960 • TheAikenHorse.com • TheAikenHorse@gmail.com Time Dated Material • Periodicals • Volume 16 • Number 3

Welcome to winter in Aiken. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the horse world is still humming along quietly here. It is true that we have had fewer events and competitions this year, and that our winter calendar is thinner than it has been in the past. However, Aiken’s horsemen are still diligently riding, driving, training and competing, even if those competitions might have fewer exhibitors than usual and no spectators at all. We were there to cover the action whenever possible, so those who missed their chance to watch the horses this fall can at least enjoy our pictures in this issue. And we did see many impressive horses and horsemen. Even with COVID-19, Aiken had new and exciting events this fall. Chief among these was the Split Rock Jumping Tour, which came to Bruce’s Field at the Aiken Horse Park in early November. Split Rock included Aiken’s first FEI level showjumping and attracted international riders as well as some of Aiken’s favorite competitors. You will find photographs from the Aiken International CSI ** in our first section. We also got out to the Aiken Training Track to watch young racehorses learning their trade, and to Katydid Farm in Windsor for the Windsor Fall Horse Driving Trials. This was an American Driving Society recognized competition that attracted a mostly local crowd of socially distanced drivers. You will find pictures from Windsor and from the track in sections two and three respectively. My favorite article of this issue is in section three. This is Mary Jane Howell’s piece about Breyer Horses, the model horses that most of us have owned and loved at some point in our lives. I was a Breyer horse collector as a child, and in fact Breyer horses provided me with my introduction to photography, as well as to writing, editing and producing

December-January 2020-2021

a regular publication. When I was about 12 or 13, my younger sister Cynthia and I became involved in the world of model horse photo showing, and then started our own model horse club called the New England Model Horse Association. Our club was listed in the Breyer Horse pamphlet Just About Horses that accompanied every model sold, and we soon attracted members from all over the country. The two of us created a monthly bulletin that we typed up and copied on a mimeograph machine in our basement and then sent out to our members. I don’t remember how long we ran that club before we got more involved in other things and went out of the model horse business. But, like most horse people, I still have some of my Breyers, and they always bring back fond memories. I was interested to learn more about them. We hope you enjoy this issue. Even though our world is unnaturally quiet right now, there is a sense that Aiken is ready to spring back to life as soon as COVID is under control. When things do finally go back to normal, perhaps our horses and horsemen will have benefitted from some extra schooling without the pressure of so much competition. If there is anything else good that has come from this difficult time, it is perhaps that we have all become more aware of how fortunate we are to be involved with horses, and how lucky we are to be here in Aiken where the horse culture is so vibrant. Our competition schedules may have been altered, but our horses can give us just as much pleasure as ever. When you are with horses, life still feels pretty normal, and it’s hard to beat that. Please drop us an email if you have any questions or suggestions, or if there is something or someone out there we should be covering. It’s a bit more difficult these days to know exactly what is new in Aiken’s socially distant horse world, so we are hoping everyone will help us out. We want to remain your horse newspaper. Enjoy your horses, have a great set of holidays, and let’s all hope that 2021 will be better than 2020!

The Aiken Horse EDITOR & PUBLISHER Pam Gleason

ART DIRECTOR Gary Knoll

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jean Berko Gleason

LAYOUT & DESIGN Gary Knoll

PHOTOGRAPHERS Pam Gleason Gary Knoll

ADVERTISING

803.643.9960 theaikenhorse@gmail.com

Going Out Of Town? Don’t miss future issues of The Aiken Horse. We will send you a one year subscription (6 issues) for $24.00. Send check or CC # & your mailing address: P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 Or sign up on the web at www.TheAikenHorse. com All contents Copyright 2020 The Aiken Horse

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

Pam Gleason Editor & Publisher

The Aiken Horse Policies: The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers, editors, or the policies of The Aiken Horse, LLC. The Aiken Horse is owned by The Aiken Horse, LLC.

The Aiken Horse

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News and Notes What’s Happening By Pam Gleason

FEI Show Jumping

This November, Aiken had its first FEI showjumping event when the Split Rock Jumping Tour came to the Aiken Horse Park. Split Rock is a horse show company based in Kentucky that prides itself in putting on international-level showjumping and hunter events with an emphasis on spectator appeal and hospitality for all. Derek Braun, an international grand prix showjumping rider himself, founded the company in 2015, holding the first shows at his own farm in Lexington, KY. The Split Rock calendar expanded quickly, adding FEI events, including World Cup qualifiers, at locations in Ohio, California, New Mexico and Texas. This year’s Aiken date was added to the calendar in February, before the COVID-19 pandemic hit the nation. It included the $100,000 Aiken International CSI** Grand Prix, as well as numerous USEF classes that gave Aiken riders the opportunity to compete in a new show. This was the first FEI CSI** in South Carolina, and the $100,000 purse was the highest showjumping prize ever offered in the state. The featured Grand Prix drew 42 competitors who rode under the flags of 10 different nations. (USA, Canada, China, Israel, Venezuela, Colombia, Mexico, Argentina, Australia and Ireland.) The horses and riders jumped a 1.45 meter course of fences set by the Brazilian course designer Guilherme Jorge, who was the designer for the showjumping courses at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Entrants were mostly new to Aiken, but did include some familiar horse and rider teams, such as Kris Killam with Gangster CHS, Doug Payne on Quintessence and Daniel Geitner, who had two rides, Fazous and Vesta de Lavardin. The course was challenging, resulting in just four double clear rounds. Two of those were from the Irish rider Richie Moloney,

who piloted Merqusio and Button Sitte, both grey Belgian Warmbloods to clean, fast performances. The third clear was from the American rider Abigail McArdle aboard Victorio 5 and the fourth from Aiken’s own Doug Payne riding Jane Dudinsky’s Quintessence, a 9-year-old bay Holsteiner gelding. The jumpoff course, described as “short, sweet and to-the-point” included eight straightforward jumping efforts with limited options for shortcuts to speed the track from fence to fence. Moloney set the standard early aboard the stallion Button Sitte, with a clear round and a somewhat careful time of 42.10. Payne went next, guiding Quintessence to a second clear and shaving off about three seconds to finish in 39.28. Richie Moloney took to the course again with Merqusio, riding aggressively to leave all the rails up and stop the clock 37.26. Abigail McArdle, the final rider, had her work cut out for her. She was clear, and she was fast, but not quite fast enough, finishing in 37.93 for second place, and dropping Doug Payne to third. Aiken’s horse show enthusiasts were impressed by the show, and local competitors were thrilled to be able to participate. The Split Rock Jumping Tour is an image-conscious and tech-savvy affair. Riders are required to wear show coats and white breeches, and to participate in mounted awards ceremonies after every class. All the classes are recorded by video and livestreamed, and all the livestreams are archived and available in perpetuity on the Split Rock app, a highly appreciated perk. Members of the community say that this type of show raises the standard for Aiken, and has already resulted in an increased desire among local riders to improve their own standards in order to be more competitive. This is a boon for trainers and instructors, as well as for people who have top-class horses for sale. While Aiken will always have many opportunities for entry level riders and green horses, there is always room to expand at the top and to establish higher aspirational goals. The Split Rock Jumping Tour organizers were thrilled with their reception in Aiken and have already applied for dates to return next year from November 10-14. The dates are currently pending approval from the USEF.

Eventing News

The USEF Eventing High Performance winter training lists are out, and the roster of “Elite” riders will be familiar to

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The Aiken Horse

anyone in Aiken. The Elite list, part of the Eventing Pathway Program developed by the chef d’equipe Erik Duvander, is for “athlete/ horse combinations demonstrating ability to contribute to medal-winning potential at World Championship level measured against worldleading performance.” This year’s list includes Phillip Dutton and the Zangersheide gelding Z as well as Boyd Martin on the 13-year-old Trakhener Tsetserleg TSF. Both of these riders are Aiken winter residents and “the usual suspects,” having competed on multiple US Olympic and World Games teams over the past decades. Two horse and rider combinations new to the Elite list have joined them, both with Aiken connections. The first is Liz Halliday Sharp on Deniro Z and the second is Doug Payne on Vandiver. (Both horse and rider combinations have been on training lists before, but in the “Pre-Elite” rather than Elite category.) Liz Halliday-Sharp, a California native who now who splits her time between Lexington, Kentucky and Ocala Florida is the USEA’s leading American rider in 2020 with nine international wins this year. A fast-rising star on the eventing circuit, she swooped in to win the Eventing Showcase at Bruce’s Field in Aiken in 2019 and 2020 and also won the CCI**** at Stable View this summer. (See her picture on the cover of the October-November 2020 Aiken Horse.) She was a reserve rider for the 2018 World Equestrian Games as well as the 2019 Pan American Games. Doug Payne, who is based in Aiken, has been competing at the top levels in eventing and in showjumping. He rode for the US team for the first time last year when he competed on the Pan Am team in Peru. The Olympic Games were canceled for 2020, but are still scheduled for next summer, 2021, in Tokyo. The following year, 2022, will bring the World Championships to Pratoni, Italy. Team selection for these events will be ongoing and based on many factors in the months leading up to the events. Horse and rider combinations selected for the Elite list have to be considered the very top contenders, while those on the Pre-Elite list also have hopes of earning a ticket. Boyd Martin and Doug Payne are both also on the Pre-Elite list with Luke 140 and Quantum Leap, respectively, giving them a deep string to pull from. In other eventing news, Aiken is looking forward to another exciting season, if conditions allow, with abundant horse trials, combined tests and schooling opportunities throughout the winter, spring and summer. The Aiken Horse Park will be holding regular dressage shows again as well as their very popular Tuesdays in the Park, which give riders the chance to practice their showjumping rounds over professionally designed courses on top quality footing. Dressage tests are also available. New this year, Paradise Farm will be holding similar Tuesday schooling days, with

December-January 2020-2021


dressage, stadium and cross country rounds available over a competition-ready cross country course. There will also be two unrecognized and one recognized show there this winter and spring. Sporting Days Farm, Full Gallop Farm and Stable View will have their own full schedules of recognized and unrecognized competitions. Stable View, whose calendar also includes hunter/jumper and dressage shows as well as recognized horse trials and their popular Eventing Academy, has some additional offerings, including the Boyd Martin/ETB Jump Schooling Cross Country Course for upper level horses and riders. Additionally, Stable View will be the site of the USEA Area III championships in 2021 and 2022. These will take place this year at the Stable View Summer Horse Trials between June 25-27, giving the Aiken area added importance in the eventing world.

Youth Polo on the Rise

Aiken has been a top polo destination for generations. Right now, it is also one of the best places in the country for youth polo. This is chiefly thanks to the tireless efforts of Tiger and Susie Kneece, who run Aiken Youth Polo, which is based for the winter at the polo arena at New Bridge Polo and Country Club. Tiger, who is the manager of Aiken Polo Club, is also the coach of the University of South Carolina Aiken men’s and women’s intercollegiate polo teams. Aiken Youth Polo also has two interscholastic teams and a middle school league. The New Bridge arena has been the site of numerous intercollegiate, interscholastic and middle school tournaments, with more to come in the future, once COVID is under control and restrictions are lifted. “We’re making a big push to get more middle and high school students involved,” says Tiger. “Kids don’t have to have any experience, and we make it super reasonable so that more kids can afford it.” Tiger teaches all levels and has his own string of lesson horses that double as mounts for the intercollegiate team. “The programs for the kids are going quite well,” he continues. “With the kids out of school they have more time, and we’ve found that the parents are comfortable with the program, since it is outdoors and in the open.” Tiger estimates that, including the intercollegiate and interscholastic teams, he has between 25 and 30 young people in the program. Interestingly, girls in the 12-13 year old range make up the biggest segment of his new recruits. “Girls at that age are already involved with horses, they’re strong enough to hold a mallet, and they’re competitive.” Girls have not always been welcomed with open arms in polo, although Aiken had active girls polo leagues in the 1920s and 1930s, far ahead of its time. These days, the percentage of polo players who are women has been growing

December-January 2020-2021

steadily, and it is no longer a rarity to see female players on teams in the big tournaments. In Aiken, women, particularly young women, have been not just visible, but dominant. For instance, a MidState Roofing team comprised of the 16-year-old Leitner twins Robyn and Reagan along with Hope Arellano (17) and her older brother Lucas (20), have been winning tournaments at Aiken Polo Club for two seasons now, putting away higher rated teams of older players with ferocious energy. Tiger’s own daughter Summer, a part of the interscholastic team, is also a fierce player who fills out the roster in many tournaments in Aiken. Having role models like this, coupled with the opportunity to learn though Aiken Youth Polo, will likely encourage more girls to take up a mallet, which bodes well for the future of women in the sport, and for the sport itself. Interested? Contact Tiger Kneece. Horses and equipment will be provided and there is no experience necessary. 803-646-3301; tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. Follow Aiken Youth Polo on Facebook.

