April-May 2019

Scroll for more

Page 1

Volume 14 • Number 5 •

April-May 2019


Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt, REALTOR®

803.640.4591

Aiken, South Carolina — Southern Charm and Equestrian Sport 215 GRACE

MLS # 105455

• The Stables in Historic Horse Dist. • Convert a part of The • 3 acres, 9 stall barn, tack room Stables to unique • 2 wash stalls, 6 paddocks residence or build • $1,200,000 Two add’l parcels dream pied-a-terre in available the park like setting

265 FOUR OAKS RD

MLS # 102282

• Remarkable 3000 sq ft timber •~4 acres, flat grass jump field frame 3BD 2BA residence • 10 stall courtyard style barn • 8 grass paddocks with shade w/feed, tack, laundry & trees on 15 acres, 1.3 mile studio apt. • Guest cottage grass perimeter Gallop track • 46+ acres • $1,375,000

525 LAURENS ST

402 COLLETON c1914

MLS # 97065

MLS # 105888

1063 COLBERT BRIDGE MLS # 102282

• Exceptional training facility • 10 paddocks, fenced grass ring on 67 acres • Euro-walker, 3 storage • 12 stall barn, 4 stall barn buildings, 3 pond w/apt • 4BR 3BA residence, in-ground • Sand exercise track pool • $1,800,000

534 MARION ST SE MLS # 102676

• 8.5 acre Hitchcock Stables • 8 large paddocks • Adjoins The Woods • 27 12x12 stall barn • Original family stable yard dating from 1882 • 2 carriage sheds, bunk house • $2,300,000

• 8.32 acres in the heart of Aiken’s Historic Horse Distr. • Restored 1BR 1BA residence • 11 stall barn w/ separate covered wash stall • 4 large, irrigated, cross-fenced grass paddocks • Multi function carriage bldg • $2,200,000

951 SHELL BLUFF DR

322 RUSHTON RD

MLS # 104052

MLS # 105176

• Light By Night Farm built in ‘14 • 11.54 acres Perim. fenced, 2008 sq ft 3BR 2BA • Exceptional 4 stall ctr aisle barn • Tack room with bath & shower • Attached garage - add stalls, house tractor, etc • $735,000

1050 CLEAR CREEK CT

• Bridle Creek 4BR 3.5BA, 3 car garage, 14 fenced acres • 1800 sq ft apt. over 9-stall center aisle barn/amenities

• • • • • •

Meticulous Period Renovation 3296 sq. ft. 3 bedroom 3.5 baths Antique Heart Pine Floors • Exquisite Mill Work 11 foot Ceilings • Multiple French Doors 4 Fireplaces • Hitchcock Ceilings Gourmet Kitchen • 1st Floor Master Suite

3 RUNS PLANTATION LOTS

MLS # 103247

• Tack room, feed stall, wash stall • Lge fenced arena/prof. footing • Multiple grass turnouts • $1,750,000

• Grand Staircase to 2nd Floor Guest Suites • Corner Lot Enclosed by Herringbone Brick Wall • 3 Blocks from the Willcox Hotel • $1,095,000

• Exceptional private lots on cul de sac within Aiken’s most established equestrian community • Amenities include: clubhouse, exercise area, swimming pool, xcountry schooling area, 2 dressage arenas, fenced Stadium jumping arena & miles of managed trails for riding or walking • Lot 48 6.33 acres $151,920 • Lot 49 6.27 acres $150,480 • Lot 50 6.55 acres $157,200 • Lot 39 5.5 acres $132,000 • Will consider seller financing with qualified offer

• Updated turnkey horse farm • 11 acres • 3BR 3BA brick home, garage & in-ground pool • 4 stall barn, wash stall, feed & tack room • 3 large grass paddocks w/ water & run-in sheds • Fenced grass riding arena • $549,000

1218 STIEFEL RD

MLS # 105212

• Agnus Forest Farm - 302 corridor • 4 grass fields (new fencing 2017), 1 run in shed • 2800 sq ft, gated, in-ground pool • 6 stall cent. aisle barn/half bath • 8 acres • $750,000

www.AikenSCProperties.com 2

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


FOX HALL

$1.99 MILLION

Spectacular Aiken Horse District brick manor house renovated in 1999 w/hardwood floors, commercial grade kitchen, fireplaces & 2 master suites, art studio, 4 stall brick barn & 3.95 acres of lush grass. Organically managed pasture & grounds w/irrigated pastures, board fencing & 3 run-in sheds. Additional acreage and guest house can be added. Easy access to Hitchcock Woods on the clay roads.

GRAY WOODS

$489,000

BRIDLEWOOD FARM $1.75 MILLION

Premier state of the art boarding/training facility with 28 stalls, 26 irrigated paddocks, 250 x 160 GGT footing ring, 2 BR/2 BA luxurious owners apartment, grooms quarters & camera monitoring system. Business opportunity with strong client base. Additional 37 +/- acres available for purchase with established trail system.

WOOD’S END WAY

$648,000

FARMSTEAD

$929,000

Larlee Construction 4 bedroom lake front home w/4.84 A in bucolic gated southside development. Reclaimed pine floors, cathedral & coffered 10’ ceilings, shiplap walls, fireplace w/pine built-ins, quartzite countertops, mahogany kitchen island, Viking appliances, 3 car garage w/workshop & pool overlooking 30 A lake.

RACELAND STABLE

$535,000

REDUCED Two story, 4 bedroom/4.5 bath, 3576 sf brick home by Todd Gaul of Designer Builders. Beautiful hardwood floors, tranquil setting and minutes from the heart of Downtown Aiken. Twenty acres located in a premier equestrian corridor ready for selective clearing for a horse farm or may be subdivided by future buyers.

EDISTO LAKE

$259,000

Enjoy lakefront living in Edisto Lake gated community with easy access to Aiken and Columbia. Spectacular sunsets, dock, and plenty of space for entertaining and outdoor activities. Beautiful views from light filled two bedroom two bath home with wood floors, wood stove and deck. Pontoon boat available with acceptable offer. $

107,400

10.74 ACRES

TWIN SILOS - LOT 2

Ride into the Hitchcock Woods from your new construction light filled 3 BR/3.5 BA custom hardiplank home with 3 stall barn, wash stall, tack room, storage & fenced turnout on 3.51 A with the ability to purchase more land. Wood floors, high ceilings, gas fireplace & chef’s kitchen with granite counters. Must see!

CROOKED CREEK

$329,000

Privately situated, perimeter dog fenced & gated farmette on 6+ acres w/updated 3 bedroom/two bath brick ranch, 2 car garage, new JD Cooper barn (easily made into 4 stalls) & inground pool on paved road. House has new flooring, updated baths & kitchen & living room w/vaulted ceiling & brick fireplace. Close to all equestrian events. Access to additional pasture.

WEXFORD MILL TRACT L

$89,900

12.41 A

Aiken Horse District on the clay roads with access to the Aiken Training Track & a short hack to the polo fields & Hitchcock Woods. 20 stall barn w/tack room, feed room, office & barn apartment. Add’l. 1752 sq ft dormitory has 3 apartments. 6 stall Eurociser, paddocks, round pen and wash stall on almost an acre.

FOX HOLLOW LOTS

Fox Hollow covers just under 800 acres including a trail over beautiful Johnson Lake, irrigated show rings, mirrored dressage ring, cross country course and fabulous trails. Choose from one of these available lots and build your dream farm. LOT 27 19.89A $200,000 LOT 1B 7.71A $77,100 LOT 46 8.9A $50,000

KALMIA HILLS 3 BR/2 BA

$169,000

Fabulous land & lots available: Twin Silos Farms, Wood’s End Way & Fox Hollow

803-215-0153 • www.AikenHorseRealty.com April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

3


your best friend in real-estate

finehomesofaiken.com

THE BALCONY is the most prestigious equestrian estate in Aiken, a comfortable showplace in the heart of Aiken’s “Winter Colony.” Close to all equestrian venues, the 5.85-acre compound is a peaceful sanctuary within tall masonry walls. The elegant slate-roofed residence shows refined craftsmanship in every detail. Stately formal rooms. 6 ensuite bedrooms w/fireplaces. Kitchen, laundry, & utilities are all updated. Exquisite gardens & lawns. 20-stall stable, 3-BR cottage, swimming pool, large paddocks. $2,750,000

TREASURE FARM is a rare downtown gem, within sight of the Coker Spring entrance to Hitchcock Woods. Charming 3-BR cottage with 8-stall barn & 3 paddocks. Beautiful Master Suite. Large screened porch in the rear, plus two covered porches. Wood floors. Fireplaces in the Living & Dining Rooms. Magnificently renovated & beautifully maintained. Barn has 1/2 bath, prep room, sink, temperature-controlled secure tack room, & hayloft. Appliances, water heater, screen porch, & HVAC all within last 4 years. $800,000

SHELBORNE FARM is a gracious 4 BR 4.5 BA custom

HIGH COTTON FARM This equestrian estate has a 4 BR/4 BA residence and 4 or 5 stall barn with charming apartment, all on 12.47 acres. Located close to town, the farm has 5 fenced grass paddocks and an electric gate entrance. The home has: new roof, numerous upgrades, tankless water heater, and new interior colors. Gas heat, thermal-pane windows. Extra-large master suite downstairs. $925,000

CHADBOURN FARM offers an idyllic equestrian lifestyle. The 3000 sq.ft. 4 BR 3 BA residence was built in 2005 and extensively updated in 2017. Light-filled interior. Great Room with fireplace. Formal dining room. Wood floors, hickory cabinets, & granite counter tops. Spacious master suite. 20 acres includes a 6-stall centeraisle barn with wash rack and tack room. Large fenced pastures, dressage arena, and 6.5 cleared acres for any equestrian use. $735,000

SNIPES POND is a 4028 sf renovated historic plantation home on 46 acres of beautiful rolling farm land. The top-quality renovation by skilled craftsmen from Reynolds Co. offers modern amenities such as a granite kitchen island, French country sink, walk-in closets, ceiling fans, & security system. multiple porches on both floors, and handsome wood floors. The 46.31 acres are ideal for farming, horses, other recreation or quiet enjoyment. Additional acreage available. $769,900

SOUTH AIKEN LAND is a 38-acre tract with tall stands of lovely old growth forest rising rising gently from Old Draw Bridge Road to a high level hilltop. The hilltop is cleared for crops and hunting, with sweet views of the valley below. Perfect for your custom horse farm, an apiary, a truck farm or an organic farm. Adjacent to dairy farm and more forest land. $165,000 (4342 per acre) Call David for information at 803-640-0123.

TOLT TRAIL Aiken horse horse farm on 19.99 acres. Great 5 BR/3 BA floor plan w/oak & vinyl floors. Topquality kitchen w/bay-window breakfast room. Master suite: beautiful views, large walk-in closet, & adjacent 4th bedroom as perfect office. Propane for gas logs & tankless water heater. Deck, HVAC & well pump new in 2018. Whole house generator. Fiberglass saltwater pool. 4-stall barn w/water & electricity, feed rm, & tack rm w/shelving. 5 turn-outs w/3 run-ins. $539,000

CENTURY LANE Brick ranch home on 5.86 acres w/6stall barn. Den fireplace. New in 2018: roof, sentricon system for house & barn, HVAC units, siding on hay barn, & paint for house & barn. Well pump new 2013. Oak floor in 2 bedrooms & DR; wood veneer floor in LR; tile floor in kitchen, den, & laundry room; new carpet in the 3rd & 4th bedroom. Hay barn & storage shed. Ideal for all riding disciplines. Close to major shopping & cinema. Property & price are lovely: $389,000

residence on 50 acres with magnificent views. Interior features are 5 fireplaces, granite counter tops, 2nd floor observation deck, wood floors, stunning 2-story great room, and a framed-in apartment over the garage. Six-stall barn with wash rack & feed room, dressage ring, 150x300 huinter-jumper ring. Board-fenced pastures. Three-car garage. $950,000

The finest farms in Aiken, South Carolina. Call 803-640-0123 for estates, farms, homes & land.

4

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

5


,

The Aiken Charity I Horse Show is proud to host the

2019 Carolinas Show Hunter Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Be a part of this new equestrian tradition, which honors and celebrates legendary horses and horsemen from the Carolinas.

Friday, May 3rd, 2019 . 6-8 p.m. RINGSIDE BRUCE’S FIELD Aiken, South Carolina $25 per person Beer, wine and light hors d’oeuvres Boots and breeches welcome purchase tickets online by friday, april 26 at

CarolinasShowHunterHallOfFame.com For additional information call 828-817-4438

H I S TO RY. T R A D I T I O N . L E G AC Y.

the perfect relaxation after an adventure in hitchcock woods hotel • lunch • dinner • cocktails • sunday brunch full-service luxury spa & salon experience

O P E N DA I LY • 1 0 0 C O L L E TO N AV E N U E S W • A I K E N , S C 8 0 3 . 6 4 8 . 1 8 9 8 • T H E W I L L C OX .C O M

6

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

P.O. Box 332 • Montmorenci, SC 29839-0332 • 803.643.9960 •

www.TheAikenHorse.com • Editor@TheAikenHorse.com

Time Dated Material • Periodicals • Volume 14 • Number 5

W

inter has turned to spring here in Aiken. The grass is green, everything is blooming and the horses in the turnout have mostly lost their winter coats. The weather is often so pleasant that you can feel almost guilty if you are not out enjoying it. The change of the seasons heralds a shift in the dominant disciplines in Aiken. The big name eventers who came for the winter have moved North. Now the big name hunter jumper riders will start to filter in for two months of prestigious horse shows at Highfields Event Center and Bruce’s Field at the Aiken Horse Park. The polo players are back too. Those who spent the winter in Aiken are getting their horses fit, while those who went to Florida are on their way home. Every year, the spring polo season starts at the Pacers and Polo game to benefit the USC Aiken Pacers basketball team. This polo match, which is the third leg of the Aiken Triple Crown, took place on March 30. Organized practices started at Wagener Polo Club at the beginning of March, and they will kick off at Aiken Polo Club on Sunday, April 7. Tournament games are set to begin at APC in the second week of April, and at Wagener and New Bridge Polo clubs toward the end of the month. Expect to see a lot of polo rigs on the road, especially up and down the 302 corridor east of town: polo players are always going somewhere. Although we are looking forward to an exciting

April-May 2019

spring, it’s hard to imagine that the next two months will be able to equal the last two when it comes to equestrian activities. The winter of 2018-2019 was probably the most action-packed we have seen, with so much going on, it was always hard to decide where to go next. In addition to ample schooling opportunities, clinics, shows and the like, there were also numerous marquee events, including recognized horse trials, dressage shows and hunter jumper shows. The month of March featured five consecutive Saturdays of spectator-friendly equestrian activities in downtown Aiken, starting with the inaugural LiftMaster Grand Prix Eventing competition at Bruce’s Field, followed by the Bruce McGhee Memorial Harness races at McGhees’ Mile, the Aiken Trials at the Aiken Training Track, the Aiken Steeplechase back at Bruce’s Field and finally Pacers and Polo on Powderhouse Field. That last weekend, the Aiken Horse Show also returned to the Hitchcock Woods for its 103rd renewal. We hope you enjoy this issue. We have articles about the winter’s activities as well as some looking forward to the spring. Read about Grand Prix Eventing and the Aiken Trials in the first section, and about horse show etiquette in the second. In the third section you can read about Aiken Youth Polo and new playing opportunities at Aiken Polo Club, which is expecting a revival this year under the leadership of the new manager, Tiger Kneece. As ever, we have profiles of people and horses, event coverage, and of course lots of pictures of everything we saw – and there was a lot. As always, we want to be your horse newspaper, so please drop us an email if you know of something we should be covering. Until next time, enjoy your horses!

The Aiken Horse EDITOR & PUBLISHER Pam Gleason

ART DIRECTOR Gary Knoll

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jean Berko Gleason

LAYOUT & DESIGN Gary Knoll

PHOTOGRAPHERS Pam Gleason Gary Knoll

ADVERTISING

803.643.9960 editor@theaikenhorse.com

Going Out Of Town? Don’t miss future issues of The Aiken Horse. We will send you a one year subscription (6 issues) for $24.00. Send check or CC # & your mailing address: P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 Or sign up on the web at www.TheAikenHorse. com

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

All contents Copyright 2019 The Aiken Horse

Pam Gleason Editor & Publisher

The Aiken Horse Policies: The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers, editors, or the policies of The Aiken Horse, LLC. The Aiken Horse is owned by The Aiken Horse, LLC.

The Aiken Horse

7


SECTION

Our cover shows Liz Halliday-Sharp winning the inaugural LiftMaster Aiken Grand Prix Eventing Invitational aboard Fernhill by Night. Read about the Grand Prix in our first section. Photography by Gary Knoll

10 12 14 20 26 28 30

News and Notes Aiken Trials Ask the Judge Grand Prix Eventing Pictures Grand Prix Eventing Report What Makes Polo Unique Jeremy Steinberg

SECTION

Darcy Dean and Skybound Skittles tackle the cross country course in the Novice division at the Paradise Farm February Horse Trials. Photography by Gary Knoll

`

45 46 48 52 57 58 60

8

68 70 72 73 74 76 79 86

The Aiken Horse

2

Battle of the Sexes Kristen Paysinger From the Judge’s Booth Cross Country Pictures Secret Lives: SkipJack Horse Show Etiquette The Ribbon Dilemma

SECTION

A fast time trial at the Bruce McGhee Memorial Harness Races at McGhees Mile. Find more pictures of Aiken’s spring events in the center spread of this section. Photography by Gary Knoll.

1

3

Aiken Polo Club German Roots Aiken Youth Polo Directory of Services Classifieds Aiken Spring Pictures Calendar of Events Index of Advertiser

April-May 2019


TEAMWORK TECHNOLOGY TRUST As the largest equine veterinary equine practice in the CSRA, Southern Equine Service is the only equine clinic with advanced diagnostic capabilities and a seasoned staff on par with those services offered at regional teaching facilities. Our team of veterinarians offer a multi-disciplinary approach to patient diagnosis that ensures optimum outcomes. Our in-house technology resources are unmatched and include the area’s only bone scan and 0.31 Tesla high resolution MRI. All of our doctors are equipped with portable radiograph and ultrasound capabilities to immediately address your horse’s needs while on-site. Most importantly, our dedication to delivering quality care is reflected in the strong doctor-client relationships we continue to build.

EQUINE S N R ER E H V T

A

M

WO

L

O

TE

GY

ICE

SOU

In short, when you give SES the reins, you get better results.

RK

T RU S T T E C

O HN

1 2 5 8 Ba n ks M i l l R d • A ik e n, S C 2 9 803 • 803-6 4 4 -1 54 4 • s ou th er n eq u i n es erv i c e.c o m

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

9


News and Notes By Pam Gleason

Carolinas Show Hunter Hall of Fame The Carolinas Show Hunter Hall of Fame will hold an induction ceremony for its new members and award winners at Bruce’s Field in the Aiken Horse Park on Friday, May 3. This will be during the first week of the Aiken Charity Horse Show, which runs from May 1-5. (The second week is May 8-12.) The ceremony is scheduled for 6-8 p.m. and will include a reception with beer, wine and light hors d’oeuvres. Festivities will begin after the featured $25,000 Aiken Charity Open Hunter Classic which starts at 4 p.m. (The cost to attend the hall of fame event is $25.)

