April May 2018

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Volume 13 • Number 5

April-May 2018


Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt, REALTOR®

803.640.4591

THIS IS MY NEIGHBORHOOD Aiken, South Carolina — Southern Charm and Equestrian Sport 189 CROOKED CREEK

MLS # 100888

• Turnkey, private, gated farm • 4 large grass, board fenced on 15+ acres pastures, flat grass area to ride • 5 stall barn w/ spacious tack • Near all 302 equestrian venues room & wash stall • $459,750

785 GRACE

FOX TAIL COURT

• 9.49 acres in Hollow Creek Equestrian • 4 matted 12x12 stalls • 2 x fenced paddocks

MLS # 101987

• Extensive community trails • Wash stall; tack & feed rooms • Well appointed 650 sq. ft. apt • $349,900

503 CHIME BELL CHURCH ROAD

• Ideal setting for equestrian barn & paddocks • 6327 sq. ft. main house, 4 bdrms, 3.5 baths

525 LAURENS STREET

2209 TALLY HO DRIVE

MLS # 71716

• 1972 sq. ft. GUEST/POOL house • 20 acres • Salt water pool & hot tub • MLS# 100906 • $1,775,000

MLS # 97065

MLS # 101470

• 11.5 acre Hitchcock Stables • Adjoins The Woods • 27 12x12 stall barn • 8 large paddocks • 2 carriage houses, bunk house • $2,952,500

• 10 Acres in Historic Horse District • 3 barns; 20 stalls, 20 paddocks • 2 grass training fields • 4BR 3BA residence • Guest cottage • Frontage on 3 clay roads • Easy access to The Woods • $3,100,000

254 BECK ROAD

1064 GRAND PRIX DRIVE

MLS # 101720

MLS # 73833

• 22 acre training center • Total of 10 stalls • Multiple board fenced paddocks • Grass riding arena • Tack room shed, workshop with area for hay • 2BR 2BA mobile home • $239,900

OLD TORY TRAIL

• Exceptional turnkey horse farm in Bridle Creek • 28 acres. 6 14x14 stalls. Courtyard barn with spacious furnished 1 bdrm apt • Wash stall, grooming stall, laundry room, tack room / lounge

MLS # 99504

• 25 acres on the ridge overlooking the 302 Valley • Part of The Vista Training Center • Established coastal pasture • Level area for barn & residence • Significant gentle rolling terrain for gallops • Buyer to survey; property may be subdivided once.• $325,000

• Home of multiple international Event riders • 8 large grass paddocks, run-in sheds, large utility building • Grass Dressage arena & grass Jump Field • $695,000

1080 ARCHIE WARE ROAD

• 16.44 acre professional eventing horse farm $550,000 • 9 stall shed row barn, 2 tack rooms, wash stall, feed room • 8 large grass paddocks, 2 run-in sheds, sand dressage area • Grass jump filed. 820 sq. ft. equipment shed/workshop • Owners residence 3 BD 2 BA, salt water pool & pool house

• 2BR 2BA 1730 sq. ft. owner’s residence • 8 stall European style cement block courtyard barn • Tack room; feed room • 4 large grass paddocks 20+ acres • Fox Hollow amenities • $875,000

MLS # 101755

• 1100 sq. ft. 2 BD 2 BTH guest cottage • Farm is gated & perimeter fenced. Plenty of dirt roads to jog on. Farm is part of Spring Meadows Equestrian Subdivision with amenities: jump field & trails • $550,000

www.AikenSCProperties.com 2

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2018


PARADISE FARM

$1.2 MILLION

Top class income producing event facility offered for the first time. 109+ acres, cross country course with water feature, 3 all purpose competition rings, 2 barns with 18 stalls & 2 story 4 bedroom home. Zoned RUD. Suitable for any equestrian discipline.

RISEN STAR

$387,000

HUNTCLIFF

$275,000

Well maintained 4 BR/2.5 BA cedar sided home on 2.52 A overlooking spring fed pond. Wood floors, tile, carpet, gas fireplace, newer sunroom addition, deck, greenhouse, basement workshop & storage building. View of pond from every bedroom window. Extra 6.1 A lot adjacent available for $80,000.

NEW BRIDGE POLO

$429,000

TWIN LANES FARM

$785,000

Turnkey equestrian property in gated Fox Hollow w/hardiplank 4 BR/3.5 BA two story home w/pine floors, 2 fireplaces & chef's kitchen. 3 stall barn w/wash stall & storage, 4 paddocks & in-ground pool. Amenities include cross country course, fabulous trails & irrigated show rings. HOA fees only $970.

BASSETT HILL

$729,000

Working 30 acre horse farm perfect for the eventer, fox hunter or any professional. Lovely 4 bedroom home, extra mobile for help, 1/2 mile sand training track, 4 stall barn, 3 run-ins, 11 pastures & round pen. Mostly cleared with good pasture and fencing.

Wonderful opportunity to own in security gated New Bridge across from community barn & new show ring. 9.85 acres of fenced pasture w/new custom 2 BR/2 BA frame & stone home w/open floor plan. Stone fireplace, exquisite kitchen w/pantry, screened porch, large master w/walk in closet & spa bath. Includes storage shed.

Fieldstone custom 3 BR/2 BA home privately situated on 42 acres w/Heider 4 stall center aisle barn w/heated tack room & indoor wash stall. 4 large pastures w/run-ins, 3 board fencing, dressage & jump schooling area. Gently rolling land w/access to Cedar Meadows trails & community show ring.

SUMMERDAY FARM

WILD OAKS

SADDLEBAG COTTAGE $239,000

$625,000

Horse farm w/lovely 3 BR Cape Cod on over 53 acres in Ridge Spring area just 15 minutes from downtown Aiken. Home has 2 car garage, hardwood floors, screened porch & fabulous deck w/dock leading to a 4 acre spring fed pond. Miles of riding trails, fabulous pastures, 3 stall barn & equipment shed. $

$1.37 MILLION

Lewis Lane 62 A horse farm with 12 stall center aisle barn, 3 BR/2 BA apartment with granite & hardwood floors, paneled tack room with half bath & laundry. Gorgeous pasture dotted with live oaks & stick and ball/jumping field.Conveniently located close to downtown Aiken.

535,000

HORSE DISTRICT BARN

Winter colony 2 bedroom/2 bath cottage full of charm and one block away from the Hitchcock Woods. This 1368 square foot, circa 1915, home has heart pine & oak floors, double fireplaces, wainscotting, Hitchcock ceilings & renovated bath with newer metal roof. Sought after Aiken location.

STOREYBOOK

$

85,080

7 ACRES

UNDER CONTRACT

FOX HOLLOW LOT 41

Fabulous land & lots available: Twin Silos Farms, Mt. Vintage, & Fox Hollow

803-215-0153 • www.AikenHorseRealty.com April-May 2018

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April-May 2018

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

P.O. Box 332 • Montmorenci, SC 29839-0332 • 803.643.9960 •

www.TheAikenHorse.com • Editor@TheAikenHorse.com

Time Dated Material • Periodicals • Volume 13 • Number 5

If you are a horse person in Aiken, spring means three things: horse shows, polo, and pollen. The first two are among Aiken’s beloved attractions. The last is not always quite so welcome. Pollen just means that it is spring and everything is in bloom of course. But in April, when the pines trees start releasing their clouds of yellow dust, it can cover everything and feel a little overwhelming, especially if you and your horse are allergy sufferers! Although we have horse shows all year round in Aiken, in the spring the season really ramps up. It all starts with the historic Aiken Horse Show, which just celebrated its 102nd anniversary in the Hitchcock Woods. The show this year attracted a large contingent of exhibitors as well as spectators, sponsors and guests. The final day of the show fell on Easter Sunday, and this turned out to be a bonus. The luncheon tent was packed, the silent auction got a lot of attention, and at noon there was an Easter egg hunt in the showring. Even the Easter Bunny was there: this was a professional mascot in a costume who hugged the kids and posed for pictures with the adults. The kids, and there were a lot of them, seemed to be having a fantastic time. The youngest equestrians enjoyed themselves on Saturday, too. There was a large costume class that allowed them to express their creativity, and the leadline class had 24 entrants, including some riders who were not even toddlers yet. We hope this bodes well for the future of horsemanship in this area. Looking forward to the next two months, in April we will have two weeks of the Aiken Spring

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The Aiken Horse

Classic held at Highfields Event Center, followed by two weeks of the Aiken Charity Horse Show at Bruce’s Field in the May. Both of these shows feature prestigious classes, such as a $25,000 hunter classic at Bruce’s Field, and $25,000 Grand Prixes as well as international hunter derbies at both shows. Both shows will also attract accomplished riders from outside the area, including people on their way back north from the winter show season in Florida. On the polo front, there have been practices all winter long on private fields in Aiken, but now that spring is here, the clubs are getting ready for their tournament seasons. The unofficial start of the polo season is Pacers and Polo, the final leg of the Aiken Triple Crown. That took place on March 31, but was an exhibition game rather than part of the serious polo season. Tournaments will start on April 13 with the first games of the Dogwood Cup at Aiken Polo Club. Aiken Polo’s Sunday games, which were moved to 1 pm last season, have moved back to their traditional 3 pm time slot this spring, and the opening game is scheduled for April 15. Tournaments at New Bridge start closer to the end of April with a member’s 8 goal, followed by two 12 goals, and an 8 goal. There will also be two six goals put on my Wagener Polo Club on New Bridge fields. The polo season is scheduled to go through the second week of June, but could last a little longer if the weather holds. With so many players based here now, it looks like it is going to be an active spring. Of course, just because polo and horse shows are big here in the spring, it doesn’t mean that other disciplines have shut down. Foxhunting may be over and the young racehorses that wintered at the Aiken Training Track may have mostly moved on, but there are still plenty of opportunities for event riders, dressage riders, competitive drivers, trail riders and everyone else in Aiken and the surrounding area. So whatever your discipline, get out and enjoy our beautiful weather with your horses. We know we will. As ever, if you have a comment, a question, a suggestion or an idea for an article, send us an email. We want to be your horse newspaper.

The Aiken Horse EDITOR & PUBLISHER Pam Gleason

ART DIRECTOR Gary Knoll

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jean Berko Gleason

LAYOUT & DESIGN Gary Knoll

PHOTOGRAPHERS Pam Gleason Gary Knoll

ADVERTISING

803.643.9960 editor@theaikenhorse.com

Going Out Of Town? Don’t miss future issues of The Aiken Horse. We will send you a one year subscription (6 issues) for $24.00. Send check or CC # & your mailing address: P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 Or sign up on the web at www.TheAikenHorse. com

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

All contents Copyright 2018 The Aiken Horse The Aiken Horse Policies: The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers, editors, or the policies of The Aiken Horse, LLC. The Aiken Horse is owned by The Aiken Horse, LLC.

Pam Gleason Editor & Publisher

April-May 2018


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Equine Rescue News & Notes Aiken Trials, Horse Show Cot on the Derby Ask the Judge

Our Cover shows Lilly Geitner leading Hidden Springs Lucky Star, owned by Elizabeth Tarumianz. Pippa Pritzlaff is in the saddle with her mother, Glenna Pritzlaff, assisting. Leadline class at the historic Aiken Horse Show in the Woods. Find more pictures from the show on page 20. Photography by Pam Gleason.

44 47 48 52 57 58 60

Allison Springer Pain in Horses Aiken Saddlery Trotters, Pacers, Polo Low Level Lasers Bernie Traurig Clinic Celia Cram

Trotting down the track at the Bruce McGhee Memorial Harness Races. More photos on page 52. Photography by Gary Knoll

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Breaking from the gate at the Aiken Trials on the historic Aiken Training Track. Find more pictures on page 20. Photography by Gary Knoll

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68 72 74 75 76 78 81 90

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Captain Gaylard Sisters Aside RoAnn Farm Classifieds Directory Dressage, CT, Jumping Calendar Index

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Equine Rescue of Aiken A Healing Place By Pam Gleason

W

hen Equine Rescue of Aiken was founded in 2006, it was originally conceived as a sanctuary for abused horses and a place where unwanted or mistreated animals could be rehabilitated and adopted. Over the past 12 years, however, it has evolved to be much more than that. Not only does the rescue help horses get into good homes, it has also become a place where people go to participate in the horse community, be with horses, and find peace. The old saying that the outside of a horse is good for the inside of a man finds its proof in the pastures of Haven Hills Farm where the rescue is based. Equine Rescue of Aiken may have been founded to save horses, and over 800 horses have been saved, but in the end it has probably saved just as many people. It is a healing place. The rescue is situated on 90-acres of rolling pastures, with hills, valleys and even a small pond where domestic ducks and wild Great Blue Heron compete for space. The pastures have run-in sheds, and each houses a small group of compatible horses. There is also a riding arena that is partially covered where the rescue runs various activities, including a program in which veterans who are suffering from PTSD or other emotional troubles work out their problems through interactions with a horse.

In addition to the veterans’ programs, the rescue also has a juvenile justice program, through which young people who have been identified by local law enforcement as being at risk can come to the rescue, work with horses and start to turn their lives around. The rescue also participates in pre-trial intervention programs offered by the city and county of Aiken, which are designed to allow first time offenders of non-violent crimes to avoid criminal records through counseling and community service. Community service is also freely given by many other groups of people, old and young. These groups include Girl Scouts, pageant queens and the Super Smart Girl Club, a charitable organization based in Graniteville designed to “motivate and mentor girls.” In addition to the groups that come out periodically, there are also volunteers who show up monthly, weekly or even every day. The volunteers do a vast amount of work, everything from feeding and grooming the horses to fixing the fences and maintaining the pastures. The volunteers do so much work, that the rescue can be run with just two full time employees, Caroline Mulstay and Caitlin Brady, in addition to the rescue’s president and CEO Jim Rhodes. Horses at the rescue fall into two general categories. There are a small number of sanctuary horse that are not adoptable and a larger number of horses that are. Over the years, the rescue has discovered its own niche of horses that are suitable for Aiken adopters: most of them are warmbloods or off the track Thoroughbreds. OTTBs make up the main population, and they are generally young, sound, healthy animals ready to go on to new careers as event horses, polo horses, foxhunters and trail horses. “We also use the Thoroughbreds in our veterans programs,” says Jim Rhodes, explaining that for one of the main programs they are required

April-May 2018

to have eight OTTBs that are ready to participate. The horses mostly come from tracks in the Mid-Atlantic where Jim has contacts with trainers who send him horses that are ready for new lives. Many of the horses are well bred and were carefully started so they already have excellent training foundations. Some, termed “war horses,” have had many starts and benefit from significant downtime before they are ready to go to work. These horses are naturals for the veterans programs. They get to spend time interacting with people while they are decompressing from racetrack life. After working in the programs, the horses are especially friendly, refreshed and curious about what new things they might encounter next. “It’s good for them,” says Jim. “One thing we don’t have is a time limit for the horses. They can take as much time as they need before they get adopted out. The work that the rescue has done is extraordinarily successful in many different ways. It does have some challenges however. Maintaining the sanctuary horses on the farm, rescuing and rehabilitating animals that are in serious trouble, and shipping and caring for the horses used in the therapy programs is extremely expensive. The rescue, a 501c3 charity, has few sources of income outside of donations. Adoption fees, while useful, are quite low and generally don’t cover the amount that the rescue has spent on the horse. The rescue has some boarding and has occasionally offered some lessons, but beyond that, it has to rely on regular donations for its income. There are a number of regular donors in the horse community, and the rescue has been the beneficiary of several bequests recently, but Jim says that donations are down this year as compared to last year, even as the rescue is gaining new followers in the community and beyond. “I don’t know if it is the new tax laws, or what it is,” says Jim. “But people just aren’t supporting us as much as they used to. It’s not that they don’t appreciate what we are doing – I think it may be that they don’t realize how much we need their help.” Jim notes that the rescue does all of its community outreach and therapy work, such as the veterans programs, for free, without charging for the use of the horses. Neither does it get any funding from the city or the county for the juvenile justice or the first time offenders program. As winter turned to spring this year, Caroline Mulstay and Caitlin Brady began riding and schooling some of the Thoroughbreds and warmbloods to ready them for adoption, finding new homes for 13 of them in the first few months of the year. There are about 20 healthy and sound horses at the rescue today who are ready for new homes – their pictures can be found on the rescue’s Facebook page. Meanwhile the healing work at Haven Hills continues. “You can’t lie to a horse,” says Jim. “A horse looks at you and knows who you are. When we have the juvenile programs out here, sometimes there will be a person that has a natural affinity for horses. I remember recently there was a group of kids, none of them had ever been on a farm before or been near a horse, and there was one girl that the horses just wanted to get close to. I watched them as they went around the farm and everywhere they went the horses were following this one girl. There was one horse that she started talking to. ‘You’re going to be all right,’ she said. ‘You and me both are going to be all right.’ “I found out later that this girl had anger issues and was getting into trouble, but now she comes back to the rescue as a volunteer, and now she’s getting good grades and she wants to become a veterinarian. She has totally changed. It was the horses that let her do that. And that’s just one of many stories from the rescue. That sort of thing happens almost every day.” Visit the Equine Rescue website www.aikenequinerescue.org or follow them on Facebook.