Concrete Rose Sold

Concrete Rose, the 2019 Aiken Trained Horse of the Year, sold at the Keeneland November Breeding Stock Sale for $1.96 million this November. A daughter of Twirling Candy out of the Powerscout mare Solerina, Concrete Rose learned how to be a racehorse at the Aiken Training Track and then had a spectacular 2- and 3-year old career, winning six of seven races and over $1.2 million. Her wins included decisive victories in the grade 3 Florida Oaks, the grade 1 Belmont Oaks and the inaugural $750,000 Saratoga Oaks Invitational. She was retired in August of her 3-year-old year after suffering a hairline fracture of her right front leg – it was not a career ending type of injury and reportedly took several x-rays to locate and identify. Now 4, Concrete Rose is a stunning, wellbuilt bay with two white socks and the look of a champion. After recovering from her 3-year-old injury, she was back in race training this spring, but injured her ankle while playing in the paddock and so needed more time off. Although she was already entered in the November sale, as late as August her connections toyed with the idea of giving

her one more race before handing her over to her consigner, Lanes End Farm. In the end, she did not race, but was entered in the sale as a racing or broodmare prospect. “Concrete Rose is a once-in-a-generation elite athlete that everyone dreams of owning, said Brian Klatsky in an interview with The Blood-Horse magazine. Klatsky is the founding partner of BBN Racing, which owned the filly in partnership with Ashbrook Farm. “It’s been an honor and a privilege for all of our partners at BBN Racing to be associated with her.” Concrete Rose was sold to Larry Best’s OXO Equine, and she was the sales-topper. Best also purchased the second most expensive horse, Indian Miss, the dam of the champion horse Mitole, a winner of over $3 million. Indian Miss, 11, is in foal to the hot stallion Into Mischief, sire of this year’s Kentucky Derby winner Authentic (stud fee: $225,000) and went for $1.9 million. Best told The Blood-Horse that he had not intended to spend so much money on Concrete Rose, but that “I didn’t think I’d touch her below $2 million. . . She’s a beautiful horse and

you can’t take that record away from her. I’m just thrilled to have her.” Although he is not sure whether he will breed her this spring or not, his ultimate goal is to cross her with his grade 1 Continued on page 26

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Give them a Home for the Holidays

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We would like to honor and recognize our past client's "fur families" that we have found NEW homes for this past year in hopes that a reader will feel emotionally compelled to consider the possibilities of adopting, volunteering or donating to your shelter of choice this holiday season!

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Aiken’s Equestrian Murals Love of Horses on Display

By Nancy Johnson, Photography by Gary Knoll “When I heard about the mural contest, I knew immediately that I wanted to create a piece to celebrate Aiken’s horse community,” explains artist Erika Rogers. “But, instead of just focusing on one horse event, I decided to show that Aiken is home to so many different equine sports.”

Then she used a high quality, outdoor latex paint on panels that had already been primed. She notes that the panels are made of a PVC material that holds up very well outdoors, but tends to be a bit flimsy, especially in such large dimensions. What proved especially difficult for her was that the three separate panels were not affixed to the wall when

Rogers, who grew up in Graniteville and spent a lot of time in Aiken, fondly remembers having horses as a child. “I had a Tennessee Walker and an Arabian years ago and my husband and I are hoping to have horses again soon, as we just purchased a big piece of property.” Erika’s mural, consisting of three 4-foot by 8-foot panels, includes three distinct disciplines – polo, foxhunting, and racing. All of them are in action, but Rogers laughs as she admits, “The hounds are my favorite. I really wanted to portray them with movement.” And indeed, the foxhounds are in the forefront and appear to be running right towards you. The City of Aiken and the Arts Commission sponsored the contest, the winner of which earned the honor of painting an outdoor mural that would be displayed downtown for a year. Mary Rosbach, who is Aiken’s tourism supervisor, coordinated the project from the original call for artists all the way through the installation of the three large panels which now grace the back of the Municipal Building in the Alley, across from Mellow Mushroom’s outdoor dining. Mary explains the criteria to enter. “The subject was to be Aikenthemed and the artists had to have some connection to Aiken.” The Aiken Arts Commission reviewed the entries, which included mock-ups of the proposed designs. They selected two finalists. Then “We asked the community to help us make the final decision. Through voting on Facebook and Instagram, Erika was named the winner.” Although she is an accomplished artist, murals are new to Erika Rogers. “Working so big was really a bit of a challenge,” she says. She sketched out her design and then projected the image onto the panels.

she painted them. “I wound up attaching them to drywall sheets to work on as it gave them more stability,” she says. Erika says she worked in real estate and real estate management for 17 years. “During that time, it seemed like everything I did still included art. I was drawing plans for developers, tweaking floor plans, and shooting photos.” Rogers, who is expecting her first child in late December, explains that fertility issues made impending motherhood a long and challenging road. “Along the way, I tried to think what makes me happy and calm and that’s how I returned to art.” She found her way back to portraits, and then illustration jobs for children’s books started coming her way, as did book cover art. She hopes to keep doing “cool projects” that give her the flexibility to focus on her baby. “I absolutely loved doing the mural and would really like to do more of them.” Mary Rosbach says she is thrilled with the finished work. “We have so much foot traffic downtown, and outdoor art like this mural just give us something extra for everyone to enjoy,” she says, adding, “And Erika’s equestrian theme is perfect for Aiken.” Mary says the original idea was to change the mural out each year prior to the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, but Covid-19 has put a bit of a glitch in that plan. She was disappointed, especially for the artist, because the opening reception that was planned for April had to be cancelled and the mural’s installation was postponed until August. The revised plan is for Rogers’s mural to remain at its current location until February 2022. “We definitely want to have it displayed somewhere else in town after that,” Rosbach confirms. While the mural project was a first for Erika Rogers, public murals,

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as well as equestrian art, are very familiar to another local artist, Betsy Wilson-Mahoney. In 2018 the Aiken native was commissioned to create numerous murals to decorate another part of the Alley through Aiken’s Downtown Development Association. Several of these murals highlight Aiken’s love of horses, including three that depict horses hanging their heads over their stall doors. “They are not any horses in particular,” says Wilson-Mahoney. “I just painted them in a variety of colors and cute positions. The whole idea of the alley project is that once it is complete, you should be able walk through with friends and take some fun pictures. For example, holding out an apple in your hand for one of the horses to eat,” she suggests. But Betsy did paint one particular horse to honor one of Aiken’s most beloved equines, the racehorse Palace Malice. Most memorable among the Dogwood Stable-owned stallion’s many wins was the 2013 Belmont Stakes, making him a true hometown hero. “I called Anne Campbell to ask about painting a mural of Palace Malice,” WilsonMahoney recounts. Campbell approved of the idea and told WilsonMahoney that she and her husband Cot, the late president and founder of Dogwood Stable, would both be proud to have their renowned racehorse featured in a mural. “Anne was great! She invited me to her home where she showed me lots of photos of Palace Malice, which were so very helpful to me.” Wilson-Mahoney has a vibrant business doing portrait commissions as well as her own regular Aiken-themed projects, which include notecards and calendars. She explains that the horse murals in the Alley came together rather quickly as she has a great deal of experience painting murals. “I’d say each of the four horses took about two days,” she recalls. “Decorative art is a totally different approach than doing a portrait. For years all I did was decorative art; I didn’t do formalized art until I turned 40. “I first investigated materials to use on outdoor murals for a client about 15 years ago and found this PVC product to be the best for that purpose. I love painting on it – it’s absorbent, and not drippy. Anything that is wood is just not going to stand up,” she explains. The local business Signworks provides the sheets, primes them, and cuts them to spec for various installations around Aiken. “They don’t rot and hold paint well. I have some panels that were installed almost two years ago in very direct, bright sun and they still look great,” Wilson-Mahoney says. “Everything in the sun fades and degenerates, but so far we are very

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pleased.” Wilson-Mahoney is thrilled that another artist has added to the equestrian art to be enjoyed by those strolling downtown. “I love Erika’s mural!” she says with enthusiasm. “In fact, my 2021 calendar, Hindsight is 2020, includes a picture of it.” Below: Palace Malice hides out in the Alley, painting by Betsy Wilson-Mahoney.

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Split Rock Jumping Tour FEI CSI** action at Bruce’s Field

Photography by Gary Knoll and Pam Gleason


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news cont.

News & Notes from page 11 winner Instilled Regard, who is still racing but will eventually retire to stud.

Almost Home Groundbreaking

On October 19, Home For Good Dog Rescue held a ceremonial groundbreaking of its “Almost Home” wellness center on Whiskey Road. Home for Good Dog Rescue is a foster-based nonprofit dog rescue and adoption agency based in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. After making many trips to Georgia and South Carolina to rescue dogs, the founders of the organization selected Aiken as their southern base of operations. Several years ago they bought a small house on a parcel of land on Whiskey Road with the intention of building a state-ofthe-art wellness center and veterinary facility on the property. Now, after years of fundraising and preparation, construction has begun. When finished, (within the year if all goes according to plan) Almost Home will have two components. One will be a full-service veterinary clinic that will offer low-cost spay and neuter services to the public. The other, the Almost Home Wellness Center, will have housing as well as quarantine and treatment areas for dogs coming into the Home for Good program. According to a press release provided by the organization: “The Almost Home facility will offer a sanctuary for dogs too ill to make the journey to their forever homes, which are mostly in northern states. By vetting and caring for the dogs until they are well enough to travel,

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HFGDR will be able to rescue more dogs that would otherwise be left behind. In addition, Almost Home will enable us to build stronger partnerships with local animal control facilities to ensure that it becomes the ‘go-to’ location for dogs in crisis. . . It will expand upon the life-saving work done by HFGDR in South Carolina and Georgia in the ten years since the charity was founded. “Aiken was the natural choice for the new facility,” said HFGDR co-founder, Toni Ann Turco in the release. “Over the past ten years, we’ve developed strong relationships with many local residents, a number of whom have been fostering dogs. This development will not only prevent the unnecessary euthanization of many abandoned and unwanted dogs, but it will provide a central meeting place for all animal lovers in the community.” To date Home for Good Dog Rescue has saved and adopted out over 9,000 dogs. Dogs brought in from overcrowded shelters or desperate situations in the South are transported to New Jersey on a regular basis, where they stay with foster homes until they are ready for new homes. While Southern states such as South Carolina and Georgia generally have more dogs than eager adopters, the opposite is true for New Jersey where rescue dogs are at a premium. The result is that dogs that are unwanted here are usually in great demand as soon as their pictures hit the HFGD website. The entire HFGD board of directors flew

down to Aiken for the groundbreaking. They were joined by the co-founders Toni Ann Turco and Rich Errico, the veterinarian Dr. Clarence Bagwell who will run the clinic, as well as representatives from the construction company J.E. Stewart Builders and Studio 3 Design Group, the firms in charge of the project. Although HFGD has saved over 9,000 dogs, over the years there were close to 60 that they brought to their facility that were too sick or injured to be rehabilitated. Those dogs were cremated and their ashes were saved in individually marked containers. As part of the groundbreaking ceremony, the HFGD team scattered the ashes over the foundation. “We’d like to think that Almost Home will rise out of their ashes like a phoenix,” said Toni Ann Turco. (Visit homeforgooddogs.org for more information.) Aiken is already home to one of the most advanced and progressive animal welfare facilities in the South, the SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, as well as one of the most successful open admission shelters, the Aiken County Animal Shelter, which has earned national-level praise for its public/ private partnership with Friends of the Animal Shelter (FOTAS.) The addition of the Almost Home center will solidify Aiken’s leadership position in the animal welfare field while contributing to improvements in the care of companion animals throughout the region.