Billy Haggard, one of Aiken’s illustrious horsemen. The Carolinas Show Hunter Hall of Fame was founded in 2016 by members of the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club’s board of directors to honor and remember outstanding horses and horsemen in the Carolinas. Inductees are nominated and voted on by current supporters of the organization. You can join as a Supporter for $40 per year, or, if you are already a member of the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club you can become a “Friend” for $30 a year. Supporters and Friends can nominate Hall of Fame candidates and vote for the election of inductees. They can also nominate and vote for candidates for the Elma Garcia Award. There are two categories of inductees: Show Hunters and Horsemen. In order to be eligible, show hunters must have been stabled in the Carolinas for at least six months during their careers. They also must have proven themselves as “an outstanding

10

show hunter” by winning a championship or reserve at a major national show and they must be permanently retired from showing. Prospective hall of fame horsemen must have lived in the Carolinas for at least six months, participated in the show hunter community for at least 15 years and “made a substantial impact on the upper levels of the sport of show hunters.” In addition the CSHHoF gives out other awards such as the annual Elma Garcia award, which goes to “an exemplary horse that showed in the junior or amateur division.” This year, the hall of fame will welcome three new horses (Dreamboat, High Hearts and Lestat) as well as five horsemen (Carol Kent, Jeanne Smith, Earl (Red) Frazier, J. Arthur (Bucky) Reynolds and Bucky Stewart Jr.) Bling Bling, who showed in children’s and amateur owner divisions and was even a ring bearer at his owner Sarah Ward’s wedding is the Elma Garcia Award winner. The late William (Billy) Haggard will receive the Janet Peterson Memorial Award. This is an award recognizing people who “make the dreams of riders and horses come true.” Billy Haggard, who rode for the United States on the eventing team at the Pan Am Games in 1959 and 1963, had also been a leading amateur steeplechase rider and a respected and accomplished competitor in the hunter ring. He is best known as the owner of Bold Minstrel, his Pan Am eventing mount, which he later lent to the show jumping maestro William Steinkraus. Bold Minstrel became the only horse ever to compete (and medal) for the United States in two different disciplines. Haggard started coming to Aiken in the 1960s and bought a home here in 1973. He died in 2004, after spending almost eight years paralyzed from the neck down as the result of a riding accident. (He was profiled in The Aiken Horse in December 2012 as part of our series Remembering Aiken’s Horsemen.) Other past inductees with Aiken connections include Bruce Duchosssois for whom Bruce’s Field is named. Bruce, an exhibitor as well as an owner, trainer and supporter of all equestrian sports, was inducted in the inaugural year, 2017. Aiken horses in the hall of fame include Western Prospect (2017) a champion working and conformation hunter who got his start with Andrea King and Aaron Vale. Happy Hour, trained at DFG Stable, and Bruce Duchossois’s Que Sera both won an Elma Garcia Award in 2018. For more information about the Carolinas Show Hunter Hall of Fame or to reserve tickets to the ceremony, visit carolinasshowhunterhalloffame.com. You can also become a supporter of the organization online. Need more information? Call 828817-4438

The Aiken Horse

Aiken Summer Classic

Aiken has a new Premier rated show on the calendar this year. The Classic Company has shifted its June horse show dates from the Georgia International Horse Park outside of Atlanta to Bruce’s Field at the Aiken Horse Park. The Aiken Summer Classics will run from June 12-16 and June 19-23. This will give Aiken six full weeks of prestigious shows in the spring and summer, starting with the Aiken Spring Classics at Highfields (April 1721 and 24-28) followed by the Aiken Charity Horse Shows at Bruce’s Field (May 1-5 and May 18-12). The exhibitors will then have one month to go elsewhere to show before returning to Aiken in June. The Classic Company has run its June shows in Atlanta since 1997, just after the 1996 Olympics for which the Georgia

International Horse Park was built. The shift to Aiken is sure to be popular among Aiken’s exhibitors, who are always game for more local competitive action. It is also something of a natural move for the Classic Company, which is based in Johns Island, South Carolina and managed by its president, Bob Bell. “We’re very excited about moving the show to Bruce’s Field,” said Bell in a telephone interview. “We have a lot of reservations already, so that’s good. We’ll have an International Hunter Derby in the second week and we’ll have a Grand Prix each Saturday afternoon. We want our show to be special and unique and we are looking for some nice championship awards for people to take home with them.” Bob Bell, who was born in New Jersey, came to South Carolina to attend Clemson University and he never went back. He got involved with horse shows through working

April-May 2019


for an IBM computer distributor after college. “Those were the early days of truly portable computers, early PCs with the big floppy disks,” he said. He ended up taking a job with Laurence and Carol Kent who were running horse shows from their home base in Camden and using the very first software program, written by Laurence Kent, that was specifically designed for horse show management. Bob came in to help, relying on his understanding of DOS computer systems. Before long, he transitioned from working in the office to managing shows. He produced his first Classic show in 1987, and by 1989 his company became The Classic Company Ltd. Today he runs 18 AA shows in six states throughout the Southeast. He has also been active in United States Equestrian Federation governance and it currently a USEF steward as well as the president of Classic Communications which publishes Sidelines magazine. Bell says he never had much of a career as an exhibitor (“I showed terribly and locally”) but he has been heavily involved in the horse show world for over 30 years. Back in the 1980s, he even helped manage some shows in Aiken at the old Ramblewood Show grounds between Banks Mill and Whiskey Roads on Citadel (there are houses there now.) “I’m very excited about coming back to Aiken,” he said. “I have made three or four trips there since we decided that we would do this, and I’ve had a wonderful time. Everything has changed completely, but everything is the same. It’s wonderful and the exhibitors are excited because it’s a true horsey community. Bruce’s Field is beautiful, the footing is great and the improvements they have made just since last year are fantastic.” Bell says that they are planning to keep the show days relatively short. One way they are hoping to relieve the pressure on the weekend schedule is by moving the pony classes to Wednesday, Thursday and Friday so that they can get finished a little bit sooner on Saturday and Sunday. Other plans include

holding a $5000 “Dash for Cash” on Friday, June 14. This will a “speed and power” jumper class open to children and adults with fences maxing out at 1.15 meters. The class, which will be the final one of the day in the Grand Prix ring, will have no entry fee. “It should be exciting and fun for all the children and adult jumpers.” The prize list is published on the Classic Company website (classiccompany.com) and anyone who would like to show is strongly encouraged to get their entries in early since stalls and entries are limited to about 570. Not worried? The Aiken Charity Horse Show in May, which has the same exhibitor limit, is already completely sold out of stalls.

Therapy Horse Honored

Buddy, an 18-year-old Quarter Horse-type gelding has been honored as the Professional Association for Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) International Equine of the Year for

proved himself to be the ideal therapy horse. “He is just such a sensitive horse and he has such a good read on people,” said Nicole Pioli, who is the program and volunteer coordinator for Great Oak. “He does everything for our students. We have a few women who started riding with us who have dementia, and they do a lot of grooming and bonding work with him and he is just a rock. For our more active riders who are walking and trotting independently, he’s just super. He is pretty much the core of our program right now.” Buddy was donated to Great Oak by his owners, Carolyn and Tom Murray, who live in Conway, S.C. Nicole Pioli says that she has known the horse for years. He was found in Augusta over a decade ago by Sherry Groat, who recommended him to Carolyn Murray as an ideal first horse. Carolyn had taken up riding later in life, and Buddy, with his easy-

Buddy at the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods going manners and kind personality taught Region 3 (South Carolina, North Carolina, her “everything she needed to know about Virginia and West Virginia.) Buddy lives at riding.” They rode on the beach and did small Great Oak Therapeutic Riding Center on courses, and Buddy was always steady and Edgefield Highway in Aiken where he has Continued on page 32

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

11


Aiken Trials Weekend Something for Everyone

By Mary Jane Howell, Photography by Gary Knoll

T

his year’s Aiken Trials had something for everyone: whether it was meeting the Hall of Fame jockey Eddie Maple during the Breakfast at the Gallops on Friday morning, or watching the dedication of the clockers’ stand to the late Cot Campbell before the races on Saturday afternoon, there was much more than just racing to satisfy the crowd. The Breakfast at the Gallops, an event in which the public is invited to the track to learn about racehorse training, is a tradition that has become more popular with each passing year. Armed with coffee and sausage biscuits, the crowd this year heard commentary from several Thoroughbred racing experts as horses in training galloped past. The highlight of the morning was listening to Eddie Maple recount the highlights of his storied career. These accomplishments included riding Secretariat in his final race and twice winning the Belmont Stakes. Maple, 70, answered questions, autographed photos and still looked fit enough to gallop a racehorse. Friday morning marked the first opportunity for the general public to view the refurbished and enlarged clockers’ stand. The stand was dedicated to Cot Campbell, the founder and president of Dogwood Stable and a pioneer in racehorse syndication. Campbell, who lived in Aiken and died in October 2018 at the age of 91 was a mainstay of the Aiken Training Track. The dedication ceremony was held Saturday afternoon before the races. Cot’s widow, Anne Campbell and her daughters Lila Campbell and Cary Umhau cut the ceremonial ribbon. Photos, old and new, adorn the walls inside the building: trainers of the past and present as well as photos of Campbell. There were six Trials races for young racehorses, interspersed with five pony and young rider races put on by the Maryland-based organization U.S. Pony Racing. This was the second year for the pony races in Aiken, and judging by the swell of entries, it will not be the last. U.S. Pony Racing has events at steeplechase and race meets, and at major horse shows such as Devon and the Washington International. Young riders came to Aiken from Virginia and Maryland, and there were local riders as well. Taylor Kingsley, 13, won the first pony race on Roger That, a professional racing pony owned by Gerry Brewster. Taylor, who came to Aiken from Camden, is the daughter of the steeplechase trainer Arch Kingsley. She also competed her own pony Snowflake in a later race. “It was just so much fun,” Taylor said after her win. “To ride as fast as you can down the stretch with the crowd cheering is the best feeling in the world.” Roger That shipped to the Kingsley’s farm in Camden earlier in the week, giving Taylor a chance to ride the 8-year-old gelding several times before heading to Aiken the morning of the races. “We galloped Monday and Tuesday, fox hunted Wednesday and then practiced our start on Thursday,” she said. “I gave him the day off on Friday so he would be a bit fresh on Saturday.” Other winners in the pony races included Ace of Spades (ridden by Tia Gay), Monkey (ridden by Daphne Walsh) and Carroway Tuesday (ridden by Noelle Railey.) Olney Kushion and Miles Bauersfield held on to win the very competitive lead line race, and Galaxxy Express (ridden by Mell Boucher) took the mile Young Rider flat race. “I don’t think I have ever seen race conditions that include a line about the height of a Shetland pony need not exceed 46 inches and ridden by a rider who is not yet 16,” said the track announcer Tony Bentley, the day of the race. Bentley, who has done a fair amount of acting as well as race calling, was put to the test when calling races with nine ponies in the field. The 2-year-old races started the actual Aiken Trials off. Dancer’s

12

The Aiken Horse

Ghost, trained by Brad Stauffer and Ron Stevens and ridden by Matti Burns won the first trial, which was the Gaver trophy. An unnamed colt by Bourbon Courage ridden by Sarah Cundith and trained by Cary Frommer won the second, the Willard Freeman Cup. Next, the von Stade Trophy went to Eloquent Lady, a filly that shipped in from St. Matthews, S.C. for her owner Maribeth Sandford and trainer Travis Durr. Alfredo Ignacio was in the irons. The first 3-year-old race of the day was the the Iselin Hall of Fame Trophy. Gnarly Mo won that race for his owner Hillwood Stables and trainer Cary Frommer. The fast gelding was a $385,000 yearling purchase at the Keeneland Sale in 2017. Alex Thomas, who spent his first winter in Aiken this year, piloted him to victory. “It was a wonderful experience and this guy is a real racehorse,” Thomas said after the race. “He was just strutting around the paddock and when I got on him it was just an electric feeling. He was calm and collected in the gate and when I turned him loose he was all business. Mo fed off the crowd’s cheering, and was just fast and smooth and perfect.” Thomas, who was raised in a racing family in Upperville, Virginia, has ridden professionally in the past, but says he is enjoying his time in Aiken. “It has been fabulous working for Cary. She has class horses, a happy environment and lots of positive energy in all the barns. We call ourselves the dream team: good horses, good grooms and good riders,” he finished with a laugh. He was also quick to give most of the credit to Gnarly Mo’s regular exercise rider Adan Moreno. “Adan is the rider who has taught this gelding so much in the mornings. I am just lucky enough to breeze him and have the opportunity to ride and win on him at the Trials.” The last two Trials of the day were won by trainer Mike Keogh for Gus Schickedanz: Roansmoke under Tim McKinsey took the Coward Trophy while Silver Sheriff with Kaitlan Montgomery won the City of Aiken Trophy. Whether races were won by seasoned exercise riders or youngsters on their beloved ponies, the 77th running of the Aiken Trials was both a learning experience and just plain fun. Cot Campbell would have approved.

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

13


Ask the Judge

Questions about Dressage With Amy McElroy

Amy McElroy is an FEI competitor, and a USEF S judge. She is qualified to officiate at any USEF recognized national show at all dressage levels. She rides, trains and teaches at Fair Lane Farm in Aiken and judges between 15 and 20 dressage and eventing shows each year. In her popular Ask the Judge column, she answers readers’ questions about dressage. Do you have a question for Amy? Send her an email at McElroyDRM@aol.com, or visit her website: www.amymcelroy.com.

Dear Amy I was recently at a two-day dressage show. I rode the same test both days, but for two different judges. I thought the second day I did so much better, but my score was about the same. I didn’t agree with the marks, and I was so disappointed. Is it ever possible to discuss your scores with the judge?

Disappointed

Dear Disappointed, That brings up a very interesting question. According to the USEF rulebook, DR 122.10, a member of the jury may not discuss a ride with a competitor before or after the final salute. However, it is sometimes possible to talk with your judge during a break, if you have arranged a meeting through the technical delegate (TD). If you feel as if there might be some discrepancy in your test (a comment doesn’t match the number, or the number seems like it is incorrect) the first thing you would do is contact the TD, who is required to be present on the grounds of all USEF shows during the competition. (If you don’t see the TD, you can inquire at the show office.) You would explain the problem with your test and why you wish to speak to the judge. The TD is allowed to ask judges if they would be willing to have a meeting. Judges are not required to meet with competitors, but most judges will if they can. Sometimes time restrictions make meetings impossible. If the judge agrees to talk to you, the judge and the TD will come up with a convenient time and place. Many judges will likely keep the TD within ear’s range during your meeting. If permission is granted, I would try to make your meeting no longer than five minutes and I suggest bringing a copy of the test in question. This will help the judge remember your ride. Unfortunately, using a videotape to dispute a judge’s decision is illegal, according to USEF DR 123.7. Keep in mind that a discussion does not imply a change in your test scores. You should approach this kind of meeting as a chance to gain insight into your ride. Remember to be polite and thoughtful. I would suggest reading your judge’s comments thoroughly, especially anywhere that you might have concerns. Pay special attention to the “further remarks” which you will find at the bottom of your test below the collective marks. This is where your judge will point out the highlights of your test and give you advice about what needs to

14

The Aiken Horse

be improved and developed to enhance the ride. Your judge is not permitted to teach you in these remarks, and will not give you specific directions on what to do: this will be up to you and your coach. Your judge will tell what needs to improve, not how to make that improvement. If you find your judge was very helpful to you, whether just from the comments on the written test, or from a conversation, you can praise them by filling out an official judge’s evaluation form. In fact, anyone who has ridden for a judge can fill out one of these forms. These may be found in your show packet, or at the show office, or even online. Of course, if you are unhappy with your judge’s observations or manner, (we hope not), you can also use this evaluation form. These forms are submitted to the USEF licensed officials committee, and become part of the judge’s record. In addition to feedback from your judges, there are many other ways to learn more about how to ride a successful dressage test. For instance, the Internet has many sites with question and answer forums with trainers, who can give you many tips and insights. If you don’t already have a coach, consider finding one. Judges really try to be fair to all the competitors. They want you to do your best, and they hope that their evaluations will be an asset to your riding. So, to answer your question, it can be possible to talk directly to your judge. But this kind of conversation should be reserved for a clear discrepancy or error, because, unfortunately, judges do not have time for personal discussions with every rider. Remember to go over your test thoroughly. Consider having your ride videotaped so that you can match the comments to your movements. Make sure you are riding at an appropriate level for you and your horse’s stage of training. Possibly seek a professional, who can help you improve your test and achieve your goals. Good luck!

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

15


aikenhorseLEFT4-19_aikenhorseLEFT 4/2/2019 4:41 PM Page 1

Courtney Conger

Randy Wolcott

Suzan McHugh

Thomas Bossard Brian Cavanaugh Jane Page Thompson Donnita Harmon

803.645.3308

803.292.8525

.

803.507.1142

803.640.2845

Lee Hedlund

803.221.6831 803.624.6072

Mike Hosang

803.270.6358 803.215.8232

.

HOMES . HORSES 803.341.8787 203.249.3071 HISTORY . HOSPITALITY

Frank Starcher

803.270.6623 803.508.1936

Jack Roth

Alex Tyrteos

Barb Uskup

Melissa Major

803.295.3199 Broker In Charge

.648.8660

www CarolinaHorseProperties com . 803

Old Buckland Barn . Equestrian training facility in

Willow Oak Farm . Turn-key equestrian facility on

Aiken’s historic downtown Horse District has spacious 2,787 square foot main residence, combining 2 original cottages with central great room. Cottage is delightfully renovated with wood floors, granite countertops and all appliances. There are 2 converted race barns with 15 expanded stalls total, board fenced paddocks, grooms’ apartment, dressage arena with mirror. Call Courtney Conger $1, 425,000

Oak Tree Farm . Country contemporary with 3 bedrooms and 3 full

over 42 acres of board fenced fields includes handsome 16-stall barn with tack & feed rooms, wash stall, and spacious lounge. Well-appointed owner’s apartment features open floor plan with 2 bedrooms, custom kitchen, living room with fireplace. Arena with professional footing for dressage or jumping, trail riding around spring fed pond. Call Courtney Conger or Randy Wolcott $595,000

West Wood Farm . Delightful Sand Hills cottage offers

baths is nestled among live oaks on over 48 acres of board fenced pastures. All new baths and kitchen with stainless steel appliances, granite counters, and all new wood & tile floors throughout. Sunlit great room and master bedroom feature cathedral ceilings and window walls with sweeping views of in ground pool and coastal fields. Center aisle barn has 3 stalls with room for more, tack & feed room, run-in and storage space. Call Courtney Conger $699,000

Hopeland Farms . Spacious Sand Hills cottage offers over 3000

square feet with 4 bedrooms and 4 full baths. The great room with cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace is open to a fully equipped custom kitchen and large sun room overlooking fenced back yard and 6-stall stable. Extensive landscaping with flowering plants year round. For horses, there are 16 acres of rolling board fenced fields shaded by live oaks and lush with established coastal Bermuda grass. Hopeland Farms offers miles of groomed trails open to residents for both riding and carriage driving. Call Courtney Conger $595,000

.

Bridle Creek Trail Immaculate 3 year old home has 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths yet measures just under 1300 square feet. Main floor master, all hardwood & tile floors. Stainless appliances, granite counters in kitchen. Home has alarm, wood burning fireplace, and barn has 4 stalls, tack room, feed room and wash stall. Beautiful pastures and fencing complete this equestrian property on nearly 4 acres. Call Jack Roth $399,000

spacious, light filled rooms with high ceilings, heart pine floors, great room with wood burning fireplace and floor to ceiling built in bookcases, formal dining, custom kitchen with granite and downstairs master suite with luxurious NEW bath. The 5acre tract is developed for horses with 2 board fenced paddocks, each with a run in shed, and 2 wells, one for the house and the other for the paddocks. Private setting in Aiken’s east side equestrian corridor. Call Courtney Conger $450,000

idence on an acre of landscaped lawn and walled gardens featuring sparkling saltwater pool. The 5 bedroom, 6 bath home features approximately 4400 square feet of impeccable living space with soaring ceilings, wood floors, spacious rooms, master suite with two luxurious baths, formal living and dining rooms, gourmet kitchen, and lightfilled sunroom with access to large deck, pool, and meticulously maintained gardens. Bonus bedroom and full bath above the oversized garage. Brand new roof just installed! Plans are approved for a 2-stall stable with feed room, tack room, and living area with kitchen. Call owner/agent Lee Hedlund $1, 200,000

Hollow Creek Preserve . Attractive, low-maintenance home

boasts high ceilings, hardwood floors & crown moldings. Fabulous kitchen features walk in pantry, granite counters, stainless appliances. Spacious owner’s suite has room-sized bath with walk in shower & 2 walk-in closets . Separate den/office, laundry room, bonus room with full bath, walk-in attic storage, 2-car garage, security & irrigation systems. For the equestrian, this level lot w/shade trees is ready for barn & fencing. Call Jack Roth $525,000

16

.