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News and Notes Polo Rule Changes

If you play or watch polo this spring, you will likely notice some fairly significant rule changes that went into effect in January 2018. The United States Polo Association (USPA) registers the players and is the keeper of the official “Blue Book” that explains the rules, lists the players and records the results of important tournaments. The organization changes a few rules every year. Usually, these changes have to do with various fine points of tournament eligibility and the handicapping of players. Sometimes they affect the way chukkers are timed. Only rarely do they actually change the flow of the game in a major way. The changes this year fall into that rare category. These rule changes, according to the USPA website, “are designed to open up the game, make it safer and bring the Outdoor Rules more in line with the USPA’s International Rules and the HPA, FIP and AAP Rules.” The biggest change is that hitting the ball out of bounds will now be treated essentially the same as a foul. If a player hits the ball over the sideboards and out of bounds, or his horse kicks it out after he hits it, the play will be stopped, the umpire will put the ball back on the field, and the other team will have a free hit. If a player hits the ball and an opposing player’s horse kicks it out, the player whose team hit the ball will get the free hit. In the past, when the ball went over the sideboards, the clock did not stop and the two teams lined up facing the umpire, who bowled the ball between them. There was no particular penalty for hitting a ball out, and in fact, it could be a good strategy if you were in the last chukker of the game and your team was ahead by a goal or two. It could slow things down, break the other team’s momentum if they seemed to be in danger of having a miraculous comeback, and generally run out the clock. This was particularly the case the last chukker. Polo has generally used a 30 second rule. If a chukker lasted seven and a half minutes, a warning bell would be rung at seven minutes and play continued until 30 seconds were up, or the ball hit the boards or went over the sidelines. In the past, if the warning bell rang and your team was up by a goal, hitting the ball out of bounds on purpose was a good way to cement your victory. Today, you will generally be giving the other team a free hit, although in the last chukker, the final 30 seconds have been eliminated (unless the score is tied) so the game is over at the seven minute mark. Other new rules involve the throw-in, which has traditionally created a large number of penalties having to do with the right of way and determining who has “the line” and is therefore allowed to hit the ball. According to the new rule, there is no line until the ball leaves the lineup, which seems to mean that whoever can get to it safely can play it.

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There is also a new “offsides” rule, which applies to players who have left the field when the play has been stopped. Those players may not come back onto the field ahead of the play and make a play on the ball until they have come back into the play near their teammates. New rules that have been announced but will not take effect until next year include a rule preventing players from “setting a pick” on an opposing player who is trying to defend against a teammate’s offensive play. There is also a long-awaited new helmet rule. After debate and

deliberation that has gone on for years, the USPA has finally announced that players must wear a helmet that has passed the NOCSAE standard for polo helmets. This might be difficult since the NOCSAE standard is stringent and, as of last year, there were no certified polo helmets on the market. There have only been two that have ever been able to pass the testing, and none of them are currently in production. The helmet makers had better get busy.

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2018


All of these new rules might take some getting used to. Billy Raab, who runs Wagener Polo and is the manager of Aiken Polo Club, says that when he first heard of the new rules, he was skeptical. However, after watching polo down in Florida this winter, he has come back a believer. “At first I didn’t like them at all,” he says. “But now I love them. They speed the game up and make it much better for everyone. They are the best thing that has happened to polo for a long time if you ask me.” Billy says that he is hoping to organize a presentation for players given by one of Aiken’s certified umpires to explain the ins and outs of the new rules and, with luck, cut down on confusion when they are applied. The last time there was a major rule change was a few years ago when new rules went into effect that restricted a player’s ability to turn the ball. That rule took players a while to figure out, but eventually it just became part of the game.

Intercollegiate Polo Returns

Starting this fall, USC Aiken will once again have an intercollegiate polo program. The school already has several active equestrian teams, including a new Western team and an eventing team. Intercollegiate polo teams have been started at the college several times over the past few years, and these teams have even gotten a taste of competition against other schools. But it has been difficult to keep them going. Lacking a dedicated facility and with no horses of their own, the students had to work hard just to get on a horse. Then, as a student run organization, it suffered every time a dedicated member graduated and there was no one to take his or her place.

This fall, however, things promise to be different. One big change is that the program will be able to follow a successful model that has already been set up by Tiger Kneece. Tiger, a former professional player who lives in Aiken, is on the board of directors of the Aiken Polo Club and he runs a polo school called Polo Adventures. He and his wife, Susie, have created an immensely successful youth polo program that practices on Winthrop Field in the historic district. Tiger’s students have competed successfully in the USPA’s National Youth Tournament Series (NYTS) for several years, and a few of them have also graduated to playing in regular tournament polo with and against adults. Over the past school year, Tiger’s kids formed three complete interscholastic polo teams which practiced at the Fire Star polo arena in Wagener. In February, all three teams traveled to Alabama to play in a tournament at the Blue Water Creek polo club. They then went to play in Atlanta, where Aiken White (Mason Sease, Anna Hale, Summer Kneece) won their game and went on to the Southeast Open Regionals. There they lost to Maryland, the eventual winner of the National Finals. Not bad for their first year of competing. The new intercollegiate team at USC Aiken is Tiger’s next project. Things will be a little easier to get running this year because the new team, which has already been registered with the USPA, will be headlined by Harry and Charlie Caldwell, a pair of polo playing identical twins from Tennessee. Both have enrolled at USC Aiken for the fall, and they will be bringing their horses with them. A third accomplished player, who is also well-mounted, will be added to the roster in the fall. continued on page 30

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aikenhorseLEFT4-18_aikenhorseLEFT 3/27/2018 2:23 PM Page 1

HOMES . HORSES 803.645.3308 803.507.1142 803.221.6831 803.270.6358 803.270.6623 803.341.8787 HISTORY . HOSPITALITY

Courtney Conger Randy Wolcott Alex Tyrteos

Lee Hedlund

Mike Hosang

Frank Starcher

Jack Roth

Suzan McHugh Thomas Bossard Brian Cavanaugh Jane Page Thompson Beth Owenby

203.249.3071 803.292.8525 803.640.2845 803.624.6072 803.215.8232 803.645.8558

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.

.648.8660

www CarolinaHorseProperties com . 803

Willow Hill Farm . Historic 1910 farm recently updated features main residence with original woodwork, eat-in kitchen modernized in 2014, 5 bedrooms each with full bath. For guests or grooms, there is a brick 2-story home with 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. For horses, there are 2 original barns with a total of 18 stalls and hay storage areas; and 8 fenced grassy paddocks, each with run-in shed. Rolling pastures and riding arena complete the 22.81 acre farm. Call Courtney Conger or Jane Page Thompson $1,100,000

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Three Runs Plantation Delightfully decorated residence in Three Runs Plantation equestrian community offers over 3000 square feet with 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, great room, formal dining room, kitchen with breakfast bay & island and screened porch overlooking established pastures and center-aisle barn on nearly 6 acres. Community amenities include riding rings, clubhouse, pool & cabana, fitness center, picnic shelter and miles of groomed trails. Call Courtney Conger $659,000

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Woolworth House Historic Winter Colony cottage with stables in downtown Olde Aiken just steps from Hitchcock Woods! Delightful 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath home, updated in recent years, features high ceilings, wood floors, fireplace, and wall of windows overlooking patio & paddocks. For horses, there is a 3-stall shed row barn. Call Courtney Conger $790,000

CEDAR

Meadows

Fire Tower Farm . Charming 4 bedroom

farm house with wood floors, open floor plan, fireplace and chef’s kitchen. For horses, farm includes 4-stall center aisle barn with unfinished loft space and over 8 acres of irrigated coastal pastures with water and 3-board fencing. Call Courtney Conger $499,000

Several equestrian lots available, ranging from 6.14 to 11.97 acres of established coastal Bermuda grass with beautiful views. Equestrian amenities include community riding ring and trails. Call Courtney Conger ~ pricing starts at just

$105,000

Hickory Hill Farm . Fabulous 21 acre horse farm in Chime Bell

.

Greener Pastures Located in the Highway 302 east side Horse Corridor, this turn key equestrian property offers over 41 acres of board fenced pasture & woods. Custom brick residence with 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths, 3-stall center aisle barn with hay storage and tack room, 8acre pasture with 4 feeding pens and run-in shed, 4 paddocks, 2 more runin sheds, and 40x50 Hoover work shop. Miles of riding on groomed trails and adjoining dirt roads! Call Courtney Conger $599,000

Polo Vista Cottage . Comfort and crafts-

Chase equestrian community includes custom 3 bedroom, 3 bath farm house, in ground pool with patio & pergola, 6-stall center aisle barn with tack room & wash area, and 3 large board fenced paddocks with run-in sheds for each. Call Thomas Bossard $699,000

manship are the hallmarks of this delightful cottage with 2929 square feet. Features include open floor plan with 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths, cathedral ceilings, stone fireplace, wood floors and window walls overlooking one of New Bridge Polo’s beautifully maintained polo fields. Call Courtney Conger $499,000

Cedar Meadows . Fabulous horse property in completely private setting with beautiful landscaping. Beautifully maintained home has 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, gleaming hardwood floors throughout. Property is 7 acres fenced and cross fenced with access to miles of trails. Center aisle barn has 3 large stalls, large feed/ storage area and tack room. Call Suzan McHugh $549,000

New Bridge Polo Stables . This beautifully constructed center aisle

barn is in like new condition and offers 18 large, matted stalls on 22.47 acres overlooking polo field. Included are wash stall, spacious tack room/lounge combo, 2 bunk rooms, laundry room and full bath. There is also an 1800 square foot, insulated equipment shed and 13 four-board fenced paddocks and pastures. Amenities include riding trails, clubhouse and pool. May be purchased in conjunction with charming 4-bedroom residence across the polo field (see left). Call Courtney Conger $999,000

NEW BRIDGE

Acreage

Pottery Mill Place . Delightful residence on 12

wooded acres bordering a lovely lake. Home features 2100 square feet, wide rocking chair porches front & back and open floor plan. Formal living room with fireplace, dining room, kitchen with breakfast bay, master bedroom with bath en suite. Attached 2-car garage with unfinished bonus room above. Call Courtney Conger $380,000

Three Runs Plantation . Turn key horse farm in

Aiken’s premier equestrian community has 3 bedroom, 3 bath home with custom details, mud room/laundry and 2-bay garage. Barn has 2 stalls with room for more, tack room and feed storage. Includes separate equipment building, fenced paddocks with established grass. Call Frank Starcher or Jack Roth $539,000

Beautiful 27.82 acre parcel close to town and equestrian venues. Perfect for horses, with cleared pasture space plus timber. Level to gently rolling land with lovely home sites may be subdivided.

$165,000

Call MIKE HOSANG

Bass Pond Farm . This 38.49 acre farm located in Aiken’s Equestrian Corridor offers it all! The 3 bedroom, 2 bath residence overlooks 3-acre spring-fed pond. Property includes guest house, groom's cottage, 20-stall barn with tack & feed rooms, apartment, Grand prix or stick-and-ball field, exercise track, fenced sand arena and fenced paddocks. Call Alex Tyrteos $695,000

NEW BRIDGE

Polo Club

Solstice Meadow . Two partly cleared

tracts ready for you to have horses at home! Direct access to trail system with miles of dedicated trails, including the 61 acre Freeman preserve, which has a wonderful pond. Call Randy Wolcott and ask about owner financing! These 5-acre parcels offered at just $85,000 each parcel. Additional acreage available!

Hillside Farm . Charming farm has 3 paddocks with run-in sheds in each, stocked pond, training field and charming cottage. Renovated in 2012, the home has open floorplan, granite countertops, stacked stone fireplace, stainless steel appliances, Jacuzzi bath. Screened porch, formal plantings and dog yard complete this 11+ acre farm. Call Jane Page Thompson $342,500

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Exquisite 11.35 acre building site in a prime location at New Bridge Polo Club. Direct access to polo fields, clubhouse, tennis and swimming pool. Complete with plenty of fencing and 3HP well!

$217,000

Call JACK ROTH

Bridle Creek . New Phase II now open at

Bridle Creek! Lots range from 5 acres to 11.77 acres. Community amenities include miles of trails, gallop, stadium jumps, cross-country jump field, and dressage ring. New community green space added at the entrance of Phase II. Call Frank Starcher or Jack Roth $16,000 per acre

HIDDEN

Oak Tree Farm . Country contemporary with 3 bed-

rooms and 3 full baths is nestled among live oaks on over 48 acres of board fenced pastures. Sunlit great room and master bedroom feature cathedral ceilings and window walls with sweeping views of coastal fields. Inground pool with new liner. Center aisle barn has 3 stalls with room for more, tack/feed room, run-in and storage space. Call Courtney Conger $699,000

Field

.

Chime Bell Chase Gorgeous building lot with 19.67 acres of beautiful gently rolling pasture planted in well established coastal Bermuda grass. Equestrian community amenities include professionally designed cross country course, dressage arena, stadium jump arena and miles of shady riding trails. Call Thomas Bossard $245,000

The Aiken Horse

Unseen from the entrance, this 21 acre tract offers approximately 12 acres of cleared pasture with the remainder in woods. Riding trails available in an intimate but relaxed equestrian community. Call COURTNEY CONGER Offered at JUST $3,900 per acre

.

Red Coat Cottage Adorable and affordable 2 bedroom huntbox on Old Tory Trail is open & airy with hardwood floors, 2 full baths, and 2 living areas. For horses, there is a 3-stall shed-row barn with tack & feed room and storage area, plus 3 large pastures on 2.78 fenced acres. Priced to sell! Call Lee Hedlund $249,900

April-May 2018


aikenhorseRIGHT4-18_aikenhorseRIGHT 3/27/2018 5:50 PM Page 1

Calvary Training Center . Picture-perfect property with a host of potential uses in Bluffton, SC includes 43+ acres, beautiful lake, Low Country home with 7 bedrooms and 4.5 baths, education center with offices and classrooms, and extensive infrastructure that could handle a 100-unit development. The world class equestrian facility includes 25 stalls, tack rooms, grooms’ lounge and baths, wash stalls, storage and 42,000 square foot covered arena. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $4,900,000

Dahlwood Farm . Historic farmhouse was relocated, spectacular-

Windsor Oaks . Stunning private country estate on 30 lovely acres with beautiful live oaks! Custom home features 5 bedrooms & 4 baths, wellappointed kitchen with granite counters, high ceilings and wood flooring throughout. Attached 4 car garage plus finished basement space. Property has 2 large enclosed metal buildings with 6420 & 4860 sq ft, with separate electrical service, plumbing & septic. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $1,300,000

ly renovated and expanded to encompass over 3,300 square feet of luxe living space! The 68+ acre farm includes custom 24-stall barn with lounge and huge veranda, 2 charming cottages for guests or grooms, oversized equipment barn and established board-fenced pastures in horse country paradise. Call Thomas Bossard $1,750,000

SPRING

Meadows

.

Red Top Estate Historic Aiken estate with grand rooms for entertaining, 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, and classic original architectural elements throughout. This Gilded Age residence with modern updates includes an apartment, formal gardens and carport on 1.22 acres. Additional parcels offered: 3 bedroom guest house for $365,000, and adjoining Carriage House parcel for $745,000. Call Jane Page Thompson or Alex Tyrteos $1,600,000

Beautiful 12.37 acre lot available in equestrian community! Amenities include unlimited use of the 14 acre equestrian area with jumps and plenty of room to exercise your horse. Miles of perimeter trails surround the 246 acre development.

Call JACK ROTH

Lot 8 12.37 acres $49,000

Shellhouse Lake Farm .

Sportsman's retreat located in Aiken’s east side equestrian corridor less than 10 miles from downtown! Drive through the gated entrance and past grassy fenced pasture to the sparkling 11 acre lake. Parcel Two offers approximately 43 acres mostly cleared and grassed with Shaw's Creek at the back border. The brick 2 bedroom, 1 bath country cabin has spacious kitchen/family room, fireplace and full length porch, with wonderful views overlooking lake. Call Mike Hosang $595,000

.