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2020 in Review

That Was the Year That Was By Pam Gleason

Look back on 2020 – if you dare. If nothing else, most people will admit that 2020 has been eventful. It has also been the strangest, most varied, most trying, most disappointing, and definitely the longest year in living memory. The year can be divided into three parts. First there was Before: January, February and the first week of March, when the “novel coronavirus” was something in China that affected a few cruise ships, the economy was good, and Aiken’s horse people were filled with optimism. Then there was The Shutdown in March and April, when the virus and COVID-19 disease appeared all over the country and Aiken’s horse world, like everything else, came to a screeching halt. Finally, there was The New Normal starting in May, when face masks became an indispensable fashion accessory, remote temperature checks were an accepted thing and everyone tried to figure out how to survive in an “uncertain time.” Although the Aiken horse world has definitely been severely affected

would be “excited.” Aiken’s horse world was thriving and horsemen were looking forward to new opportunities and exciting developments in the near future. For example, in January, the Aiken Steeplechase Association announced that it had finally found and purchased land for a dedicated steeplechasing facility and would begin work on creating a track and other amenities. The land deal came together through a partnership with the City of Aiken, and the horse world was enthusiastic about the prospect of adding another top class equestrian facility at the edge of city limits. The eventing world was hopping. At the Aiken Horse Park, organizers were preparing for the return of the Eventing Showcase to Bruce’s Field. This is a modified Advanced level horse trials with the cross country staged on a condensed track designed to maximize the spectator experience. The first showcase, held in 2019, attracted some of the top riders in the world, and the second was expected to be just as high octane. Outside the city limits, Stable View had a new March date for an FEI level event which would be run at the one-through-four-star level and was expected to bring in former and future Olympians. Other local eventing facilities were seeing record entries, and one of them, Jumping Branch Farm, had new owners who were getting ready to put

BEFORE: Bruce McGhee Memorial Harness Races on their first event. by the virus and its economic and social effects, as we move forward Aiken’s marquee eventing riders were especially keen for the winter toward 2021, we seem to be doing reasonably well. Horse shows, polo season since 2020 was to be an Olympic year. Some of Aiken’s winter matches, horse trials and driving trials resumed and were well attended, horsemen were virtual shoo-ins to make the Olympic team; others saw home and farm sales soared, and our area gained a reputation in the 2020 as the year they would have a legitimate shot to get there. The horse world as somewhere that was not badly affected by the virus. The Olympics were scheduled to be in Tokyo in August. Shelley Page, a result was that Aiken attracted new horsemen as fans and as residents, familiar face in Aiken as the organizer of horse trials around the area, and it brought in new competitions that will put it in an excellent was already packing her bags for a long stay in Japan to work at the position to grow and thrive once COVID-19 is finally vanquished. Games. Before Organizers were getting ready for Aiken’s traditional spring If there was one adjective that could be used about the Aiken Horse happenings. This year, there would have been six straight Saturdays of world in January and February 2020 it would be “optimistic.” A second spectator-friendly events, starting with the eventing showcase, followed

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by the Bruce McGhee Memorial harness races at McGhee’s mile, the Aiken Trials races at the Aiken Training Track, the Aiken Steeplechase, the Pacer’s and Polo polo match and then the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods. April would bring premier horse shows to Bruce’s Field and Highfields Event Center. The polo season would start in April, and players were solidifying their teams and legging up their horses. And until early March, everything went according to plan. COVID was already rearing its ugly head the first weekend in March when the eventing showcase came to Bruce’s Field, but it seemed far away and the show was not affected. The harness races went on as planned a week later. By Aiken Trials weekend, shutdowns were looming. On March 13, the day before the Trials, South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster declared a state of emergency, and the writing was definitely on the wall. The Trials went on, but with a subdued crowd. There was a growing realization that the spring season was effectively over.

financial hits of the spring, the professionals can certainly use the business. On the other hand, encouraging people to come into the area from places with a higher viral load seems like an open invitation for COVID-19 to rampage through the local population. As with the rest of the country, Aiken is split between people who believe it is possible to manage the risks and hold their shows and events, and those who see any unnecessary travel and social gatherings as irresponsible. Those in the middle recognize that outdoor horse events themselves appear to pose little risk of spreading the virus, especially with the mitigation strategies that have been mandated by the USEF. So far, there has been no claim that any equestrian event in the U.S. has acted as a “superspreader” event. The greater risk is that horse show and polo game attendees might spread the virus while staying in a hotel, or while shopping or eating downtown. As with many things in the United States these days, it can be a divisive and controversial issue.

Shutdown

Hope and Disarray

Aiken’s equestrian COVID cancellations started with the Aiken Steeplechase, followed quickly by Pacers and Polo and then the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods. When the United States Equestrian Federation suspended all recognized competitions for 30 days on March 16 (a suspension that was eventually extended to May 3), that put the kibosh on the remainder of the spring eventing season, as well as on the Aiken Charity Horse Shows and the Aiken Spring Classics. The USEF suspension, the governor’s order and new city ordinances ended competition in Aiken until early May. Equestrian activities still went on, however, since horses need to be fed and exercised, pandemic or no pandemic. Outside of city limits, there were some low key, socially distanced schooling horse shows starting in late April. By May, polo tournaments were being held at the three local clubs, offering some of the only spectator opportunities anywhere. As soon as the USEF restrictions were lifted shows and events started up again. Organizers did their best to accommodate exhibitors in what were generally termed “uncertain times.” For instance, at Stable View, they did away with late fees for their shows to make it easier for last minute entries to come in. For many equestrian professionals, the shutdown months were a devastating blow, especially coming as they did at the height of the season where event organizers make their living. Fortunately, there was some financial assistance available for horse businesses, including funds from the federal paycheck protection program, small business loans and even grants from the City of Aiken. National organizations sometimes stepped in, too. For instance, the United States Polo Association disbursed grants to clubs and polo professionals who “experienced significant financial distress from March 14 to May 31 due to COVID-19.” The USPA also offered prize money for the first two post-COVID tournaments of the season, which helped many clubs attract players.

The New Normal

Over the summer and into the fall, the Aiken horse world adapted to new rules and regulations. Following USEF guidelines, recognized shows required masks for anyone not on a horse. Most shows and events banned spectators, but some were more strict than others. At some facilities, anyone entering the grounds had to submit to having their temperature taken with a remote thermometer. Although South Carolina does have restrictions on “mass gatherings” and the city of Aiken has its own rules and regulations, this part of the country is considerably more open than many other places where horse people congregate. As a result, Aiken competitions have become especially popular for locals as well as for people who travel here from other areas. Some shows and horse trials in the early summer had double the number of exhibitors that they had in 2019. At Aiken Polo Club, there were 12 teams in the fall 6-goal and 4-goal, the largest entry of any tournament at the club since 2008. This is, of course, a double-edged sword. On the one hand, Aiken has always delighted in being an equestrian destination, and after the

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The year 2020 devastated many businesses and crushed some dreams in the horse world. Canceled shows meant disappointment to competitors for whom horse shows are a passionate hobby, and it also brought financial trouble to the people who rely on shows to make a living – the organizers, braiders, and workers who keep everything running. The cancellation of the Olympics disrupted the plans of athletes hoping to earn their place on the team. Junior riders missed out on what might have been their last year in the under-18s, or their final chance to go to the Pony Finals, which were called off at the very last minute after some positive COVID tests at the Kentucky Horse Park. Aiken’s high school polo players missed the interscholastic finals and their chance to compete in a youth tournament in Argentina. At the same time, however, the horse world, and particularly the Aiken horse world, proved itself to be more resilient than many people expected. Horse trainers report that, even with shows shut down, interest in lessons and in buying horses remained high – higher even than in a usual year. Rescue organizations say that the expected flood of unwanted horses never really arrived. In fact, some horses were in relatively short supply, such as off-the-track-Thoroughbreds – with racing still going on in many places, trainers were holding on to their stock. This is not to say that rescues are doing well: places such as Equine Rescue of Aiken are very much in need of donations to care for their horses and to assist needy animals. Monetary contributions have fallen off sharply due to COVID, especially since many of the things that the organization uses as fundraisers – parties, tours of the facility – have been put on hold. And this year the horse world in Aiken continued to grow, despite everything. Realtors were busy selling horse properties all year long. Properties that changed hands included some prominent facilities and some famous homes, with new equestrian professionals coming in to add their talents and energies to the horse world here. The Aiken hunter-jumper world made a significant step up in November when the Split Rock Jumping Tour came to the Aiken Horse Park, representing the first FEI level showjumping Aiken has seen. The tour already has plans to come back next year. This makes three disciplines in Aiken with FEI competitions: the area already has had international competitions in combined driving and eventing. Always known as a superior place to train horses, Aiken seems to be well on it way to becoming an international level multi-discipline horse show destination as well. Looking forward to 2021, most of the Aiken horse world is cautiously optimistic. There are still many challenges ahead, especially related to the COVID-19 pandemic, which is not yet under control, although vaccine news is encouraging. This winter and spring the horse world here is likely to experience further disruptions, and plans may need to change, sometimes at the last minute. But the horse community is strong, determined and growing all the time. The year 2020 may have been one to forget. With any luck, 2021, officially the first year of the new decade, will be one to remember.

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We know you have many venues to choose to spend your advertising dollars. We appeal to you to choose Great Oak, not only because we believe so strongly in our mission, but we also believe involving the community in our mission is vital to our success. Together, we can provide an essential marketing service, and provide you with advertising that creates a positive feeling with your target audience. We have a diverse range of individuals passing through our barn doors and viewing our content each day. Please join us in helping our community. To learn more about our Corporate Sponsorships visit: www.GreatOakEAP.org

Thank You

P.O. Box 1288 Aiken, South Carolina 29802 803-226-0056 www.greatoakeap.org

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Businesses shown above have contributed $1000 or more to Great Oak in 2020.

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developed with lots of imagination and plenty of Horse sense.

BRIDLE CREEK EQUESTR I AN COMMUN I T Y

From the developer of Three Runs Plantation comes another wonderful equestrian neighborhood in Aiken, South Carolina. Bridle Creek meanders across 600 wooded acres, featuring five-acre lots and larger. Amenities include a dressage arena, jump arena, X-Country Schooling area and an activity center with meeting, social and fitness space. All this plus miles of scenic trails. Phase One is already sold out, with more to come. Inquire today by calling 1-888-297-8881 or email info@bridlecreekaiken.com 600 Acres • Miles of groomed and marked trails • Jump arena • Dressage arena with mirrors • X-Country schooling area Activity/Fitness Center • Homesites from 5+ acres • From the developer of Three Runs Plantation HOMESITES INDIVIDUALLY PRICED • DEVELOPER FINANCING AVAILABLE • BRIDLECREEKAIKEN.COM Marketed by The Carolina Real Estate Company, Aiken, SC. Plans and prices subject to change without notice. This does not constitute an offer in any state where prohibited by law. No time requirement to begin construction.


Inside 40 44 48 52 54 56

Secret Lives: PJ Driving in Aiken Windsor Fall HDT H/J Trainer Teddi Ismond New Helmets for Polo Ask the Judge


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OFFICE: (803) 761-0678

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503 Chime Bell Church Road

Proudly Offered at $2,499,000 This spectacular equestrian estate amid 20 acres is an alluring blend of southern sophistication, timeless elegance, innovative design, and unparalleled craftsmanship. The main house features 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, a welcoming entry, parlor room, formal living and dining, family room, chef's kitchen and luxurious master suite. The upper level has 3 bedrooms, 2 bath and a sun-filled bonus room. The back terrace is perfect for relaxing poolside or watching the sun go down. The Pool/Guesthouse features an office/bedroom, 1 bath, REC room, pavilion w/ a well-equipped summer kitchen and fireplace perfect for quiet nights at home or entertaining friends. The equestrian amenities include a beautifully appointed 5 stall center aisle barn with all the needed amenities, a private ring, & large grass turn-out. In addition to the 3 car garage there is an annex barn with 3 bay storage & overflow stalls.