New Bridge Polo Club Possibly the best 6.85 acre building lot now available in an exceptional location at New Bridge Polo. A short walk away from the clubhouse, tennis court and swimming pool, it has direct access to Polo Field One and overlooks Field Three. The lot is perimeter fenced with established coastal Bermuda grass and a well and electrical service have already been installed. Call Alex Tyrteos $280,000

.

C’est La Vie Farm Located on over 60 acres of fenced fields & woods, this fully developed horse farm includes brick 3 bedroom home, 2-car garage, center aisle barn, dressage arena, 6 large paddocks, 2 run-in sheds, round pen, dog run. The custom barn has 8-10 stalls with rubber pavers, tack room/lounge with Mexican tile floors, half bath, feed room, wash stall, fly spray system, and large unfinished apartment with enclosed stairs to loft. Courtney Conger | Randy Wolcott $550,000

SOLSTICE

Meadow

Gardens

Call COURTNEY CONGER

.

Bridle Creek Phase II now open at Bridle Creek! Lots range from 5 acres to 11.77 acres. Community amenities include miles of trails, gallop, stadium jumps, cross-country jump field, and dressage ring. Community green space added at entrance. Call Jack Roth $18,000 per acre

Chukker Cottage . Overlooking historic Whitney Polo Field is this exquisite brick res-

TIMSHEL Level, partially cleared lots in developing equestrian area with easy access to Aiken, Edgefield and I-20. Riding rings and trails are underway, and homeowners with interests in eventing, hunter jumpers, driving and trail riding are in residence. Best of all, lots from 12.25 to over 14 acres are available for only $4,500 per acre!

.

Scott’s Estate This landmark 63.85 acre property, conveniently located only 6 miles from downtown Aiken, includes a spectacular 7 acre pond, fed by Shaw's Creek with natural swimming pool. Beautifully planted hardwood trees and extensive lawns sweep down from the house to the pond and a backdrop of mature pines behind the pond complete the dramatic landscape. The house has 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths, large farmhouse kitchen with eat-in alcove & wood burning fireplace, and large Florida room with second fireplace. Call Alex Tyrteos $1, 100,000

.

Woolworth House Historic Winter Colony cottage with stables in downtown Aiken just steps from Hitchcock Woods, Aiken’s 2,200-acre riding reserve! Delightful 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath home, updated in recent years, features high ceilings, wood floors, fireplace, and wall of windows overlooking patio & paddocks. For horses, there is a 3-stall shed row barn. Call Courtney Conger $675,000

The Aiken Horse

Partially cleared tracts ready for you to have horses at home! Direct access to trail system with miles of dedicated trails, including the 61 acre Freeman preserve, which has a wonderful pond. Ask about owner financing! These 5-acre parcels offered at just

$85,000 PER PARCEL Call RANDY WOLCOTT

.

Three Runs Plantation Beautiful NEW Wolf Construction home on a great lot in Phase 7 has 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths on main floor, with bedroom/bonus room and full bath upstairs. Property has 5.2 acres and 2-bay garage. Flooring throughout entire house is either oak hardwood, ceramic tile or carpet in bedrooms. Natural gas and hi-speed fiber optic internet available. Miles of groomed trails, schooling areas, dressage ring, pool, clubhouse and fitness center. CallJack Roth $579,000

April-May 2019


aikenhorseRIGHT4-19_aikenhorseRIGHT 4/3/2019 2:00 PM Page 1

GOODSPRINGS

Plantation

Build the home of your dreams! Two lots available in small, private, gated equestrian community that's close to Stable View with easy access to the interstate, downtown Aiken and Augusta

LOT 13 $41,000 3.41 acres

Wadmalaw Island Equestrian . This Charleston equestrian property

Magnolia Blossom Ranch . Beautiful equestrian estate at Three Runs Plantation on two lots, over 13 acres of established grass with majestic views! The quality built huntbox has 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, custom kitchen in 1638 square feet of living space, and includes 5 stalls with automatic waterers, wash stall, tack/grooming stall and storage. There are 3 large paddocks, irrigation, security system, and stone entry with custom gate. Call Jack Roth $735,000

LOT 22 $57,000 4.68 acres Call MIKE HOSANG or BRIAN CAVANAUGH

Steeplechase Cottage . Beautiful 3-acre parcel in Aiken's Horse

offers proximity, privacy and possibilities! Renovated main residence has 5 bedrooms (2 master suites!), 3.5 baths, huge walk-in closets with built-ins, home office and gym. Property includes nearly 17 acres, with 15 acres of fenced pasture and riding arena. Large 8-stall barn with kitchen, bath, laundry, wash area and detached tack room. The 4-stall barn has hay loft & storage. Call Jack Roth $1,150,000

District has magnificent views of the steeplechase track and horse show grounds. The 3458 square foot main residence has open floor plan that includes 4 bedrooms and 3 full baths. Kitchen boasts top of the line appliances, and gracious screened porch overlooks salt water pool. Charming guest house has 2 bedrooms and 2 baths. Call Thomas Bossard $1,599,000

Red Top Estate . Historic Aiken estate with grand rooms for entertaining, 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, and classic original architectural elements throughout. This Gilded Age residence with modern updates includes an apartment, formal gardens, carport on 1.22 acres. Call Jane Page Thompson or Alex Tyrteos $998,500

The Wilrose . Stunning private country estate on 12 lovely acres with beautiful live oaks! Custom home features 5 bedrooms & 4 baths, well-appointed kitchen with granite counters, high ceilings and wood flooring throughout. Attached 4 car garage plus finished basement space. Additional 18 acres with 2 large metal buildings available — complete 30 acres offered at $1,300,000. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $999,000

JOYNER POND

CHARLESTON

Level, wooded 10 acre parcel, near Oakwood, ideally located in desirable Aiken equestrian corridor. Suitable for country living, including mini-farm and equestrian use, but close to charm and shops of downtown Aiken.

Grassed and level 22.65 acres perfect for multi-use equestrian facility in the heart of horse country. Large fenced paddock, runin sheds, and several wonderful home and barn sites.

Highway

Acreage

.

The Polo Club Location, Location, Location! "The Polo Club" is an early century charmer, which was originally built as a clubhouse for Whitney Polo Field. Directly across from Aiken's Training Track in Historic Horse District, the property has easy access to downtown Aiken and south side shopping. Enjoy the wraparound porch with picturesque views. Keep cozy in front of the 5 fireplaces. Beautiful hardwood floors and original details enhance this historic property that also boasts ample paddock space. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $975,000

$84,000

Call MIKE HOSANG or BRIAN CAVANAUGH

.

Thirty Oaks Farm Charming 2 bedroom, 2 bath cottage with fireplace surrounded by horse country 12.38 acres. Equestrian amenities include 6-stall barn with feed/tack room, separate workshop, hay storage building, 10 turnouts, lay-up field, and 5 run-ins in perimeter fenced established pasture. Call Mike Hosang $389,900

$175,000

Call MIKE HOSANG or BRIAN CAVANAUGH

NEW BRIDGE

Polo Club

.

Rainbow Ridge Farm Adorable 6.5 acre farm lovingly improved by its owner, a rated local builder. Attractive 2-story cottage has 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, open floor plan with main level master. Gourmet kitchen with granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Antique barnwood floors, rear porch overlooking 4 newly fenced paddocks with irrigation, 2 run-in sheds, and RV/machinery storage shed, which could easily convert to a 4-stall barn. Adjacent to trails in Windsor horse country! Call Alex Tyrteos $305,000

Large lot (8.71 acres) complete with fencing, well & septic across from endline of Field 2. World class polo community with polo fields, clubhouse, tennis & swimming pool.

Nearby Farm . Comfortable home with 3 bedrooms and 3 full baths near Stable View and other equestrian venues. The 32 acre farm offers fenced paddocks with pasture for turn-out, and new multi-purpose building for workshop, garage, barn or storage. Excellent location convenient to both Aiken and Augusta. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $449,000

$99,900 Call MIKE HOSANG

Pearl Bonnet . This 4 bedroom, 2 bath

manufactured home on brick crawlspace foundation would make the perfect starter home! Island kitchen includes range, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer & dryer. Located on over 2 acres, the property is approximately 16 miles from downtown Aiken — close enough for convenience, yet far enough for secluded country living! Call Donnita Harmon $124,900

NEW BRIDGE

TALATHA

Exquisite 11.35 acre building site in a prime location at New Bridge Polo Club. Direct access to polo fields, clubhouse, tennis and swimming pool. Complete with plenty of fencing and 3HP well!

Planning your ideal Aiken horse farm? Here’s 2.5 wooded acres in south side equestrian community just minutes to shopping and dining!

Farms

Polo Club

.

Lakeview Farm Stately gated entrance leads you into Lakeview Farm. This sportsman's retreat includes approximately 77 gently rolling acres mostly in grass, an 11 acre fishing/skiing lake with a country cabin set right on the shoreline. 2 bedroom, 1 bath cabin boasts a full length porch overlooking lake, large, open kitchen, family room with fireplace. Large, separate den with fireplace. Unique property n popular Highway 302 equestrian corridor lends itself to a variety of uses such as equestrian, recreational and farming. Call Mike Hosang $735,000

$185,000

Call JACK ROTH

Wexford Mill . Southern Living at its finest! This 4-

bedroom, 2.5 bath home sits on over an acre with amazing views of the lake from the rocking chair front porch. Plenty of room for entertaining with bright & spacious living room and family room, crown molding, smooth ceilings and calming colors. Lots of storage in walk-out attic and the finished garage with workshop. Call Donnita Harmon $299,500

Courtney Conger

Randy Wolcott

Suzan McHugh

Thomas Bossard Brian Cavanaugh Jane Page Thompson Donnita Harmon

803.645.3308

803.292.8525

.

803.507.1142

803.640.2845

Lee Hedlund

803.221.6831 803.624.6072

Mike Hosang

803.270.6358 803.215.8232

Frank Starcher

803.270.6623 803.508.1936

.

Jack Roth

JANE PAGE THOMPSON

$46,000

Alex Tyrteos

803.341.8787

203.249.3071

Barb Uskup

Melissa Major

803.295.3199 Broker In Charge

.648.8660

www CarolinaHorseProperties com . 803

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

17


18

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

19


Grand Prix Eventing at Bruce’s Field.


Photography by Pam Gleason and Gary Knoll


ABOUT NEW BRIDGE (visit newbridgepolo.com or call 1-888-4NB-POLO)

presents

Windsor Cottage

New Bridge is an 860-acre gated equestrian community nestled among rolling pasture lands on New Bridge Road just 15 minutes from downtown Aiken. Born from the excitement, intensity and tradition of polo, New Bridge is the home of New Bridge Polo & Country Club and of Aiken Youth Polo, but also embraces equestrians of all disciplines as well as those who simply love the outdoors, with all sharing the essential joy of a life that celebrates horses, people and land - in a place that connects them. Residents enjoy an array of equestrian amenities including five meticulously groomed polo fields, stick and ball areas, an exercise track, polo arena, riding trails, all-weather GGT dressage and jumping arenas, miles of groomed roads made for riding and The Stables, our full-care, premier 24-stall boarding facility.

HEATED MAIN FLOOR SCREENED PORCH GARAGE

A swimming pool with lounge area, a clay tennis court, and an Argentinian colonial-style Clubhouse with restaurant/bar (open spring and fall), balcony, porch, and outdoor spaces round out the perfect setting for everyone from families to empty nesters, casual riders to competitive athletes, and those simply seeking solace from a busy world. The New Bridge world is one where all can revel in the luxury of leisure, the excitement of sport, the abiding beauty of horse country, and the deep connections of a close-knit community. New Bridge: room to play; room to ride; room to live, all in a place you ! will want to call home.

2,147 SQ. FT. 207 SQ. FT. 576 SQ. FT.

The Windsor Cottage is located on an extra-large homesite in serene setting that backs up to Clearwater Creek. This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath Craftsman’s style cottage has fine detailing outside and in. Welcoming front porch, plus a screened porch with entry from the great room. Gracious room sizes in a single-level floor plan with 2,147 square feet of heated and cooled living space, plus an attached, over-sized 2 car garage.

Enjoy lots of closet and storage space in this open floor plan home. Gracious foyer entry. Spacious great room with wood-burning fireplace leads into the kitchen and separate dining room. Private, large master bedroom suite with roomy walk-in closet. Two bedrooms (one can be a den or office) in the back of the home share a full bath. Conveniently located powder room for guests; separate laundry room; covered breezeway to the garage. Design services by

Now Under Construction

Custom built by

Offered through New Bridge Realty

Contact Raza Kazmi, 888-4NB-POLO, info@newbridgepolo.com

22

The Aiken Horse

Exterior siding of long lasting Hardie Board with shingle accents, double pane windows, landscaped yard with sprinkler system, individual septic and well. Purchase of home includes a membership certificate in New Bridge Polo and Country Club and access to all the amenities that New Bridge offers.

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

23


TRIPLE CROWN

BUY 12 GET 1

FREE Aiken’s Premiere Equine store!

www.aikensaddlery.com | 803-649-6583 1044 East Pine Log Road, Aiken, SC 29803

24

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


AG B ERAY d. Offerlavastl.id P FF IL –gsMpurchhialesesupplies O R a 0 APber of cbations, w 1 $ on numating lo t limi ticip No t par a

HORSE FEED. DEFINED. Legends® feeds are fortified by Kentucky Equine Research to meet your horse’s individual needs. For feeding advice or to create a custom ration, visit microsteed.com/legends. Visit ker.com/legends to read the latest in equine nutrition and health and subscribe to the Equinews® newsletter presented by Legends® Feeds.

legendshorsefeed.com Questions or Comments: Southern_States_Feed_Questions@cargill.com

©2019 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

25


Doug Payne finishes strong over the Palmetto Golf Club.

26

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


Grand Prix Eventing

Crowd-Pleasing Spectacle at Bruce’s Field By Amber Heintzberger, photography by Pam Gleason

W

ith a daring cross-country round in front of a packed house, Liz Halliday-Sharp and Fernhill By Night won the inaugural $50,000 LiftMaster Grand Prix Eventing Invitational at Bruce’s Field in Aiken, March 1-2, 2019. It was the first run of the season for the 16-year-old Irish Sport Horse (Radolin x Argentina XII, by Argentinus) owned by Deborah Halliday. Halliday-Sharp, who is based in Ocala, Florida said that the seasoned upper-level event horse knows his job and gave it his all. “It’s not a bad way to kick off the season,” she quipped as she received her award check. Every rider was placed on a team that represented a local charity, and Halliday-Sharp was riding for the Friends of the Animal Shelter (FOTAS), a nonprofit that helps the animals at the Aiken County Animal Shelter. In addition to her own award check, she also earned FOTAS $2,500. “He was brilliant throughout,” she said of Fernhill by Night. “There were a couple of spots in the dressage I could have ridden a bit better; my half-passes to the right were not as good as they usually are. He can be a lazy horse, but he actually pushed on pretty well. He was fantastic in the show jumping. I mean I couldn’t have asked him to jump any better. I think he enjoyed the crowd and was quite sassy when he came out of the ring, which is great.” Liz Halliday-Sharp said the short format suited her horse well, and she went all out for the time on cross country, not only to be competitive but because she said her horse is better with a forward ride. The pair flew through the cross country and finished on their dressage score of 28.7. “He really gave me everything, and he hasn’t run since last year,” she said. “He deserves this. We don’t run him a lot now; we just keep him excited for the party.” (Halliday-Sharp and Fernhill by Night went on to win the Carolina International CCI4*-S in Southern Pines, North Carolina on March 23.) Doug Payne aboard Vandiver finished second on a score of 30.8. The 15-year-old Trakehner (Windfall x Visions of Grandeur, by Mystic Replica xx), owned in partnership between Doug and Jessica Payne and Debi Crawley, made the twisting, turning cross country track look like a walk in the park. Payne’s charity, Home for Good Dog Rescue, also got a check for $1,500. Home for Good is a New Jersey-based rescue with a Southern headquarters in Aiken that is devoted to rescuing and rehoming Southern dogs. The Eventing Grand Prix had a spectator-friendly, two-day format, with dressage and show jumping on Friday, and cross country on Saturday afternoon. The shortened cross-country course consisted of Advanced sized jumps and ran over approximately 2100 meters featuring 22 jumping efforts at a galloping pace of 535 meters per minute. All of the action, situated in the infield of the track at the Aiken Horse Park, was easily viewed from a large VIP tent (a convenient shelter from the torrential downpours on Friday), and from the surrounding area. The course was designed by Captain Mark Phillips and built by Eric Bull of ETB Equine Construction, the same team that crafted the course for the 2018 World Equestrian Games in Tryon, North Carolina. The Aiken course consisted entirely of miniature versions of local landmarks, including The Willcox, the Aiken Post Office, and, of course, a traditional “Aiken” fence. Every fence was intricately detailed and painted and then decorated with flowers for a stunning visual effect. The VIP tent was packed with patrons long after the competition wrapped up, and the exciting sport combined with a craft beer festival in the trade fair drew a large crowd to the rest of the infield. The British Olympian, William Fox-Pitt, came over from England

April-May 2019

and took a catch ride on Sandro’s Star, usually piloted by Chris Talley. The pair finished in third place on 31.1, with the second fastest crosscountry round of the day. Sandro’s Star is an 11-year-old Oldenburg stallion (Sagnol x Poetic Patter xx, by Nostalgia’s Star xx) owned by Hannah Salazar. Fox-Pitt said that he was grateful for the generosity of Sandro Star’s owner and rider in sharing such a nice horse, and said he hoped that Talley would go on to do great things with the stallion. “He’s a lovely horse, and he did the job well,” he said. He also said that while he hopes that competitions like the Eventing Grand Prix do not replace the traditional form of eventing, he liked that it provided a way to showcase the sport to a wide audience, and said that he had a lot of fun over the weekend. “I’ve been to Aiken to teach, and I have friends here, and it’s been a lovely weekend,” he said. “I think the event has done just what it is supposed to do.” Boyd Martin, who winters at Stable View in Aiken, entered three horses in the competition, but opted to run just one horse on Saturday’s cross country. Martin broke his collarbone foxhunting in February, and with Tsetserleg and Ray Price slated to enter the CIC4* at Red Hills in Florida the week after the Grand Prix, he wanted to be a little careful. He did complete the entire competition with Christine Turner’s fiery chestnut mare Kyra, a 12-year-old Canadian Warmblood (Eastern Echo x Miner’s Girl, by Miner’s Mark), who finished fourth overall. Martin, who was on the advisory board for the event, said, “We had a spectacular crowd on Friday, considering the rainy weather. The course rode well, and I was happy with my horse.” Alexandra Knowles on Sound Prospect, a 17-year-old Thoroughbred (Eastern Echo x Miner’s Girl, by Miner’s Mark), owned by the Sound Prospect Syndicate, was tied with Martin for fourth place but ultimately finished in 5th, as Martin was closer to the optimum time. Phillip Dutton, who spends winters at his own Red Oak Farm in Aiken, was a longtime friend of Bruce Duchoissois, for whom Bruce’s Field is named. Dutton, formerly an Australian citizen and a member of Australia’s eventing team, started coming to Aiken with Bruce in the 1990s. In 1996, when the Australian team was preparing for the Atlanta Olympics, Duchossois hosted the entire Australian team at his farm. (The team won the gold medal.) For Dutton’s efforts in bringing the event to life and his contributions to the local horse community, the mayor of Aiken presented him with a key to the City of Aiken. “It was a bit of a shock and a great honor to receive the key to the city, it was very generous and thoughtful of the mayor and it’s certainly been a great privilege to be a part of this community,” said Dutton, who competed aboard Fernhill Singapore, finishing eighth overall. “I’d say the event exceeded expectations for the first year,” he continued. “Certainly we’re aiming for it to improve every year but to get the local community involved was exciting – giving back to local charities it was a win-win for everybody. I think it was a good experience for the riders to have a little pressure – overall the standard was very good. “Mark does a great job designing anyway, but this is a little unique in that it’s a lot of jumps in a short amount of time, there’s a little more intensity in the way you ride and Mark has done a lot of them now, probably the most of any designer in the world,” he continued. “We didn’t have a horse or rider fall, there were just a couple glance-offs, and he tried to make it so it could be seen by the crowd who were up close and personal. Bruce’s Field is unique in that it has some galloping stretches but it’s in the middle of town. We’re excited for the future of the event.”