Snaffle Bit Farm NEW custom built 3 bedroom home in Three Runs Plantation equestrian community on over 5 acres, this Southern style timber frame home features exposed posts & beams, cathedral ceilings, heart pine floors, gourmet kitchen with granite countertops & stainless steel appliances, fireplace, mud room and 2-car garage. NEW 2-stall barn & fencing! Call Frank Starcher or Jack Roth $530,000

THREE RUNS

Plantation

Kings Ridge . Private gated equestrian estate with

sweeping views of 5 verdant acres, lakes and gleaming pool artfully situated to capture vibrant sunsets. Multiple outdoor living spaces, elegant kitchen and cozy den overlooking the lake. With 5100 square feet under roof, the exterior living spaces have been designed with as much attention to detail as the interior living spaces. Studio apartment above garage with workshop, fenced yard for pets. Call Jane Page Thompson $836,000

Beautiful 9.68 acre lot in Phase II of Three Runs has established Bermuda grass. Fenced and cross-fenced and ready for your house and barn. The lot borders riding trail and has access to more than 30 miles of groomed trails, jump rings, dressage arenas and cross country fences. Other amenities include club house, pool and fitness center.

Three Runs Plantation . Beautiful home on

5 fenced acres with salt water pool features open floor plan with high ceilings, wood floors and custom millwork. Included are keeping room & living room with fireplaces, gourmet kitchen with granite, 4 bedrooms, theater room/5th bedroom, 5 baths, covered porch with fireplace, pool, 3-bay garage, finished bonus. Jack Roth or Frank Starcher $815,000

Call COURTNEY CONGER

$222,640

EQUESTRIAN

WAGENER

In the heart of Aiken’s east side Highway 302 horse country is this beautiful parcel with 34 acres of gently rolling pasture planted in well established grass, complete with fencing and gate. Adjoins Shellhouse Lake Farm (see above)

55 acre parcel has pond, 30 acres established Bermuda grass hay field, beautiful wetlands and mixed woodlands. Located on Highway 302 in Aiken’s east side equestrian corridor, close to eventing, polo and fox hunting

Acreage

Corridor

Indigo Cottage . Amazing new custom home on an

.

Three Runs Plantation Located on over 8 acres in Aiken’s premier equestrian community, this stately 10-stall barn awaits completion to make it a show place. Features include hand-crafted cupolas, gabled entrance, pine paneled breezeway, large tack room, office/apartment with 2 rooms and full bath. The entry area opens to a t-shape with 5 stalls on either side, plus wash stall and feed room. Large loft accessed by outside stairs can be finished as living space. Call Courtney Conger $390,000

Call MIKE HOSANG

ONLY $340,000

acre in New Bridge Polo & Country Club features 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, large kitchen with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances, luxurious main level master suite, fireplace, finished bonus room with bath, with oak & tile flooring throughout. Entertain outdoors with wrap-around porches and deck overlooking polo field. Call Jack Roth $489,000

Red Top Carriage House . Here’s a 3

bedroom, 2 bath cottage AND a 5-stall barn in downtown Aiken! Lovingly restored cottage has open living space, galley kitchen, sleeping porch and covered patio. Part of the Red Top Estate across from Aiken’s beautiful Hopelands Gardens with access to trails in Hitchcock Woods. Call Jane Page Thompson or Alex Tyrteos $745,000

$595,000

Call JANE PAGE THOMPSON

NEW BRIDGE

Polo Club

Large lot (8.71 acres) complete with fencing, well & septic across from endline of Field 2. World class polo community with polo fields, clubhouse, tennis & swimming pool.

Three Runs Plantation . Beautiful

Phase 1 lot offered with NEW hunt box combo to be constructed by Farmfield Builders. Includes 700 square foot apartment, 3 stalls, tack room, feed room and wash stall. Close to community amenities including clubhouse, riding arenas, pool, and direct access to the 30-mile trail system! Call Alex Tyrteos $320,000

$99,900

Call MIKE HOSANG

.

Open Range Exquisite farm on almost 7 acres, conveniently close to Aiken and equestrian communities. Amenities include 3 bedroom, 2 bath farmhouse with open plan interior, high ceilings and quality finishes. The 6-stall center-aisle barn has tack room and horse wash. Other amenities include riding ring and paddocks with 3-board fencing. Call Alex Tyrteos $357,000

.

Three Runs Plantation Spectacular nearly new home with 3 bedrooms and 3 full baths on 6 perfect acres of grass, irrigated and fenced. The barn has room for 4 horses with heated and air conditioned tack room. The bonus room over the garage is roughed in for another bedroom or office and a full bath and a kitchen. Call Jack Roth or Frank Starcher $769,000

CHIME BELL

TIMSHEL

Chase

Gardens

.

Old Buckland Barn Historic training facility in Aiken’s downtown Horse District has spacious 2,787 square foot main residence, combining 2 original cottages with central great room. Cottage is delightfully renovated with wood floors, granite countertops and all appliances. There are 2 converted race barns with 15 expanded stalls total, board fenced paddocks, grooms’ apartment, dressage arena with mirror. Call Courtney Conger $1, 425,000

Level, partially cleared lots in developing equestrian area with easy access to Aiken, Edgefield and I-20. Riding rings and trails are underway, and homeowners with interests in eventing, hunter jumpers, driving and trail riding are in residence. Best of all, lots from 12.25 to over 14 acres are available for only $4,500 per acre!

Call COURTNEY CONGER

Courtney Conger Randy Wolcott

Lee Hedlund

Annie’s Inn . Meticulously maintained Bed & Breakfast built in the

1800s in Aiken’s Equestrian Corridor! A successful B&B for 38 years, this marvelous property includes 8185 elegant square feet main residence with 6 bedrooms, 6.5 baths and 8 fireplaces. Includes 6 separate cottages with excellent rental history, in ground pool, greenhouse. Contents convey! Call Suzan McHugh $1,500,000

Mike Hosang

Frank Starcher

Beautiful 16.31 acre lot, already cleared, in a wonderful equestrian community that offers top notch amenities, including a dressage ring, hunter/jumper ring, and cross-country course.

Call MIKE HOSANG

$158,200

Jack Roth

803.645.3308 803.507.1142 803.221.6831 803.270.6358 803.270.6623 803.341.8787 Alex Tyrteos

Suzan McHugh Thomas Bossard Brian Cavanaugh Jane Page Thompson Beth Owenby

203.249.3071 803.292.8525 803.640.2845 803.624.6072 803.215.8232 803.645.8558

.

.

.648.8660

www CarolinaHorseProperties com . 803

April-May 2018

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April-May 2018


game changer � chanj-er] � [gam noun

1. A newly introduced element or factor that changes an existing situation or activity in an undeniably significant way. GASTROCARE™ from Legends® is the only supplement in the Legends® line specifically designed to support healthy digestive tract function in show and performance horses. Where others failed to change the game, Legends® excelled. Legends®. Redefining what horse feed should be. For more information or to find a dealer near you, visit: www.southernstates.com/legends

SUPPLEMENT Legends® Feeds are fortified with Kentucky Equine Research (KER) micronutrients to meet your horse’s individual needs. For feeding advice or to create a custom ration using Legends® Horse Feeds, visit microsteed.com/legends. Visit legends.equinews.com to subscribe to EquiNews, an award-winning newsletter powered by KER. EquiNews contains the latest in equine nutrition and health news, as well as updates and special offers directly from Legends® Horse Feeds.

If you have questions or comments, please contact Southern_States_Feed_Questions@cargill.com. ™

GastroCare , Legends® and Fresh From the Heart Fresh From the Farm® are registered trademarks of Cargill, Incorporated. Southern States® is a registered trademarks of Southern States Cooperative, Incorporated. Kentucky Equine Research®, Equinews® and MicroSteed™ are trademarks of Kentucky Equine Research. © 2018 Cargill, Incorporated. All rights reserved.

April-May 2018

PHOTO BY MAREISH MEDIA/SUSAN MCCLAFFERTY

The Aiken Horse

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Cissie Sullivan Tracey Turner Nan Campbell Betty Alexander

803-998-0198 SullivanTurnerTeam.com

Singular Setting in aiken’S HorSe DiStrict - 8.64 acreS

renovateD HiStoric Home | new gueSt cottage | 6 BeDroomS & 4.5 BatHS | HeateD gunite Pool | 8-Stall Barn | viewS of aiken training track & Bruce’S fielD | mlS 95156 | $2,895,000

croSSwayS - HiStoric eState on 4.7 acreS

flatrock creek farm - 54+ acre ParaDiSe

Private, tranquil retreat witH StockeD PonD, coveyS of quail & PaSture | 3 BeDroomS | 3 BatHS | 3000 Sf | equiPment BuilDing outBuilDingS | 25 minuteS to aiken | mlS 96758 | $698,000 Owner is SC Licensed Agent

827 DaSHer circle - tHree runS Plantation

magnificently reStoreD Home, Pool & garDenS | cloSe to HorSe DiStrict & HitcHcock wooDS | 5 BeDroomS | 4 full & 2 Half BatHS garage w/aPartment | caretaker’S cottage | mlS 86999 | $2,200,000

Beautifully DeSigneD 3579Sf Home w/BonuS room | many uPgraDeS 3 BeDroomS | 3 BatHS | 3-Bay garage | ScreeneD PorcH | 5+ acreS cloSe to 3runS amenitieS | mlS 98288 | $579,000

Private HorSe farm on 41+ acreS

two magnoliaS farm - SuPerB location - income ProDucing!

HanDSome & traDitional 3 BeDroom, 2 BatH Brick Home | gueSt cottage | 4-Stall Barn w/tack rm & SHoP | riDing arena | PaDDockS gateD & Perimeter fenceD w/ trailS | mlS 98533 | now $625,000

12 cozier ct – foxcHaSe farmHouSe – on tHe wooDS!

HorSe reaDy! 3 Stall Barn, PaDDockS & run-in SHeD, new winDowS 4 Br | 3 full BatHS | 1 Half BatHS | 2,922 Sf | 2 acreS | $449,000

1579 ceDar meaDowS rD – ceDar meaDowS equeStrian 4-Stall Barn, Savvy PaDDock layout, in-grounD Pool & low maintenance Home! 4 BeDroom | 3 BatHS | 4.47 acreS | mlS 100693 | $545,000

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7+ gorgeouS acreS, Perfect layout for equine BuSineSS or Private farm | 2 BarnS | 10 PaDDockS | low maintenance 4 BeDroom, 3 1/2 BatH Home | mlS 98555 | now $479,000

461 imPlement - HoPelanD farmS

11 Private ac. w/acceSS to riDing trailS. renovateD & SoutHern cHarm! 3 BeDroomS | 2.5 BatHS | 11 acreS | mlS 100259 | $519,900

148 wire roaD – cloSe-in aiken location!

run-in & 3 lovely PaDDockS, in-grounD Pool & garDenS, Beautifully renovateD Home 4 BeDroom | 4.5 BatHS | 9.97 acreS | mlS 100647 | $785,000

The Aiken Horse

foxcHaSe – 2 acreS on tHe wooDS

3512 Sf Single Story Home witH SPaciouS ownerS & gueSt Suite! 4 Br | 3 BatHS | + 428 Sf HeateD/cooleD art StuDio w/full BatH 2 fP | Sunroom | 2-car garage | mlS 101497 | $435,000

ronD Point HiStoric eState

tHiS williS irvin DeSigneD reSiDence offerS grace, Beauty & Privacy w/eStaBliSHeD garDenS, exPanSive lawn, terraceS, Stunning Pool. 5 Br | 6 full & 1 Half BatH | 6,640 Sf | 2.02 acreS | aPt | $1,395,000

Private 16+ acre farm - 768 oak leaf lane

quality log Home | 4 BeDroomS | 3 BatHS | 4-Stall center aiSle Barn 4 fenceD PaStureS | leSS tHan 3 mileS to tHe viSta & cloSe to many equeStrian training venueS | mlS 99592 | $495,000

368 Burkelo roaD | 302 HorSe country!

renovateD Home w/Pool & 10 Stall Barn on 18+ acreS 3 BeDroom | 2 BatH | mlS 101983 | $450,000

1212 Huntcliff | SoutH aiken!

11+ acreS, 3 Stall Barn w/2 Br aPt. & 4-7 Stall Barn. aS iS. 6 BeDroom | 5 BatH | 1 Half BatH | mlS 101363 | $549,000

April-May 2018


April-May 2018

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Aiken Trials; Aiken Horse Show in the Woods

Photography by Gary Knoll & Pam Gleason


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The Aiken Horse

April-May 2018


H I S TO RY. T R A D I T I O N . L E G AC Y.

the perfect relaxation after aan adventure in hitchcock woods breakfast • lunch • dinner • sunday brunch full-service luxury spa experience

O P E N DA I LY • 1 0 0 C O L L E TO N AV E N U E S W • A I K E N , S C 8 0 3 . 6 4 8 . 1 8 9 8 • T H E W I L L C OX .C O M

Buckingham Farm for Sale 27493 Morgnec Rd, Chestertown, Maryland

Buckingham Farm, a 152.49 acre waterfront farm estate on the Chester River three miles from Chestertown, MD, is one of the most picturesque horse farms in Maryland. The location of the house provides sweeping views of the River. The main residence, originally constructed in 1940, consists of 4,436 square feet of finished living space offers a main level master suite with his and her master bathrooms & closets and working fireplaces. The great room ceiling extends to the second level offering an upper level overlook further accented with authentic wood beams. Adjacent to the great room is the tasteful country kitchen, which is central to the library/den with working fireplace, bar and egress to the waterfront patio. The farm estate offers all the amenities for the horse, hunting & nature enthusiast. The thoughtfully restored historic “train station” serves as a comfortable guest cottage while preserving its historic charm. In addition a four bedroom, one bathroom caretaker dwelling, one bedroom, one bathroom garage apartment and farm office with half bath offering ample room for family and friends. Further complimenting this equestrian facility is the breeding barn, 8-stall stable, pool house, refitted dairy barn for equipment, feed & hay storage and an all season five pen dog kennel. $2,495,000

Your Source for Local Knowledge and Comprehensive Real Estate Services. 201 South Cross Street, Chestertown, MD 21620 | 410.778.3779 200 A Island Professional Park, Stevensville, MD 21666 | 410.643.3066 www.csrealtors.com | Fax 410.778.9155

April-May 2018

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Locally produced. Universally loved. Why give your horses a run-of-the-mill feed with a questionable shelf life when you can nourish them with a fresh-from-the-mill feed made yesterday? Locally owned and operated by avid horse people, Banks Mill Feeds has been manufacturing optimally balanced formulas – full of fresh ingredients and free of variation – for more than 20 years. All formulas are fixed. Choose from one of our nutrient-rich blends created for every type of horse and discipline, or let us custom mix one for you.

A IKEN’S FRESHEST FEED. Locally available at Aiken Saddlery & Supply. Or call for the dealer in your location. 803-641-0007 | www.BanksMillFeeds.com

WHY FEED CHIA SEED TO HORSES? CHIA PROVIDES THE SUBSTANCE ESSENTIAL TO CELL LIFE: A BALANCED PROPERTY OF GIVING OUT (NUTRIENTS) AND READILY TAKING UP (DEBRIS)

WHAT ARE CHIA SEEDS? Chia (salvia hispanica) is an ancient Aztec grain that’s an excellent source of essential oils, antioxidants, minerals, protein, soluble fiber & low NSC (non-structural carbohydrate). The US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) classifies CHIA SEEDS as a Dietary Supplement. Its nutritional content complies with the FDA’s strict regulations for a “healthy food”. Banks Mill Feeds imports high quality chia seeds from Paraguay. Non-GMO and Pesticide-Free. Chia seeds are easy to top dress on feed, with a mild, nutty flavor. Horses love them!