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Secret Lives of Horses

PJ: From Rodeo to Beach to Hunt Field By Nancy Johnson, photography by Gary Knoll

P

eople often wear various hats in the course of their lives. PJ, a 21-year-old Percheron-Paint cross, hasn’t worn any hats, but he has worn a variety of saddles, and even a harness. Bred in Missouri, PJ’s first career was performing as the opening act at rodeos. Along with another horse, he pulled a large wagon like those from the Wild West days. But one day there was a tragic accident. As a result, PJ’s driving partner had to be euthanized and PJ himself was left traumatized. Although PJ’s owner Lori Austin says the details are a bit sketchy as to how he made it there, PJ then wound up in Kauai, Hawaii, where he worked as a trail horse for tourists on the island. “I had recently bought, from a trainer, a 2-year-old that I planned to bring along,” Lori says. At that time, she lived in Hawaii herself. “Shortly after I took that horse home, I was diagnosed with MS. When the trainer learned this, she called and suggested that PJ might be a better fit for me at the time.” As it turned out, PJ was not working out especially well in the trail horse program. As a draft cross he could handle carrying people of all weights, had a great disposition, and was basically very quiet, but he had a pretty big spook that left a number of beginner riders on the ground. Lori bought PJ, who was then 13, and brought him to her home on the neighboring island of Oahu. “When I first heard [his name] over the phone, it sounded like Pajono, which reminded me of pajamas, so I started calling him PJ. Then, when I got his papers, I found that his name was actually Tejano, which is Spanish for Tex-Mex, describing people or culture from Mexico living in Texas.” But by that time, the horse was already PJ to Lori and her family, so, except for the nameplate on his stall, he’s known by his misconstrued nickname. For the next five years, Lori and her daughter both enjoyed riding the striking black and white gelding in Western tack through coconut groves and along spectacular beaches. Lori explains that while the scenery and weather are fantastic, keeping four horses in Hawaii just became too difficult. So in 2017 her family and the horses moved to Aiken. PJ flew to the mainland along with two of Lori’s other horses, and then, after a layover in Memphis, Tennessee, they were transferred to another trailer in Charlotte, North Carolina, finally arriving in Aiken. “He was phenomenal for the whole trip,” Lori recalls, “Which is kind of funny because he never has loaded that well into a horse trailer.” Once PJ settled in and Lori got the lay of the land around Aiken, she determined foxhunting would be their next adventure together. PJ adapted well to the new discipline and Lori soon joined the Whiskey Road Foxhounds. “He’s not a forward horse, but he’s just awesome foxhunting!” she says. Lori explains, however, that they stay with the non-jumpers in third flight. “PJ has made it clear that he thinks jumping

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is crazy. If it’s a regular log on the ground, that is fine, but anything else and he will just slowly come to a stop and step over.” A couple of years ago, Lori sought help from the local trainer Lauren Gibson to ride PJ and get him legged up for her to hunt. “We wound up remodeling him a bit,” Lauren says with a smile. “We put hind shoes on him, developed his topline and just got him more symmetrical and stronger.” Lauren explains that due to Lori’s physical limitations from MS, “PJ has to carry her; really be a bit of a therapy horse and keep himself under her. He’s just a saint of a horse.” Recently, Lori and PJ have been getting some more disciplined dressage training from Lauren Gibson. Improving PJ’s transitions is a focus in their lessons, since the smoother he is, the better it is for Lori’s balance issues. Lori says that PJ is an ideal partner for her because “He always wants to please people and is what I call human conscious. With my MS, I can feel faint and occasionally fall when dismounting. PJ is very intuitive and will just stand like a rock and wait for me. He’s always been very aware of humans and where they are. He will never step on you or get in your space.” Since moving to Aiken, PJ has lived on Lori’s small farm. There are currently three other horses on the property, but according to Lori, despite his age, PJ is still alpha male. “Knowing he is 21, I am cautious with PJ, but don’t plan to retire him until it’s time. He is definitely my all-time favorite horse,” Lori says. Although she also rides her younger mare, Lori explains that she must be on her game to do so safely. “If I am the least bit tired, I know I can’t ride her, but no matter how tired or fatigued I am, if I can get on him, I can ride PJ.”

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Aiken Driving World Still Cruising By Pam Gleason

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riving enthusiasts in Aiken say that their sport can provide an ideal distraction from the COVID-19 pandemic. Driving a horse gets you out in the open, breathing fresh air and far away from other people. The Aiken Driving Club, which is celebrating its 35th anniversary this year, has had to curtail some of its social activities, but driving itself is still going strong. “We’re quietly entertaining ourselves,” says Peggy Dils, who is the president of the club. “I think that in the horse industry in general it is a little bit easier for us because we can be outside with our horses and we are not really in much contact with other people. We can get out in the woods and go driving on the roads. Social distancing is easy.” The club has been able to have a number of organized outings, educational seminars and a few competitions over the summer and fall. “We are all COVID conscious,” Peggy explains. “And the USEF and the American Driving Society have guidelines that they are pretty strict about. Of course, none of our events have been able to have spectators, which is a little challenging. But even though we can’t have spectators, we can have volunteers, so volunteering is one way to get out and enjoy a

competition.” To celebrate their 35th anniversary, the Aiken Driving Club held a fall weekend of pleasure driving from November 7-8. This included a drive through Katydid Farm in Windsor on Saturday and a second outing at the Silver Bluff Audubon preserve along the Savannah River on Sunday. Both events were well attended with about 25 carriages at Katydid and 72 drivers and friends of the club at the Audubon event. Other recent drives included the Windsor Trail Rock Hunt over the summer, in which drivers tried to locate 20 painted rocks on their drive in a type of treasure hunt that has become quite popular. There have been cones and marathon clinics at Katydid Farm, as well as several horse driving trials recognized by the American Driving Society. The Windsor Fall Horse Driving Trial in mid-November attracted 35 competitors, most of them from the local area, but a few from farther afield. “It might have been the most well attended HDT in the country so far this year,” comments Peggy, who says that most driving trials have been canceled, and that those that have run saw a smaller number of entries than usual. “People are hungry to get out,” she continues. “Everything we do, we follow the American Driving Society and USEF guidelines, wearing masks and maintaining social distance. The club is doing pretty well. We have about 180 members, with about 80 of

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them being active in driving. We have a wonderful volunteer base, good friends, some retired drivers and a few new young drivers coming along. It’s a nice group.” The Aiken driving community’s marquee event did not happen this year, however. The first weekend in November has traditionally brought much of America’s competitive carriage driving world to Windsor for the Katydid Combined Driving Event, a major competition that has often held the national championships for various different USEF divisions. However, Katydid Farm, where the CDE has been held, is currently for sale after the passing of its owner, Katrina Becker in 2019. With the fate of the venue uncertain, the ADS Volunteer of the Year. Katydid CDE found ottie Paul, a member of the Aiken Driving Club a new home at the for 20 years, was recently named the American Tryon International Driving Society “Volunteer of the Year.” Dottie, who Equestrian Center grew up riding horses in various disciplines on the in Mill Spring, NC West Coast, came to the Aiken area in 2000 because as well as a new date she was attracted to the growing driving community in the spring. The here. She was especially well known for many years first Tryon-based because of her fabulous driving mule, Tammianne, Katydid CDE who made up a tandem with her Morgan driving was scheduled for pony QC. In her driving career, she showed through April 2020, but the Advanced level, and acted as a groom at grassroots was canceled due shows all the way to the World Championships. to the pandemic. Now in her 80s, Dottie remains active in the driving Jennifer Matheson, community and is well known all over the country. an international “Dottie was awarded this honor because she is the driving competitor epitome of what volunteering is all about,” according who organizes the to the Aiken Driving Club newsletter. “Volunteers are event, is also running the backbone of our sport; without them none of our a second CDE at driving events could take place.” Tryon in the fall. This competition, the Tryon Fall CDE, took place as planned in September. “It went well,” says Jennifer. “It’s an excellent facility and they are a great organization to work for.” The Windsor area east of Aiken remains the nexus of the carriage driving world here, with a number of well-known competitors making their winter (or their year-round) homes at farms surrounded by horsefriendly dirt roads. This winter, there will be several additional low-key horse driving trials, as well as the Windsor Trace Combined Test in March. If the COVID situation improves, the Aiken Driving Club will hold a new driver clinic to introduce more people to the sport sometime in the early spring– one was scheduled for last March, but canceled due to the pandemic. Next fall, Windsor will be the location of the ADS North American Preliminary and Intermediate Championships, which will be held at the Windsor Trace CDE November 4-7. Jennifer Matheson says that she is eager to see more people get involved in the sport, explaining that the driving trials and clinics she has been running locally are very much at the grass roots level. “I want people to recognize that this is very approachable and very doable,” she says. Peggy Dils agrees. “We’d love to have more people get involved,” she says. “If people are interested, they can go on our website; you can join the club, come out and volunteer. We’d really love to have you.”

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For more information, visit the Aiken Driving Club website: www. aikendrivingclub.com

December-January 2020-2021


The award was presented to Dottie by Lisa Singer, the ADS vice president, who lives in Windsor. In announcing the award, Dan Rosenthal, who is the ADS president, said “One of the great pleasures of being the president of the ADS is getting a chance once a year to recognize some of the amazing people who give so much to the sport of carriage driving. This year the ADS is recognizing Dottie Paul as our volunteer of the year. On behalf of the board of directors and all your fellow carriage drivers in the Aiken community and throughout the United States, I offer Dottie my sincere congratulations for this well deserved recognition and our thank you for all that you have contributed over the years. “We received a record number of requests from drivers all over the US and from Canada suggesting that Dottie be recognized in this way and it was the board’s great pleasure to fulfill these requests.”

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Windsor Fall Horse Driving Trial at Katydid Farm

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Trainer Teddi Ismond

New in Town By Nancy Johnson, photography by Gary Knoll

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uring Teddi Ismond’s career as a trainer in the hunter/ jumper world, she has lived in some famous and prestigious horse country – Keswick, Virginia, as well as Wellington and Ocala, Florida for instance. But she recently opted to make Aiken the home base for her business. “I chose to move to Aiken because I saw a great opportunity to be part of a wonderful horse community,” she says. “With all the A shows at Bruce’s Field, you can actually go home at night instead of living in a hotel, which appeals to me quite a lot,” she adds with a laugh. For Teddi, it is not just shows at Bruce’s Field that are enticing, but the fact that Aiken offers several other show grounds, all with good footing and courses. The showing opportunities are both plentiful and accessible. “Highfields also has A shows and they, as well as Stable View, have lots of nice schooling shows for young horses. There is literally something going on every week that won’t break the bank when you are bringing up young ones.” Having so much variety in Aiken really appeals to her, not only for young horses, but also for her clients. “I have some adults who might not want to compete at the “A” shows, but still want to go to a few nice shows, and then I have some that are very competitive and for them there are basically two A shows every month. The quality of facilities here is certainly growing in leaps and bounds, which is so attractive to me as a teacher and a trainer.” As a junior, Teddi rode with legendary trainer George Morris for a time, and then her parents built a farm in Ohio and hired the top horseman Bernie Traurig. Teddi rode with Traurig for five years during which time they had several Hall of Fame horses and top Grand Prix jumpers. “I was so lucky that I had great parents who realized that [working with horses] was what I wanted to do; they loved it and it became a lifestyle for them as well,” she says. Teddi then spent eight years in Wellington working at Palm Beach Polo Club with Mason Phelps. In 1998, she moved to Keswick, Virginia where she ran her own show barn, Hunting Valley Farm. For the next 20-plus years, she taught riders from short stirrup all the way through the pinnacle of the hunter, jumper, and equitation ranks from her home base in Keswick as well as from two satellite farms in Richmond and Culpeper. While she herself is a very good rider and likes bringing along young horses, Teddi particularly enjoys teaching. While she was in Virginia, Teddi traveled to Aiken occasionally to conduct clinics. “I met a group of people here that I kept in touch with,” she says. One of the people she met through her clinics was Amy Hebert, the owner of Aiken Saddlery. “Amy wound up sending her horses to me in Virginia and now I’m finally teaching her here in Aiken. “Last spring, I just decided Aiken was really up and coming, and committed to make the move,” Teddi continues. Since arriving in June, she has already built up a considerable clientele, teaching at several local facilities as well as at private farms in

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the area. She plans to lease a barn in the spring, where she will take in a few horses for training and offer a small, select group of sales horses. Teddi emphasizes, “I don’t want to have too many in training because I feel it is very important to give those horses the attention they need. Although I will branch out a little more into training, teaching is my passion, so that will always be first and foremost for me,” Teddi is comfortable teaching riders of all levels on both hunters and jumpers as well as juniors doing the equitation classes. “I have a bit of everything student-wise, except right now I don’t have any pony children. I like to teach kids as well as adults. It seems my mix changes every four years; you never know what you are going to have,” she says. She already has a pretty full lesson schedule. “I typically teach about five lessons, five or six days a week. Some of Teddi’s clients, including several from Chicago and Vermont, just sent their horses to her farm in Ocala to prep for the upcoming winter shows at the new World Equestrian Center there. Teddi’s daughter, Taylor Harpman, is in Ocala getting the farm prepared and will be managing the horses over the winter. Teddi’s son, Chaz Harpman, is also a professional and is based in Wellington. “Taylor is a huge help with clients at the horse shows; it surely makes my job a lot easier,” Teddi says. She plans to go back and forth from Aiken this winter. “Some of my Aiken clients may come down to show, but others won’t; it’s not a prerequisite for me at all,” she says Although she has been an “R” judge for a long time, Teddi says, “I don’t do as much judging as I used to because teaching is taking preference for me and I don’t want to be away that much.” Teddi enjoys teaching clinics and recently held one at Aiken Equine Rescue, sponsored by Aiken Saddlery. “It was great fun. We focused on form and function; how a rider’s form affects the horse’s function.” Cat Koman, a health coach who owns Pilates, Performance & Wellness in Aiken, worked with Teddi in evaluating the riders. “The clinic was so well received that I am hoping to do another one in March or April. My plan is for another surprise clinician to join me and Cat,” she says. “I’m a little different than some of the big trainers in that I will go to the customer,” Teddi explains. “They don’t have to board with me to ride with me. And I don’t just teach show riders, which is a surprise to a lot of people because they assume with my background that I wouldn’t want to teach others, but I do and really love it. “Aiken is an amazing place for horsemen! There is so much to do, and I have already made so many new friends,” Teddi says with enthusiasm. “The best part is that everybody here loves their horses. It’s such a breath of fresh air.” Contact Teddi Ismond through her website, huntingvalleyshowstables.com, Facebook or at 804-307-0531.