The Aiken Horse

27


What Makes Polo Unique By Adam Snow

T

he roots of the polo are both ancient and martial. According to the Polo Museum and Hall of Fame (Florida), polo’s origins are “older than recorded history,” and derive from “mounted nomads in Central Asia who played a version – part sport, part training for war.” There are other sports that carry one or the other of these characteristics, but none that combine all of them. Lacrosse, whose Algonquin founders referred to the tribal competition as the little brother of war, represented its own form of cross-training for battle. Popular equestrian sports today – eventing, cutting, and racing – share the partnership and high level of trust between horse and rider. But polo’s essence – and what makes it truly unique – is the game’s multiple layers of teamwork. Consider that preparation for a match involves not only strategies for the four human teammates, but ones for effective partnerships with each of the individual horses that any team member will play. I usually play 8 or 9 horses in a match, which means there’s a lot to think about, a lot of different teams to coordinate before each and every match. And you want everything just right. My wife, Shelley, a veterinarian who has committed herself to the preparation and maintenance of equine athletes, put it better than I could in our book Polo Life: Horses, Sport, 10 and Zen Imagine preparing not only yourself, but readying eight other sentient athletes as well. And they can’t tell you if they need more work, a spell of rest in the pasture, or where they might feel soreness. Yet preparing them to play their best – getting the feed and exercise right, the injuries diagnosed and healed, settling on the tack and bit selections so that both horse and rider feel comfortable – is easily as important as the human player’s preparation. Here is where the game gets complicated. (Chapter 3, pages 25-26) Two additional features distinguish polo from most, if not all, other sports: teams do not stay together for very long, and the professional version is primarily a pro-am model. Both factors are related to the sport’s system of handicapping individual players, and defining tournaments by the maximum limit for team handicaps. The scale for individual handicaps ranges from -1 to 10, and can be thought of as an estimate of that player’s value. Like golf but in reverse, with the highest polo handicap (10) representing the most proficiency. The word goal is used interchangeably with handicap and has at least a loose association with that player’s worth in terms of net goals – their combined offensive and defensive production, over the duration of an average match. Handicaps are reassessed semi annually by a national committee comprised of current and retired players who observe and vote on registered players. One’s handicap may go up, down or remain the same, according to recent successes or lack thereof. And a player’s handicap may even vary by country. At one stage in my career, I held three different handicaps for the UK, US, and Argentina, in descending order.

28

The Aiken Horse

A “team handicap” is simply the sum of the four teammates handicaps, which can add up to but not surpass, the upper limit of a specific tournament. In and around Aiken today, one can find tournament polo at the 4, 6, 8 and 12-goal levels. When an 8-goal team squares off against a team with a total handicap of 7, the latter starts the game with one goal on the scoreboard. In Florida this past winter, a spectator could observe tournaments at the 20, 22 and 26-goal levels. The higher up you go, the smaller the pool of qualified players and horses from which to choose, and the greater the expenses related to putting a competitive team on the field. The pro-am nature of the sport means that the team sponsor (variously called an amateur, player-owner, or patron) participates as a playing member of his or her squad. Although corporate sponsorship, as well as purse prizes for certain tournaments, are gradually becoming more common, the game continues to be predominantly financed by amateurs who love the thrill of competing in this dynamic team sport. Because every individual handicap reflects a relative ability, if someone is performing well for their handicap (regardless of whether they are 0 or 10, amateur or professional) then they are an asset to their team. This is the intended “leveler” between teams entering the same tournament, and is also what allows players of varying skills to participate together on the same playing field. There’s another critical component to the polo team, and these are the grooms, the caretakers responsible for the day-to-day feed, exercise, and maintenance of a tournament string. Just as the horse is crucial to the player’s ability to perform, so too is the groom’s care fundamental to the comfort and preparedness of these ponies. Let’s face it, the best team tactics and most skilled ball-handling ability of a player are worthless if he or she can’t get to the play. With all the team members involved, the line between reward and frustration can sometimes feel exceedingly narrow. But the rewards, as well as the challenges, are great. Get it right – the preparation, the horses, the larger “team” – and there’s no other sport like it.

Adam Snow is professional polo player who attained and held a 10-goal rating while playing in the top polo contests in the world. A member of the United States Polo Association Hall of Fame, he lives in Aiken with his wife Shelley Onderdonk and their family. He and Shelley are authors of the book Polo Life; Horses, Sport 10 and Zen. Pololife.co

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

29


Dressage Trainer Jeremy Steinberg Now in Aiken

By Nancy Johnson, photography by Gary Knoll

I

n an average year, Jeremy Steinberg, a renowned dressage clinician, teaches 48 weekends. So what does he do on that very rare weekend with no clinic on his schedule? He spends it giving lessons to his new neighbors. Jeremy and his wife, Chanda, moved from southern California to Three Runs Plantation, an equestrian community in Aiken, at the end of November 2018. On Saturday, February 23, despite a cold rain, a sizeable audience watched as Jeremy taught individual lessons in his first Aiken clinic. Many were curious to see for themselves this highly regarded horseman whose teaching resume lists four years as the USEF Dressage Youth Coach as well as a stint as the coach of New Zealand’s national dressage team. His riding achievements include the individual gold and team silver at the North American Young Rider Championships as well as training and competing many horses to Grand Prix. Sixteen-year-old Madelynn Walker specifically wanted Jeremy’s suggestions to prepare her pony for the FEI Pony Tests later this year at the National Dressage Pony Cup in Chicago. “Jeremy was very engaging and explained the dynamics between my pony and myself,” she said. “And he gave me good insight as to what to work on for future goals. I really enjoyed his teaching style.” Mary Marshall is converting from show hunters to dressage. “I have a lot to learn about this discipline and I had heard of Jeremy’s reputation and high remarks from others that had ridden with him. My hunter/jumper trainer, John Abbott, also encouraged me to take some lessons with Jeremy on my dressage horse,” she said. “He was very good at explaining why he was asking you to do something. That helps a lot in my ability to absorb what outcome I am trying to achieve by using different aids. I am a huge believer in having homework from my lessons and I did walk away with some new tools in my pocket to help enhance my horse’s performance.” “I am excited to have Jeremy’s caliber of professionalism living in Aiken. We are fortunate to have him in Three Runs,” said Judy Lynch, another rider in the clinic. “Jeremy is a great communicator and very effective, not only able to pull out areas best to work on, but just as effective in communicating these corrections in his teaching. Jeremy helped me enormously. He brought clarity to training some movements, while incorporating my level of skill as well as the horse’s conformational weaknesses.” These three riders, as well as several others he taught that day and the next, were each unique in their experience, abilities and goals. But that didn’t faze Jeremy. “I will teach anyone who wants to learn,” he said. “Strangely, the more advanced riders can sometimes be easier to teach because we are working with more technical concepts that are broad spectrum, which in theory they are already conceptualizing, so the work becomes more teamwork than teaching and can take weeks to bear fruit. But with younger horses or greener riders sometimes the changes can be more instant and dramatic, so because of that the greener riders take more focus on my end, especially in a clinic situation, because I want to give them as much information as I can in a really short period of time. I know it sounds strange, but I almost take those lessons more seriously because I remember being in that position and how important it is.” Jeremy, 43, says that his teaching philosophy as well as his training and riding techniques grew out of his long relationship with his trainer and mentor, the late Dietrich von Hopffgarten, a Vancouver-based German dressage trainer. “The man I grew up riding with was a teacher instead of a coach. When you had a lesson, he would teach you. You would get a lot of information and a lot of applied theory so you could actually do it. He’d give you enough information so you could go away for a week, two weeks, or even six months, and work.”

30

The Aiken Horse

Jeremy draws a distinction between this type of teaching and pure coaching, where the rider is told what is good and bad, and is directed through some patterns. He says with coaching, the riders may get the result they are looking for during the lesson, but have no idea how to replicate it afterwards. Von Hopffgarten’s influence on Jeremy can be seen in many ways, from his ultimate respect for the horse to his straightforward approach and outspokenness. Jeremy feels strongly that technical correctness is the backbone of dressage, yet he sees it being overlooked by riders at the highest levels. He cites some specific examples of horses not being penalized by judges, even though a specific movement was not performed correctly as outlined in the FEI rulebook. “This sport is subjective and it’s judged, but we need to separate beauty and technical correctness,” he says. Jeremy advocates a complete overhaul of the present scoring system, but questions whether it will ever happen. “They talk all the time about transparency, but I don’t see it. I don’t see this great idea to change the system to make it less subjective and more straightforward.” Jeremy writes a column called “Between Rounds” in The Chronicle of the Horse in which he expresses his views on touchy topics such as discrepancies in the FEI rule book and judging, along with less controversial ones such as assessing and working toward one’s goals and the importance of raising young riders to be good human beings. He expects that here in Aiken, in addition to teaching and riding his horses during the week, he will be able to expand on his writing, since the majority of his clinics are in the East, and he will be spending less time traveling. How did Jeremy and Chanda come to Aiken? Jeremy says he first came here about eight years ago to visit his friend Ursula Dodge and her husband Eric Gum, right after the couple moved to Three Runs Plantation from Washington State. He continued to visit every year thereafter. “I just fell in love with the area and joked that I wanted to move here,” he said. Ursula and Eric loved the thought of Jeremy living nearby, but didn’t think he would ever leave the West Coast, where he had a strong client base. “Ursula has been my best friend since we rode at the same barn in Seattle. She and Eric are like family. Shortly after we got married, Chanda met them. When everyone hit it off; the stars just aligned. Chanda’s from Kentucky and wasn’t in love with California and I really wanted out of Southern California at that point. So I said, ‘Let’s look at Aiken.’” The story of how Jeremy and Chanda met could come out of a movie script. Chanda, who is a lawyer and an amateur rider, was participating in one of Jeremy’s clinics in Louisville, Kentucky. That weekend George Morris was in town visiting a friend, and wanted to come by to watch a few lessons and meet Jeremy. He arrived during Chanda’s lesson. She had a hard time focusing on her riding with George watching and thought it was a terrible lesson. But she still attended the party after the clinic, where her friends had plans to fix Jeremy up with someone else. “But fate had other ideas I guess,” says Jeremy. “Chanda and I hit it off. The rest is history. She moved to San Diego shortly thereafter; we got married a little over a year later and here we are!” “We still wake up every morning and say we can’t believe we actually live here,” said Jeremy. Having had a large training barn for years, he says he is happy to have their horses at home. “Horse management is so much easier here,” he says. One of the three horses in their barn is Chanda’s, one is a horse that Jeremy has in training, and one is a 7-year-old mare that is Jeremy’s own project. “I bred her and she’s kind of the love of my life,” he said. Learn more about Jeremy on his website, www.steinbergdressage.com or on Facebook @jeremysteinbergdressage. To inquire about clinics or lessons, contact him at jeremysteinberg@mac.com or 206-799-5646.

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

31


News & Notes from page 11 reliable. When Carolyn retired and wanted to spend more time traveling, she asked Nicole if there might be a purpose for Buddy at Great Oak. Nicole said yes, and Buddy came to Aiken as one of the center’s first horses. Buddy has taken his riders to the South Carolina Equestrian Special Olympics and to the therapeutic riding class at the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods. He will be back at the S.C. Equestrian Special Olympics at Bruce’s Field in the Aiken Horse Park on May 1819. Great Oak is sending eight riders, two of which will be paired with Buddy. Nicole says that things are going well at Great Oak, which celebrated its first anniversary at its new facility on February 14, the same day that they learned about Buddy’s PATH award. The facility has a new sensory trail, which was built by the local Boy Scout troop. There are 40 riders a week who come to participate in the programs and everyone is getting ready for five weeks of summer camp for children of all ages and abilities. “It’s getting fun,” says Nicole. Great Oak is based on a 20-acre farm not far from the center of Aiken. It offers therapeutic riding for children and adults with physical, emotional and psychological challenges. It also has a variety of other “Equine Assisted Activities” including a veterans’ program, after school activities for girls, “Silver Saddles” for mature women and community based instruction in which high school students

32

learn about horse and farm care. The organization is starting a new fundraising campaign this year. Members of the community are now invited to sponsor a horse for the year. The cost is $2,500, which covers all the horse’s expenses, allowing Great Oak to devote more resources to its programs. There are six horses in all – you can find more information and photos of the horses on the Great Oak website. There are other sponsorship, donation and volunteer opportunities, too. Visit greatoakatrc.org for more information.

History for Sale in Camden

History enthusiasts might be interested to learn that Kamschatka is for sale. Kamschatka is an antebellum estate built by James and Mary Chesnut in Camden in 1854. The

The Aiken Horse

10,000 square foot residence has nine bedrooms, eight and a half baths and is situated on 15 landscaped acres not far from the Springdale Racecourse and Camden hunt country. The estate includes three guest cottages, an 8-stall stable with three paddocks and a gardener’s cottage with two garages. Mary Boykin Chesnut was an educated, forward-thinking woman born in Charleston in 1823, the daughter of Stephen Decatur Miller who served as the governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator. At 17, she was married to James Chesnut, a lawyer from Camden who would later be elected a U.S Senator. After South Carolina seceded from the nation in 1861, he became a brigadier general in the Confederate Army and an aid to the Confederate president Jefferson Davis. Mary Chesnut wrote three novels, none of which were published. But she did achieve great renown for her Civil War diaries, which cover the years 1861-1865. She expanded and revised these diaries in the 1880s, and they were published as A Diary from Dixie in 1905 and 1949, and then as Mary Chesnut’s Civil War in 1981. The 1981 edition, edited and annotated by C. Vann Woodward, won the Pulitzer Prize for History and is considered one of the most important accounts of the Civil War from a Southern perspective. Among other things, it was a major source for the Ken

April-May 2019


RESCUE . NURTURE . LOVE . FOSTER . ADOPT . DONATE . Over 7200 dogs rescued and cared for in Aiken. Help us rescue more dogs by donating at:

w w w. h o m e f o r g o o d d o g s . o r g

HOME FOR GOOD DOG RESCUE April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

33


Burns Civil War documentary miniseries that aired on Public Broadcasting. The Chesnuts had two homes in Camden: Kamschatka, where they lived until James was elected to the Senate in 1858, and Mulberry Plantation which belonged to James’s family. Mulberry Plantation was declared a National Historic Landmark in 2000. Most of the Civil War diaries themselves were probably written at the couple’s home in Columbia where Mary spent the war years. Kamschatka has connections to some other well-known people, too. For instance, in 1938 it was purchased by the family of the conservative author and commentator, William F. Buckley Jr. The Buckleys owned the

estate for more than 50 years. Interested? Visit the website for a video tour of the property. www.kirkwoodlane.com

SPCA Albrecht Center Wins Award The SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare was recently recognized with a “Best Shelter” award by the MuttNation Foundation. MuttNation was founded by the country singer Miranda Lambert and her mother Bev Lambert. Miranda is an animal lover and she adopted her own dog from an animal shelter where she used to volunteer. MuttNation’s goal, according to its

We offer a wide range of fencing, including equestrian properties and residential privacy fencing. Run in and storage sheds are also available.

Free estimates and design assistance Contact John at (803) 292-5161 34

The Aiken Horse

website, is to “promote and facilitate the adoption of shelter pets, encourage spay and neuter for all pets, and educate the public about the importance and beneficial impact of these actions.” The award that the Albrecht Center won was part of MuttNation’s “Mutts Across America” campaign which gives out grants to one shelter in each of the 50 states every year. Shelters are selected for having high adoption rates, high volunteerism and fiscal responsibility, among other things. In addition to a certificate and recognition on the MuttNation website, the Albrecht Center

was awarded a $3,000 grant. The SPCA Albrecht Center, which is located on Willow Run Road adjacent to Aiken’s dog park was founded in 1935 by Mrs. Fitch Gilbert and three other members of Aiken society: Julia Fish Breese, Louise P. Ford, and Mrs. J.E. Thorpe. Mrs. Fitch Gilbert might be better known in Aiken’s equestrian circles as the mother of the famous steeplechase jockey and polo player Pete

Bostwick. (Fitch Gilbert was her second husband.) From the beginning, the SPCA has had a strong relationship with Aiken’s horse community, which continues to the present day. Today, the Albrecht Center has a stateof-the art facility which includes a low cost veterinary clinic in addition to a shelter and adoption center. To promote the welfare of the animals in the shelter and to make them more adoptable, the Albrecht Center engages in enrichment activities including a successful dog training program called Phideaux University. They have even added a cat training program this year through a grant from the Jackson Galaxy Project. The program is called “Cat Pawsitive” and it uses positive reinforcement to teach cats to do such things as give high fives and come up to greet potential adopters. Does anyone really expect a trained cat? Probably not. But the activity reduces stress, keeping cats healthier, happier and more likely to find their new homes. (Learn more about the Albrecht Center, adopt, donate or volunteer at www.letlovelive.org.)

April-May 2019


featured listing

937 Colbert Bridge Rd Wagener, SC 29164

maple hill south

Welcome to Aiken's most complete sport horse training facility or luxury private equestrian estate, on 65.67 managed ac, a full size covered arena with the finest fiber footing available by Attwood Surfaces. Serious dressage riders love the mirrors. 8 stall center aisle barn & attached designer built 2 bdrm 2bth, 2076 sqft owner residence is constructed with top quality materials for low maintenance upkeep and custom design features throughout. 2 separate master suites offer privacy & comfort. The home is full of natural light offered with vaulted ceilings with high windows in the Great Room, multiple sets of glass doors lead residents & guests to extensive outdoor partially covered patio space. The Hot Tub is the perfect spot to relax in after a hard day's work, watching the sunset. Maple Hill South was built in 2009 for a Canadian Olympian event rider who chose this specific south-side location for its privacy, terrain, and proximity to Aiken's multiple equestrian eventing facilities.