BENEFITS OF CHIA SEEDS Boosts the immune system Good for respiratory system Chia’s water-absorbing properties clear intestinal sand to avoid a common cause of colic Enhances fluid & electrolyte balance Stronger, faster growing hooves

BANKS MILL FEEDS 24

The Aiken Horse

Helps prevent laminitis & insulin disorders Eases mare cycles & estrus inflammation Calms hot, nervous temperaments Promotes a healthy, glossy coat Maintains supple joints & connective tissue Repairs & maintains cellular walls

Anti-inflammatory Aids in wound healing Supports a healthy heart & blood circulation Contains anti-allergic properties Encourages a strong metabolism Easy to store, keeps up to two years

803-641-0007 | banksmillfeeds@aol.com | www.banksmillfeeds.com April-May 2018


Presents

Berkshire II Cottage

New Bridge is an 850 acre gated equestrian community nestled among rolling pasture lands just 15 minutes from downtown Aiken. Born from the excitement, intensity and tradition of polo, New Bridge is the home of New Bridge Polo and Country Club but also embraces equestrians of all disciplines as well as those who simply love the outdoors, with all sharing the essential joys of a life that celebrates horses, people and land – in a place that connects them. Residents enjoy an array of equestrian amenities including five meticulously groomed polo fields, stick and ball areas, an exercise track, riding trails, all weather GGT dressage and jumping arenas (dressage arena to open Summer 2018), miles of groomed roads made for riding and The Stables, our full-care, premier 24 stall boarding facility. A swimming pool with lounge area, a clay tennis court, and an Argentinian Colonial-style Clubhouse with restaurant/bar (open in-season Spring and Fall), balcony, porch, and outdoor spaces round out the perfect setting for everyone – from families to emptynesters, casual riders to competitive athletes, and those simply seeking solace from a busy world. The New Bridge world is one where all can revel in the luxury of leisure, the excitement of sport, the abiding beauty of horse-country, and the deep connections of a close-knit community. New Bridge: room to play, room to ride, room to live, all in a place you will want to call home. Located on a nicely wooded 1-acre lot with view of polo field and stable's paddocks, this 3 bedroom, 2½ bath New England style cottage has a spacious front veranda, porch and rear patio. It offers 2,025 square feet of heated and cooled living space plus an attached, over-sized 2 car garage with storage area. Downstairs master suite; custom kitchen with stainless steel appliances and custom stone counter tops; separate pantry and mud room/laundry area; dining room; living room with fireplace; plus a sunroom/den. Second floor features a loft area with tremendous views. There are 2 full size bedrooms; bathroom and extra storage. Vaulted 9 foot ceilings throughout. Exterior siding of long lasting, integrated color Hardy Board siding and shingles; double pane windows; landscaped yard with sprinkler system; individual septic and well.

Custom built by

April-May 2018

Now Under Construction • Offered through Cooper Realty Email: jd@cooperhs.com Mobile: 502.417.2307 Office: 803.335.3527

Price of $339,500 will include a membership certificate in New Bridge Polo and Country Club and access to all the amenities that New Bridge offers.

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The Aiken Horse

April-May 2018


BREEDING SERVICES Did you know that the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital offers a wide-range of reproductive services for horses? From the diagnosis and treatment of reproductive diseases to AI and embryo transfers, our state-of-the-art facility and mobile services are designed to meet all your breeding needs. Make an appointment today! 706.542.3223 • vet.uga.edu/hospital 2200 College Station Road, Athens, GA

April-May 2018

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On Not Winning the Derby The Spoils of the Also Ran By Cot Campbell

I

am a freshly minted nonagenarian, and I have found that one encounters the occasional slow day. During such a lull, I decided to look into the overall financial careers of those Dogwood horses that have run in seven Kentucky Derbys (G1). I was flabbergasted with what I discovered. In a 23-year period (1990–2013), Dogwood Stable partnerships ran eight horses in seven Kentucky Derbys. We ran second, third, and fourth, and came away with wonderful memories and $230,000. But when the last horse ended his career, the eight horses—bought at public auctions for a collective $1,233,000—had grossed a staggering $31,685,454! This came through both racetrack earnings and breeding farm deals. What this says, of course, (duh!) is that good horses run in Kentucky Derbys, and—Derby accomplishments or not, and industry woes or not—there are stunning purses to be won before and after, and even more spectacular opportunities at stud. The eight Dogwood horses yielded more than 26 times what they originally cost. There figured to be a few blockbusters in the group; and, happily, there were. Several more were plenty useful, and there were two that had no business in the Derby, and did not make much of a footprint later. The interesting question: Would any major racing stable (e.g. Reddam Racing, Gary and Mary West, Live Oak, John Oxley, West Point, Eclipse, Team Valor, etc), with eight Derby runners throughout several decades, have fared as well? I would think so. Maybe even better. But this 26-to-1 ratio of earnings to purchase price might have been hard to match. Dogwood’s eight purchases, averaging $154,125, would be very much more on the frugal side than the pattern of the average significant outfit of recent years. The highest price we paid was $300,000 for Summer Squall. The lowest was Smilin Singin Sam— $30,000. The former won the Preakness Stakes (G1) and a lot more. The latter won the Remington Park Derby, and little else. The four Derby runners that became racing millionaires—Summer Squall, Palace Malice, Wallenda, and Limehouse—averaged $170,750 when bought. The other four and their purchase prices were Smilin Singin Sam ($30,000), Trippi ($65,000),Jack Flash ($195,000), and Impeachment ($260,000). One of these—the fine sprinter Trippi— has had a sterling stud career at Ocala Stud and is now flourishing in South Africa. The farms involved would not want specific purchase prices bandied about,

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but it is harmless to disclose that Summer Squall, Palace Malice, Trippi, and Limehouse collectively generated $23,300,000 for their partners when stallion duty deals were consummated. In revisiting all this, I have assigned only $300,000 stud revenue to Wallenda, a grade 1 stakes-winning ($1,205,929) son of Gulch. This is erring on the side of conservatism because his stud career was complicated and unsuccessful, and the details murky now to boot. He got off to a slow start in Kentucky, was sent to Japan, where he was not popular, went downhill, and alarmingly faced euthanasia. Dogwood— when alerted by the wonderful Old Friends watchdogs— “bought” him from the Japanese for an extortionary 10 grand. We brought him home, and he lived out his days at Old Friends. No breeding monetary return was assigned to Impeachment, though there was a pittance. Third in the Tampa Bay, Arkansas (G2), and Kentucky Derbys and then the Preakness, efforts were made to syndicate him in Florida, but there was no stampede to buy shares in this stayer. He ended up in Canada. Smilin Singin Sam’s breeding potential was gloomy, and mostly talk. He had some occasional fun, but his meager breeding earnings are not worth calculating. Jack Flash went jumping—as a gelding—and then enjoyed life as a show horse. While only a total of $230,000 came from the three Derby placing checks, the eight horses ultimately grossed $8,385,254 on various racetracks. That figure then, combined with cautiously calculated breeding revenue, created total gross income of $31,685,454. This is dramatically more than I would have dreamed, if hazarding a guess before all the research. The top racetrack earner was Palace Malice at $2,676,135, besting Summer Squall’s $1,844,282—dollars earned 23 years earlier. Wallenda rated third in the standings with $1,205,929, with Limehouse at $1,110,433. Trippi, toiling in sprints, earned $666,220. Impeachment, $350,450. Smiling Singin Sam, $271,005. Jack Flash, $271,000. It is stunning what these large, four-legged animals can do for one’s livelihood. It is also clearly substantiated that most of them can have a negative outcome. No horseman ever lived who could consistently identify the good ones. Therein lies the charm. Cot Campbell is the founder of Dogwood Stable, based in Aiken. This story originally appeared in the April 7, 2018 edition of The Bloodhorse.

April-May 2018


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News, from page 13 Intercollegiate and Interscholastic (I/I) polo takes place in an arena, and Susie says that she and Tiger are finalizing a deal to have a polo arena constructed in a convenient location so that the new I/I program will have its own home base. Intercollegiate polo is highly competitive, and the new team will not necessarily be dominant, but it will certainly be a contender. Both Caldwell twins are accomplished players, and Charlie Caldwell has an added distinction as a horse trainer. Last year he entered and won the national Retired Racehorse Project Thoroughbred Makeover Challenge with a 3-year old mare named Old Tavern, beating about 300 professional and amateur trainers in almost a dozen different disciplines. “We’re all really excited about the Caldwells coming,” says Susie. “We hope that having a good team here will encourage other polo kids to consider USC Aiken when they are making their college plans.” A number of potential new recruits will be in town from April 2829 when the National Youth Series Tournament comes to Aiken once again. For more information, contact Tiger Kneece at 803-646-3301.

Horses And Harmony:

“Horses and Harmony,” a benefit for the Aiken Symphony Orchestra, will be held in the covered arena at Stable View at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. The event consists of a concert given by a 30-piece orchestra while a variety of different horsemen perform assorted routines and demonstrations to the music. The musical instruments selected for the concert include violins, wind instruments and horns. Timpani drums, which might scare the horses, are being left behind. The musicians will be set up in a roped-off end of the arena, where there will also be tables for eight, a silent auction and a bar. The other half of the arena will be reserved for equestrian performers. These will include the Grand Prix dressage rider Charlotte Bayley, who will put on a musical freestyle aboard her Dutch Warmblood, Unlimited. There will be a mini horse and carriage drill team: They are called the Bumblebees and the plan is to dress the horses and drivers in black and yellow stripes and perform a routine to the strains of RimskyKorsakov’s the Flight of the Bumblebee. Katherine Gunter and Gina Salatino, both members of the Aiken Hounds, are planning to show off their off the track Thoroughbreds, which they have been retraining as part of the Retired Racehorse Program’s “America’s Most Wanted Thoroughbred” competition. And the Shae Rose Vaulters, a group from the Charlotte area, will demonstrate their athletic skills. There will be many other acts, including the “Happy Hour” drill team, which has a reputation for being amusing. David Stinson, a realtor at Meybohm and a well-known figure in Aiken’s equestrian and cultural circles, will act as the emcee. The idea to combine horses with music as a way to raise money came about through a conversation between Em Lignon (the three-time

president of the Aiken Symphony Guild and current fundraising chair) and Donald Portnoy, the symphony’s conductor. “We thought the idea was brilliant,” said Dave Tavernier who is the current Aiken Symphony Guild president. “It’s a unique blend of the equestrian and the symphonic community.” Horses and music have gone together since ancient times, according to various legends. One of the most interesting goes like this: the Sybarites who lived in southern Italy in the 5th century BCE, had trained their horses to dance to the music of a flute. When their enemies, the people of Croton, came to conquer the city, they pulled a dirty trick. Instead of using their usual trumpets to call their soldiers to the front lines, they sent a squadron of musicians to play dancing tunes on flutes. At the sound, the Sybarite war horses immediately threw their riders and began dancing. Croton won the battle. Musical accompaniment to equestrian pageantry continued for centuries. From the time of the Crusades through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, equestrian events were a staple of royal life. European courts combined ceremony, horsemanship and music in festivals that included parades, jousts, tournaments, and equestrian ballets. In these events, noblemen rode horses that had been trained to step high and to execute various geometric figures. The routines were often similar to those performed by dancers in courtly ballets of the same era. Today’s musical freestyle classes at dressage shows are the direct descendants of the Renaissance horse ballets. There are also many different troupes of horses that dance to music, including the Lipizzaner in Austria, the royal horses in Spain, and a number of different traveling equestrian acts. Horses and Harmony is a modern rarity, however, since these days most horses that dance to music have to make do with recordings rather than live musicians. Tickets are $80 per person; go to www.symphonyguild.org to order or send in your check to the guild at P.O. Box 2801, Aiken 29802. Call 803-645-6545 for more information. Tables of eight may be reserved. by Diana Hunt

Extreme Mustang Redux

Nicola Bolt, a local horse trainer, has once again accepted the challenge to transform an American Mustang from ‘wild to mild’ in only 118 days for this year’s Extreme Mustang Makeover competition. The Mustang Heritage Foundation designed the EMM to showcase the trainability and versatility of mustangs in the hopes of increasing awareness about America’s native horses. The 2018 Extreme Mustang Makeover finals will be held at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky on June 21. Mustangs that have been a part of the competition will be auctioned to approved homes immediately following the finals. Nicola was the reserve champion of the 2017 Extreme Mustang Makeover last year with a tractable mare named Coraline. This year, Nicola picked up two mustangs on February 23. Both horses were

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trailered east from the Bureau of Land Management’s Herd Management Areas (HMAs) in Nevada. The first, Taz, will be her partner for the EMM competition. He is a 4-year-old chestnut gelding from the the Eagle HMA. The second horse, Lou, is a 4-year-old palomino who was not intended for the competition. Instead she is in the “Trainer Incentive Program.” For this program, horses are assigned to approved trainers who are given between 10 to 90 days to gentle their mustang and find a qualified adopter. Horses are considered gentled when they are halter broken, easily load onto a trailer, and pick up all four feet. Lou, an apt student,

has already been adopted and is living in Aiken with her new owner. Taz has not been quite as easy to deal with. Nicola hosted a demonstration at her farm in Edgefield shortly after the horses arrived. During the demo, Nicola was able to touch Lou on the head and shoulder, move her around the round pen, and quickly taught her to turn and face her trainer when she came to a stop. By contrast, Taz spent the day hiding behind Lou, showing the whites of his eyes whenever Nicola came close, and generally exhibiting all of the behaviors one would expect from a wild horse. “Taz is a much more reactive and flighty mustang than Cora was,” says Nicola. “He took a lot longer to really trust. But as our relationship grows, I see a little less of that horse and more of a smart, confident horse every day. He has a ton of ‘try’ and learns quickly when he’s in the right frame of mind. Some days, it takes a lot of patience to get him there! He is very athletic though, so things that Cora struggled with physically will be much easier for Taz.” On April 2, just five weeks after he arrived at her farm, Nicola rode Taz through the Hitchcock Woods. He was accompanied by Lou, who was ridden by Tori Ashley, a good friend of Nicola’s. “Taz was wonderful,” reports Nicola. “He could not have been better. Nothing really bothered him. And, of course, nothing bothered Lou either.” Nicola has 12 weeks left to prepare for the EMM competition. She is planning to show in three events: showmanship, compulsory flatwork, and trail obstacles. Competitors who place in the top ten in the preliminary classes will qualify for the finals. This earns them the right to compete in the event highlight, the freestyle. Right now, Nicola is thinking of basing her freestyle routine on The Lion King. “I’m hoping I’ll be riding bridleless, so I can just ride off a neck rope made to look like a lion’s mane,” she says. “But I need to see if it looks ridiculous before I commit!” As the returning reserve champion, who led last year’s competition up until the final freestyle, Nicola is not an unknown competitor anymore and she knows more eyes will be on her this time. But she is immune to the pressure and is concentrates completely on doing what is best for Taz. “My goal for the makeover is to have a confident, relaxed, and focused horse,” says Nicola. “I hope we make it to the top ten and that Taz finds an awesome home.” by Ragan Morehouse

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Ask the Judge

Questions about Dressage With Amy McElroy

Amy McElroy is an FEI competitor, and a USEF S judge. She is qualified to officiate at any USEF recognized national show at all dressage levels. She rides, trains and teaches at Fair Lane Farm in Aiken and judges between 15 and 20 dressage shows and events each year. In her popular Ask the Judge column, she answers readers’ questions about dressage. Do you have a question for Amy? Send her an email at McElroyDRM@aol.com, or visit her website: www.amymcelroy.com.

Dear Amy I am new to dressage, although I have done some eventing. I am planning to stop jumping and show straight dressage from now on, so I have a few questions about equipment. First: is it acceptable to ride a dressage test in my jumping saddle? I don’t currently own a dressage saddle and I feel safe and comfortable in the saddle that I have. Second, am I allowed to use a neck strap for “just in case” at the show? Third: my horse prefers to go without a noseband. Is this allowed? Thank you for your help.

Newby Dear Newby, Welcome to the dressage circuit. These are great questions and the answers are important to know as an equipment violation could mean elimination. Let’s start with your saddle. You are in luck with your jumping saddle. In all levels of eventing dressage, any English-type saddle is compulsory according to USEF EV 115.2a. In straight dressage up to Fourth level, any English saddle is also allowed as long as the saddle has flaps and the stirrups have closed branches. When you ride at the FEI Levels (anything above Fourth Level) a dressage saddle then becomes compulsory. You might be interested to know that saddle pads are optional at dressage shows, but I don’t recommend riding without one. However much you like your jumping saddle, if you continue your pursuit of dressage you may want to try a dressage saddle because it will encourage your body to be in a more correct and balanced position. This will make is easier for you to be effective and you will find it more comfortable to do sitting work with the dressage saddle’s deeper seat and strategically placed stirrup bars. Next, let’s address the issue of the neck strap. Neck straps are permitted in eventing dressage as there is not currently a specific rule about their use as a “gadget.” It’s a different story entirely in straight dressage competitions. Under the penalty of elimination, a neck strap is strictly forbidden as it is considered a “gadget.” You can’t use it in your test. Of interest: other gadgets that are illegal according to USEF rulebook DR 121.7 include martingales, bit guards, nasal strips, tongue ties, and bearing, side, running or balancing reins. Any kind of boots, bandages, blinkers, ear muffs, ear plugs, and seat covers are also illegal. Finally, let’s consider the noseband. In all dressage levels, a noseband is a requirement. There are many styles to choose from.