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New Rules; New Helmets Polo Strives for Safety By Pam Gleason

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f you plan to play polo in 2021, you probably need a new helmet. This is because the United States Polo Association is finally implementing a rule requiring players at all levels and in all tournaments and club events to wear a helmet that has passed the most stringent and demanding safety standard of any equestrian head gear. This standard was established by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE – generally pronounced “noxy.”) Helmets that pass the latest NOCSAE polo standard must be able to sustain major impacts from any direction, as well as to absorb multiple minor blows without damage. This differentiates polo helmets from helmets used in most other equestrian sports. A helmet certified by the USEF or the Pony Club, for instance, can protect the head in one significant fall, and then you are supposed to replace it. A certified polo helmet, on the other hand, must be able to keep working after multiple falls, providing a level of protection similar to that of a football helmet. As a sport, polo is a late-comer to world of certified helmets. The USPA has been supporting helmet research ever since 1978 when the organization hired Dr. Voight Hodgson of Wayne State University in Detroit to test helmets and establish safety standards for them. Helmets are tested by being fitted with a weighted dummy head and then dropped onto an anvil from various heights and at different angles. Sensors on the dummy head measure how much impact the head sustains, and then a “Severity Index” (SI) is calculated for each area of the helmet. Starting in 1979, Polo Magazine began publishing charts that showed the different SI ratings of commercially available helmets, letting players decide what kind they wanted to wear. Traditional polo helmets in the 20th century were modeled after the pith helmets the British once used to protect their heads from the sun in India. They were canvas-covered cork hats, later supplemented by a thin layer of plastic and with some cloth padding inside. They typically were loosely secured by a chin strap, and provided very little significant protection, even if they stayed on the player’s head in a crash. And yet, for many decades, they remained the most popular models on the field, even when relatively safer helmets started hitting the market. As with most equestrian sports, head injuries are the most significant and serious risks to polo players, and are the type of injury most likely to lead to serious disability or death. Because of this, the Safety Committee of the USPA has been debating for decades how to make sure that players have access to and wear safer helmets. The first NOCSAE standard for polo helmets was published in 1990. The standard was revised in 2004, and then again in 2011. The USPA resisted requiring helmets to pass any tests for many years, but in September 2008, the organization announced that they were officially adopting the 2004 NOCSAE standard, and that all players would have to wear a certified helmet in any game or practice. At that time, there were only three helmets available that could pass (two made by Bond Street in England and one made by Falcon in Argentina), so the organization announced that the helmet rule would not be implemented until January 2012. Three years seemed like a reasonable amount of time to allow helmet makers to design and manufacture safer models, and to get players to adopt them. But by the time 2012 rolled around, it was clear that polo was not yet ready for NOCSAE. A handful of helmets could pass the test but were bigger and heavier than regular helmets, and few players wanted to wear them. The number of polo players is relatively small and the cost associated with designing and testing a polo helmet are quite high, so there was little incentive for helmet makers to invest their time and money in making a NOCSAE compliant helmet. Several companies did devote themselves to trying, and occasionally new models came on the

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The Charles Owen Sovereign market – only to disappear within a few years. When the USPA took another stab at requiring a NOCSAE helmet in the fall of 2017, there were zero models on the market that could pass new the test. Once again, the organization kicked the can down the road, announcing that the helmet rule would be implemented in June 2020, while also offering grants to helmet manufacturers to design and produce compliant helmets. This summer, because of disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, implementation of the helmet rule was delayed again, this time until January 2021. Currently, there are two recently designed NOCSAE polo helmets on the market: the Casablanca NEU and the Charles Owen Sovereign, with a few more from different manufacturers in the pipeline. Older NOCSAE approved helmets from the previous standard are not compliant. The USPA helmet rule is set to go into effect on January 1. The current NOCSAE rated helmets have significant advantages over their predecessors. A main reason for this is that modern high tech materials provide superior impact protection with significantly Casablanca NEU

December-January 2020-2021


less bulk and weight. The Casablanca Neu has a carbon fiber outer shell and is lined with expanded polypropylene and D30 Decell, a material originally created for military applications that has a unique ability to resist shock. Although the company says that the helmet is 9% bigger than their standard helmet, it still has a low profile and is actually the lightest helmet they have manufactured. The Charles Owen features a carbon fabric outer shell, which provides extra protection again crushing and is lined with Viconic Sporting, an energy absorbing material that is used in football and lacrosse helmets. Neither of these helmets is inexpensive. A standard cloth-covered Casablanca has a retail price starting at $590 (it is more for leather and for various customizations) while the Charles Owen goes for $599. Both companies recommend that players get fitted for their new helmets rather than just buying them online, and players are strongly encouraged to place their orders as soon as possible, since it would be very possible to overwhelm either or both companies if everyone tries to get theirs all at once. In early December, representatives from both companies held a well-attended fitting for Aiken’s players at New Bridge Polo and Country Club, ensuring that Aiken players will be equipped before the season here starts in March. Will these helmets be better accepted than earlier models? Although reviews of the new models themselves have been good, polo players are not a group that especially likes being told what to do, and there are some in the community who still argue that players should be allowed to make their own safety choices. Some also call the benefits of the NOCSAE standard into question, chiefly using the argument that the helmets have been certified through laboratory testing, but have not yet been field tested, and may not be as good as some other helmets in actual playing conditions. Pushback against the helmets has included such things as a Change.org petition to delay or scrap the new rule, which garnered about 1,000 signatures back in February. In 2018, the British-based Hurlingham Polo Association, which is the governing body of polo in essentially every country except Argentina and the United States, implemented its own helmet rule. This required polo helmets to adhere to the same safety standards as those accepted by the British Horse Racing Authority. While British players generally accepted the new rules, there was a minor revolt when the Argentine high goal players came to town that spring and insisted that they would not trade their noncompliant helmets for ones that passed the British

December-January 2020-2021

standard. Eventually, the Argentines relented and followed the rules, but not before playing a prestigious game without them and incurring no penalty. Will there be a similar “Helmet Gate” at clubs in Florida this winter, or here in Aiken in the spring? The USPA is determined that there will not be. At the beginning of each game, umpires have been instructed to examine every player’s helmet to ensure that it bears the current NOCSAE logo (so don’t peel that thing off !) and players have been told that if they need to change their helmets during the game, they must show the replacement helmet to the umpire when they go back on the field. Clubs are specifically not allowed to waive the new helmet rule. Furthermore, any team that has any player who competes for any amount of time without a compliant helmet will automatically forfeit the game. Given these new rules, it seems unlikely that a “helmet denying” movement would gain much traction in the long run, although it is probable that there will still be players who object to the lack of choice as well as to the high cost of the new helmets. In the end, it is also true that there has been a dramatic increase in awareness of head injuries in all sports, and protective gear has become much more appreciated in all horse sports. Given this atmosphere, it seems likely that firmly mandating certified helmets will lead to rapid and broad-based acceptance of them, just as safer helmets were accepted in other professional sports such as football and hockey, even if there was resistance at first. Improvements in helmet design and technology will likely follow in the coming years, leading to more comfortable and attractive head gear that will also provide superior protection for players everywhere. Safer helmets might even become more affordable. Polo players, especially high goalers, can have outsized egos, but in the end even they will agree that they have only one head, and they need to protect it.

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Ask the Judge

Questions about Dressage With Amy McElroy

Amy McElroy is an FEI competitor, and a USEF S judge. She is qualified to officiate at any USEF recognized national show at all dressage levels. She rides, trains and teaches at Fair Lane Farm in Aiken and judges between 15 and 20 dressage and eventing shows each year. In her popular Ask the Judge column, she answers readers’ questions about dressage. Do you have a question for Amy? Send her an email at McElroyDRM@aol.com, or visit her website: www.amymcelroy.com.

Dear Amy,

I am currently competing at First Level dressage and I am just starting to work on a First Level musical freestyle. Can you tell me how these tests are scored and what the judge is looking for in a winning freestyle?

Dancing with Horses Dear Dancing,

Freestyles have become very popular, and a freestyle is a great way to showcase your horse’s best qualities at each of the levels. It is a lot of work putting together a winning ride, but it is well worth it in the end. In addition to planning creative patterns you will need to incorporate music to enhance your routine and to match your horse’s gaits and rhythm. When a judge evaluates a freestyle test, the scoring is divided into two separate sheets: one for the technical and the other for the artistic aspect. The technical sheet includes only the compulsory movements and does not take the music or choreography into account. Technical marks are given in half or full points, (for example, 6.0 , 6.5., etc.) , similar to a standard dressage test. The artistic sheet consists of five categories which can be considered similar to the collective marks. This side of the test takes both the music and the technical performance into account. The scores for artistic merit may be given in tenths (for example 6.2., 6.3 etc.) The technical and artistic scores are combined together to arrive at your final percentage. Important reminders when composing a freestyle: All USDF freestyles (Training through Fourth Level), have a maximum time limit of 5 minutes but there is no minimum time. Unfortunately, any movements presented after the time limit will not be counted and will also incur a one-point penalty from the artistic side of your test. Timing begins after your first halt and salute, unlike a standard test which starts when you enter at A. Your freestyle test ends with your final salute. When riding a freestyle you are not required to submit your test to your judge. You are the only one who knows it, so be very certain the movements you perform are easy to recognize. Your judge will be looking for the following required movements on the technical side of a First Level freestyle: medium walk and extended walk (both must be 20 continuous meters), 10-meter working trot circle (left and right), leg yield (left and right), trot lengthening on a straight line, 15-meter canter circle (left and right), change of lead through the trot (left and right), canter lengthening on a straight line, halt with salute on the centerline at the start and finish. On the technical side you will also have a single scoring box for rhythm, energy, and elasticity, similar to the standard test collectives, gaits, impulsion, submission, but combined into a single score. In your freestyle, the only movement with a coefficient of two is the free walk. As in a standard First Level dressage test, you may elect to rise or sit the trot. The artistic side has five scoring boxes. These are Harmony between horse and rider (this has a coefficient of three), Choreography (coefficient of four), Degree of Difficulty (coefficient of two), Music (coefficient of three) and Interpretation (coefficient of three.) All USDF freestyles have the same five artistic scoring boxes. So what is your judge hoping to see when evaluating the technical aspect of your freestyle? Your judge wants to see a horse that is solid

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and reliable at his level. A First Level horse should show correct basics, have developed thrust, balance, and thoroughness, and should be able to maintain a consistent contact with the bit. You should make sure you perform all the required movements at least one time. There is no limit on how many times you can perform any particular movement. Each time you show a movement, you will be awarded a score. Your final score for the movement will either be the highest score you achieved or the average of all your scores for that movement, rounded up at the judge’s discretion. For example, if you perform a leg yield left three times and you receive a 6.5, 7.0, and 7.0, you might get a 7.0 for your final leg yield score. You want your routine to be as creative as possible, and not to look like a standard First Level test. It is also advisable to make your freestyle more difficult than the hardest test of your level, in this case First Level test three. You are allowed and encouraged to use unique lines, curves and turns. In addition to the compulsory movements, you are also allowed to do counter canter, including a serpentine, lengthenings on curved lines (as long as you also do one on a straight line) leg yields in any configurations, and circles any size 10-meters or larger. Here are some suggestions to increase the level of difficulty: leg yields on steeper angles, zig-zags in leg yields, interesting transitions, moves on the centerline and quarter line to name a few. Try to be original! What is your judge hoping to see when evaluating the artistic merit of your freestyle? You will be judged on the five elements. 1. Harmony: When giving you a score for harmony, your judge is taking the technical aspects of your performance into consideration as well as the gaits, submission and impulsion. You and your horse should show trust, confidence, and ease. 2. Choreography: Your choreography score includes such factors as whether you use the entire arena, whether the patterns you perform are easy to understand, and how creative you are, not relying on familiar test moves. 3. Difficulty: When judging the difficulty, your judge wants to see a ride that is at least as difficult as First Level test 3, and better yet, is more difficult. 4. Music: Your music score evaluates how well the music suits each gait and movement. Ideally, the music should complement the gaits. It’s a good idea to have different music for the walk, trot, and canter tours, though you should stick with one genre or style of music. The editing of your musical accompaniment is also taken into account in your score. 5. Interpretation. Your interpretation score evaluates the relationship between the music and the movements. Your music should start before you enter the arena, although your routine officially begins after your salute. You will impress your judge if you keep your test interesting and entertaining as soon as you move off from your halt. Keep in mind you can halt and salute anywhere, as long as you are on the centerline. Try to find music that suits you and your horse and keep it upbeat – it should not sound like background music. Although you want to make sure your freestyle is difficult for your level, don’t make it too difficult. Be certain you are able to successfully perform all the patterns you have created and do not include any movements or transitions that are not found in First Level. Movements that are above First Level will be penalized with a deduction of four points from the technical score. The rulings for equipment and attire are the same as in a standard dressage test. I hope you have fun with this ride!