Offered at $1,500,000 • MLS#106352

Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt, REALTORÂŽ - 803.640.4591 www.AikenSCProperties.com April-May 2019

REAL ESTATE

The Aiken Horse

35


The Hitchcock Woods Foundation would like to thank our corporate sponsors, luncheon sponsors, benefactors, exhibitors, volunteers and guests who made the 103rd Aiken Horse Show possible and a great success. Proceeds go directly to the management and preservation of our beautiful Hitchcock Woods. Corporate Sponsors Platinum Level

Gold Level

Silver Level

Photo credit: Aiken Standard

36

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


trout wAlk fArm | suPerB 90 Acre equestriAn ProPerty

one of tHe Prettiest fArms in Aiken witH Access to 142+ Acres of conserVAncy lAnd; fArm is suitABle for All disciPlines! well-designed 8-stAll courtyArd style stABle; gorgeous HAy fields, PAsture witH run-ins, trAils; equiPment storAge, Pool, Pond & 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 BAtH mAnAger’s Home. offered for $1,695,000

HAtcHAwAy House & BArn on 30+ Acres

soutHern Historic 3 Bedroom, 2 BAtH Home situAted PriVAtely. HAy fields, 1/4 Acre Pond. 4-stAll BArn w/wAsH stAll & tAck room, HAy BArn & equiPment Building, fenced PAddock w/run-in. mls 105274 | now offered for $640,000

oAk knoll - stePs to Aiken’s Horse district

Historic willis irVin designed, 3804 sf Home witH loVely Pool & gArdens. fully fenced/wAlled 1+ Acre, renoVAted kitcHen/ lAundry, sePArAte gArAge; 4 Bedrooms; 3 full & 2 HAlf BAtHs. mls 102602 | now offered for $899,000

BArrington fArms - Best lot VAlues on soutHside 5 to 26 Acre lots witH Perimeter wAlking/riding trAils nAturAl gAs & u-Verse AVAilABle, county tAxes only lots stArting from $52,500

Cissie Sullivan

11.41 Acres on lewis lAne | 12-stAll BArn w/ liVing quArters

englisH tudor-insPired wide center Aisle BArn witH wAsH stAll, feed room, tAck room & 1/2 BAtH. 3 Bedroom, 2 BAtH 1800 sf of liVing sPAce ABoVe witH loVely PAstorAl Views. mAgnificent oAks, PAddocks & PAsture in PriVAte setting witH AmBiAnce & suPerB locAtion. AdditionAl 12 Acres AVAilABle. offered for $679,000

115 Burkelo rd | 20+ Acres in Aiken Horse country

BeAutifully designed 3 Bedroom, 3 1/2 BAtH Home w/stunning Views, greAt room, gorgeous kitcHen & PorcH ideAl for entertAining. Perimeter fencing, 3-BAy worksHoP & sePArAte BArn structure reAdy to AdAPt to your needs | mls 106081 | $740,000

crosswAys - loVely Historic estAte on 4.2 Acres

deligHtfully renoVAted soutHern Home, Pool & gorgeous gArdens. gAted w/Perimeter wAlls/fencing; centrAl locAtion to Horse district & equestriAn Venues; gArAge w/APt 5 Bedrooms | 4 full & 2 HAlf BAtHs | mls 86999 | $1,750,000

wexford mill - ride, fly, fisH or sAil

enjoy wAterfront liVing on 83+ lAke cArroll or liVing AdjAcent to your PriVAte runwAy | lAke lot 6A - sold! HAngAr lots $18,000+ | 5+ Acre lots from $40,000

summerfield | equestriAn estAte witH coVered ArenA

eAsy Access to BotH Aiken, sc & AugustA, gA, tHis 74+ Acre estAte HAs it All! well-APPointed 4 Bedroom, 4,761 sf Home HAs stunning PAstorAl & Pond Views. 9-stAll stABle; tAck room w/ full kitcHen & BAtH; ligHted & irrigAted coVered ArenA; HAy & equiPment Building w/ studio APArtment. offered for $1,990,000

1042 woodlAnd driVe | 48+ Acre fArm

BeAutiful fArm designed for PriVAcy & enjoyment of nAture, AnimAls & Horses. ABundAnt HAyfields, fenced PAstures & AmAzing Views! 3 Bedroom, 2 BAtH modulAr Home, 7-stAll center-Aisle BArn, fenced PAsture w/run-ins. mls 105961 | $550,000

1731 citAtion | foxcHAse on tHe woods

excePtionAl turnkey equestriAn ProPerty! fully renoVAted 4 Br, 2 1/2 BAtH Home & greAt outdoor liVing sPAce. loVely PAddocks, 2-stAll BArn w/feed & tAck room & BArn storAge Building. mls 106324 | mArketed At APPrAised VAlue At $525,000

lAnd oPPortunities in Aiken Horse country

four 5+ Acre PArcels on redds BrAncH rd - from $97,500 lots on mt. BeulAH roAd - 4+ Acres - from $22,250 42+ Acres on Big tree roAd - $275,000

Tracey Turner

803-998-0198 | SullivanTurnerTeam.com April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

37


38

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

39


AIKEN HORSE 3Runs 012919.qxp_Layout 1 1/31/19 10:52 AM Page 3

No roaming charges.

Of all the great things about Three Runs Plantation, it’s the 30 miles of trails that residents love best. This neighborhood of custom-built homes, barns and equestrian amenities is at the heart of horse country in picturesque Aiken, South Carolina. Save your place today. To find out more, click on ThreeRunsPlantation.com.

AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA

2400 Acres • Marketed 30 miles of groomed and trails Competition level jump & indressage arenas schooling by The Carolina Real Estate Company, Aiken,marked SC. Plans and prices subject •to change without notice. This does not constitute an offer any state where prohibited by law.•NoX-Country time requirement to begin construction. complex Clubhouse & outdoor pavilion • Pool & cabana • Activity/Fitness Center • Homesites from 5+ acres • Spec homes available or build to suit HOMESITES INDIVIDUALLY PRICED • DEVELOPER FINANCING AVAILABLE Marketed by The Carolina Real Estate Company, Aiken, SC. Plans and prices subject to change without notice. This does not constitute an offer in any state where prohibited by law. No time requirement to begin construction.


Inside 45 46 48 52 57 58 60

Battle of the Sexes Kristen Paysinger From the Judge’s Booth Cross Country Pictures Secret Lives: SkipJack Horse Show Etiquette The Ribbon Dilemma


42

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


©ESI 2019

1224 SIZEMORE ROAD AIKEN, SC 29803

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

43


FORTHCOMING EVENTS

HIGHLIGHTED EVENTS

April 13 Open Schooling Day

April 3

April 14

Schooling

Dressage/CT/HT Schooling Show

Hunter/Jumper Show

May 8

The Hunters are back!

Schooling Dressage Show

April 6 - 7

May 11

“Spring Fever”

Open Schooling Day

USEF/USDF Dressage

May 12

Judges: Lisa El-Ramey &

Dressage/CT/HT Schooling Show

Pamela Wooding

April 20 Stable View Hunter Pace 44

The Aiken Horse

“A G at h er i ng P l a c e” Aiken, South Carolina

117 Stable Drive Aiken SC 29801 484.356.3173 info@stableviewfarm.com www.StableViewFarm.com

April-May 2019


Battle of the Sexes

Charity Event at Holland Eventing By Pam Gleason

The Battle of the Sexes is over, and the women have won.

T

hat, at least, was the result of the inaugural Aiken Battle of the Sexes charity eventing competition that took place at Holly Berry Farm in the Bridle Creek Equestrian community on March 17. The St. Patrick’s Day happening featured two teams of eight riders. The format was a foreshortened “jump-jump” type affair. Riders completed a short cross-country course, including banks, logs and water jumps, ridden to an optimum time of 90 seconds. At the end of the cross country, they jumped into the stadium and immediately began a jumper course in which the fastest time won. Knocking down rails counted as two seconds-worth of time faults, which kept the scoring simple. Riders competed against one another in pairs: A representative from the men’s team would ride, followed by a representative from the women’s team. The rider with the fastest time of the pair scored one point for his or her team. The team with the most points at the end of the day was declared the winner. The Battle of the Sexes was put on by the Garrett family, the owners of Holland Eventing and Holly Berry Farm, to benefit local charities, celebrate the end of the Aiken eventing season, and to test the waters for holding a larger and more public event at the facility in the future. The Garretts invited the riders and their friends to a ringside cocktail party under a tent before and during the competition. After it was over, everyone stuck around for a dinner party in a different tent. The Willcox did the catering, and Byron Bush, the owner of Bright and Bold Entertainment, provided music. The course was set for horses that were “Preliminary appropriate,” according to Joanie Morris who organized the competition. The riders included some big names and international riders. The men’s team, called Kev’s Kicking Cowboys, consisted of Dr. Kevin Keane (Captain), Phillip Dutton, Ryan Wood (Australia) John Nunn, Dave Voss, Doug Payne and Nilson da Silva (Brazil.) The women’s team, Allison’s Aiken Angels, was captained by Allison Springer, with Colleen Loach (Canada), Colleen Rutledge, Kate Brown, Kate Chadderton (Australia) Holly Payne and Erin Sylvester. The competition started out with a tight contest between Doug Payne and Allison Springer, but as the afternoon progressed, the women pulled ahead decisively. Some of the men privately pointed out afterward that they had brought greener horses, since they had understood that it was intended to be a schooling event. Meanwhile, they said, the women came with their seasoned competitors. It

was also noted that the women’s team was made up entirely of professionals, while the men’s team had a mix of amateurs and professionals. The women, for their part, said they were just having fun – this was a competitive group, and what could be more fun than winning? Riders and spectators alike enjoyed the novel format, the spectacular facility and the opportunity to ride on a team with their colleagues. Although in many ways the Battle of the Sexes was decidedly low key and laidback, it was also a highly appreciated fundraiser for two Aiken charities. Holland Eventing and the Garrett family donated $15,000 in prize money, with $10,000 going to the winners and $5,000 to the second place team. Allison’s Angels won $10,000 for SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, while Kev’s Kicking Cowboys brought in $5000 for the Aiken Horse Park Foundation.

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

45



Kristen Paysinger

Eventer, Dressage Rider and Doctor

By Mary Jane Howell, Photography by Gary Knoll

O

dds are that most riders will visit an emergency room at least once in their lives, but for Kristen Paysinger, an Aiken resident, the emergency room is her normal work environment. Strokes, broken legs, overdoses, the list goes on. She handles it all as one of the emergency medicine physicians at Aiken Regional Medical Centers. Somehow, after a 10-hour shift, she still finds time to ride and compete her horses. Dr. Paysinger is a South Carolinian by birth and she was practically predestined to become a doctor: her grandfather was a neurosurgeon, and her father, Dr. Benjamin Paysinger Jr., still practices as an ear, nose and throat doctor in Columbia. A 2009 graduate of the South Carolina School of Medicine, Paysinger completed her residency at Orlando Health Central in Florida in 2012. And while she loved medicine from an early age, she also loved horses. Her parents would not allow her to have a horse growing up, so she rode at Hickory Top, the local stable in Columbia. She was assigned a Connemara pony named Kerry, who was the recipient of gentle rides, hugs and treats. “My father was adamant that if I wanted a horse I would have to buy one myself, so several months after finishing my residency in Orlando that’s exactly what I did,” she said with a laugh. Dr. Paysinger had taken a job as an emergency medicine physician in Ocoee, just outside of Orlando. Just as important, Ocala was less than two hours away and it was there she that settled into a routine of lessons and learning about eventing, a sport she had fallen in love with. Her new horse, Commander II was terrified of jumping at first, so Paysinger found a good coach to help the bay gelding with his phobia. The extra schooling worked, and the pair moved up through the ranks to win regionals in their division. “I was very happy in Florida – I enjoyed my work and I had a likeminded ‘tribe’ of friends with horses in Ocala. We cheered each other on at shows, relaxed at the barn, it was really great,” she recalled. Paysinger would probably still be in Florida today, but family ties are strong and when her sister had a baby, the young doctor felt a pull to return to her home state to be nearer family. She already knew about Aiken and the city ended up being a good fit for both her medical career and her horse passion. “Aiken is really like Disney World for horses,” Paysinger said. “I love it here.” Today, Dr. Paysinger is part of the emergency room team at Aiken Regional Medical Centers, a job she has had since the summer of 2016. When she is on duty, she is one of a pair of doctors in the ER, along with three physician assistants. With more than 51,000 patients a year, the emergency room is never dull and Dr. Paysinger likes it that way. “When I was in medical school I was drawn to several different fields, including obstetrics and gynecology. I knew pretty quickly that I didn’t like being in an office situation, so when a roommate was doing an ER rotation I really paid attention. I loved her stories.” Emergency room doctors need to develop a diverse skill set: they may need to deal with a broken leg, a pregnancy that is in trouble, or a heart attack. “I love the energy that is involved with ER medicine,” Paysinger said. “People come in and we can either fix problems quickly or we can halt the issue somewhat and send the patient to another unit. My job involves saving people’s lives and when you actually do that, it is the most incredible feeling and that’s what keeps me going.” Not every ER story has a happy ending, and Paysinger says there are times when she has had to switch from happiness to empathy within minutes. “A doctor sometimes goes through rapid emotional change, depending on a patient’s situation. There is a subtle art to it,

April-May 2019

this emotional rollercoaster, and it’s different from the excitement of making quick decisions when you are under the gun, so to speak.” The same energy that Paysinger puts into her medical career, she also puts into her riding. “I am obsessive, no doubt about it, and a lifelong learner,” she said. When Commander II suffered a check ligament injury, she decided to develop him as her dressage horse. With the help of her trainer Amy

photo by ocala horse photos

McElroy, the pair has blossomed. Their partnership took center stage when Paysinger gave the test ride for the $50,000 LiftMaster GrandPrix Eventing Invitational at Bruce’s Field on March 1. “That was such an amazing, fun experience,” she said. “All I can say is ‘wow’ and I was so proud of Commander.” Paysinger hasn’t turned her back on eventing, however. She has a beautiful Oldenburg mare named Lusitana (Luna) with whom she won the amateur Training level division at the Nutrena American Eventing Championships (NC) three years ago. “I would say that there are some parallels between eventing and being an emergency room physician,” Paysinger said. “Both involve incredible adrenaline rushes and you need to be a jack of all trades.” And as if dressage and eventing weren’t enough, Paysinger enjoys hunting with Aiken Hounds (First flight, of course). The obvious question might be, “When do you have time to work?” “I believe we all need a good balance in our lives, and my horses give me that needed balance to stay well and happy,” she explained. “When the show schedule comes out, I request the dates that I need, and the same with the Saturdays and Tuesdays for fox hunting. It all works out.” At her home in Three Runs Plantation in Aiken, she also has a broodmare prospect named Rosie and a growing youngster named Bailey. There are two German Shepherds and a barn cat named Honeybee to round out the family.

The Aiken Horse

47


­From the Judge’s Booth Scoring the Hunter Round By John Abbott

W

hat goes on in the judges’ booth during a hunter class? How does the judge determine the placings? In a jumper class, all that matters is that the horse goes clean and fast. But judging a hunter class is a more subjective matter. It is not entirely subjective, however. To begin with, there is an established point scale that judges are requested to follow. Although the guidelines for this point scale do allow for the judge’s personal opinion of the type of horse that he or she might prefer, the points are there to ensure fairness in placing the class. As a judge, the first thing that I am looking for is a well turned-out horse and rider. This is the first impression that I have of the exhibitor as he or she enters the arena. The rider’s clothes should be tailored and fit well; boots should be shined; hat and gloves clean. This is particularly important for an equitation class. Also true for an equitation class, the rider’s coat should be of a solid dark color, with a white show shirt. I

have judged local shows where some riders do not wear gloves: this can spoil a rider’s chance of getting a ribbon in an equitation class, no matter how well he or she performs. The horse should be clean, with a healthy, glossy coat. Horses should be body clipped if they have a winter coat. If they have white socks, these should be bright and unstained. The mane and tail should be braided, or combed neatly. In recent years, braiding is becoming less of a requirement in smaller shows, and in even some A level shows. However, you will find in the AA rated classes, where points count, braiding also counts. This applies equally in a rated division, classic, or a Derby. If left unbraided, the horse’s mane should be pulled and combed and the tail should be brushed out and clean. The tack should be immaculate and well-fitted with a fleece saddle pad and leather girth. The ends of all the straps on the bridle should be secured by leather keepers. This may sound obvious, but you would be surprised by what enters the ring sometimes! Before the horse and rider begin their course, they traditionally make an opening circle, starting out at a trot and then picking up the canter. While observing this circle, I look for high quality, rhythmic gaits. The horse’s stride ought to cover ground in a level and pleasing manner

48

The Aiken Horse

while appearing comfortable to ride. Judges also reward an athletic gait with suspension. On the course, the horse’s pace and style should be consistent all the way around. Take off and landing distances and the arc over the fence should be the same at all the jumps, and each jump needs to look relaxed and athletic. If I have two horses that are very similar, the horse with more quality will be pinned higher. “Quality” includes conformation, beauty, athleticism, balance and attitude. Let’s discuss the basic point system put in place by the United States Equestrian Federation. Judges give each round a numerical score from 0 to 100. A 75 is considered an average score. High 70s are better, scores in the 80s are excellent, and in the 90s are superb. If your score falls in the low 70s, this means there were some errors in your round. Scores in the 60s indicate big mistakes, which might include dangerous jumping, dropping the knees, missing lead changes, bolting, kicking out, running through the jumps, or poor quality jumping style with little scope. Minor errors consist of a chip, a prop at a jump, a few rubs, a late lead change, or a loose but acceptable jumping style. Points might be taken off for an irregular pace or for appearing weak at a jump with a flat take-off that is not dangerous. One thing that happens on the hunter course that needs to be better understood is breaking stride, which will result in a score of 45, even if the remainder of the course is well executed. Breaking stride consists of trotting on course, or trotting through a lead change. This is frequently seen at the local level, where horses and riders might not have practiced a flying change. It might seem like a minor error, but it is not. In fact, it is preferable to counter canter through a corner if you miss a change, rather than trotting to change leads. In general, judges would rather see a flying lead change if needed, but ideally we don’t need a lead change at all if the horses are balanced and land on the correct lead for every change of direction. Imagine how smooth a course would look without lead changes! When I am judging, at the end of each round, I look at my list to see where the rider who just completed a course fits in. Say there was a rider who went before who had a similar round. I ask myself, was this rider better or worse than that one? If the previous rider had a score of 78, do I place this rider above or below them? When all the rounds are completed, it is then a simple matter to rank the competitors by their numerical scores, awarding the highest scoring exhibitor with the blue ribbon. I hope this overview has been helpful in giving you an idea of what we see from the judge’s booth, and understanding how a hunter round is evaluated. If you have further questions about how things work at a horse show, ask an experienced trainer or exhibitor, and remember that you can always consult the USEF rulebook, which is available online through the USEF website, or even on your smartphone as an Android or iPhone app. John Abbott is a USEF “R” judge licensed in Hunter, Hunter Equitation and Hunter Breeding. He runs a training business based in Aiken, SC. Contact him by email: john@boysonhill.com

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

49


SCQHA

South Carolina Quarter Horse Association scqhaonline.com

2019 SHOW DATES

April 26-28 • SC Equine Park, Camden, SC May 24-26 • SC Equine Park, Camden, SC June 21-23 • SC Equine Park, Camden, SC July 25-28 • T. Ed Garrison Arena, Clemson, SC October • TBA

“The Fun and Friendly Horse Show Association” For More Information contact Show Manager: Billy Prather (803) 669-1325 or Email Billy at bpquarterhorses@bellsouth.net

50

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

51


center s

Eventing in Aiken: Holland Eventing and Paradise Farm, Winter 2019


spread

Photography by Gary Knoll and Pam Gleason


54

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


LLC

RED HORSE STABLES JAMES L. FOLEY, OWNER

1223 Smith’s Lawn Drive, Aiken, SC (603) 845-8379

Boarding ~ Training ~ Sales Lisa Seger Insurance Distinctive Insurance for Your Lifestyle

Whether you ride for pleasure or competitively, owning a horse is a substantial commitment. The horse people at Lisa Seger Insurance can help you protect the emotional and financial investment you’ve made. Equine, Luxury Home & Auto

LisaSegerInsurance.com Pagan Gilman 770-283-7344 Pagan@lisasegerinsurance.com

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

55



Secret Lives of Horses Skipjack: a Majestic Partner

By Nancy Johnson, Photography by Gary Knoll

S

eeing Skipjack in his paddock, most horse people would probably be surprised to learn he is 24 years old. A charismatic chestnut, the 17.2 hand Hanoverian/Thoroughbred gelding looks as if he could walk into the show ring tomorrow. But for Skipjack, affectionately known as “Skippy,” horse shows are a happy memory, which are even more memorable for his owner, Babbie Wanamaker and his lifelong trainer, Sue Sisco. Babbie first saw the Skippy the day after he was born at Sue Sisco’s and Andy Miller’s Sunfield in Pennsylvania. “He was absolutely huge!” she recalls. “In fact, Sue and Andy really had to work to pull him out.” That year, 1995, four foals were born at Sunfield, including one out of a mare Babbie owned. Sue was making a name for herself in the hunter breeding world and Skippy would become her poster child. His dam, Nice ’n Easy, was shown successfully in the Amateur Owner Hunter division in the early 1990s by Ellen Greiner. His sire, Limited Edition, already had a lot of nice offspring on the ground. “I watched him grow up,” Babbie says. “Sue does a great job with the young horses; it’s really her specialty.” Skippy quickly proved his quality, winning breeding classes, including his yearling class at Devon. Sue knew he had a lot of potential. “He was always dead quiet, a beautiful mover and uncomplicated,” Sue says. “Even as a 3-year-old, I’d school him once or twice a week, jump eight or 10 jumps and get off, because he was perfect.” Unfortunately, Babbie’s own young horse wasn’t turning out to be the type she was looking for. So Sue came up with an idea. “I had people come to look at Skippy, and I put Babbie on him so they could see how he would be with her riding, as their customer was also an amateur,” Sue says. “Skippy was perfect for Babbie and it made me think it would be a shame to have someone else enjoying him when he suited Babbie so well.” “Sue really wanted to keep him in her barn and I knew with his incredible temperament and great start that he would be ideal for me,” says Babbie. She sold her young horse, along with another horse, to buy Skippy as a 3-year-old and says every day since then has been “like waking up on Christmas morning.” Shortly after Babbie bought Skippy, Sue rode him to top ribbons in the International Hunter Futurity for 3-year-olds. The following year, 1999, he returned to be champion at the IHF in the 4-year-old division. Then Skippy began doing double-duty, winning with Sue in the PreGreen division and with Babbie in the Low Adult Hunters. Over the next few years, Sue went on to ride him in the First and Second Year Green Hunters and even a bit in the Regular Working Hunters, while Babbie moved up to the Adult Hunters. They showed mainly in USEF Zone 2 (Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York) and occasionally ventured to shows in Maryland and North Carolina. Some of Skippy’s performance career highlights include a reserve championship with Babbie at Devon in the Local Hunter division and a win with Sue in the only hunter derby he ever entered. “Sue and I still have our little pet name related to that hunter derby at Swan Lake [Pennsylvania]” says Babbie with a laugh. “In texts we refer to Skippy as DCS – Derby Champion Skipjack!” Next, Sue and Babbie decided to try riding and showing Skippy sidesaddle, since they both enjoy the classic beauty of riding aside. He adapted very easily. “You would think he had been doing it his whole life,” says Babbie. With his size and presence, he turned heads when showing at some of the most prestigious shows on the East Coast.