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When you are using a plain snaffle bridle, you can use one of the following nosebands: a regular caveson, a drop noseband, a flash noseband, a combination of a caveson and a drop, or a crossed noseband (also known as a figure eight noseband.) Of interest: a padded noseband is allowed, but you cannot use a noseband that has any metal on the inside touching the horse’s flesh. Other equipment that is required includes a browband which can have as much decoration and “bling” as you like. You are also required to use a throatlatch or its equivalent, such as the jowl strap that is a feature of a Micklem bridle. With so many nosebands to choose from, there should be one that suits any horse. Also, remember that there is no ruling on how loose a noseband may be, only on how tight it may be. The noseband may be fitted snugly, but not so tight that you can’t fit two fingers beneath it. Your ring steward may check the fit of the noseband after your test when he is examining your bit. He may also check the length of your whip, the length and severity of your spurs and the sides of your horse for blood. If your horse is wearing a bonnet, you will have to remove it so that its ears can be checked for noisecanceling devices. If the steward discovers any violations, you may be eliminated. I hope this answers all of your questions. So, come on down the centerline in your jumping saddle while maintaining a correct dressage position with a perpendicular straight line between ear, hip and heel. Find a noseband that suits your horse and fasten it loosely if that makes him happier. You will have to leave the neck strap at home; when you feel comfortable doing this, that would be a good indication that you are ready to start showing. Enjoy!

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Allison Springer An Aiken Asset by Kim F Miller

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llison Springer has come a long way from her waitressing days at 10 the riders in this country and the sport was really struggling to be as Downing Street in Aiken. The once-popular restaurant isn’t open great as it is in other countries.” She just recently handed the reins of anymore, and Allison no longer needs the part-time gigs that supported ERA of NA to a California-based contemporary, Shannon Lilley, but her horses during her first steps toward becoming the international remains an active contributor and continues to act on the inspiration competitor and sport leader she is today. Since being an alternate for that triggered her first involvement. the 2012 Olympics with "We had a vision of what eventing could and should her first equine superstar, be and we felt a responsibility as riders to help steer the Arthur, Allison has been sport in a better direction.” An initial $1,000 donation a winner and top finisher from Allison and her peers to start the organization is at North America’s elite a drop in the bucket compared to the hours invested competitions and she is since, but she could not be happier with the pay-off. constantly in the crosshairs “I believe some of our very best events in the country of those scouting athletes today (for example: Carolina International and to represent the United Plantation Field) are that way because of our Pro Tour. States in international We wanted to make a better overall experience for competition. everyone who enjoys our sport – owners, riders, horses, The 43-year-old’s spectators, sponsors and so on. I’m so proud of the mornings of breezing influence that the organization has had.” racehorses and nights Allison encourages everyone to consider ERA of NA waiting tables may be membership, which starts at $25 annually for basic behind her, but her energy benefits. Higher-level memberships for professionals continues to fuel her include “incredible” accident and disability insurance success. She currently has policies that are otherwise extremely difficult for three horses going at or athletes in a physically risky sport to get at an near the Advanced Level, affordable rate. all horses she’s brought up Her high profile role in the sport has a counterpoint through the ranks herself. at home. “There’s a wonderful soft side to Allison that Lord Willing was the people don’t get to see all the time,” says Fernanda U.S. Eventing Association’s Kellog, who, along with her husband Kirk Henkel, Intermediate Horse of owns the rider’s winter base, Fox Frolic Farm in Aiken. the Year in 2017. He and “She’s like a member of the family and it’s a treat for us Fernhill Casano are gaining to have her here.” mileage at the 3-star Thursday barn lunches are a long-standing Fox level, the level at which Frolic tradition. Along with cooking for up to 25 lucky the Olympic Games are invitees, Fernanda enjoys seeing Allison’s interactions contested. And Business with clients, working students, staff and the many Left: Allison with Lord Willing at Fox Frolic and Above: on the cross Ben is right behind friends she’s made in Aiken over the years. country course. Callie Heroux Photography them in the 2-star ranks. “I see that camaraderie and how encouraging she is They’re all a bit young to be ready for a go at the World Equestrian with everybody,” the stable owner observes. “It’s funny stories and time Games coming to Tryon, North Carolina in September. If all goes well, just to have fun. She’s a benign leader.” The nature of her dealings with however, the 2019 Pan American Games and the 2020 Olympic Games all reflects the reality that “It’s not just about Allison,” Fernanda notes. should coincide with these horses hitting their stride as international “It’s about the team. The joy she has seeing a client or working student contenders. come back with a ribbon is as important as her coming back with a “My goal is to get them solid at the Advanced level this year and then ribbon.” see what exciting things we can do and places we can go!” says Allison. Handle With Care The Fairhill Spring CIC in mid-April and Jersey Fresh in May are “Event horses are like orchids,” Allison asserts. “Everything has to be upcoming itinerary highlights. just right.” That requires proactive horse keeping practices that are

Leading The Way

trademarks of her program. One example arose 10 years ago when her top horse at the time, Destination Known, developed allergies and breathing difficulties. To address the problem, she discovered Haygain® Hay Steamers, then recently developed in England to remove breathable irritants found in even top quality hay. Another horse, her well-known international partner, Arthur, thrived on steamed hay for different reasons. “I had always struggled to maintain his weight and appetite,” she recounts. But various studies confirmed that steaming hay makes it more palatable to most horses, and Arthur agreed. From being a picky eater he became a horse that “dived right into his hay.”

Allison is an established advocate for the sport of eventing, manifested in various volunteer leadership roles, past and present. Around 2005, she helped launch the group recently re-branded as the Eventing Riders Association of North America. Formerly known as the Professional Riders Organization, the ERA of NA has grown to include all stakeholders in the sport. It has spurred significant improvements in competition quality, safety and prize money, and positively influenced how the public perceives the sport. “I got involved in leadership at a time when there weren’t many riders actually involved,” Allison explains. “There wasn’t an official voice for

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After her success with Arthur, Allison started giving steamed hay to every horse in her program, even those without apparent respiratory or diet issues. For Allison, it’s all about putting in that ounce of prevention. “Some might see steaming hay as an extra step, but to me it’s totally worth making it part of the horses’ routine,” she says. She says she feeds Buckeye Equine Nutrition and gives supplements from SmartPak and Nupafeed as well. Seeing Allison’s horse care approach on a daily basis, Fernanda describes it as uniquely well-rounded. “Sure, they’re competition horses so they have a scheduled program, but it includes hacks through the countryside and lots of turn-out and relaxation time. They have to compete and do their best, but they also have moments where they can just be plain horses.”

A Bribed Beginning

Allison says she came to horses via a bribe from her father. “I was a thumb sucker,” she shares. “This was a concern because I had perfect teeth and the dentist had told my parents I had a 99.9% chance of not needing braces as long as I stopped sucking my thumb.” She was about 6 then, and her folks settled on a bribe after various other attempts failed. A chance interaction with a friend’s pony gave Allison the perfect answer when her dad asked what “one thing” he could provide her in trade for immediately and forever stopping the thumb sucking: “A pony.” “I was so stricken with the pony disease, there was no looking back,” Allison reflects. “I never cheated and my dad was a man of his word and I knew my having a pony was meant to be.” Allison’s now-retired parents continue to be very much a part of her journey, renting a cottage at Fox Frolic to be close to their daughter when she’s in residence. Attending the Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York in 1980 and watching the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Games eventing competition on television planted the seeds of her dreams. “I watched all the equestrian sports, but the Three-Day Event was what captured me. To me, this was the ultimate horse sport. And once again I felt destiny knocking on the door. I knew that was what I was going to do.” Earning her colors at Fox River Valley Hunt (Elizabeth, Illinois) at an early age and the rare “A” U.S. Pony Club rating at 16 indicated that Allison would fulfill that destiny. Allison came to Aiken from her native Barrington Hills, Illinois, about an hour outside of Chicago. After graduating Bowdoin College in 1997, she committed to following her equestrian dream even though it meant a life of long, exhausting days. She began galloping racehorses in 1999 in Illinois for Richard Duchossois’ Hill ‘N Dale Farm. She did that in the early mornings, rode her own horses in the afternoon and waitressed at night. Later that year, Allison was asked to start young horses for Richard’s son, the late and much-missed horseman R. Bruce Duchossois, at his H ‘n D location in Aiken. “I fell in love with Aiken then,” she recalls of the era that included waiting tables at 10 Downing Street. “The town is adorable with a great history and community.” Fast forward several years to when she became established in her eventing career, Allison returned to Aiken to work with Australian-born American Olympian Phillip Dutton. About 10 years ago, she began wintering regularly in Aiken, basing her 17-horse business at Fox Frolic Farm. The Hitchcock Woods is a favorite spot for Allison and she’s a big fan of the footing and other qualities found at the area’s many eventing competitions. She is also, of course, a huge fan of the realized vision of Bruce Duchossois, the Aiken Horse Park, and the park’s main competition arena, Bruce’s Field. With spring comes “the great migration,” when the geographic hub of equestrian competition shifts north. Allison’s program heads to her Virginia base and Fernanda to Fitch’s Corner in Millbrook, New York. It’s a bittersweet time, the Fox Frolic owner admits, but it’s counterbalanced by the anticipation of a “family reunion” of sorts when everyone returns to Aiken when the colder seasons come around again.

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Is Your Horse in Pain? He’s trying to tell you By Susan Parry, DVM

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observer to arrive at an overall score that ranges from zero to 12. (Find the Equine Grimace Scale here: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/ article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0092281) Horses are like people; some are more stoic than others. Because of this, changes in a horse’s expression are often the best indication that something is wrong. Pay attention to your horse’s face and body movements. Does he trot along with his ears pinned back? A comfortable horse swings his ears back and forth to listen for sounds around him or to his rider’s voice. Does he constantly shift around in the crossties or on the end of the lead rope? A comfortable horse will stand like a table, at least a good portion of the time. Are the muscles above his eyes and around his lips tight? This is an often-overlooked indication that all is not right. The most common criterion for diagnosing lameness pain is a “head bob” at the trot or walk. When a horse is 5/5 lame, he is “three-legged lame” or hopping on three legs. In this case, it is pretty obvious what hurts. However, if a horse’s whole body is in pain, his back hurts, or both his front feet hurt, there is no head bobbing. The head bob or nod only occurs if one foot in a front or back pair hurts more than the other. Symmetrical pain (pain in the left foot is equal to pain in the right foot) results in a horse reluctant to move (lacking forwardness or impulsion), moving stiffly and/or being short-strided. If your horse isn’t head-bobbing lame, is he painful? In my practice of rehabilitation and performance therapy, I primarily treat horses that are not “lame.” Instead they are brought to me because they are not moving well, are uncooperative, not “forward” and so on. These are usually symptoms of pain. Among the things that I look for: do they swing through the back as they move? Are their bodies supple or stiff ? I look Illustration from the Colorado State University Veterinary Medical Center Equine Comfort Assessment Scale at their faces: are they tense around the eyes or mouth? When trotting freely in a pen or on the lunge line, do they pull their head and neck up above their withers? This University Veterinary Medical Center. This scale goes from 0-5, with could be an attempt to shift weight off two front feet that are both sore. zero representing no pain, and 5 meaning excruciating pain. For this These horses are often tense, grouchy or standoffish. scale, the caretaker or veterinarian evaluates the horse’s overall posture, Too often, if a horse still does his job, the thought of pain is expression, attitude and behavior to arrive at a numerical score. (Find a discounted. This may not be because people are callous or unfeeling. chart for your stable here: http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/Documents/ More often it is because they just don’t recognize pain’s subtler anesthesia-pain-management-pain-score-equine.pdf ) symptoms. Sometimes even veterinarians, trainers or farriers will dismiss The Equine Comfort Assessment Scale incorporates an additional an owner’s concerns. But in my experience, if an owner, rider or a trainer pain scale called the Equine Grimace Scale, which was developed thinks a horse is “not quite right,” they are always correct. If the source in 2014. It turns out that pain is written all over a horse’s face, and of the pain is not immediately obvious, sometimes it is just a matter of examining a horse’s facial expression can give an accurate indication of digging deeper, looking at the whole horse and opening our eyes and how he feels. Horses express pain with changes in the way they carry our minds. their ears, their eyes and eyelids, their mouths and chins, and their lips Is there something that worries you about your horse? He might be and nostrils. The Equine Grimace Scale asks an observer to rate a horse’s trying to tell you he’s uncomfortable. Are you listening? facial expression on a scale of 0 to 2 (zero being no pain; 2 obvious pain) in six different areas. Adding up these six numbers allows the o one who loves horses wants to think their horse is in pain, and sometimes pain is hard to spot. Horses don’t always express pain the way we expect them to. As a result, horses often suffer in silence, while their caring owners don’t do anything to help relieve their discomfort until it becomes severe. Obviously, no one wants this. So how can you tell if a horse is in pain? Let’s start with the term “pain.” What does it mean? Pain is defined as physical suffering or discomfort. That covers a lot of ground, from mild irritation to unbearable agony. In my experience, a horse’s pain often goes unrecognized until it is severe: he is unable to rise, unwilling to eat or move, standing with his head low, or in the case of colic, rolling on the ground. In these cases, the horse’s pain is unmistakable. A bigger challenge is to identify if a horse has some pain that he lives with all the time or “pushes through” in training. In some competitive arenas, so many horses are living with chronic low level pain that many people don’t even recognize what a normal, happy, comfortable horse looks like. So how do we recognize and measure pain? With humans that can speak, we ask them to rate their pain from 0-10, zero being no pain, 10 being the worst pain they can imagine. To measure pain in our horses we can use various assessment tools. The most well-known is the “Equine Comfort Assessment Scale” created by the Colorado State

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Aiken Saddlery

Giving Back is Good Business By Pam Gleason

n the three and a half years since Amy Hebert and CP Doremus bought Aiken Saddlery, the business has grown in many ways. The first, and most obvious, is that the floor space has been expanded, making room for a wider variety of retail items. This has given the store, which was primarily a feed store back when it started, more of a tack shop feel. The business has also grown to include a whole array of programs that contribute to the Aiken equestrian world. For instance Aiken Saddlery regularly sponsors educational events, generally held on Tuesday evenings at the Willcox, a hotel that strives to be “Aiken’s living room.” Experts come to give talks on cutting edge nutritional research, and equipment manufacturers come to present the latest and greatest in rider safety equipment. The store also sponsors clinics at various placesby such well-known figures as the Olympian Nona Garson; the dressage trainer Christine Traurig; and show jumping luminaries such as Mark Leone and Frank Madden. In addition, Aiken Saddlery is a sponsor of about three dozen different events in every conceivable equestrian activity, as well as a wide variety of local charities. “We try to support the community and be involved in all the different disciplines,” says Amy, explaining that her philosophy comes from her father, who owned family jewelry stores in Connecticut where she grew

I

to horse shows. Meanwhile, from the time she was very small all the way through college, she worked in the family stores, gaining a deep and natural understanding of the retail business. At the University of Georgia in Athens, she studied anthropology with a minor in classical archaeology. Her degree provided her with an entrée to a first job: working on an archaeological dig in New York City where an 18th century African American cemetery had been discovered. It was a fascinating project, but Amy missed the horses. “I was going to Central Park to ride horses from the Claremont. It was great and I had a good time, and it was nice to be a part of the project – they have a museum there now. But I just wanted to ride.” So, after about a year of city life, Amy left and went to work for a Unionville, Pennsylvania horsewoman who bred racehorses and showed on the amateur circuit. “I did everything. She had a stallion that she bred, so I foaled out babies, I broke them and took them to the track to get them their gate cards. I foxhunted and I groomed for her at all the big shows. I learned a lot.” During this time, Amy met her husband CP. After they were married, she moved to New Jersey where he lived. For the next 18 years, she galloped horses at Monmouth Park racetrack, working for the trainer

up. “He ingrained in me that you always give back to the community that supports you. We’ve been really well received since we’ve taken over the business, and that is wholly due to the community, so we give back as much as we can.” Amy and CP, who are married, started coming down to Aiken for the winter season many years ago, and moved here full time in 2014. They were previously based in New Jersey, where CP had his own communications business and Amy worked at Monmouth Park racetrack. Aiken Saddlery, founded in the late 1970s, was a highly successful and respected tack and feed store owned and run by Lydia Rose. Although the store was not officially for sale, when Amy and CP came upon the opportunity to purchase it, they took the plunge. The business changed hands in August 2014. Amy laughs and says that she never wanted to own a tack shop, but to the outside observer, it seems like a natural fit, almost a destiny. She grew up with a passion for horses, riding with the pony club and going