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There was a Horse Named Kelso Aiken Trained Super Horse By Pam Gleason

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hen Kelso was born on April 4, 1957, his general appearance did not inspire confidence. The first foal of his dam, Maid of Flight, the dark brown colt was skinny and undersized. In addition to his unprepossessing appearance, his temperament was difficult and he didn’t have the most impressive breeding. True, Maid of Flight was a respectable racehorse and the daughter of the Triple Crown winner Count Fleet. But his sire, Your Host, was a little regarded stallion best known for his crooked head carriage, the result of a spinal injury when he was a foal – his nicknames on the track were “sidewinder” “twister” and “magnificent cripple.”

But if ever a horse caught lightning in a bottle, it was Kelso. When he finally retired from the track at age 9, he was one of the most celebrated racehorses of the century and racing’s all-time leading money earner. He was named Horse of the Year a record five times in a row, from 1960 until 1964. He was the Champion 3 year old in 1960 and the Champion Handicap Horse every year from 1961 through 1964. He won the Jockey Club Gold Cup five times, the handicap triple crown, and at the age of 7, set a world record for two miles on the dirt that still stands today. Just 11 days after that race, he set an American record for 1 1/5 miles on the turf in the Washington D.C. International. He won the Stymie handicap in 1962 and then again in 1965, when he was 8. An iron horse who could win over every surface and at any distance, he

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beat the toughest horses of his generation, including every 3-year-old champion for five years, often carrying in excess of 130 pounds. Almost any ranking of the greatest racehorses of the 20th century has Kelso near the top, behind Man o’ War and Secretariat, usually, but almost always in the top 10, and often in the top five. Cot Campbell, the late founder and president of Dogwood Stable in Aiken, rated him number one. Bred by Allaire DuPont and owned by her Bohemia Stable, Kelso came to the Aiken Training Track over the winter each year with his trainer Carl Hanford. Not only did he keep fit with daily outings on the track, he sometimes also made appearances at the Aiken Trials. “Aiken’s most distinguished winter visitor,” would gallop over the sand in an exhibition that was usually the most talked about event of the day. Born in Kentucky, and with a home base at Mrs. DuPont’s 1,200 acre Woodstock Farm in Maryland, Kelso was also an Aiken horse, and likely the best racehorse ever to tread the city’s soil. Kelso’s inauspicious start as a scrawny, hot tempered colt was paradoxically one of the main reasons why he became such a famous racehorse with such spectacular longevity. He was so difficult to ride when he was first put under saddle, that he used to throw his riders on a regular basis. Because of this, and in an effort to spur his growth, he was gelded before his second birthday. This act, depriving him of a stud career and the racing world of his genetic material, also gave him a long racing life – if he had been a stallion he would likely have retired to the breeding shed by his fifth birthday, before completing some of his most impressive feats. Gelding him did seem to promote his growth: eventually he matured to 16 hands – not small, but not big either. He never gained much bulk, always looking sleek and spare – he was often compared to a greyhound, or to a deer. As he grew older, his manners improved, but he was never an easy horse. He was particular about who rode him, and he was very strong – he wanted to run and did not like to be held back. He developed a close relationship with his owner, who spent time with him daily when he was at the farm. He and his exercise rider, Dickie Jenkins, were inseparable for his whole career. He was brimming with personality, incredibly intelligent, willing and full of heart. Kelso’s racing career began in September of his 2-year-old year. That year he was under the care of Dr. John Lee, a veterinarian who worked part time as a trainer. Kelso won his first race with an apprentice jockey, and then was second in his next two races. The following year, Dr. Lee retired and Mrs. DuPont decided to turn her racehorse operation into a more professional enterprise. She hired a full time trainer, Carl Hanford, and Kelso went into serious work in the spring of 1960. He made his first start in late June, after the Triple Crown races had been run, each of them captured by a different horse. Hanford would say later that he had never suspected that Kelso might have been a Derby caliber horse. In any case, Kelso was relatively late to mature and was born well into the spring. He probably would not have been ready to race so hard so early in the year even if everyone had recognized his potential. As soon as he hit the track that summer, Kelso started winning. He won his first race by 10 lengths. In his second race, he won a 1-mile race at Aqueduct by 12 lengths in the fastest time ever recorded by a 3-yearold in New York, all under a tight hold by his jockey. The racing press and his own connections sat up and took notice. Kelso was something special. Not only could he run a hole in the wind, he loved to race. That year, he won again and again, finishing the season with eight wins in nine starts in the toughest races in the country. Track records fell; champions were vanquished. Kelso proved he could win on the dirt, and on the turf and at all distances. The longer the race, the better he

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performed. At the end of the year, he easily captured the Champion Three-Year-Old honors, as well as the Horse of the Year title. From the time he was 4 until he was 8, Kelso ran mostly in handicap

races. In a handicap, the horses with better records are assigned higher weights to try to equalize conditions. Because of this, trainers and jockeys always have to use careful strategy. The better a horse performs, the higher his assigned weight might be the next time he goes out. Kelso’s handlers wanted to keep added weight to a minimum, and so their general plan was to win, but not by too much. His trainers and jockeys always claimed that, if it were not for their fear of his being assigned more weight, Kelso would have won by more lengths, gone faster, and set more records than he did. As it turned out, he usually was the top weighted horse in the race, and yet he also set or equaled track records 10 times, even while under wraps. He had two regular jockeys in his life: Eddie Arcaro and Milo Valenzuela. Both would call Kelso the best horse they ever sat on. Every year, Kelso returned to the track with as much enthusiasm as the year before, and he barely seemed to miss a step as he got older. After his 7-year-old season and his fifth consecutive Horse of the Year honor, Mrs. DuPont and Carl Hanford considered retiring him, but he had other ideas. Kelso wanted to run, and so he went back to the track the next year, winning three of his six races at 8. He raced once as a 9-yearold, finishing fourth in a sprint race in Florida. Five days later, he took a bad step while training and suffered a hairline fracture of his sesamoid bone. The injury was not severe, but it was enough to send him into retirement at last. Kelso went home to Woodstock Farm along with his inseparable animal companions, a gelding named Spray and a dog named Charley Potatoes. By June he was sound and ready to embark upon a new career. He spent the summer hacking on the farm, and in the fall, Mrs. DuPont started hilltopping him with the Vicmead hunt in Delaware. The following year, Mrs. DuPont engaged the trainer Alison Cram to teach him dressage and improve his jumping. Alison, the aunt of Rick Cram who owns and runs Progressive Show Jumping here in Aiken, was the former national junior dressage champion. She found Kelso to be an incredibly apt pupil, taking to dressage with ease, and jumping 3’6” courses with effortless grace. A celebrity on the track, Kelso’s fame only grew after his retirement. He went on tours to raise money for equine veterinary research, and he gave jumping and dressage exhibitions at the Washington National, at the National Horse Show in Madison Square Garden, and at various racetracks around the country. Mrs. DuPont continued to take him foxhunting in the fall, over the protestations of her daughter, the

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pioneering Olympic event rider Lana DuPont, who was convinced he would run off with her. (For the record, Mrs. DuPont generally claimed that he was a perfect gentleman, but sometime also admitted to thrilling moments in the chase when his competitive spirit got the better of him.) At age 17, Kelso began to feel stiff with arthritis and so was retired from riding. He lived a charmed life on Woodstock farm, frolicking in the pasture with his companions and sleeping in an oversized stall with its own mailbox for all his fan mail. (Kelso was the first racehorse known to have a fan club.) His stall was bedded with sugar cane fibers, and his water bucket was filled with spring water from Arkansas. He loved sweets – ice cream especially – and he had his own special sugar lumps that came individually wrapped in brown paper bearing his name. He sometimes joined Mrs. DuPont’s garden parties. Nothing was too good for Kelso. At 26, he made one last public appearance. Mrs. DuPont had been asked if she would allow him to return to Belmont Park to lead the post parade for the 2-mile Jockey Club Gold Cup, the race he had won for five straight years. He would be joined by another retired Gold Cup champion, the 13-year-old Forego, in an exhibition to benefit the Thoroughbred Retirement Fund. After consultation with his veterinarian, Mrs. DuPont agreed. Kelso and his companion, a gelding named Pete, were prepared with three weeks of riding, and they were off to New York. Kelso seemed to enjoy his return to the track. He danced up and down in front of the cheering crowd, looking fit and energetic despite his years. Afterwards, he shipped home without incident, happy and energized by the outing. But it was too much. The following day he suffered a bout of colic, an ailment that he had been prone to in his racing days. But this time, he would not recover. By the late afternoon, his condition was dire, and by the evening he was gone. Many thousands of words have been written about Kelso, and it would take pages to list all his accolades and awards. He was inducted in the Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame in 1967, and the Aiken Racing Hall of Fame in 1977. “There was never anything like him before and there has never been anything like him since,” said Carl Hanford years later. “They don’t make them like that any more. In fact, they never did.”

Allaire DuPont with her champion “Once upon a time there was a horse named Kelso,” wrote the Daily Racing Form columnist Joe Hirsch. “But only once.” Kelso was buried in a horse cemetery on Woodstock Farm next to his dam and beside his sire’s headstone. The epitaph on his tombstone reads “Where He Gallops, The Earth Sings.”

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Breyer Horses Everyone’s Favorite By Mary Jane Howell

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hey are magnificent creations – the proud Man o’ War, the Clydesdale with his braided mane, the smaller Lipizzan stallion shown in the “levade” movement, pintos, appaloosas, Misty of Chincoteague and her foal Stormy, an Arabian stallion – when it comes to model horses, there is a breed, a color and a discipline for every horse lover, thanks to 70 years of Breyer horses. “A Horse Of My Very Own,” is Breyer’s trademark and is a phrase that rings true for collectors in their 60s as well as horse-crazy youngsters today. Funny thing is, many of us had our own real horses growing up, yet still loved our Breyer models. From the very beginning, Breyer horses were sculpted and painted to be realistic representations of a particular breed. There was correct conformation, muscle tone, warm eyes and a personality that shined through. Some models were ready for action: racehorses preparing to set foot on the track at Churchill Downs, or a turf course that happened to be the front yard; a stock horse waiting for a stray cow to separate from the herd; stallions rearing in their own personal Fight Club, looking for dominance over a herd that might include a sitting donkey or a petite Arabian mare and a variety of foals. For horse people everywhere, Breyer models had a role in the unlimited imagination of our shared childhoods. The first Breyer horse was actually not a stand-alone model, but part of a mantel clock created by a company called Mastercrafters Clock and Radio that was sold at Woolworth’s and various other stores in 1950. The original horse was designed by a company called Hartland Plastics and that model was known as “Large Western Champ.” He stood over the clock on a wooden base. Hartland supplied more bases to Mastercrafters than horses, and so it was that in 1950, new horses were needed. Mastercrafters turned to another Chicago-based company, the Breyer Molding Company, to fulfill the orders. At the time, Sam Stone

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and Charles Schiff owned Breyer, then a tool and die manufacturing shop and custom molder. The company designed and manufactured industrial parts, but they were fortunate to have on their staff a molding engineer who was a true artist. His name was Christian Hess and he went on to create 115 models over the next 45 years while working for Breyer. His first creation, simply known as #57 Western Horse, graced the Mastercrafters clock, but it stood on the right side of the clock, not over it, as “Champ” had done. Soon there were more orders for the Western Horse model by itself than for the horse and clock. The company realized it was onto something and they changed their name to reflect the new direction: Breyer Animal Creations. The Western Horse was Chris Hess’s first model and Secretariat his last, sculpted in 1987. In between he created such beloved models as the Clydesdale Stallion (1958), the Morgan (1963), Old Timer (1966), Misty of Chincoteague (1972), Black Beauty (1979), and Walter Farley’s Black Stallion (1981). Before the days of the Internet, the Breyer models were often found in the Christmas catalogs of stores such as Sears, Montgomery Ward and JC Penney, which made it easy for young horse lovers to request the exact horse they wanted when they wrote their letters to Santa. In 1984 Reeves International, a privately held company based in Pequannock, New Jersey, acquired Breyer Animal Creations. Reeves was founded in 1946 by Werner Fleischmann, a Swiss entrepreneur who brought high-quality toy brands to the U.S. marketplace. His son Tony would eventually purchase the company in 1998, after forgoing a placement at Tufts University’s Veterinary College. Tony Fleischmann is the president of Breyer and has surrounded himself with individuals who are as devoted to the world of horses as he is. Stephanie Macejko is the vice-president of marketing and product