April-May 2019

Among his sidesaddle wins were the reserve championship at the Pennsylvania National as well as winning classes at Upperville and the Gold Cup at Devon. Throughout his career, many people wanted to buy Skippy, but Babbie never had any intention of selling him. “It became clear very quickly that no matter how much money I could get for him, it would be literally impossible to replace him.” There was a hectic point in her life when Babbie was unable to show or even ride consistently. She was concentrating on her job and building her own small farm, leaving very little time for Skippy. Once again, Sue came up with a solution. She had an accomplished adult student, Lisa Demars, who was in need of a nice horse to ride and show occasionally. Babbie had known Lisa for years and knew her horses were cared for impeccably, and so she allowed Lisa to lease him. Now it was Lisa’s turn to win the Adult Hunter classes with Skippy. A couple of years later, Babbie took her horse back home and began riding him again. They showed lightly for about a year, then Babbie began to ease him into retirement. Skippy, then 15, loved trail rides, and he and Babbie hacked around the beautiful countryside in Chester County, Pennsylvania, occasionally participating in paper chases. Approaching the winter of 2014, Babbie had been rehabbing Skippy from an injury and he was coming along well, but she worried the weather would prevent her from keeping up his exercise routine. Sue and Andy had recently moved to Aiken, so Babbie sent him South to continue his rehabilitation. “I hadn’t been to Aiken in many years, but when I came to visit Skippy, I found I just loved it. So about two weeks later I came back down and bought a small farm,” says Babbie. Babbie knows what a rarity Skippy is and how fortunate she is to have him in her life. “I am not the most courageous rider, but I could go to a horse show with confidence knowing he was going to take care of me. He always gave 150 percent,” she says. “He had so much success throughout his career – it was like winning the lottery. Plus he’s such a kind horse; he’s just dear and fun to be around. I love that he is very vocal. Every time you walk in the barn he nickers to you.” Sue says that to this day, Skippy is still a beautiful mover and very sound. “I attribute his long career and soundness to the fact that Babbie was never greedy about showing him. She targeted a few key horse shows a year and did a few warm-up shows to prep for them. Plus, she takes meticulous care of him.” Like Babbie, Skippy now splits his time between Aiken and West Chester, Pennsylvania. “We completely retired him a couple of years ago, but Sue thought it would be good for him to get a little bit more exercise,” says Babbie. “Now, every once in a while he goes on walkonly trail rides. He’s even ventured out to the [Hitchcock] Woods and strutted down Lauren Street all dressed up for the Christmas parade.”

The Aiken Horse

57


Show Like A Winner Horse Show Etiquette By Lauren Allen

C

hances are you’re nervous and so is your horse. Other riders are buzzing around in every direction, and it doesn’t seem possible to jump even a single fence in the warm-up without creating a six-horse pile-up. Your trainer is yelling because you didn’t remember to bring a crop and you’re riding like it’s your first time in the saddle. You spent a lot of money and effort to get to the horse show, but it’s hard to have fun when you feel so unprepared and overwhelmed. Hunter/jumper horse shows are almost always a schizophrenic mix of hurry up and wait, coupled with a bone-crushing amount of work. Add in generally terrible food, uncontrollable weather, and ancient equestrian turnout traditions such as impractical riding clothes and intricate mane and tail braids for the horses, and it’s almost a wonder anyone ever goes to a second show. It takes a lot of shows to master horse show protocol, but here are some things to consider to make sure your show experience is positive for you and for those around you. 1. When you arrive at the competition, be aware that there will be many people pulling in and unloading equipment and horses. Don’t park in a way that blocks others from entry to the barns, and be especially careful to leave plenty of room for any trailers already parked in your vicinity to have their ramps opened and horses loaded or unloaded. Don’t park your trailer in a high traffic area and disappear to do entries — unload your stuff and pull away to park more permanently before handling any other show business. 2. If you brought your dogs to the show, please keep them on a short leash. Horse shows are not dog parks and serious accidents can occur when dogs are running around: horses can spook and riders can be injured. Dogs can be injured, too. 3. If your horse needs to be lunged, inquire about lungeing areas and only use areas that are designated for lungeing. Usually show arenas are strictly off limits, since repetitive circles can compact and damage the footing. Be thoughtful about other people and horses around you: be aware of the effect that an over-exuberant horse can have on other horses and be sure your lungeing isn’t endangering any riders. Share the space if another person is waiting to lunge and there is room for more. Stay off your phone, and keep your ears and eyes open while you lead or work your horse. 4. Pick up your trash! Try to recycle your drink bottles or, even better, use a reusable container. The amount of trash generated at a horse show is staggering, and a shocking amount of it ends up drifting around the grounds. 5. In the warm-up ring there are several ground rules you should know. Educated riders will expect you to ride to the right of oncoming traffic, but always be alert to beginner riders who don’t know this rule or jumpers whose track takes priority over flat riders. If you are not riding to the right for some reason, call your track out to oncoming riders, by saying something like “on the inside.” It’s a good idea to call out when passing another rider travelling the same direction as well, and to try to follow the flow of the ring (for instance, if the majority of the other riders are tracking right, try to go with the traffic.) Be sure to call your jumps if there are other horses jumping, by loudly saying “red diagonal” or “white oxer,” etc. This is especially important if you are going to practice a rollback or something other riders may not be expecting. Also, be polite to the people who are standing in the arena setting jumps—don’t threaten their safety by invading their space on your horse. 6. When you’ve finished schooling be sure to take care of your horse

58

The Aiken Horse

first, before you sit down and take a break. Your horse deserves a chance to have a drink, some hay, and maybe go to the bathroom in their fresh shavings after keeping you alive in that chaos! You should give your horse a good bath for the show, preferably in warm water if it’s cool and immediately cover him with a cooler to keep him warm while he dries. Be thoughtful about your horse above all else, but also consider those around you. If your horse poops in the washrack pick it up and remove it. When you dump manure in the manure bins, dump it to the back so it doesn’t end up blocking the front and causing an overflow. 7. On show day: be early. If you need it, have it with you. Don’t make your trainer or your parents run around recovering all the things you forgot, such as a crop, spurs, your number and so on. Courses are usually posted in the morning, so learn them before you are warmed up and waiting at the in-gate. Ask your trainers if they want you to sign up for a specific rotation, and check in with the gate if necessary to be sure about timing. That being said, do not irritate the gate crew by endlessly asking them what time your class will go. Keep track of the show in your ring by paying attention and don’t forget to try to be prepared for curveballs, such as classes getting cancelled, or moved to another arena. 8. Buy your trainer some lunch! Or a coffee! Ask them if they’d like any water! They aren’t standing out there all day for the nice tan and free microdermabrasion from the arena dust. Trainers aren’t omniscient; they try hard to plan how the show will play out, but with multiple arenas and the invariable scheduling surprises, sometimes they aren’t able to be ahead of it all. Also, trainers shouldn’t be yelling at you once you are in the ring; you are on your own to remember your diagonals, leads, the trot, jump or the halt. It’s not their job to keep you on course. Part of the benefit of horse showing is learning to handle the mistakes that you will inevitably make. After your class, clear the gate before stopping to discuss how it went with your trainer so you don’t block traffic coming in or out of the ring. If you are pleased with how you rode, do not gloat. You may be in a different position after your very next class. Try not to making a fuss about ribbons. If you are disappointed, try not to cry or throw a tantrum. Don’t be ugly to your parent or your trainer. You win some you don’t deserve and you lose some you should have won, so it’s best not to be a sore loser or an obnoxious winner. Don’t whine about the judging, either. Try to remember that everyone is working to be better, and encourage and applaud the people around you. Perhaps they will return the favor! 9. Once you have ridden, be sure to let your horse know you appreciate his hard work by praising him; nothing says spoiled brat louder than being rude to your horse. Run up your stirrups. Loosen the girth. Dismount and walk your horse back to the barn if he has worked hard. 10. At the end of the show day, be sure to put your horse back in his clean stall to enjoy his fresh water and hay. Untack and groom him first, before you take care of yourself. If you do these things, you will be showing like a winner, no matter what color ribbons (if any) you bring home.

April-May 2019


We have over 30 years experience assisting competitive horses and riders with custom riding attire, saddle fitting and horse wear.

2677 Wagener Rd. Aiken, SC 29801 803.641.7070 | OakManorSaddlery.com

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

59


The Ribbon Dilemma What to Do With Them? By Pam Gleason

I

remember winning my first blue ribbon. I was about 9 and it was probably my third horse show. I won it in an equitation class called walk, trot, beginning canter, and my mount was a saintly roan school pony named Takoa. I treasured that first blue. I hung it on the wall of my bedroom, along with a handful of lesser ribbons from earlier shows. As I moved into my high school years, the wall filled up with ribbons. I organized them by color, blues in the middle, then reds, yellows and so on. Eventually, to save space, I only hung the blues, reds, champions and reserves. The lesser ribbons went into a cardboard box. The cardboard box went into the attic. Sometime before I departed for college, the winning ribbons went into that box too. And there they have sat for decades, next to an even bigger box of forgotten ribbons and trophies that my sister won. If you go to horse shows it is practically inevitable that you will begin to gather a large collection of ribbons. When you are a child first starting out, ribbons of any color seem magical. As you grow older and more accomplished, you only want the top ribbons. Some riders discard their pink and green ones right after they come out of the ring. Horse show organizers go to great effort and expense to order nice ribbons, and exhibitors would complain if they didn’t. Especially considering this, it seems disrespectful as well as wasteful to throw them out. It’s not much better just to put them in a box and forget about them. Besides, no one needs boxes of faded horse show ribbons cluttering up their attic, as my mother has recently called to remind me. The ribbon dilemma presents riders with two basic choices: you can keep your ribbons, or you can get rid of them. If you keep them, how should they be displayed? If you are over about 18, hanging them on the wall of your bedroom is pretty much out. If you have a nice tack room or office in your barn, you might put your top ribbons on the wall there, but you probably won’t want to look like you are proud of a fifth or sixth place ribbon, unless you won it somewhere extremely impressive. Another problem is that there is only so much room on any wall, and ribbons can take up a lot of space – if you are good enough, or persistent enough, that is. There are several common ways to store and display ribbons that are more elegant than hanging them directly on the wall. One of the simplest and least expensive methods is to place them in a large glass container. The container can be a decorative jar, or it might double as something like a lamp base or an end table. All swirled together in a container, horse show ribbons and rosettes can be an attractive and unique accent to a room. Some people incorporate them into glasstopped tables, or even turn their rosettes into coasters. Creating quilts, wall hangings and decorative pillows out of old ribbons is another option. If you are handy with a sewing machine, you can do this yourself. However, it is probably not something you will want to take on if you are already over booked and really should be spending any free time you have cleaning your tack. Fortunately, there are now several companies that will make something pretty out of your old ribbons for you. Most of these are one-woman operations, and the things they make can be stunning. Marti Lance, who is based in Ohio, runs a company called Lance Quilts that specializes in repurposing her customers’ ribbons into something decorative and unique. “Usually, people will just send me a box of 65 to 100 ribbons, and I can make a quilt or a wall hanging out of them,” says Marti, who has been quilting for 40 years and has a degree in mechanical design. “The reason I need so many is because I want to be sure to display the writing on the ribbons, so you can look at the quilt and remember the specific shows.” Marti says she can incorporate rosettes and even medals into her

60

The Aiken Horse

designs. “I get all kinds of ribbons and all places, from champions down to sixth or seventh place. I’ve done quilts from new ribbons and from ribbons people won back in the 60s.” Horse show ribbons tend to fade, but that does not bother Marti, who nevertheless suggests protecting your ribbon quilt from too much sunlight. “I think those older faded ribbons kind of give a wall hanging character. I turn the ribbons into a piece of art. That’s how I look at it.” Wall hangings from Lance quilts range from $250 to $550, depending on the size. Other ways some riders repurpose their ribbons include using them to decorate shadow boxes dedicated to a beloved horse, or even cutting them up and making them into belts and neckties. If you don’t want to go to the effort and expense of turning your ribbons into something you can use, you have two more choices: either you can sell them or you can give them away. Not too long ago, the idea of selling your old horse show ribbons would sound pretty ridiculous. However, as the saying goes, “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.” Today, people can and do sell used show ribbons. The most common way to do this is online on eBay, where right now there are over 200 lots of “used horse show ribbons” on offer. They are usually sold in groups, often of six or more, and they are sometimes sorted by color. The average asking price is $2-$3 per ribbon, which is actually comparable to how much they might cost new. (An average three-streamed custom rosette from Hodges Badge Company ranges from $1.70 to about $6.00 – larger and more complex champion and reserve ribbons are more expensive.) Giving away unwanted ribbons is another option. Marjean McIntyre, who lives in Aiken and is now showing in eventing, used to travel to many carriage competitions in the Midwest. She says that she always kept ribbons in the dressing room of her horse trailer. Then when she was on her way to or from a show, she would give them to children at truck stops who wanted to come and meet her horses. “They would usually act like it’s the most precious gift they have ever gotten in their life,” says Marjean. “I know when I was a little girl I would have thought I had died and gone to heaven if someone had given me a horse show ribbon. That’s part of the reason that I do it. Of course, that doesn’t work as well in Aiken – horses are so common in Aiken it’s not as exciting to see one and the kids don’t care as much about ribbons.” To rehome your ribbons in larger quantities, consider donating them to a charitable organization. One such place is Great Oak Aiken Therapeutic Riding Center on Edgefield Highway in Aiken. Nicole Pioli, who is the program and volunteer coordinator at Great Oak, says that center would welcome any ribbon donations that people wanted to make. She says the organization would love to have ribbons to give to their students as prizes and as awards at their practice horse shows. It doesn’t even matter if the ribbons are older or faded. “There are all kinds of other things we can do with them,” she says. “We can use them for art projects, too. We’ll take whatever people want to give us.” In the end, whether you want to hang onto your ribbons for sentimental reasons, or would be happy to let them transition to a new life with someone else, there is no excuse for them to be hidden away in storage: you can do something with them. Which reminds me that I still have to call my mother back about that box in her attic. I’ll bet that ribbon I won on Takoa is still in there. Interested in donating to Great Oak? Visit greatoakatrc.org for more information.

April-May 2019


#1 Stall Deodorizer, 35 Years & Counting.

• Greater wet spot coverage means GREATER Odor Control • Smaller particles means FASTER Ammonia Capture • Powder delivers OPTIMAL Effectiveness and SUPERIOR Value Also available in

GRANULAR 25 lb. & 40 lb. For more info and a dealer near you: 800.367.1534 / www.sweetpdz.com

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

61


62

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

63


50,000 SQUARE FEET OF FUN FOR SALE. Why do so many equestrians worship Aiken, South Carolina? Its temperate climate, footing that never freezes, and year-round equestrian activities top the list. Now comes the opportunity to acquire your own piece of training paradise within the oasis of Aiken. Fully covered, lit, and irrigated, the 50,000 square foot arena at Tod’s Hill allows for all-weather, around-the-clock jumping, polo, dressage and more – just minutes from downtown Aiken – and even closer to home should you choose. The arena at Tod’s Hill is offered with an option of 15 to 50 residential acres within the gated equestrian community of Tod’s Hill.

THE ARENA AT TOD’S HILL OFFERED WITH AN OPTION OF 15 TO 50 ACRES MARKETED BY KARL MCMILLAN 843-693-6115 TODSHILL.COM

PROPERTY MARKETS GROUP


Inside 68 70 72 73 74 76 79 86

Aiken Polo Club German Roots Aiken Youth Polo Directory of Services Classifieds Aiken Spring Pictures Calendar of Events Index of Advertisers


Your Camden Showgrounds

I-20 Exit 101

288 STALLS WITH RUBBER MATS, 3 EXHIBIT RINGS WITH STATE OF THE ART FOOTING, 2 COVERED ARENAS, FANS, CATTLE PENS, GENEROUS SPACE FOR LUNGEING AND SCHOOLING, AND VENDOR AREA

April 5-7 April 12-14 April 19-21 April 26-27 May 3-5 May 17-19 May 24-26 May 31-June 2 June 21-23

scequinepark.com/calendar-2019 for more information For Booking Information (803) 983-0366 info@scequinepark.com a 501c3 non-proďŹ t organization

Camden Spring Classic PSJ Spring Show Palmetto Paint Horse Club SC Quarter Horse Association Palmetto Paint Horse Club Camden Spring Classic H/J SC Quarter Horse Association Camden Spring Classic II SC Quarter Horse Association Dates Subject To Change Dates Subject to Change

scequinepark.com 66

Camden SC I-20 Exit 101

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

67


Aiken Polo Club 2019 New Manager; New Programs By Pam Gleason

W

hen Tiger Kneece took over as the manager of Aiken Polo Club this January, he knew that the first thing he wanted to do was encourage more people to join the club. Tiger, a former 7-goal professional player who has competed in (and won) most of the top tournaments in the United States, got his start playing on Aiken’s fields as a child. He has an emotional connection to the club and a commitment to seeing it do well. In recent years, there has been more of an emphasis on tournament

polo in Aiken and less interest in club polo. As a result, while tournaments at Aiken Polo Club have seen good participation, club membership has dwindled. Tiger wants to reverse that trend by restoring a club atmosphere and bringing in new playing members. The ultimate goal is to see the sport thrive on the city’s historic fields. “Aiken Polo Club isn’t just a place to have tournaments,” says Tiger. “It’s a 501c3 not for profit charity. Our fields are in trust to preserve them for polo. We are here to ensure that there is a club and fields in Aiken, and people playing polo on them for the next 100 years. We’re in it for the long haul. We’re promoting youth polo, club polo, a polo school, everything we need to make sure that polo survives and grows in Aiken.” In consultation with the Aiken Polo Club president, Charlie Bostwick, and with the Aiken Polo Club board of directors, Tiger developed a new and attractive player membership package that encompasses the spring and fall seasons. (April-June and SeptemberNovember.) For a cost of $2000 per year, members will have practices on Wednesday and Friday afternoons, with games on Sunday. The 3 p.m. Sunday games, which are usually tournament matches in front of the crowd, will be double-headers whenever possible, with white-pants club matches following the featured tournament game. The club will encourage a spirit of camaraderie by having barbecues or refreshments after the practices, especially on Friday afternoons, when many amateur players are relaxing after the end of the work week. Player members will be able to enjoy the refreshments and the shade of the Alan Lyle Corey III pavilion during Sunday games, a privilege that costs nonmembers $320 for the year. In addition to all these benefits, player members will be entitled to a $500 discount for their team in all Aiken Polo Club tournaments. This means that if a player enters two tournaments in the spring and two in the fall, he or she will essentially be practicing three times a week and playing in and attending the Sunday games for free.