John Forbes. She was a rider, a groom and an assistant trainer. She also got involved in the international amateur racing circuit, which gave her the opportunity to ride as a jockey at major racetracks across the United States and in Europe. She rode at Suffolk Downs in Massachusetts, at Arlington Park in Illinois and at Colonial Downs in Virginia. She also raced in England, Italy, France, Germany and even Russia (“I had 50 percent winners in Russia,” she says with a laugh.) As the owner of Aiken Saddlery, she has been able to combine her intimate knowledge of horses with her lifelong understanding of retail. CP, who sold his New Jersey business when the couple relocated to Aiken, has a number of other businesses he is working on in town, and he contributes his entrepreneurial savvy to the store. He can even sometimes be found helping out in the back, loading people’s trucks with hay and bags of grain. In addition to sponsoring myriad events and equestrian happenings in Aiken, Amy, CP and the entire Aiken Saddlery staff have a mission

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to assist their customers. The women who work in the store are all horse people. They come from various different disciplines and have a wide range of experience in the horse world. Because of this they can provide advice and assistance to horsemen of all levels and types. “Everyone has something to put on the table,” says Amy. “I think that’s nice: it’s not like you walk in and everyone here is just a foxhunter or a polo player. All disciplines are welcome.” “It’s a group effort,” adds Jen Easters, who works at the store. “Aiken is growing and it is important that we grow along with it. With the growth of places like Three Runs Plantation [a local equestrian development] we have people coming in who may not have taken care of their own horses before. That’s another great thing about working here. You get to see someone who has a problem with a horse, or maybe just needs some education, and you can give them that general horse care advice and they really appreciate it.” Jen has been behind various customer appreciation initiatives at store such as the “App Card” launched before Christmas last year. This is a digital punch-card-like rewards program that you can download to your cell phone. When you place an order, you give your phone number and the order is credited to your account. For every dollar you spend inside the store (on tack, supplements, supplies and apparel), you get two points; and for every dollar you spend outside (in feed, hay and shavings) you get one point. For every 1000 points you get a $5 gift certificate and you also get a $5 gift certificate on your birthday. “We also have specials every Wednesday,” says Jen. “I try to do something different each week, and I try to make it for things that will be useful. I recently did 25% off clipper blades, and those never go on sale. Sometimes I do double points.” The App Card also helps customers keep track of any specials that the store is offering in conjunction with feed suppliers. Currently, there are several loyalty rewards programs that are active: buy 10 bags of Tribute and get one bag free; buy 12 bags of Triple Crown and get one bag free.

April-May 2018

There are specials for Fromm dog and cat food and for certain kinds of Purina. Customers can be up-to-date on all the promotions just by looking at the app on their phone, which also records of all their points and purchases. “It’s been very popular,” says Jen. “It’s very organized, and it’s noninvasive because it keeps track of things for people – they don’t have to remember to bring in a coupon or a punch card to get a benefit. It keeps all your receipts forever so you can review what you’ve ordered. The points add up quickly.” Today, Aiken Saddlery is a distributor of a wide variety of different types of feed for horses, dogs, cats, chickens and even pigs, turtles and exotics. They sell traditional favorites such as Banks Mill Feeds, which are milled right across the street, as well as Purina, KER, Triple Crown and Nutrena. They have recently added Tribute feeds, which are gaining a devoted local following. There is also a selection of hay and shavings, shelves full of supplements and grooming supplies, tack at various price points and clothing for riders, and for people who want to look like riders. Future plans include expanding the parking lot, which was not designed for a store with such a large clientele, and adding a wide screen television set to livestream equestrian events such as the LandRover Kentucky Three Day Event and the Kentucky Derby. Meanwhile, Amy and the staff at Aiken Saddlery continue to work to help their customers and to contribute to the health of the Aiken horse world. The business involves long hours and a great deal of time and energy, but it has many rewards. “It’s fun to get to know what people do with their horses and to get to know them,” says Amy. “Where else do you get to go to work where you are greeted by the store dogs, and you can wear your britches and boots and nobody thinks that it’s strange?” “Plus we get to ride every day,” adds Jen. “You can’t beat that.”

The Aiken Horse

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Trotters, Pacers, and Polo


Photography by Gary Knoll & Pam Gleason


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Low Level Laser

Therapy for Sport Horses By Ragan Morehouse

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hese days, horse people everywhere are talking about laser therapy. We have heard that lasers can heal tendon and ligament strains, repair muscle tears, and even reduce the effects of arthritis. Stories about lasers healing wounds, re-growing hair and making scars disappear are pretty common. You may have even heard that lasers make broken bones knit together faster. But are these stories true? Does laser therapy really work? Can shining a focused beam of light on an injury help it to heal faster? Is laser therapy worth the hundreds of dollars that so many of us willingly shell out? The answer is definitely, maybe. Success stories and positive case studies abound, but there are few actual clinically controlled experiments that support the use of low level laser therapy on injured horses. That leaves horse owners to decide for themselves: is it worth spending money on a therapy that may not have much benefit, on the chance that it really does do fantastic things? Just what is laser therapy, anyway?

been mostly positive, apparently improving healing in these species. Unfortunately, very little “good” research has been done studying how well laser therapy works to heal injuries in horses. Anecdotes, studies involving only a few subjects, and studies performed by someone with a keen interest in having the results come out a certain way (such as the laser manufacturers) do not provide the type of data that many veterinarians are looking for. Because of this, some veterinarians think that relying on lasers is premature.

Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT)

For the past 50 years, two different types of lasers have been used in medical settings: surgical lasers and low-level lasers. Surgical lasers use heat to cut through skin, tissue, and even tendons and ligaments. Lowlevel lasers, also known as cold lasers, use a lot less power and don’t heat the targeted area. Instead, they actually change the way a cell functions by giving it an energy boost. Although scientists are not exactly sure how this works, they have been able to measure changes after a cell has been exposed to a laser. Studies have shown that cell energy is increased, the cell’s metabolism ramps up, and it grows and matures more quickly. In other words, the laser can help the cell to heal itself. This is why so many doctors and veterinarians are excited about low-level laser therapy (LLLT).

Classes of LLLT

After 50 years of development, many different types of lasers have been built. Lasers vary by how much power they can generate, how deep their wavelengths of light can penetrate into the body, and what type of light they can emit. Some low-level lasers are so powerful that they can burn if they are not used appropriately. In 2002, to help protect users, lowlevel lasers were grouped into classes based on their potential to damage non-targeted tissue. The classification system does not address how the actual tissue being targeted by the laser is affected. Class I and II lasers are very safe and pose no hazard to eyes or

exposed skin. Class III lasers don’t harm exposed skin, but can damage eyes in certain circumstances such as if they are viewed through a microscope. Class IV lasers can harm both eyes and skin and are also considered a fire hazard. Most veterinarians use either Class III or Class IV lasers to treat their patients because these lasers are more powerful and thought to be able to penetrate deeper into the body to the underlying tissues.

The effectiveness of LLLT on Horses

In order for scientists (including doctors and veterinarians) to agree that a new treatment works, research must show a direct cause and effect relationship between the treatment and improvement in the condition being treated. LLLT research results in humans and rats have

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Dr. Carol Gillis, DVM, a leader in the field of ultrasound diagnostics for tendon and ligament injuries, is concerned about the wide use of laser therapy without a solid body of research to guide it. “I really want to see peer-reviewed research before I am a believer,” she says. “I will drag my heels until I have solid evidence. I think that it is overly sanguine to think that something doesn’t have a side-effect. Over the years, my index of suspicion has been raised. However, I do tend to think of lasers in terms of a risk-benefit analysis: I may suggest that clients use them in some cases if the potential benefit outweighs the risk.” Some of these cases include shallow wounds, suspensory branch injuries, and cases of painful inflammation. “From the research I have reviewed, laser therapy is fairly well documented to reduce inflammation, but not as well documented to promote healing,” explains Dr. Gillis. “Additionally, laser therapy is less effective the deeper the injury. For example, the suspensory branches are closer to the skin and so laser therapy for the branches may be more effective than therapy on the suspensory body as it is deeper. A hind suspensory can be three to four centimeters under the skin. There is more depth of penetration with the newer Class IV lasers as they have more ability to generate longer wavelengths. But do I think they work on deeper structures such as the sacroiliac which is 9 to 12 centimeters? Probably not.” “One other thing,” adds Dr. Gillis. “A lot of people talk about lasers improving blood flow, but you already have good blood flow when an area is inflamed. There is a 300% increase in blood flow in a tendon injury. That’s what I did my doctorate on. My research asks the question: how do we know we want increased blood flow? Proud flesh shows that horses are prone to over-healing. They may need help with control of cell proliferation but I don’t think they need help with blood flow.” Dr. Susan Parry, DVM, specializes in physiotherapy and uses treatment methods such as acupuncture, LLLT, exercise therapy, spinal manipulation and chiropractics. She often works with Dr. Gillis to provide alternative treatment options to patients with both acute and chronic issues.

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2018


“We may not have the double-blind studies [an accepted type of scientific study], but I think laser therapy is very useful,” says Dr. Parry. “If you look at the results of human research, you can see that there is plentiful evidence that lasers can do a lot of good. Skeptics may say that human or rat skin is different than a horse’s skin; that in the lab, skin is uniform whereas in real life, the beam has to pass through skin, fascia, tissues, etc. They may say that we cannot know how much of the beam actually penetrates to deeper injuries. But I believe that if even one percent of the beam penetrates, maybe it penetrates enough. Other than the financial hit to the owner, as long as we are careful, we are going to do no harm.

horses in the Aiken area, is very optimistic about the usefulness of LLLT. “I use the laser daily and sometimes, several times a day,” she says. “Its use is so broad and it is just a fantastic modality. I use it most often on distal limb injuries, suspensory branch injuries, and superficial deep flexor tendon injuries. I have also used it on kissing spine, sacroiliac, and neck injuries.” Dr. Thompson added the Class IV RLT Sound laser to her practice in January of this year. The lack of clinical research was an initial concern for her, but she was convinced that it could be a useful tool after hearing about the experiences of several prominent veterinarians at the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) meeting in

“We know from cell studies that normal cells don’t always respond to lasers but stressed cells do,” she adds. “Many of my clients ask me, how do I know if I am hitting exactly the right piece of tissue? I tell them that I don’t really need to be exact to be effective because the whole area gets bathed - both the normal and the stressed cells. I do need to know the depth of the injured tissue so that I can make the appropriate calculations and adjust the laser settings, but it does not need to be absolutely precise to be effective. “I use lasers daily in my practice, most often in conjunction with acupuncture or exercise therapy,” she continues. “I use lasers to increase the speed of healing of lacerations, skin wounds, and incisions. Infected wounds are good candidates for lasers because the laser can reduce the number of bacteria in the wound. Laser therapy is especially effective when combating drug-resistant bacteria like MRSA. Muscle injuries, tendon and ligament issues, and arthritic joints also respond well. Laser therapy reduces pain, increases blood flow, and accelerates mobility.” But Dr. Parry says that there are some caveats and that lasers need to be used with care. “The Class IV lasers have the potential for thermal damage in inexperienced hands. The Class IIIb lasers can also have adverse effects, such as slowing down healing, if the dosage calculations are incorrect. A lot of Class IV devices come with pre-programmed settings that are too hot and too high. If an animal feels any discomfort, that typically means the dose is too much.” Dr. Sarah Thompson, DVM, a veterinarian who treats competition

November 2017. “I had been looking to incorporate a laser in my practice for a couple of years,” she explains. “I was specifically waiting on research about the RLT Class IV laser. At AAEP, I spoke with several vets whom I hold in high regard and listening to their success stories clinched the deal. The RLT has been fantastic and I am so glad that I can use it to help my clients. “My most successful story to date is a driving horse that was out of action for almost a year. He had two injuries: a hind suspensory branch injury from February 2017 and a front check ligament from July 2017. The check ligament injury was the worst that I had seen,” she says. “In January of this year, he was 2 out of 5 on the lameness scale for both injuries. I started lasering him two to three times a week for a total of 20 treatments. The horse competed at the Live Oak International two months later, in March, and continues to be sound.” Anecdotes such as Dr. Thompson’s proliferate on the websites of laser manufacturers, the chat boards of online horse forums and in veterinary newsletters. While it may be difficult to find equine-focused LLLT research, it is fairly easy to find an LLLT proponent. Both Dr. Thompson and Dr. Parry have used it on their own animals and are convinced of its many benefits. “It’s not a one time fix but it definitely works,” says Dr. Thompson. “I wouldn’t use it on my clients if I wasn’t confident that it helps!”

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Bernie Traurig Clinic

A Great Oak Therapeutic Riding Center Benefit By Lauren Allen

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Traurig asked “How do you talk yourself out of that or into the other?” Encouraging the rider to verbalize her own self talk on the way to the jump proved a useful fix, as the rider demonstrated by following up with a nicely compressed distance on the next approach. “That was ideal,” cheered Traurig. He prompted the audience to applaud, “We need somebody in charge of the applause meter. That was super!” Traurig asked riders to tackle challenges without worrying too much about being perfect. “If you have a change, do it. If you don’t have a change, do it anyway, I want to see your technique.” Traurig helped to improve lead changes by asking students to ride deeper into the corners. He pointed out that allowing the horse to anticipate and do a lead change early contributed to the problem of swapping leads on the approach to a fence. He was able to offer tailored instructions in one session to students ranging from young intermediate riders to seasoned professionals and adult amateurs, without missing a beat. Traurig peppered each lesson with anecdotes about his own family or other expert riders. “John French once told me he wouldn’t buy a horse because his lead change was too easy,” for example, or “Don’t let anyone tell you you have to be born with a good eye…when my daughter was 13 she worked over poles until she developed an eye that I am jealous of !” Great Oak Therapeutic Riding Center benefitted from the clinic in several ways. In addition to helping to defray the expense of riding lessons for low income students, Traurig’s fame draws Ashley Slaughter, a student at Great Oak, had the opportunity to compete in a therapeutic riding class at the Aiken Horse interest in the horse world Show in the Woods this March. She rode Quarter Pounder. and that also helps to spread awareness locally about the therapeutic center. According to with an individual headset in order to be able to hear well, and Traurig’s Nicole Pioli, who is the program director at Great Oak, a similar Bernie voice was also amplified for the auditors in a way that was intimate and Traurig clinic held in 2017 made $5,000 for the organization. relaxed, a contrast to the theatricality of some other famous clinicians. Great Oak is volunteer intensive, since each session requires three Traurig effortlessly incorporated the audience in his discussions, people on the ground to assist the rider. Pioli extolled the benefits of taking onlookers through his initial assessment of each rider’s tack, riding lessons on general gross motor skills and said that Great Oak casually discussing saddles, bridles and bits while getting the names offers equine assisted therapy to people of diverse diagnoses, ranging and backgrounds of each horse-and-rider team. He tightened girths from 6 to 60 years old. Each client works with a therapist to develop and nosebands as he asked for a show of hands, testing the audience’s riding goals that will help facilitate outside goals, such as perhaps “a familiarity with names of brilliant riders and teachers from the past. He person who has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s and is concerned was pleased to see that many were familiar with such names as Kathy about falling may work on holding two point position [also known as Kusner and Vladimir Littauer, counting at least eight hands raised for jumping position] in order to improve their balance.” Kusner and claiming that was a record. One auditor joked that it was The clinic was also greatly appreciated by Aiken’s horsepeople. Ann really just proof of the audience’s age. Thal, a trainer based in Aiken who regularly hosts clinics with top To start off, Traurig set a simple course, building from cavaletti, to trainers was among the auditors. She summed up the double benefit crossrails, to combinations of verticals and oxers of increasing difficulty, of Traurig’s clinic: “It’s wonderful to have opportunities for continued with a careful sense of what each horse and rider combination was education for riders and trainers here in Aiken, and I truly appreciate all comfortable with and capable of doing. An emphasis on pace, balance that Great Oak is doing for outreach in the community.” and use of the opening rein helped riders to develop their skills. One rider confessed to a habit of finding long distances to fences, and he only thing better than a master class for dedicated equestrians is a master class that also spreads the joy of horses to more people. That was the magnificent outcome when a group of committed riders gathered on March 13th and 14th at Lisa Darden’s True Bleu Farm off Stiefel Road in Aiken for sessions with Bernie Traurig, the internationally renowned equestrian coach. Proceeds of the clinic went to benefit the Great Oak Therapeutic Riding Center program and scholarship funds. Great Oak is a 501c3 charity based in Aiken with the mission to “provide equine assisted activities that promote the physical, emotional and psychological health of individuals with special needs.” Bernie Traurig is an Olympian who has the unusual distinction of having competed at the top of the field in three disciplines: show jumping, dressage, and eventing. At the Aiken clinic, his presentation was confidently low key and conversational. Each rider was outfitted