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development and has been with Breyer for 27 years. Prior to her work names on the model’s belly with a gold marker, and if anyone wanted with Breyer, Stephanie managed public relations and events for the U.S. Go Bragh’s autograph I would sketch an outline of his hoof on whatever Equestrian Federation. piece of paper they had – usually it was the festival program.” “I did not have a horse growing up, but I did have Breyer horses,” “I was so proud of him – he took the crowds in stride, and never she said with a laugh. “I am passionate about getting kids involved flinched when I caught a three-year-old examining his chestnuts,” she with horses and that is one reason I love our annual BreyerFest at the recalled. “My heart skipped a beat because I had only looked away for Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington each year.” a second to watch the Parade of Breeds and when I looked back there BreyerFest was not held as a live event in 2020 because of COVID-19, was this little guy who had slipped under the stall guard. Go Bragh was but 34,000 Breyer fans just looking at him with a attended the annual quizzical expression.” festival in 2019. Carol Kozlowski has “The festival is multibeen coming to Aiken generational, and I love for 20 years, usually from seeing license plates from January through midevery state,” said Stephanie. April. A former president “There is something for of the US Eventing everyone – whether it is Association, she still model horse showing, competes, gives clinics and classes for customized lessons and is still a Breyer horses, a model painting Horse fan. tent, and many people Like their equine bring their Breyer models counterparts, Breyer to sell, while others come Horses come in various to buy. We usually have sizes. The original 40 workshops ranging (Traditional) models are from drawing to how to on a 1:9 scale and are 12” make your own halter or a long and 9” high. There are diorama.” Classic/Freedom models Each year there is one on a 1:12 scale and these Breyer models now come with their own riders are 9” long and 6” high. Stablemates were for a Breyer horse known long time the smallest members of the Breyer model family – 1:32, but as the Model of the now the Mini Whinnies have that honor, although they are only sold in Year, and that horse, sets. modeled after a real Although they may only be models, the Breyer team makes their live horse, is one of horses as realistic as possible. the main attractions “If you fall in love with real horses, then you understand their beauty at BreyerFest. Back in and spirit,” Stephanie Macejko explained. “We have 20 different pairs of 1998 the Model of the hands from start to finish Year was a Connemara on each model and we stallion named Erin are serious about them Go Bragh, whose looking like real horses.” diminutive size (15.1 To that end Stephanie hands) often made him is on a continual the underdog at threesearch for artists who day events. That did understand the various A Breyer in an authentic Rambo turnout not stop him, however, breeds and disciplines. from triumphs at Ledyard, Southern Pines, Groton House, and Morven One such sculptor is Park. Carol Kozlowski, a trainer who lives in Aiken during the colder Morgen Kilbourn, who months, competed Go Bragh for 12 years, a partnership she said, that lives near Southern “read like a good book.” Pines, North Carolina. Go Bragh was bred by Edward and Jacqueline Harris, whose A “horse girl” from an Hideaway Farm was in Geneseo, New York. Their son Stirlin directed early age, Morgen grew a children’s film based on the stallion’s remarkable career called “The up in a family of artists Little Horse Who Could.” The Breyer team, always with an eye on (her father worked for marketing, included the movie in a box set with the Erin Go Bragh’s the toy company Coleco, Where it all began: Western Horse with clock model. Carol was teaching a clinic in New Hampshire, but she flew of Cabbage Patch Kids down to Kentucky for BreyerFest that July. The Harrises brought Go fame) and was equally at home in a barn or a studio. Morgen has Bragh down from the farm, and Stirlin and his wife Beth were there as sculpted four Breyer models, including Bristol (a Dutch Warmblood) well. who was introduced in 2018 as part of Breyer’s Premier Collection, “It was a real family affair for us,” recalled Carol. “I grew up with Catch Me (a cantering Warmblood, 2017), Wyatt (the Gaming Stock Breyers and remember cantering them around the braided rug in our Horse, 2014), and Bobby Jo (Working Cow Horse, 2015). living room. To be at an event like BreyerFest, with thousands of horse Morgen starts each assignment with a wide-variety of sketches. For lovers, was so much fun. We did a “meet and greet” and I signed our Bristol, who is shown jumping in a mid-air pose, she actually sketched

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the horse taking off, landing and Jerri started live showing in everything in-between. “It is tricky the 1980s and her Hanoverian to get a good sketch – mine are model was once named a Grand usually hit or miss,” Morgen said. Champion. “Breyer liked the mid-air pose the “Every Breyer model is best, so then the next step is to give slightly different so judges look them a sculpture and I usually do for tiny flaws. They want to see mine in clay.” perfect seams, perfect paint Morgen had Breyer horses jobs, and clean horses! I used growing up, but it wasn’t until she make-up brushes to keep my read an article in Breyer’s Just About models spotless when they were Horses magazine on Rich Rudish, on the table.” the artist who sculpted Sham (the Jerri is an artist by both equine hero of Marguerite Henry’s passion and trade, so it is no King of the Wind) that she realized surprise that she would like to there was such a career path. hold “Paint Your Breyer” classes “I was blown away thinking that I whenever the COVID-19 actually could sculpt a Breyer model restrictions are lifted. Jerri Phillips with her stable of Stablemates. one day – and the fact that I have “Breyer sells painting kits that done four is mind-blowing to me,” she said with a laugh. come with several Stablemates models, but my husband and I like to Other members of the Breyer family include the collectors and serious hunt through thrift stores on the off-chance we come across old Breyer enthusiasts. Jerri Phillips is a relative newcomer to Aiken, having moved models. I like to repaint them and remodel them using my imagination.” here last May from Florida. To say that she loves Breyer horses is a bit of “Breyer horses have become part of our consciousness, I think,” Jerri mused. “I think we all recall where we got our horses. I remember like it

Above: Morgen Kilbourn sculpting Catch Me; Right: the finished model an understatement – she has hundreds of them. “I got my first Breyer on my fifth birthday from my aunt and uncle,’ she recalled. “I have been collecting ever since – for 50 years!” “I pretty much collected the Traditional and Stablemate sizes and every one of them has a name,” she said. “I started photo showing them in the late 70s. This was when you took real photos and had to wait for them to be developed. I would have bloodlines for my horses, charge stud fees for my stallions (usually 25 cents), keep track of their breed and gender, what type of finish the model had, etc.” When Jerri would hear about a Breyer contest, she would send her photos and stories in to be judged and anxiously wait to find out if she had won. “It was so cool! I would get my photos back with a prize. It meant the world to me Photo shows for Breyers were modeled after real horse shows and put on by other enthusiasts. There were class lists that included halter classes, performance classes, costume classes and anything that might be in a real horse show. In performance classes, horses would be photographed in home made tack, in a setting that made it look like the horse was in the middle of a performance. Model horse shows often awarded real horse show ribbons, trophies and certificates.

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was yesterday that I bought my Ruffian model at Churchill Downs.” Because there are so many Breyer horses after 70 years, the Breyer website includes an area where you can find your model: identifyyourbreyer.com. Model owners can read about their horse’s history – who sculpted it, when it was released and if it has been retired. But beware, plan on being lost for hours on the site! Today’s Breyer horses can be seen on their own YouTube channels, on Facebook and on Instagram. Imagination and creativity go hand-inhand. The Breyer Animal Creations brand did not stagnate, but grew with each generation. Today it is possible to buy everything from tack, bandages, little bell boots, jumps, barns, and a truck and trailer for your Breyer horses. In the early days of Breyer horse play, we made corrals from popsicle sticks, found friends who could sew small saddle pads and matching polo wraps and perhaps put Barbie or Ken (although we didn’t like those dolls too much) on the wild mustang for a wilder ride. The end result is the same, no matter what the decade: horsepeople love our Breyers.

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BOARDING/TURNOUT/ TRAINING Chime Ridge Stables. 803-5083760. Please leave message. Heart Horse Stables has roomy individual pasture boarding with 12 x 12 run-in shelters. Owners on site. Just over the Aiken line in Windsor. Arena, round pen, trails. $350/mo 704-288-7385 www.Sporting Days Farm.com. 3549 Charleston Hwy, Aiken, SC 29801 - 5.5 miles from Aiken By-Pass. Offers year round, seasonal or short term boarding as well as dry stalls. 150 acres with trails and practice areas. USEF/ USEA Horse Trials in the winter, schooling shows. Visit our website to see all that it offers in 2020. sdaikenht@aol.com 610 613 2010 Horse boarding in Windsor, SC carriage driving community. Lovely, low country setting. 12x12 stalls connected to 2 acre fields and a short term paddock with shelter available. Jog’lin Board Farm Contact Lisa Whitcomb 414-477-9419 HAY Hoss Luva Hay. Exceptional quality local Coastal Bermuda Hay and Alfalfa mix from out of state. Competitively priced. Will deliver state-wide. Satisfaction

Guaranteed. Jim McClain: 803.247.4803 Round and Square Bales. Oakwood Farms: 3593 Silver Bluff Road, Aiken SC 29803. $60 per bale round hay bales. $70 per bale round bales kept inside. Square bales at $7.00 per bale. Will deliver for a small fee. Please call 706-830-2600 or 803-8270864. email garymcelmurray@ glmconstruction.net HORSES/PETS & SERVICES Thoroughbreds For Sale. Two OTTB geldings for sale: Man of Chrome, 16h chestnut, 7 y.o. Reasonably quiet, galloped and breezed by 70+ rider, lots of mtrial work. Won the Byng, 15.3 chestnut 6 y.o. High energy but safe. Both raced in October and returned sound, but time for new careers. Each priced at $1,000. Can be seen at Aiken Training Track. Bill Allyn. 518-744-2088. Leave message. Trinity Farms Terriers: Irish Russell Terriers & Norfolk Terriers. Old World, Healthy 100 year old Bloodlines with proven calmer dispositions. Health & Dispositions guaranteed. Preservation breeders for 48 years. Donna Fitzpatrick 803-648-3137 easyjacks.com, trinityfarmskennel. com

RENTALS Small efficiency cottage & stable for rent. Large stalls, rolling pasture & paddocks, 300 acres of trails, X- country course, stadium area, hot and cold water wash stall, nestled in horse subdivision. 15 min north of downtown Aiken. Cottage $500 per month, stall $185 per month. Possible part-time barn work for qualified person. Please call or text: 262-844-8734 Cozy, cute carriage house for rent on Hitchcock Woods on iconic equestrian estate. 1BR/1BA. Sleeps 4. $125/night. European style barn with soaring ceilings. 3 stalls available (self care) $20/night per horse. 5 min to downtown Aiken and close to all horse venues. Perfect for female solo travelers. Monthly discounts avail. www.StayAiken.com

Horse boarding in Windsor, SC carriage driving community. Lovely, low country setting. 12x12 stalls connected to 2 acre fields and a short term paddock with shelter available. Jog-in Board Farm Contact Lisa Whitcomb 414-477-9419 Four Stall Stable (3 stall minimum) is available 5.5 miles from downtown Aiken $275.00 per head 2 large paddocks, storage area for trunks and hay etc. Grass practice area with jumps and dressage arena and trails. Over 150 acres. Text 803-226-2024 TACK & APPAREL Aiken Horse Blanket Couture. Creative coolers; your colors. Creative equine-ware. Tack covers/carry bags Saddle pad enhancements. Blanket wash/ waterproof . Blanket repair. AikenHorseBlanket.com. Elisa Denaburg. 803-640-3211

Very nice retired polo pony mare. 12 years old; 16 hands. Nice on trails; no spook. Has an old ionjury but sound and noce enough to pursue low levels of a different career. $2,500. Call for more details. 803-295-8687.