68

“It’s probably the best deal in polo,” says Tiger. Over the winter, Charlie Bostwick, Tiger, and Pat Nicholson, who maintains the fields, have been working assiduously to improve all the facilities. Aiken Polo Club will have the use of six fields this season. These include two club practice fields (Winthrop Field on Mead Avenue and Little Powderhouse Field on Powderhouse Road) and four tournament fields. In addition to the three Aiken Polo Club tournament fields (Whitney and the two fields at Powderhouse) the club will also be using the tournament field at Crestview when the downtown fields need a break. The Powderhouse fields in particular have gotten something of a makeover this winter. Not only have they been aerated, fertilized and treated with preemergent weed killers, they have also been outfitted with two new sets of boards to keep the ball from rolling off the field and to make the games more enjoyable for players and spectators. Powderhouse also has a new scoreboard – both the scoreboard and the boards came from Barb Uskup’s Meadow Hill farm, which she sold this winter. Tiger says he expects to see a lot of polo on Aiken’s fields this spring. In addition to the regular practice games, he will also be running his youth polo program, giving lessons and encouraging more people to take up the sport. He’ll even have a few horses going for himself, so that he can fill in at practices when necessary. “We’re really excited,” says Tiger. “Everyone is really excited. We’ve already gotten in a lot of memberships, and they are all really good people and we think that there will be enough players to make it really fun. It’s what people want – a real club with a club atmosphere and social activities. We’re going to be using Whitney Field more, and using the pavilion more, too. We can’t wait.”

Aiken Polo Spring Schedule 2019 Dogwood Cup 2 Goal: April 12 - 21 USPA NYTS: April 26 - 28 Jake Kneece Memorial 4 Goal: April 18 - 28 USPA Sportsmanship Cup 6 Goal: May 1 - 12 USPA Congressional Cup 4 Goal: May 15 - 26 USPA Museum Cup 2 Goal: May 30 - June 9

Aiken Polo Club Fall Schedule Alan Corey Cup 4 Goal: Sept. 18 -29 USPA Governors Cup 6 Goal: Oct. 2-13 Aiken Women’s Polo Tournament: Oct. 1- 6 A Flight 10 -14 Goals B Flight 4 - 8 Goals USPA Officers Cup 6 Goal: Oct. 11 - Oct. 20 USPA Players Cup 4 Goal: Oct. 24 - Nov. 3 USPA Aiken Fall Cup 2 Goal: Nov. 1-10

Interested in joining the club? Contact Tiger at 803-646-3301. Visit AikenPolo.og for more information.

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

69


German Roots

International Horses and Ponies at the Patchwork Ranch By Sarah Eakin, Photography by Gary Knoll

W

hen it came to choosing a sport horse, there was one obvious choice for Elli Meinert: going back to her cultural roots and picking the warmblood of her heritage, the Oldenburg breed. Originally from Hamburg, Germany, Elli lived in Canada for a while along with her mother, Carina Crawford, who is an international carriage driving competitor. Three years ago, Carina fell in love with Aiken and saw relocating to the area as the ideal way to escape cold Canadian winters. Elli joined her mother two years later and today they have a base in Windsor, The Patchwork Ranch. This is a beautiful facility that Carina originally developed as a breeding farm for the German riding ponies that she uses in driving competitions. Today, Elli is also bringing up three young Oldenburg mares there, horses that are destined for the jumper ring. Elli grew up in an equestrian environment in Germany. She never showed there, but she did ride seriously, imbued with the German emphasis on dressage and flat work. “I learned to ride on the lunge line – no stirrups or reins,” she said. Once in Canada she showed reining horses as an amateur for 12 years before acquiring her first Oldenburg mare in May 2018. She went back to her native country last December, where she purchased two additional Oldenburg mares at an official Oldenburg auction in Vechta, Lower Saxony. She said this trip was a once in a lifetime experience and a reflection of the Oldenburg Horse Breeders’ Society’s desire to promote their breed on an international level. The Oldenburg Verband, or Registry, is proud of its horses, and it wants to share them with the world.

“They like the buyers to be satisfied with their purchases,” Elli said, explaining that her experience at the sale was a thorough process from start to finish. It began back in Windsor. “We looked at the catalogue before we left. Once we were there, we watched [the horses] doing their morning training and we were able to set up times to try them and talk to the people who had been riding them. The whole experience was very educational, well put together, and well thought out.” Both horses that Elli bought had already shown and placed in classes in Germany. She wanted horses that she could ride and show, and that would also have the quality to breed. “I was looking for disposition as well as conformation, with a view to a possible embryo

70

transfer undertaking down the line,” she said. She was also conscious of matching herself with the right horse and found the association to be very helpful in helping her with her choice. “Not everyone can ride a top competition horse,” she said. “The horse’s mind is really important to us,” she continued. So is a horse’s conformation: Elli knows what she likes and she looks for some very specific things. “The way the neck ties into the chest; I like a bit more of a horse in front of me. In the end, movement and flat work is a huge part of show jumping, and rideability is a big thing. I like them to be attentive and easy to ride.” Like many modern breeds, the Oldenburg has developed over time to appeal to a wider market for sport horses. Originally developed as carriage and all-purpose farm horses, starting in the 1960s, Oldenburg mares were outcrossed with Thoroughbreds, Anglo-Arabs and Trakehners to produce lighter and more athletic animals with superior movement. The Oldenburg Verband’s motto is “Quality is the only standard that counts,” and the association has a liberal policy of incorporating the best horses from outside its own bloodlines in the studbook, as long as they can pass the stringent requirements of the Verband. The horses themselves are closely monitored by the German association, which gives support to its owners wherever they are in the world. For instance, in Aiken, Elli is able to rely on the mentoring and support of Sebastian Rohde. Rohde is a former international show jumper and multiple European medal winner who represents the Oldenburg Verband in North America and inspects horses here. He will be in Aiken this June to do a foal inspection at The Patchwork Ranch. In addition to inspecting horses registered with the Oldenburg Studbook itself, Oldenburg inspectors also conduct official inspections of German Riding Ponies in the United States for the German Weser-ems pony registry. “The Oldenburg Horse Breeders’ Association has put together a detailed inspection system,” Elli explained. “The neck gets a score, the front legs get a score. . . . They evaluate foals on the ground. They are then microchipped, with hair taken for DNA.” The toprated foals are awarded the Premium rating.” The interest and participation of the Oldenburg Verband is a big part of the attraction for a relatively new owner of the breed like Elli. Recently Sebastian Rohde came to Aiken to give her lessons on her three mares and she speaks to him almost every week about their progress. All three mares are being gently introduced to small schooling shows in the Aiken area, before heading out on the road to slightly larger shows. Elli is also contemplating embryo transfer and expects to have a foal every year. “There is a really good support system from Germany,” she said. “These people really care about how you get on with your horses. They want updates and really want to see you succeed.” This summer’s inspection at The Patchwork Ranch in Windsor will feature Carina Crawford’s German riding ponies’ foals as well as a few Oldenburg horses from the region. The inspection, which is open to the public will take place on Friday, June 21 starting at 10 a.m. In addition to conducting inspections, Rohde will give a presentation explaining the Oldenburg Verband’s breeding goals and describing the inspection and registration process. For more information and to receive updates about the inspection, follow The Patchwork Ranch on FaceBook, where Elli is hoping to livestream the whole event. For those who are able to attend in person, the inspection will provide a rare opportunity to explore the attributes of the Oldenburg breed, without having to fly to Germany to do so.

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

71


Growing the Future Aiken Youth Polo By Sarah Eakin

T

he focus of the United States Polo Association’s Youth Polo is, according to their mission, ‘to develop new playing members of the USPA.’ If they want to find success stories, they need look no further than the Aiken Youth Polo program run by Tiger Kneece and his wife Susie. Michael Bradford, 14, a student at South Aiken High School, came into polo from a non-polo background but is already eyeing the future from a professional stance. “We are not from a horse family or a polo family,” said his father Lain Bradford, “But the youth program in Aiken was really accommodating. Michael is completely hooked and spends his time before games watching videos to study professional players.” According to his father, he has also been approached to play in upcoming 8-goal tournaments in Aiken, his first step on a rung of the outdoor polo ladder. Outdoor polo is played on a 10-acre field, but interscholastic and intercollegiate polo are played in the arena. Standard arena size is 300 feet by 150 feet, enclosed by walls that are about 4 feet high. Four years into Tiger and Susie’s management of youth polo in Aiken, the final goal on the horizon is the formation of an intercollegiate women’s team, to go along with the new men’s team, which “fell into our lap two years ago,” Tiger said. “We were asked by some polo families that were going to be in Aiken to take it on and we do what we always do when we are asked to help with young people in polo: We said ‘yes’”. This year’s men’s team consisted of USC Aiken freshmen Harry and Charlie Caldwell and Jim Deal. The team has set the bar high with significant victories against established collegiate polo teams such as the Universities of Kentucky and Virginia. The USC women’s team may or may not materialize next season, “But if it doesn’t happen this year, it will definitely happen next,” Tiger said. He is counting on having enough of his current high school age players in college in a few years. Anna Hale, currently a Mead Hall student and member of Aiken Women’s Interscholastic team, could be a potential candidate. Her mother Angela says she has yet to narrow down her college choices, so she may go somewhere else. She earned her spurs playing on the open intercollegiate team as well as on the women’s interscholastic team, putting up a good fight against some of the national big hitters. All the Aiken teams made it to the regionals this year, but none advanced to the nationals. “It was very inspiring,” said Angela Hale. “The more established teams have it down to a science and spend a lot of time in the arena. Our girls now know what they have to do.” Clearly there is talent and enthusiasm among the 25 core players of the Aiken Youth Polo program. In the past, it was difficult for the interscholastic and intercollegiate teams to find an appropriate place to practice. That challenge has been overcome now that there is a regulation-sized polo arena at New Bridge Polo and Country Club. Such generous investment on the part of the club and the

72

USPA is essential –not surprisingly, the degree of success of the youth polo program is dependent on funding, volunteers and additional participation. “We are always looking for new players,” said Tiger, who spends time reaching out to high school students with an interest in horses and a potential passion for polo. “We are also always looking out for volunteers and donations.” Anna Hale had a slight head start in the sport because her father had taken it up some years ago. She shares ponies and a barn with him. “We were exposed to polo, but not nearly on the level we are now,” Angela said. “There are players like Josh Escapite [whose father Cuko is a professional player] and Summer Kneece, [Tiger’s daughter] who come from polo playing families. There are those of us who have some connection with the sport – and then there are others who have no background in polo but are able to start playing from scratch.” Such success stories show that the USPA’s belief in growing polo from the grass roots up is justified. Tiger, who sits on a number of the association’s youth related committees sees things moving in the right direction, with one proviso: he wishes that the organization would allocate funds according to need and impact, rather than on a strictly equal basis. “They [the USPA] are trying,” he said. “And they have the money. They are doing a better job, but I am a big proponent of allocating funds where funds are needed rather that spread them thinly including to programs where that size of donation will make less of an impact.” Even with limited funding, Aiken Youth Polo has made up the shortfall by supplying enough equipment for players to get started, rather than requiring them to make a big investment in gear right away. “That’s the way we’ve kind of structured our polo,” Tiger said. “We offer a mechanism for kids and their families to get into polo without spending a fortune.” Tiger’s mantra is that “anyone can come and join us” and Michael

Bradford is testament to this approach. Starting out as a complete polo novice, through donations, he has acquired his own string of six horses, equipment and a partially donated trailer, all gifts from the polo community. “The support has at times been overwhelming,” Michael’s father Lain Bradford said. There is a chance to get a close up look at the Aiken Youth Polo participants in action. The USPA National Youth Tournament Series takes place from April 27-28 at Powderhouse field, hosted by Aiken Youth Polo. Last year’s competition had 40 players, breaking the national record for a NYTS event. This year is expected to be equally well-attended. Follow Aiken Youth Polo on Facebook.

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


Directory of Services BARNS,CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING Cooper Home and Stable. For Equestrians by Equestrians. A unique design and build general contractor specializing in equestrian construction and farm development, architecturally designed custom homes, historic renovations, remodeling and additions. Contact J. D. Cooper, cell 502-417-2307, office 803-335-3527, cooperhs.com. G. L. Williams & Daughter. Serving the CSRA for over 52 years. Specializing in hauling, grading, clearing, property maintenance, and excavation.We provide everything from several types of fill dirt, top soil,compost, mortar sands, crushed asphalt/concrete, to screenings and a variety of rocks.Free Estimates Available (803)663-3715 Certified DBE.WOSB. www.glwilliamstrucking.com Larlee Construction, LLC. Fine Equestrian Facilities. 1096 Toolebeck Road, Aiken SC 29803. 803.642.9096. larleeconstruction.com. BLANKET CLEANING & REPAIR Introducing Aiken Horse Blanket Couture! Welcome one, welcome all! Finally, you can have your favorite equine creation designed and made just for you and your horse. Fine material, fine sewing, fine products. For your consultation and initial fitting, contact Elisa at 803-640-3211. On the other side of things; washing, waterproofing and repairing blankets, sheets and fly sheets still exists. Same cell number as above. Email: elisa@aikenhorseblanket.com BOARDING/TURNOUT/TRAINING/SALES Chime Ridge Stables. Stalls available, full, partial or self care. Fun, friendly, adult atmosphere. Convenient to town, South Aiken 803-508-3760. The Stable On The Woods: Elite boarding & training facility and home to trainers Darrell and Melissa Vaughn. With access to Hitchcock Woods, our barn sits on 70 acres and boasts a full size dressage arena with mirrors, show jumping arena and high-quality grass pastures making this the ideal place for you and your horse. Training program to meet your needs, whether your discipline is Dressage, Eventing, Hunters, Jumpers or Foxhunting. thestableonthewoods.com 603.785.0435 Vaughn Equestrian: offering training, sales, and boarding. Professionalism is the guiding principle of owners Darrell and Melissa Vaughn in shaping every component of Vaughn Equestrian. Dressage, Jumpers, Eventing & Young Horses. training and sales. vaughnequestrian.com (603)-785-0435 COMPANION ANIMALS, CARE & SERVICES Trinity Farms Terriers: Norfolk Terriers & Russell Terriers. Quality family dogs with proven calmer dispositions. Generations of great temperaments. Health/dispositions guaranteed. Breeder of terriers for 40+ years. Donna Fitzpatrick. 803.648.3137. easyjacks.com & trinityfarmskennel.com & trinitynorfolkterriers.com. FEED, SUPPLEMENTS & SUPPLIES Aiken County Farm Supply. 1933 Park Ave., Aiken. 803.649.2987. Aiken Saddlery & Supply. Full service tack & feed store. 1044 E. Pine Log Rd., Aiken. 803.649.6583. aikensaddlery.com HAY Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver statewide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803. HOME & FARM SERVICES Be Fly Free. Automatic fly systems for barns and sheds. No unpleasant odor, no synthetic insecticides, no petroleum distillates. Call Carlos: 803-645-0361. beflyfree.com; carlos@beflyfree.com.

Providing competitive comprehensive insurance for horses and farms. Excellent professional and personal service always delivered with a smile. betsyminton.com. 800 942 4258 Hutson-Etherredge Company. Insuring Aiken farms since 1876. Your hometown independent insurance agency can customize your equine property coverage by choosing the best company to fit your needs. We are a full service insurance agency. Call Sandi Vogus for a quote! 803-649-5141 INSTRUCTION/LESSONS Amy McElroy. USDF Gold Medalist and USEF S judge. Instruction and training at all levels. Visit amymcelroy.com or call 803.640-4207. Aiken Horsemanship Academy. Your naturally inspired adult learning resource! Offering Clinics, Courses, Starting Young Horses, Evaluations, and Lessons. JulieRobins.com 803-641-4715. B & E Stables. Elite Training and Sales Facility for all levels of horse and rider. Visit classicaldressagetraining.com or call Elaine: 803-2571949. Jodi Hemry Eventing. Three-Star Eventer offering professional training, sales, boarding, instruction, horse shows, located in the heart of Aiken. 803-640-6691 JodiHemryEventing@gmail.com JodiHemryEventing.com PHOTOGRAPHY & DESIGN SERVICES Gary Knoll Photography.com. Commercial, portrait, weddings, advertising. Pet portraits. Complete wide-format video service. 803.643.9960 410.812.4037. garyknollphotography.com REAL ESTATE/ RENTALS Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 28 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803-439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. Aiken Luxury Rentals. Distinctive accommodations for horse & rider in beautiful Aiken. Downtown fully furnished cottages, historic stables. Executive relocation; corporate housing. Short & long term. aikenluxuryrentals.com; info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803.648.2804. Carolina Real Estate Company. Fine homes, estates and horse properties in Aiken, South Carolina. Let us welcome you home to AIKEN, Home of Horses, History & Hospitality! carolinahorseproperties.com. (803) 648-8660 Sharer Dale, Meybohm RE “Where town meets country.” sharerdale@ gmail.com. 803.522.3648. Suzy Haslup, Meybohm. “Your Aiken Horse Real Estate Specialist.” Buying or selling in the most celebrated equine community in the South. ww.aikenhorserealty.com; 803-215-0153 Tracey Kenworthy Turner, Meybohm. Specializing in marketing & selling Aiken’s horse country properties for 15+ years. southernhorsefarms.com. 803-215-4734. TACK & TACK CLEANING/REPAIR The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 538 Two Notch Rd. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166. YOGA/FITNESS Aiken Yoga: At Aiken Yoga we are passionate about sharing the benefits that regular yoga practice has on one’s physical and mental well-being. We offer Yoga classes, Yoga for Equestrians, Pilates, Barre, Cycle and Functional Fitness -- helping people to keep fit for daily living. Sarah Accord, RN, 116B Pendleton St. SW Aiken. 803-524-8833 or sarah@aikenyoga.com; for schedule go to aikenyoga.com.

INSURANCE Betsy Minton, Dietrich Insurance Company, 803. 617. 8353.

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

73


Classifieds CUSTOM MINI MEADOWBROOK CART Forest green with black patent leather & wicker. Made by Charles Lust of Lafayette, NJ. Matching show harness by David LaSalle included. $1,900. Contact njohn000@epix. net for photos or call 484390-1452

Mill Race Farm, Aiken. Warm weather luxury horse retirement, breaking, training, layups. 803-640-1818

4-year-old TB Mare 16 hands Athletic. Call for more info: 239-989-2011

8-year-old OTTB Mare 16 hands Sound and athletic. Call 941-538-1164

BOARDING/ TURNOUT Chime Ridge Stables. Come join us! Fun group of mature riders at Chime Ridge Stables. Space available full, partial or DIY. 803508-3760; please leave message. Pasture board or dry stalls at Hilltop Farm of Aiken. Beautiful property in 302 corridor, close to town. Under new ownership. anguslady2@hotmail.com or 770468-5760.

BUILDING/REPAIRS/ PAINT

per bale round bales kept inside. Square bales at $7.00 per bale. Will deliver for a small fee. Please call 706-830-2600 or 803-8270864. email garymcelmurray@ glmconstruction.net Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver state-wide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803.

HELP WANTED

Building & Repair: Carpentry, Doors, Windows, Decks, Cabinets, Trim, Stairs, Railings, Gates, Wood Siding, Floors, Framing, Repairs. Licensed, bonded, insured. Contact Paul Dyches. paul.t.dyches@gmail. com. 803-645-6645.

HAY Round and Square Bales. Oakwood Farms: 3593 Silver Bluff Road, Aiken SC 29803. $60 per bale round hay bales. $70

Freelance writers who know horses! The Aiken Horse is looking for contributors. Experience writing preferred; experience with horses a must. Must be a self-starter able to work independently. Must be good with deadlines and willing to rewrite if necessary. Good attitude important. Email resume, writing clips and availability to AikenHorseJobs@gmail.com.

PETS&SERVICES

SHAVINGS

Trinity Farms Terriers: Norfolk Terriers & Russell Terriers. Quality family dogs with proven calmer dispositions. Generations of great temperaments. Health/ dispositions guaranteed. Breeder of terriers for 40+ years. Donna Fitzpatrick. 803.648.3137. easyjacks.com & trinityfarmskennel.com & trinitynorfolkterriers.com.