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April-May 2018

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Up and Coming Celia Cram

By Ragan Morehouse, Photography by Gary Knoll

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I get out of school at 3:30 and we come to the barn and we ride about three horses each. We normally get home around 6 or 6:30 and then we have homework and dinner. There isn’t a lot of free time. This year, I also did archery. The high school practice was on Thursday afternoons and I couldn’t go because of riding. So I would practice on my day off, which is Monday. We don’t ride on Mondays. When my sister had basketball, since it is more of a team sport they made her go to the team’s practice. I had to ride her horses that day which was really difficult because I still had to ride my own horses too.” Cathy Cram, Celia’s mother and her trainer, is adamant that riding is not the only thing in her daughters’ lives. “We had a wedding a couple weekends ago and we took four days off. You would have thought that I had taken the childrens’ left arms,” says Cathy. “However, by the end of the weekend, we were all happy that we took the time off and enjoyed family time. When the kids got back on, they were so refreshed and kept exclaiming about how good the horses felt, especially in spite of the four day break. I force them to take Monday off, especially if we have shown over the weekend. We try to take Thursdays off as well but that doesn’t always work. We try really hard to do a couple of family trips over the summer if we can and I always encourage the girls to do sports at school. It’s all about the balance.” This year, Celia has decided to take the next step in her equitation career and is showing in the 3’6” equitation (a.k.a. ‘Big Eq’) classes. She is hoping to qualify to compete in the ASPCA Maclay Finals at the National Horse Show in Lexington, Kentucky and the Dover Saddlery/USEF Hunter Seat Medal Finals at the Pennsylvania National Horse Show in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. “My goals for her are whatever her goals are for herself,” says Cathy. “We talked about this all last year and she wants the next step to the 3’6” Medal and Maclay.” Right now, Celia is one horse short in her string; she and Cathy are actively looking for an equitation horse that can help her attain her goals. “My horse that I rode in the equitation classes last year, Google, was leased out,” explains Celia. “We had another eq horse come in but she didn’t work out. Then we had one of the Geitner’s sale horses for a while. I showed him in two or three ‘A’ shows and I got a lot of points on him before he got leased out. So now we are trying to find one so that I can keep showing in the eq and getting points.” While waiting for her next equitation mount, Celia is competing in the high children’s jumpers (1.1m) on her young jumper, Auspicious, and in the Low Children’s Jumpers (1m) on Ziggy Poplin’s Turbo. She also keeps busy with catch rides at shows, mentoring the younger children in the barn, and schooling ponies for the littler kids. “Both of my girls are really dedicated; more than I ever thought they would be,” says Cathy. “The reason why they are so confident and precise with their riding is because they have spent so many hours in the saddle. They have been given Above: Celia with Auspicious at the Aiken Horse Show and Right: aboard Ziggy Poplin's Turbo, March tremendous opportunities by people like Robin Greenwood, Madness at Highfields Karen Kelly, Wendy Arndt and Carrie Emerson. There are so many people to thank; so many people that have contributed to their the win in the South Carolina Governor’s Cup held at Bruce’s Field, success by giving them opportunities that I could never have afforded. the PSJ Medal Finals at Highfields (both in Aiken), and the Palmetto They are so appreciative and they work hard.” Medal Finals at the South Carolina Equine Park in Camden. She was Hard work, natural talent, a supportive family, and incredible the youngest rider ever to sweep all three finals. Celia was also named opportunities seem to be a recipe for success. In addition, Celia, who Zone 4 Champion in the 12-14 year old division in both the children’s aspires to become a professional, says she loves it. Showing is not hunters and the equitation. And, as if all of that wasn’t enough, she just about the horses, it is also about being part of the horse show finished the year as the 12-14 year old USEF circuit champion of the community. year for South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia. “I really love going to shows,” she says. “My favorite thing about Although horse shows are a way of life for the Cram family, Celia showing is getting to see all the friends that live somewhere else that I is still just a kid. She has had to learn to make time for school, riding, don’t get to see on a normal basis. Competing with them is fun. I love seeing friends, sports, and family. cheering them on.” “It is hard to balance school and riding,” she admits. “My sister and elia Cram’s success in the horse show ring is a testament to the axiom that hard work pays off. A 14-year-old freshman at Mead Hall Episcopal School, Celia spends as much time in the saddle as most kids spend on their iPads. Her parents, Rick and Cathy Cram, are the owners of Progressive Show Jumping, Inc., a horse show management company, and Highfields, a 60-acre horse show venue in Aiken, South Carolina. Born into the horse world, Celia and her younger sister, Liza have been riding as long as they can remember. Last year, Celia had the best show year of her life. Having graduated from the pony divisions the previous season, Celia spent the majority of 2017 showing in the 12-14 year old equitation classes on the chestnut gelding, Internet II (barn name, Google). At the end of the show season, Celia had won a South Carolina equitation trifecta, cinching

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A SECLUDED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY WITH EVEN MORE SECLUDED HOMESITES. Good fences don’t make good neighbors. Rolling hills, wooded acres, spring fed ponds and a flowing tributary do. Embrace the privacy of Tod’s Hill, a peaceful gated community with expansive homesites minutes from downtown Aiken — and far from everything else.

EQUESTRIAN HOMESITES FROM 6 TO 22 ACRES. MARKETED BY THE RE/MAX COLLECTION TATTERSALL GROUP KARL MCMILLAN 843-693-6115 Fine Homes & Luxury Properties

TODSHILL.COM

Fine Homes & Luxury Properties

Fine Homes & Luxury Properties


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Inside

Captain Gaylard Sisters Aside RoAnn Farm Classifieds Directory Dressage, CT, Showjumping Calendar Index


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Remembering Captain Gaylard Aiken’s Riding Master By Pam Gleason

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Hitchcock Woods, where he often rode and took his students. Today, visitors to the Woods can remember him when they school their horses over Captain Gaylard’s fences which can be found northeast of the Travers Line not far from the Coker Spring and Berrie Road entrances. “He had all kinds of tricks,” remembers Nanny (von Stade) Ward, who rode with him along with her brothers and sisters when she was a child. “He would have you ride without your stirrups and bareback sometimes. In the Woods, he would have you ride up and down steep banks. He was a wonderful teacher.” Other former students remember him as being strict, but very kind, and a horseman through and through. All of his students remember him best for his mantra of “legs, body, reins.” “To stop your horse, you collected him with your legs, then leaned your body back in the saddle, then used your reins,” says Ivor Stoddard, Louis’s grandson, who rode with Gaylard for many years. “I can still hear him saying that.” In addition to teaching riding, Captain Gaylard was a well-known polo umpire, officiating every winter at Aiken Polo Club as well as at major national and international matches. He was always in demand as a private coach for riders of all ages and abilities, from young beginners up to 10 goal polo players. He earned universal respect for his ability as a horseman, and many of the best polo players relied on his judgment when purchasing their mounts. “Once a Gaylard student always a Gaylard student,” wrote George E. Coleman in an article for the Brooklyn Eagle in 1941. “Just before the U.S. tilt on the international field a week ago, one of the players, who was slipping fast, suddenly found his former teacher Gaylard in front of him, handing out a good old fashioned tongue lashing. The rider took every bit of it, said ‘thanks Bill’ then went out and played the game of his career.” “Bill Gaylard was involved with everything to do with horses in Aiken,” says Nanny Ward. “He was at the Captain Gaylard leads Aiken Prep School boys through the Hitchcock Woods. racetrack and at polo and at the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods. He was just a wonderful man and Long Island and in Aiken. By 1922, Bill Gaylard was headquartered in everyone loved him.” Long Island during the warmer seasons and making an annual winter A quick glance through old newspapers and books about historic pilgrimage South. Aiken proves that this is the case. Although Captain Gaylard was In addition to taking charge of the Stoddard stable, Gaylard also seldom the subject of a story, his presence was often noted, whether as started teaching riding lessons, both to children and to adults. Bill an instructor at Aiken Prep, the ring master at the Aiken Horse Show or Smith, whose son Lewis was an international polo player, suggested that one of the marshals of Aiken’s Golden Anniversary Polo Parade in 1932. Gaylard would not attract many clients if he went by his actual rank Captain Gaylard sold his riding school in 1954 and retired in Aiken of Sergeant. So he and Louis Stoddard gave the Sergeant an unofficial with his wife Mabel, who was also from Somerset. Their son, Kenneth, promotion, and he was known as Captain Gaylard forever after. did not follow in his father’s footsteps, becoming an engineer, rather Captain Gaylard was in immediate demand and had an instant than a horseman. Captain Gaylard died in 1956 at the age of 68. He following. In Aiken he opened his own riding stable in the historic left behind a far-reaching legacy in the equestrian world, one that district, not far from the Aiken Training Track. He also became the reverberates today through the children and grandchildren of his pupils, riding master at Aiken Prep School and later at the Fermata School. who still follow his equestrian philosophy, even if they may have never Captain Gaylard loved Aiken. He thought the climate was ideal for heard his name. training and conditioning horses of all kinds. He especially loved the f all the horsemen in Aiken’s old Winter Colony, Captain William Henry Gaylard was probably the most influential. Mrs. Louise Hitchcock may have been the driving spirit behind many of Aiken’s equestrian traditions, and people such as Pete Bostwick (a renowned polo player, steeplechase and flat jockey) may have inspired the colony with their brilliant athleticism. But Captain Gaylard taught everyone to ride. Captain Gaylard was born in Somerset, England in 1888, the son of a professional horseman. Devoted to horses from childhood, when he came of age he tried to join the cavalry. At first he was turned away and told to enlist as an infantryman because he was deemed too small. But his heart was set on the cavalry and he persisted and eventually found himself a member of the 17th Dragoon Guards. He fought in World War I and had tours of service in India, China, Egypt and South Africa, playing polo and training cavalry horses between engagements. After the war, he was sent back to England where was assigned to assemble and train ponies for the 1921 British International polo squad, which played against the United States for the Westchester Cup that year. America took home the cup, but Louis Stoddard, one of the American team’s 10 goal players, was so impressed by Sergeant Gaylard that he hired him to come back to the United States to oversee the Stoddard polo operation. Louis Stoddard had a home in Westbury,

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Sisters Aside

Winter Week Aside in Aiken By Nancy Johnson

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nne Moss succinctly summed up the allure of riding sidesaddle as the Aiken Ladies Aside sidesaddle group gathered to kick off their “Winter Week Aside” at Three Runs Plantation in Aiken in late January. “It’s so fun meeting this group,” she said. “We are a small group, us sidesaddle ladies. Even if we do different things sidesaddle – hunt, show, and even race, it’s a real sisterhood.” Any woman, whether an accomplished sidesaddle rider or a newcomer to riding aside, is welcome to join this special sisterhood and to participate in all the activities organized by Aiken Ladies Aside. Betty Alexander founded the group in 2005 when she moved from the MidAtlantic to Aiken and was surprised to see very little local interest in riding sidesaddle. “I got some supporters and then convinced the Aiken Horse Show to include a ladies sidesaddle division,” she said. “That really helped us a lot!” The historic horse show was the perfect place to showcase the elegance of riding aside, and it was not long before the club began to grow. Another big boost came in 2013 when Sue Sisco moved to Aiken from Pennsylvania. Sue is a renowned sidesaddle competitor who has won just about every ladies’ sidesaddle hunter championship on the East Coast, including retiring the trophy at Madison Square Garden in 1992. For their annual Winter Week Aside, Betty makes a point to invite special guests to join the local members for talks, demonstations and lessons. This year’s guests, Anne Moss, Shelly Liggett and Sara Gartland, each brought a wealth of knowledge on a particular aspect of riding aside.

A “Civil” Look at the War

Anne Moss, who lives in Coatesville, Maryland, earned her USDF silver medal riding sidesaddle and has found numerous ways to enjoy her love of riding aside. It all began as something to do when accompanying her husband, an avid Civil War reenactor, on his various outings. “At first I would just kind of ride around the grounds a bit while the demonstrations were taking place,” she said. Then as she continued to learn about women riding during the 19th century, she gradually acquired and modified clothing and tack for an authentic, vintage appearance. With her look completed, she took a bigger role in the reenactors’ events. At the Winter Week Aside, she showed the group slides of some of her more memorable moments, including participating in the Battle of Cedar Creek in Middletown, Virginia; Presidents’ Day in Philadelphia and parades in Old Bedford and Hibernia Park, Pennsylvania. “Ladies mostly rode socially at that time and always with a gentleman escort,” she explained. “They had to be completely covered, even their ankles, and then were lifted up onto the saddle.” In addition to a long skirt and petticoat, the women wore a riding corset. Frilly hats adorned with feathers and ribbons were the fashion. “Sometimes their outfits included military finishes; some even matched parts of their husband’s uniforms,” Anne noted. “The bridles were flashy, with lots of brass, not at all like the conservative bridles you see in the show ring today.” Anne said she always stresses safety and suggested that reproduction riding habits should be updated with breakaway features to prevent accidents caused by clothing getting tangled in tack. She said she also recommends breakaway stirrups and using an overgirth to keep the saddle secure. Riding at Civil War reenactments requires some extra attention to horse training, which Anne explained. Horses need to be desensitized to the sound of cannons and of gunshots, also important to those who participate in Wild West events. “We start off using a cap gun and progress from there,” she explained. “It takes time and lots of treats.”

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Perfecting a Close Fit

Shelly Liggett came to Aiken to impart her extensive knowledge of sidesaddle fitting. Shelly is the president of the International Side Saddle Organization (ISSO) and the organizer of an annual sidesaddle camp held at the USET headquarters in Gladstone, New Jersey called Camp Leaping Horn. “Fitting is multi-faceted,” she said. “Not only do you have to fit the saddle to the horse, but also to the rider.” While doing this is similar to fitting regular astride saddles, regular saddles are currently in production and there are many more options to choose from, along with more precise sizing: e.g., wide tree, long flap, and so on. The vast majority of sidesaddles in use today are antique saddles that have been restored or rebuilt, sometimes from the tree up. Shelly showed how to measure the seat for the rider. Then, using a piece of wide, firm, flexible electrical wire, she demonstrated how to bend it to conform to the underside of the saddle. That wire can then be used to make a template that can help determine if a saddle is a potential fit for a particular horse. “It is very important that the horse’s shoulder can move properly,” she stressed. If you have a saddle that is close you can use all sorts of corrector pads to make it work,” she continued, gesturing to a bag of pads of varying sizes and thicknesses, most cut from inexpensive Western saddle pads. Even if the saddle needs more adjustment than what can be accomplished with padding, Shelly said that it might still work. “You can unstuff or stuff-up a saddle. It really isn’t that hard to do.”

A Dream Trip Abroad and Aside

Sara Gartland, a sidesaddle enthusiast, came to the Winter Week Aside from her home in Cochranville, Pennsylvania. She started out in the wee hours of the morning, arriving in Aiken in time for a late afternoon hack, and then on to the welcome party at Three Runs Plantation clubhouse that evening. The next morning she and Anne Moss were off hunting aside with the Aiken Hounds in the Hitchcock Woods, each aboard a seasoned hunter owned by Betty Alexander. “Most of my sidesaddle experience has been catch riding,” Sara said with a laugh. “They have all been well-schooled and come with great saddles, so it’s a pleasant experience.” Sara told her story of a dream realized with a recent catch ride: showing at the National Side Saddle Show at Addington Manor in Britain. It was through Emma Brown, who served as an instructor at Camp Leaping Horn in 2016, that she first heard of the English show. Emma, a well known British sidesaddle rider and instructor facilitated her trip and even helped her find a horse to ride. “No matter what came up, she just kept saying, ‘Don’t worry, I’ve got you,’” Sara recalled. She also had lots of help from other sidesaddle friends, especially Heidi Opdyke and Gail DiScipio who gave her equitation and turnout advice prior to her trip. Shelly Liggett helped her to secure a scholarship from ISSO to defray some of her costs. Sara said there are many differences between competing sidesaddle in this country and in Britain. Most obvious is the size and scope of the show: in the United States sidesaddle riding is fairly rare, but in England there were hundreds of riders competing in classes throughout three consecutive days. “The first day you basically design your own dressage test that will show off you and your horse’s best features,” Sara said. “The only limitations were that it could be no longer than three minutes and that you must include all three gaits in both directions.” The second day was equitation day, which Sara said was the show’s real specialty. “There are three sections, novice, intermediate, and open.