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DIRECTORY LISTING ADS: $25 per issue CLASSIFIED ADS are $25 for the first 30 words & 40 cents for every word or $90 for the year (6 issues.) thereafter. Add $5 for blind classified. BUSINESS CARDS: $65 per issue or $280 for the year (6 issues.) PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for horses: $35; Limit 30 words & one picture DISPLAY ADS are available in a range of PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for real estate, etc. sizes. For a detailed rate sheet and $45; Limit 60 words & one picture. publication schedule, visit our website: BOXED CLASSIFIEDS: add $5 to your total TheAikenHorse.com

December-January 2020-2021

MAILING ADDRESS: The Aiken Horse, P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 EMAIL: theAikenHorse@gmail.com We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

Pay online: TheAikenHorse.com or call us: 803.643.9960

Advertise in the February-March issue! Deadline January 22, 2021 Publication date February 5, 2021

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Directory of Services BARNS,CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING G. L. Williams & Daughter. Serving the CSRA for over 52 years. Specializing in hauling, grading, clearing, property maintenance, and excavation.We provide everything from several types of fill dirt, top soil,compost, mortar sands, crushed asphalt/concrete, to screenings and a variety of rocks.Free Estimates Available (803)6633715 Certified DBE.WOSB. www.glwilliamstrucking.com BLANKET CLEANING & REPAIR Aiken Horse Blanket Couture. Please see our business card ad on page 81. Elisa: 803-640-3211; elisa@aikenhorseblanket.com BOARDING/TURNOUT/TRAINING/SALES Chime Ridge Stables. Stalls available, partial or self care. Fun, friendly, adult atmosphere. Convenient to town, South Aiken 803-5083760. Heart Horse Stables has roomy individual pasture boarding with 12 x 12 run-in shelters. Owners on site. Just over the Aiken line in Windsor. Arena, round pen, trails. $350/mo 704-288-7385 Horse boarding in Windsor, SC carriage driving community. Lovely, low country setting. 12x12 stalls connected to 2 acre fields and a short term paddock with shelter available. Jog’lin Board Farm Contact Lisa Whitcomb 414-477-9419 www.Sporting Days Farm.com. 3549 Charleston Hwy, Aiken, SC 29801 - 5.5 miles from Aiken By-Pass. Offers year round, seasonal or short term board as well as dry stalls. 150 acres with trails and practice areas. USEF/USEA Horse Trials in the winter, schooling shows. Visit our website to see all that it offers in 2020. sdaikenht@ aol.com - 610 613 2010 The Stable On The Woods: Elite boarding & training facility and home to trainers Darrell and Melissa Vaughn. With access to Hitchcock Woods, our barn sits on 70 acres and boasts a full size dressage arena with mirrors, show jumping arena and highquality grass pastures making this the ideal place for you and your horse. Training program to meet your needs, whether your discipline is Dressage, Eventing, Hunters, Jumpers or Foxhunting. thestableonthewoods.com 603.785.0435 Vaughn Equestrian: offering training, sales, and boarding. Professionalism is the guiding principle of owners Darrell and Melissa Vaughn in shaping every component of Vaughn Equestrian. Dressage, Jumpers, Eventing & Young Horses. training and sales. vaughnequestrian.com (603)-785-0435 COMPANION ANIMALS, CARE & SERVICES Trinity Farms Terriers: Irish Russell Terriers & Norfolk Terriers. Old World, Healthy 100 year old Bloodlines with proven calmer dispositions. Health & Dispositions guaranteed. Preservation breeders for 48 years. Donna Fitzpatrick 803-648-3137 easyjacks. com, trinityfarmskennel.com DENTISTRY MidAtlantic Equine Dentistry :Mike Cissell DVM, MS, DACVS-LA: Excellence in equien oral health. midaltanticequinedentistry.com; maed.aiken@gmail.com. (928) 458-4529. FEED, SUPPLEMENTS & SUPPLIES Aiken County Farm Supply. 1933 Park Ave., Aiken. 803.649.2987. Aiken Saddlery & Supply. Full service tack & feed store. 1044 E. Pine Log Rd., Aiken. 803.649.6583. aikensaddlery.com

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HAY Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver statewide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803. INSURANCE Betsy Minton, Sterling Thompson Equine, 803-617-8353. Now writing homeowners insurance for private residences. No horses required but certainly welcomed. Access to top-notch underwriters offering customized, affordable coverage. Still delivering excellent competitive insurance options for your horses and farms. betsyminton@sterlingthompson.com. Sterling Thompson Equine: 800 942 4258 Hutson-Etherredge Company. Insuring Aiken farms since 1876. Your hometown independent insurance agency can customize your equine property coverage by choosing the best company to fit your needs. We are a full service insurance agency. Call Sandi Vogus for a quote! 803-649-5141 INSTRUCTION/LESSONS Amy McElroy. USDF Gold Medalist and USEF S judge. Instruction and training at all levels. Visit amymcelroy.com or call 803.6404207. Aiken Horsemanship Academy. Your naturally inspired adult learning resource! Offering Clinics, Courses, Starting Young Horses, Evaluations, and Lessons. JulieRobins.com 803-220-1768. Jodi Hemry Eventing. Three-Star Eventer offering professional training, sales, boarding, instruction, horse shows, located in the heart of Aiken. 803-640-6691 JodiHemryEventing@gmail.com JodiHemryEventing.com REAL ESTATE/ RENTALS Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 28 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803-439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. Carolina Real Estate Company. Fine homes, estates and horse properties in Aiken, South Carolina. Let us welcome you home to AIKEN, Home of Horses, History & Hospitality! carolinahorseproperties.com. (803) 648-8660 Sharer Dale, Meybohm. “Where town meets country.” sharerdale@ gmail.com. 803.522.3648. Suzy Haslup, Meybohm. “Your Aiken Horse Real Estate Specialist.” Buying or selling in the most celebrated equine community in the South. ww.aikenhorserealty.com; 803-215-0153 Tracey Kenworthy Turner, Meybohm. Specializing in marketing & selling Aiken’s horse country properties for 15+ years. southernhorsefarms.com. 803-215-4734. TACK & TACK CLEANING/REPAIR The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 544 Two Notch Rd. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166.

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The Aiken Training Track

photography by Gary Knoll



Aiken Area Calendar of Events

DECEMBER

3-13 December Classic I&II. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 4-6 SCHJA Finale Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 4-6 GQHA Georgia Classic Quarter Horse Show. Georgia National Fairgrounds, 401 Larry Walker Pkwy, Perry, GA. gqha. com 5 Volunteer Invitational Schooling Day. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 5 PSJ Just For Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 5 Holiday Classic Horse Show. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm. com 5 USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 5-6 USEF/USDF “Winter Wonderland� Dressage Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@ stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 5-6 Tall Boots HJ Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 6 XC School. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 8 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 11-12 Sorting (RSNC). BSC Arena, 3976 Highway 24 South, Waynesboro, GA. Cliff Chancey, 706.840.3971. rsnc.us 12 Aiken Driving Club Christmas Drive. Details TBA. aikendrivingclub.com 12 PSJ Just For Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 12 Dressage test of Choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com. Fullgallopfarm.com

December-January 2020-2021

12-13 Stable View Eventing Academy Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@ stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 13 USEF Recognized Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com, Fullgallopfarm.com 15 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 19 Greenies Play by reservation. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 19 Highfields Derby Days. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 19 Radway Show. Radway Eventing, 4627 Whiskey Road, Aiken. Kim Davies: 803.998.6059, radwayeventing@yahoo.com, radwayeventing.com 21 CEC HJ Show. Voxton Farm, 226 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. Linda Klein: 803.425.4795, voxtonfarm@aol. com, camdenequinecircuit.com 22 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 26 Stable View Schooling Jumper Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 27 Chat Hills Hunter Pace. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 29 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 31 Whiskey Road Champagne Trail Ride. Aiken. Betsy Minton (hunt sec.): 803.617.8353, whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com

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JANUARY 2-3 3 5 5

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PSJ HJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com Stable View Schooling Jumper Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Apple Tree 2-Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com

Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 19 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 19-24 Augusta Cutting Horse Futurity. Georgia National Fairgrounds, 401 Larry Walker Pkwy, Perry, GA. gqha.com 21 Apple Tree 2-Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com 22-24 Winter Premier. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 23-24 USEF/USEA Stable View “Aiken Opener� Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 26 Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 26 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 28-29 Apple Tree 3-Phase. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com 30 Dressage Test of Choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com 30-31 Dressage in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 30-31 PSJ HJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 31 USEF Recognized Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com, Fullgallopfarm.com 19

FEBRUARY 2 Georgia State Sorting Championships. BSC Arena, 3976 Highway 24 South, Waynesboro, GA. Cliff Chancey, 706.840.3971. rsnc.us 8-10 Aiken Winter Classic I. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 12 Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 12 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 13 Stable View Schooling Dressage Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 14 Apple Tree 2-Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com 15-17 Aiken Winter Classic II. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 16 CEC HJ Show. Toopler Branch, 1035 Lee Lane, Lugoff, SC. Rebecca Hudson: 803.699.2282, Tooplerbranch@hotmail. com, camdenequinecircuit.com 16 Stable View Winter Combined Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 17 January Combined Tests. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com 8-9

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Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com Schooling HJ Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Whiskey Road Foxhounds Hunt Week. Aiken, SC. whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com Apple Tree 2-Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com WBRL World Barrel Racing Finals. Georgia National Fairgrounds, 401 Larry Walker Pkwy, Perry, GA. gqha.com Winter Encore. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 Eventing and Dressage Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com Highfields Just for Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com CEC HJ Show. Springdale at Pine Tree Stables, 1265 Sanders Creek Road, Camden, SC. Candi Cocks: 803.243.4417, springdale47@gmail.com, camdenequinecircuit.com

December-January 2020-2021


7 7-13 8-14 9 9

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17 18 19-20 19-21 19-21 20-21 23 23

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XC School. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 Belle Meade Hunt Week. Thomson, GA. Angela Smith, Hon. Sec.: 706.595.2525, bellemeadehounds.com Live Free Southern Classic Draft Horse Show. Georgia National Fairgrounds, 401 Larry Walker Pkwy, Perry, GA. gqha. com Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com Dressage Test of Choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com USEF Recognized Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com, Fullgallopfarm.com Apple Days. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com USEF National HJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Valentine’s Day Classic Horse Show. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm. com USEF/USDF “I LOVE Dressage.” Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Whiskey Road Foxhounds Hunter Pace. Aiken, SC. whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com Apple Tree 2-Phase. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com Sorting. BSC Arena, 3976 Highway 24 South, Waynesboro, GA. Cliff Chancey, 706.840.3971. Rsnc.us USEF/USEA Hunter Trials. Paradise Farm. 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com USEF National HJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com Dressage at Bruce’s Field. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com Dressage Test of Choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com USEF Recognized Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com, Fullgallopfarm.com

December-January 2020-2021

25-26 Apple Tree 3-Phase. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com 25-28 Chat Hills Hunter/Jumper Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 27 CEC HJ Show. Country Springs Farm, Camden, SC. Dawn Cooper: 803.466.7134, countrysprings01@gmail.com, camdenequinecircuit.com 27-28 Eventing Academy. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 27-28 GHF/Massey Ferguson Dressage Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 27-28 PSJ HJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com

MARCH 2

Dressage Test of Choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com

2

Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com USEF Recognized Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590. fullgallopfarm.com. Stable View Schooling Jumper Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com Grand-Prix Eventing Invitational. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org USEF National HJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 XC Schooling at Sporting Days. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com

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Apple Days Schooling Dressage & Stadium. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 603.345.0382 12 Apple Days Schooling XC. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 12-14 USEF National HJ Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 13 Aiken Trials. 538 Two Notch Road, Aiken. aikentt@bellsouth. net. aikentrainingtrack.com. 803-648-4631 13 Dressage Test of Choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com 14 USEF Recognized Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590. fullgallopfarm.com. 16 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 20 Aiken Spring Steeplechase. 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. aikensteeplechase.org. 803-648-9641 20-21 USEF/USDF Southern Comfort Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm. com, stableviewfarm.com 21 Schooling Horse Trials. Paradise Farm. 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail. com, paradisefarmaiken.com ‘ 21 Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com 11

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Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 25-27 Stable View Spring FEI CCI-S 1-4 star Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@ stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 25 Apple Days Schooling Dressage & Stadium. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 603.345.0382, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.org. 26 Apple Days Schooling XC. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Text Only: 803.226.2024 27 Pacers & Polo. Powder House Field, Powder House Rd, Aiken. aikenpolo.org. 803-643-3611. 27 Dressage Test of Choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo. com, Fullgallopfarm.com 28 USEF Recognized Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590. fullgallopfarm.com. 30 Schooling in Paradise. Stadium, Dressage & Cross Country rounds from 9am-until finished. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 31 Aiken Polo Club Practice begins. Aiken Polo Club. aikenpolo. org. 803-643-3611. Tiger Kneece: 803-646-3301.

December-January 2020-2021


BUSINESS CARDS

OutямБtting Southeastern Farriers for Over 30 years

GREAT SERVICE AND QUALITY FARRIER SUPPLIES ARE OUR PRIORITY

Aiken, SC

803.685.5101

Columbus, NC 828.894.0280

www.monettafarrier.com

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Index of Advertisers Advertiser

Aiken County Farm Supply Aiken Fine Homes and Land Aiken Horse Park Foundation Aiken Horsemanship Academy Aiken Polo Club Aiken Saddlery, Inc. Aiken TB HOF American Glory Style American National Insurance Auto Tech Banks Mill Feeds Barnware Bridle Creek Carolina Company RE Carolina Company RE CHAPS Competitor Tent Coward & McNeill Real Estate D & M Partners DFG Stables Epona Equine Divine

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Advertiser

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December-January 2020-2021


December-January 2020-2021

The Aiken Horse

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