Shaving Saver: Delivering you bulk shavings the economical & convenient way! Large, durable bags (950 lbs.) of pine shavings delivered to your stable. Reusable, eco-friendly bags make storage neat and simple; bulk pricing makes your bedding affordable. Quality blended easy sift & large flake shavings that your horse will love! Call or text Claudia White 410-303-4617 or email scshavingsaver@gmail.com

REAL ESTATE & RENTALS Aiken Luxury Rentals. Distinctive accommodations for horse & rider in beautiful Aiken. Downtown fully furnished cottages, historic stables. Executive relocation; corporate housing. Short & long term. aikenluxuryrentals.com; info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803.648.2804. For Sale: 10 acres; cleared and sprigged. Wire Road. 803-4745194.

TACK Six saddles, custom made in Walsall England by Prince Phillip’s saddler. Used but in excellent condition. All fittings, including overgirths. $500 apiece. 803-4745194 Retiring polo player selling ALL gear. Bridles, saddles, mallets, helmets, boots, horse wraps and sports medicine boots -- etc ( EVERYTHING). Search and view on Facebook @ Polo gear for sale. Instagram @ Polo Gear For Sale. Or, call 910-315-5900.

Advertising in The Aiken Horse

CLASSIFIED ADS are $25 for the first 30 DIRECTORY LISTING ADS: $25 per issue words & 40 cents for every word or $90 for the year (6 issues.) thereafter. BUSINESS CARDS: $60 per issue or $240 PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for horses: $35; for the year (6 issues.) Limit 30 words & one picture DISPLAY ADS are available in a range of PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for real estate, etc. sizes. For a detailed rate sheet and $45; Limit 60 words & one picture. publication schedule, visit our website: BOXED CLASSIFIEDS: add $5 to your total TheAikenHorse.com

74

MAILING ADDRESS: The Aiken Horse, P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 EMAIL: theAikenHorse@gmail.com We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

Advertise in the June-July issue! Deadline May 17, 2019 Publication date: June 2019

Pay online: TheAikenHorse.com or call us: 803.643.9960

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

75


Aiken Spring Saturdays


Photography by Gary Knoll



Aiken Area Calendar of Events APRIL

3 Schooling HJ Show. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 3 Pleasure Drive. Meadowridge Farm, 1521 Syrup Mill Road, Blythewood, SC. aikendrivingclub.com 4-7 Camden Spring Classic. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, psjshows.com 4-7 The Fork at TIEC. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 5-7 USEA/USEF Chat Hills Horse Trials. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 5-7 Lakeview Plantation Trail Ride. Lakeview Plantation, 875 Cedar Knoll Fairfax, SC. 855.280.7121, info@cedarknoll.com, lakeviewplantation.com 5-7 Tryon Welcome 3. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 5-14 Georgia On My Mind HQHA Stock Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 6 CEC HJ Show. Southern Comfort Farm, 58 Hickory Hill Road, Camden SC. 803.432.0745, scfarmcamden@aol.com, camdenequinecircuit.com 6 Purrs and Paws. SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, 199 Willow Run Road Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org 6 Paradise Farm Schooling Horse Trials. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com, paradisefarmaiken.com 6-7 USEF/USDF “Spring Fever” Dressage Show. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 6-7 Spring Fling Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Keels Kirby: 843.598.0535, clemson.edu/ extension/garrison 6-7 Cheryl & Co. (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Cheryl Sims: 404.518.9198, willspark.com 7 Fun Show (Barrels, Poles, etc.). Almost Heaven Stables, 220 Golf Course Road, Warrenville, SC. Valeria Beard: 803.663.3001 or 803.646.1021, almostheavenstables.com 7 Combined tests/Dressage Tests. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 7 Tryon Hounds Annual Spring Hunter Pace. Long Shadows Farm, 500 Blackwell Road, Campobello, SC. wchpace.org 10-14 Tryon Welcome 4. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 11-14 Southern Pines CDE. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 12-13 9th Annual Kiwanis Rodeo. Kiwanis Fairgrounds, 16942 Hwy 67, Statesboro, GA. ipra-rodeo.com 12-13 Ranch Sorting Event. BSC Arena, Waynesboro, GA. Johnny Lovett: 706.551.2190 or Cliff Chancey: 706.840.3971, rsnc.us 12-14 PSJ Camden Spring. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, psjshows.com 12-14 Chat Hills HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 12-21 Dogwood Cup 2 Goal. 4 Chukker. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org 13 Backstretch Experience: Behind the Scenes at the Aiken Training Track. 8:45-11:15am. Rye Patch parking lot, 100 Berrie Road, Aiken. 803.642.7631, halloffame@cityofaikensc.gov, aikenracinghalloffame.com 13 Eventing Academy Schooling Day. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 13 Schooling GDCTA Dressage, Show Jumping, 3-Phase. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 13 Extreme Cowboy Race. Green River Farm, 623 North Green River Road, Gaffney, SC. southernobstaclechallenges.com 13 73rd Annual Tryon Block House Races. 6881 NC Highway 9, Columbus, NC. tryon.com 13-14 USEA/USEF FENCE Horse Trials. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence. org, fence.org

April-May 2019

13-14 Ride Better Clinic. Stono River Stables, Charleston, SC. Laura Quarles: 843 813 5506, paradisefarmaiken.com 13-14 Brownwood Farms (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Roger Brown: 770.312.4473, willspark.com 14 Eventing Academy Schooling Show. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 17-20 JD Massey Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Keels Kirby: 843.598.0535, clemson.edu/ extension/garrison 17-21 Aiken Spring Classic Masters. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 18-21 Tryon Welcome 5. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 18-21 Tryon Spring Dressage. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 18-28 Jake Kneece Memorial 4 Goal. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org 19-21 PPHC Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 20 Spring Hunter Pace. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 20 CEC HJ Show. Toopler Branch Farm, 1035 Lee Lane, Lugoff. Rebecca 803.699.2282, Tooplerbranch@hotmail.com, camdenequinecircuit.com 20 Chat Hills Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 20 USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass: 803.648.0100 or 610.613.2010, jhallglass@aol. com, sportingdaysfarm.com 20-21 Dressage Spring Series I&II USEF/USDF. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 20-21 Atlanta Youth Dressage Challenge. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 20-21 Longleaf Pine Horse Trials. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 24-28 Aiken Spring Classic Finale. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 24- May 5 Wagener 4 Goal. New Bridge Polo, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. 803.664.7706, wagenerpolo.com/schedule 25-28 Tryon Welcome 6. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 25- May 11 Members Cup 8 Goal. New Bridge, 862 New Bridge Road. Haley Bryan: 803.215.3577, HBryan2485@aol.com. newbridgepolo.com/polo 26-28 USPA NYTS. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org 26-28 Carolina Classic Paso Fino Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Keels Kirby: 843.598.0535, clemson.edu/extension/garrison 26-27 4th Annual American Hero Pro Rodeo. Columbia County Fairgrounds, 562 Columbia Road, Grovetown, GA. rodeosportsnetwork.com 26-28 Mini Circuit SCQHA Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 26-29 Buster And Sheryl Mclaury Clinic. Double J Arena, 501 Lockaby Road, Pendleton, SC. Dorothy M Davis: 828.891.4372 26- May 12 Pete Bostwick Memorial 12 Goal. New Bridge Polo, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. Haley Bryan: 803.215.3577, HBryan2485@aol.com. newbridgepolo.com/polo 27 FENCE Open Horse Show. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence.org, wchpace.org 27 Hunter Pace and Trail Ride. Fant’s Grove Trail System, Butch Kennedy Trailhead behind T. Ed Garrison Arena, Pendleton, SC. wchpace.prg 27-28 Primetime Dressage Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 27-28 GHF/Massey Ferguson Dressage at the Horse Park. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 27-28 Newton County Saddle Club Open Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com

The Aiken Horse

79


27-28 Horse Show Ventures (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Morgan Taylor: 770.827.0175, willspark.com 28 CT & Dressage. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 30- May 1 Tryon Spring 1. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com

MAY

1 Schooling HJ Show. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 1-12 Aiken Charity Horse Shows USEF Premier Rated. The Aiken Horse Park @ “Bruce’s Field”, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 1-12 USPA Sportsmanship Cup 6 Goal. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org 2-4 Dixie Cup Spring Classic Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 2-5 Chat Hills Euphoria 2019. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 2-5 Area III Kim Severson Clinic. Pine Top Farm, 1432 Augusta Highway, Thomson, GA. pinetopeventing@gmail.com, pinetopfarm.com 3-5 PPHC Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 4 Woofstock Doggy Derby Days. Citizens Park, 1060 Banks Mill Road, Aiken. fotasaiken.org 4 CEC HJ Show. Tally Ho Farm, 3962 Lawson Grove Road, Timmonsville SC. Katrina Hutto: 843-319-9286. camdenequinecircuit.com 4 Rolling Hills Saddle Club (H,J,W,B). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Info Line: 770.338.0143, willspark.com 4-5 Area 18 Championship Spring Cutting Show. Hippodrome Arena, North Augusta, SC. Judy K Boozer: 864.876.6272. cuttingnews.com 4-5 USEF/USEA Recognized Horse Trials. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 4-5 Appaloosa Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Kay Roberson: 803.266.3757, clemson.edu/extension/ garrison 7 Thrift Store Party for Aiken SPCA. SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, 199 Willow Run Road Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org 8 Schooling Dressage Show. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 8-12 Tryon Spring 2 and Carolina Classic. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 8-18 Aiken Saddlery Cup 6 Goal. New Bridge Polo, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. 803.664.7706, wagenerpolo.com/schedule 10-11 Freedom Rodeo. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Travis Young: 404.401.5110, willspark.com 10-12 Chat Hills HJ Horse Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 11 Eventing Academy Schooling Day. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com

80

11 Gwinnett 4-H Spring Open Horse Show . Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 11 Historic Stables Experience. 9-11:15am. $30pp. Rye Patch parking lot, 100 Berrie Road, Aiken. 803.642.7631, halloffame@cityofaikensc.gov, aikenracinghalloffame.com 11 Schooling GDCTA Dressage, Show Jumping, 3-Phase. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 11-12 Ride Better Clinic. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com. paradisefarmaiken.com 11-12 PSJ Highfields Mother’s Day Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 11-12 WHES May Schooling Day and Horse Trials. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 11-12 Greater Atlanta Dressage Southern I/II. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 12 Eventing Academy Schooling Show. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 15-19 Tryon Spring 3. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 15-26 USPA Congressional Cup 4 Goal. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org 16-19 Triangle Sandhills Spring Classic. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 16- Jun.1 Spring Trophy Challenge 8 Goal. New Bridge Polo, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. Haley Bryan: 803.215.3577, HBryan2485@aol.com. newbridgepolo.com/polo 17-18 Ranch Sorting Event. BSC Arena, Waynesboro, GA. Johnny Lovett: 706.551.2190 or Cliff Chancey: 706.840.3971, rsnc.us 17-19 Camden Spring Classic H/J I. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 17- Jun. 2 Tommy Hitchcock Memorial 12 Goal. New Bridge Polo, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. Haley Bryan: 803.215.3577, HBryan2485@aol.com. newbridgepolo.com/polo 18 Pups and Suds. SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, 199 Willow Run Road Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org 18 PSJ Just For Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 18 Seasons In The Grove CT. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 18 Atlanta Youth Dressage Challenge. Georgia Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 18-19 South Carolina Equestrian Special Olympics. The Aiken Horse Park @ “Bruce’s Field”, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 18-19 USEA/USEF Chat Hills Horse Trials. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 19 CT & Dressage. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 19 Connemara Celebration. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 19- Jun.2 Polo Pony 4 Goal. New Bridge Polo, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. 803.664.7706, wagenerpolo.com/schedule 22-26 Tryon Spring 4. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 22- Jun.1 USPA Congressional Cup 6 Goal. New Bridge Polo, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. 803.664.7706, wagenerpolo.com/schedule 24-26 SCQHA Show. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 24-27 Lakeview Plantation Trail Ride. Lakeview Plantation, 875 Cedar Knoll, Fairfax, SC. 855.280.7121, info@cedarknoll.com, lakeviewplantation.com 25 Rolling Hills Saddle Club (H,J,W,B). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Info Line: 770.338.0143, willspark.com 25-26 USEF/USEA Recognized Horse Trials YEH/FEH. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com. paradisefarmaiken.com

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


25-26 Chat Hills Dressage Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 25-26 Horse Show Ventures - The Southeastern Hunter/Jumper Series. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 25-26 Obstacle Trail Clinic. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence.org, fence.org 27 Open Schooling Day Cross Country and Show Jumping. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward: 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@ gmail.com. paradisefarmaiken.com 28- Jun.2 Tryon Spring 5. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 29 Twilight #1. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 30-Jun. 2 Chat Hills HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 30-Jun. 9 USPA Museum Cup 2 Goal. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net. aikenpolo.org 31-Jun. 1 9th Annual Blythewood Doko Rodeo. Blythewood Community Arena, Blythewood, SC. blythewoodrodeo.com 31- Jun.2 Camden Spring Classic H/J II. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com

JUNE

1 GQHA Novice Show Series. Georgia Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 1 Combined Test and Dressage Show. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com 1-2 USEF/USEA Recognized Horse Trials. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 4-9 Tryon Spring 6. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 5 Schooling HJ Show. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 5 Yappy Hour. 6-8 pm. SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, 199 Willow Run Road Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org 6-9 Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show- Saddlebred Division. Broyhill Preserve, 1500 Laurel Lane, Blowing Rock, NC. brchs.org 7-9 Palmetto Sport Horse Spring Classic. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Robert Obermiller: 828.674.1758, clemson.edu/extension/garrison 8 Chat Hills Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 8 Rolling Hills Saddle Club (H,J,W,B). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Info Line: 770.338.0143, willspark.com 8 CEC HJ Show. Pine Tree Stables, 1265 Sanders Creek Road, Camden, SC. Lynn Conto: 803.424.1952, conto@bellsouth.net. camdenequinecircuit.com 8-9 GHF/Massey Ferguson Annual Dressage Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 8-9 PSJ Mullet Hall Summer Classic. Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, Johns Island, SC. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 9 Save the Horses Charity Horse Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Mellisa Cotton: 404.557.6158, willspark.com 11-12 USEF/USDF “Summer Solstice” Dressage. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 12 Twilight #2. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 13-16 Harmon Classics Derby Mania. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence. org, fence.org 13-16 Tryon Summer 1. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 14-16 Good Old Summertime Horse Show (H, J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Cheryl Sims: 404.518.9198, willspark.com

April-May 2019

14-16 Tryon Dressage Summer 1. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 15 Pups and Suds. SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare, 199 Willow Run Road Aiken. 803.648.6863, letlovelive.org 15 Ela Ladwig Dressage Clinic. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com 15 Dressage Test of Choice Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson: 803. 215.6590, fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com. fullgallopfarm.com 15 Hunter Pace. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 15 Schooling GDCTA Dressage, Show Jumping, 3-Phase. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 15-16 WHES May Schooling Day and Horse Trials. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com 15-16 H. J. Fox Classics I & II. Georgia Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 16 Obstacle Challenge. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 19 Twilight #3. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@ chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 19-22 SC 4-H Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Kristine Vernon: 864.656.4028, clemson.edu/ extension/garrison 20-23 Tryon Summer 2. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 21-23 Southern Fox Summer Classic (USEF). Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 21-22 Carl Black Classic IPRA Rodeo. Jim Miller Park, Marietta, GA. rodeosportsnetwork.com 21-23 SCQHA Show South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 22 USEF/USEA “Summer” Horse Trials. Stable View 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 22-23 PSJ Highfields June. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 22-23 Chat Hills Dressage Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 22-23 Elite Showjumping (H, J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Vic Russell: 678.858.7192, willspark.com 26-30 Tryon Summer 3. Tryon International Event Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, tryon.coth.com 27-30 Stars & Stripes Circuit (GQHA). Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 28-29 FENCE Rodeo. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence.org, fence.org 28-30 Feathered Horse Summer Classic. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Gail Shrine: 512.653.3635, clemson.edu/ extension/garrison 28-30 Cheryl & Co. (H,J). Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. Cheryl Sims: 404.518.9198, willspark.com 29-30 Chat Hills Summer Event. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, Chatthillseventing.com 29-30 Ride Better Clinic. Stono River Stables, Charleston, SC. Laura Quarles: 843 813 5506, paradisefarmaiken.com 29-30 Dressage at the Park. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com

The Aiken Horse

81


Business Cards

82

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


Monetta Farrier Specialties

TWO GREAT LOCATIONS

GREAT SERVICE AND BROAD RANGE OF QUALITY FARRIER SUPPLIES

Aiken, SC

803.685.5101

Columbus, NC

828.894.0280

www.monettafarrier.com

MyMalvernBank.com Serving Aiken year round

EAST COAST EQUINE DENTISTRY Lou Heffner

Quality work at an affordable price.

20+ years experience

April-May 2019

803.649.9343 home 610.960.2405 for immediate response The Aiken Horse

83


Mortality FarM liability Care/Custody/Control shawna dietriCh

800-942-4258

Louisville, KY

•

Aiken, SC

betsy Minton

803-617-8353

www.dietrich-insurance.com

84

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

85


Index of Advertisers Advertiser

86

Page Section

Advertiser

Page

Section

Aiken County Farm Supply

63

2

Lisa Seger Insurance

55

2

Aiken Fine Homes and Land

23

1

MacQueen Equine Law

25

1

Aiken Horsemanship Academy

11

1

Marrinson Stables

50

2

Aiken Luxury Rentals

55

2

Meybohm Vaillancourt

2

1

Aiken Polo

66

3

Meybohm Vaillancourt

35

1

Aiken Polo Club

38

1

Meybohm Dale

18

1

Aiken Saddlery, Inc.

24

1

Meybohm Dale

19

1

Auto Tech

32

1

Meybohm Haslup

3

1

Barnware

55

2

Meybohm Sullivan/Turner

37

1

Be Fly Free

50

2

Mountain Stream Log Homes

61

2

Carolina Horse Shows HOF

6

1

New Bridge Polo Club

22

1

Carolina Real Estate

16

1

New Era Farm

55

2

Carolina Real Estate

17

1

Oak Manor Saddlery

59

2

Classic Company

88

3

Paradise Farm

59

2

DFG Stables

43

2

Patty Merli Saddles

50

2

Epona

6

1

Polysols/GGT Footing

42

2

Equine Divine

23

1

Progressive Show Jumping, Inc

51

2

Equine Rescue of Aiken

75

3

Red Horse Stable

55

2

Estancia La Victoria

29

1

Retired Racehorse Project

54

2

Estrella Equine

25

1

SCQHA

50

2

Fencing Solutions

34

1

South Carolina Equine Park

66

3

FITS Equestrian

49

2

Southern Equine Service

9

1

FOTAS Aiken

62

2

Southern States Cooperative,

25

1

G L Williams and Daughter

44

2

Spay SC

67

3

Gary Knoll Photography

78

3

SPCA Albrecht Center

87

3

Harrison K-9

39

1

Stable View Farm, LLC

44

2

Hilltop farm of Aiken

61

2

Sweet PDZ

61

2

Hitchcock Woods Foundation

36

1

The Kneaded Edge

11

1

Home for Good Dog

33

1

The Kneaded Edge

59

2

Keller Williams Gutierrez

6

1

The Tack Room

49

2

Keller Williams Stinson

4

1

The Willcox

6

1

Kershaw County Realtor

15

1

Three Runs Plantation

40

1

L & N Equestrian

44

2

Tod’s Hill

64

2

Larlee Construction

5

1

Warneke Cleaners

59

2

Lightning Protection Systems

59

2

Windsor Court

34

1

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2019


WHERE shopping

lives

BOUTIQUE ITEMS. THRIFT STORE PRICES. FREE DONATION PICKUPS. LARGE ITEM PICKUPS (803) 648-6863

DOWNTOWN

MITCHELL PLAZA

404 RICHLAND AVE E AIKEN, SC

1589 WHISKEY ROAD AIKEN, SC (803) 226-0255

TUESDAY - SATURDAY 10 AM - 5 PM

MONDAY - SATURDAY 10 AM - 5 PM

April-May 2019

The Aiken Horse

87


June 12-16, 2019 | June 19-23, 2019 $25,000 Grand Prix | $5,000 Dash for Cash $7,500 Welcome Class | $15,000 USHJA International Hunter Derby $5,000 Classic Hunter Derby | $1,000 Green Hunter Incentive

843-768-5503