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I chose novice.” Each rider was judged on a dressage test, a jumping course, and on their turnout. “It was pouring rain for my dressage test,” said Sara. She soldiered through, winding up 15th out of 30 in that phase. She then placed eighth for turnout, and was fourth over fences, making her fifth overall and the highest placed overseas rider in the novice division. The final day was devoted to working hunter classes. For these, exhibitors rode a jumping course, and the top riders were called back to show individually on the flat. Finally, there were the team relays with

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teams made up of riders from different areas. “It’s really just a big fun thing,” said Sarah. “I really hope to return to England and compete again,” adding that she would be thrilled if some other riders would join her. “We could have a team!” Photo by Nick Bridges Photography:Anne Moss on Gandalf and Sara Gartland aboard Wyatt, both owned by Betty Alexander, setting off to hunt with Aiken Hounds in the Hitchcock Woods.

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RoAnn Farm Life with Horses By Pam Gleason

“Y

ou shouldn’t have to be rich to own a horse,” says David Walker, who, along with his wife Geri, owns and runs RoAnn Farm in Aiken. RoAnn Farm is a 47-acre short- and long-term boarding facility near Graniteville. Situated on one of the highest plateaus in Aiken County and at the end of a dead end street, it is a tranquil place with pastoral views all around. RoAnn is set up for the convenience of the boarders. Horses live in their own private paddocks with run-in sheds. The paddocks all have alleyways between them so that horses will not argue over the fences and each paddock belongs to the boarder who is using it. “I don’t move the horses around,” David says. “You will always know where your horse is here. I have heard horror stories about people keeping their horses at some other places and when they get there to go ride, they can’t find them. That will never happen here. I want everyone to feel secure knowing that their horses are safe, and I want everyone to feel welcome.” In addition to the paddocks and run-ins, RoAnn also has an office, a feeding barn and a large sand arena where David and students who ride with him can practice barrel racing. Every November or December, David and Geri put on a small horse show that has a variety of classes for different disciplines. In addition, RoAnn is the site of several weddings each year, which Geri manages. She has studied event planning, and hopes to grow the wedding business in the future. David says that boarders at RoAnn are generally people who work full time and come to visit and ride their horses at the end of the work day. RoAnn is especially suited to this because the entire place is lighted at night with bright dusk-to-dawn lights. “I never close and I don’t have a time limit,” says David. “People can come out here and ride at 1 a.m. if they want to. At night this place is lit up like the Walmart parking lot. There is nowhere else in Aiken like it.” Riding at night is especially popular during hot summer months, when cooler nights provide some relief for horses and humans alike. David says that he has been fascinated with horses his whole life. Growing up in Beech Island, South Carolina, he remembers watching on television when Secretariat won the Triple Crown in 1973. He got his first horses when he was 12 or 13 and his older brother Bobby brought two of them home. When he was a little older, he started

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working at a show jumping stable, which exposed him to horses of a different caliber. Then, in the 1980s, he started getting involved with the racing world. At that time, there was an informal racetrack in Augusta called Augusta Downs, where there was some Quarter Horse racing, as well as an arena where they held Western pleasure shows. David spent a lot of time there. “It was a backyard version of a racetrack and we had all kinds of races,” he says. “There would be a rope stretched across the track and we would do a walk-up start. When I think back on it now, I wonder how we got away with it and no one got hurt.” In 1992, Billy Morris founded the National Barrel Horse Association (based in Augusta) and things changed for the better. The NBHA awards prizes to barrel racers at all levels according to some slightly complicated calculations. The result, however, is that people of all abilities, riding horses of differing levels of talent, can be competitive and win money on a regular basis. “That was a jumpstart to every discipline in the area in my opinion,” says David, who became involved with the sport in the 1990s. Fast forward to today, and David says that he sees being around horses as a lifelong learning experience. He still does the barrel races (he is qualified for the World Championship Show in Perry, Georgia this year) but his passion is for horses themselves and not for one particular discipline. He says he has been fortunate to have been exposed to many top horsemen from different parts of the horse world, including such people as the renowned Arabian trainer Steve Diamond, who kept a pair of Egyptian stallions at RoAnn during an ice storm. David’s passion for horses extends to sharing his own general horsemanship knowledge with anyone who wants to learn, including the teenagers who ride at the farm, his grandchildren and his boarders. “Sometimes people don’t know, and no one wants to help them; sometimes they get criticized for not knowing,” he says. “I don’t think it should be that way. I’m the first to admit that I don’t know everything. But if there is a problem, and I don’t know the answer, I will find someone who does.” David and Geri have a devotion to their business, a commitment to their clients and a clear love for horses. “There is nothing more beautiful than a horse grazing in a pasture,” says David. “And there is nothing more amazing than watching a baby foal grow and develop. Someone said to me once that when you look into a baby foal’s eyes, you are looking into the eyes of God. I believe that.”

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Classifieds Antique Victorian Child’s Push Sleigh

Burgundy With Gold Pinstriping: Circa mid to late 1800’s. This replica of the full-size horse drawn sleighs is in original condition including paint, striping, tufted horse hair upholstery. The handle is removable. $480.00. Email for more pictures or information. redpony7250@gmail.com.

Land For Sale

10 ac off 78 in Aiken. Fenced, in grass and horse shelter. Karenphillis@yahoo.com 803 646-8606

803-645-7538.

Pasture Board

1890’s Auto Surrey

Short or long term pasture board in 302 area close to eventing & polo. 5 acre field with wooded area & water. New fence. 40 acres private trails to ride or drive with some small natural fences. Several other riding & schooling areas. Self or full care; owners on premises. Other options available on the farm; run-in sheds being built. Quiet & private.

Amish refurbished Padded Patent leather fenders and dash, convertible top and rubberized wheels. Paint and seat refurbished by antique auto restorer. Single and double shafts included.

$9,995.00

803-599-6605

803-643-9960

BOARDING/ TURNOUT Mill Race Farm, Aiken, SC. Warm weather luxury horse retirement, breaking, training, layups. 803-6401818 Chime Ridge Stables. Stalls available, full, partial or self care. Fun, friendly, adult atmosphere. Convenient to town, South Aiken 803-508-3760. .

BUILDING/REPAIRS/ PAINT Building & Repair: Carpentry, Doors, Windows, Decks, Cabinets, Trim, Stairs, Railings, Gates, Wood Siding, Floors, Framing, Repairs. Licensed, bonded, insured. Contact Paul Dyches. paul.t.dyches@gmail. com. 803-645-6645.

HAY

Round and Square Bales. Oakwood Farms: 3593 Silver Bluff Road, Aiken SC 29803. $60 per bale round hay bales. $70 per bale

round bales kept inside. Square bales at $7.00 per bale. Will deliver for a small fee. Please call 706830-2600 or 803-827-0864. email garymcelmurray@glmconstruction. net Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver state-wide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803.

PETS&SERVICES Black Russian Terrier Puppies: Call Karen. 803-646-8606; karenphillis@yahoo.com Trinity Farms Terriers: Norfolk Terriers & Russell Terriers. Quality family dogs with proven calmer dispositions. Generations of great temperaments. Health/dispositions guaranteed. Breeder of terriers for 30+ years. Donna Fitzpatrick.

803.648.3137. www.easyjacks.com & www.trinityfarmskennel.com & trinitynorfolkterriers.com.

REAL ESTATE & RENTALS Aiken Luxury Rentals. Distinctive accommodations for horse & rider in beautiful Aiken, SC. Downtown fully furnished cottages, historic stables. Executive relocation; corporate housing. Short & long term. www. aikenluxuryrentals. com; info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803.648.2804. Black Sheep Farm. Unfurnished 3 bed/ 2 bath cottages for long term rental and small furnished loft apartment, small guest house for short term 2 night to seasonal rental, charming pastoral setting yet proximate to downtown Aiken, and Hitchcock Woods. Horses and pets welcome. www. blacksheepfarmaiken.com. 904-2349596

Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 28 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803-439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. Aiken, SC: Available: 2 six stall barns & turnout. 3 BR. living quarters. Show ring & riding trails. 803-640-1818 For Rent: 10 acres, 10 stalls. 2-bedroom, 2-bath. Close-in to town. $2,000 per month. 803-4745194

TRAILERS

1999 4-Star Polo Trailer fits 6 horses; has partition & extra large dressing /tack room. Water tank with pump. Excellent condition & ready to pull. 803-6468606. karenphillis@yahoo.com

Advertising in The Aiken Horse

CLASSIFIED ADS are $25 for the first 30 DIRECTORY LISTING ADS: $25 per issue words & 40 cents for every word or $90 for the year (6 issues.) thereafter. BUSINESS CARDS: $60 per issue or $240 PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for horses: $35; for the year (6 issues.) Limit 30 words & one picture DISPLAY ADS are available in a range of PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for real estate, etc. sizes. For a detailed rate sheet and $45; Limit 60 words & one picture. publication schedule, visit our website: BOXED CLASSIFIEDS: add $5 to your total www.TheAikenHorse.com

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MAILING ADDRESS: The Aiken Horse, P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 EMAIL: theAikenHorse@gmail.com We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

Advertise in the June/July issue! Deadline: May 21, 2018 Publication date: June 1 2018

Pay online: www.TheAikenHorse.com or call us: 803.643.9960

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Directory of Services BARNS,CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING Cooper Home and Stable. For Equestrians by Equestrians. A unique design and build general contractor specializing in equestrian construction and farm development, architecturally designed custom homes, historic renovations, remodeling and additions. Contact J. D. Cooper, cell 502417-2307, office 803-335-3527, www.cooperhs.com. Joshua Jackson Builders. Building custom homes, barns, and estates in and around the Aiken area. Acreage available for sale. www. JoshuaJacksonBuilders.com 803-642-2790 Larlee Construction, LLC. Fine Equestrian Facilities. 1096 Toolebeck Road, Aiken SC 29803. 803.642.9096. www.larleeconstruction.com. BLANKET CLEANING & REPAIR Aiken Horse Blanket. Servicing equestrians with high quality horse blanket repair, wash and waterproof. or your convenience, drop off locations are; Aiken Saddlery, 1044 E. Pine Log Rd, Aiken, 29803 or the 302 General Store, 4746 Wagener Rd. Wagener, 29164. www.aikenhorseblanket.com; on fb Aiken Horse Blanket Group. Contact Elisa @803-640-3211. BOARDING/TURNOUT/TRAINING/SALES Chime Ridge Stables. Stalls available, full, partial or self care. Fun, friendly, adult atmosphere. Convenient to town, South Aiken 803-508-3760. Du Lop Acres. Retirement/Rehab. The farm is based in one of the quietest areas of South Carolina and is ideal for any horse to retire or rehabilitate. A peaceful farm for horses offering personalized full care for your horse. www.dulopacres.com. 858-208-6027 The Stable On The Woods: Elite boarding & training facility and home to trainers Darrell and Melissa Vaughn. With access to Hitchcock Woods, our barn sits on 70 acres and boasts a full size dressage arena with mirrors, show jumping arena and high-quality grass pastures making this the ideal place for you and your horse. Training program to meet your needs, whether your discipline is Dressage, Eventing, Hunters, Jumpers or Foxhunting. www.thestableonthewoods.com 603.785.0435 Vaughn Equestrian: offering training, sales, and boarding. Professionalism is the guiding principle of owners Darrell and Melissa Vaughn in shaping every component of Vaughn Equestrian. Dressage, Jumpers, Eventing & Young Horses. training and sales. www.vaughnequestrian.com (603)-7850435 COMPANION ANIMALS, CARE & SERVICES Palmetto Dog Club. Training classes, puppy socialization, obedience, rally & agility. 803-262-9686. www.palmettodogclub.org. Trinity Farms Terriers: Norfolk Terriers & Russell Terriers. Quality family dogs with proven calmer dispositions. Generations of great temperaments. Health/dispositions guaranteed. Breeder of terriers for 30+ years. Donna Fitzpatrick. 803.648.3137. www.easyjacks.com & www. trinityfarmskennel.com & trinitynorfolkterriers.com. FEED, SUPPLEMENTS & SUPPLIES Aiken County Farm Supply. 1933 Park Ave., Aiken. 803.649.2987. Aiken Saddlery & Supply. Full service tack & feed store. 1044 E. Pine Log Rd., Aiken. 803.649.6583. www.aikensaddlery.com HAY Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver state-wide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803. HOME & FARM SERVICES Be Fly Free. Automatic fly systems for barns and sheds. No unpleasant odor, no synthetic insecticides, no petroleum distillates. Call Carlos: 803-6450361. www.beflyfree.com; carlos@beflyfree.com. INSURANCE Betsy Minton, Dietrich Insurance Company, 803. 617. 8353. Providing competitive comprehensive insurance for horses and farms. Excellent professional and personal service always delivered with a smile. www. betsyminton.com. 800 942 4258 Hutson-Etherredge Company. Insuring Aiken farms since 1876. Your

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hometown independent insurance agency can customize your equine property coverage by choosing the best company to fit your needs. We are a full service insurance agency. Call Sandi Vogus for a quote! 803-6495141 INSTRUCTION/LESSONS Amy McElroy. USDF Gold Medalist and USEF S judge. Instruction and training at all levels. Visit www.amymcelroy.com or call 803.640-4207. Aiken Horsemanship Academy. Your naturally inspired adult learning resource! Offering Clinics, Courses, Starting Young Horses, Evaluations, and Lessons. www.JulieRobins.com 803-641-4715. Hunter/Jumper Trainer with winners at WEF, Indoors and Big Eq Finals. Will come to you. Cindy Purcell. 803-649-0990. Jodi Hemry Eventing. Three-Star Eventer offering professional training, sales, boarding, instruction, horse shows, located in the heart of Aiken, SC. 803-640-6691 JodiHemryEventing@gmail.com www. JodiHemryEventing.com Riding With Reason. Want to improve your riding position, balance & confidence and work in sync with your horse? Try a lesson on the Equisimulator in our purpose built classroom here in Aiken or bring your own horse for a ridden lesson. Agent for Heather Moffett Soft tree saddles. Yvonne Brookes: info@ridingwithreason.com; www.ridingwithreason. com. 803 842 3114 PHOTOGRAPHY & DESIGN SERVICES Gary Knoll Photography.com. Commercial, portrait, weddings, advertising. Pet portraits. Complete wide-format video service. 803.643.9960 410.812.4037. www.garyknollphotography.com REAL ESTATE/ RENTALS Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 28 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803-439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. Aiken Luxury Rentals. Distinctive accommodations for horse & rider in beautiful Aiken, SC. Downtown fully furnished cottages, historic stables. Executive relocation; corporate housing. Short & long term. www. aikenluxuryrentals.com; info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803.648.2804. Carolina Real Estate Company. Fine homes, estates and horse properties in Aiken, South Carolina. Let us welcome you home to AIKEN, Home of Horses, History & Hospitality! www.carolinahorseproperties.com. (803) 648-8660 Black Sheep Farm. Unfurnished 3 Bed/ 2 bath cottages for long term rental and small furnished loft apartment, small guest house for short term 2 night to seasonal rental, charming pastoral setting yet proximate to downtown Aiken, and Hitchcock Woods. Horses and pets welcome. www.blacksheepfarmaiken.com. 904-234-9596 Sharer Dale, RE/MAX, Tattersall Group. “Where town meets country.” sharerdale@gmail.com. www.sharerdale.remax-carolina.com 803.522.3648. Suzy Haslup, Meybohm. “Your Aiken Horse Real Estate Specialist.” Buying or selling in the most celebrated equine community in the South. ww.aikenhorserealty.com; 803-215-0153 Tracey Kenworthy Turner, Meybohm. Specializing in marketing & selling Aiken’s horse country properties for 15+ years. www.southernhorsefarms. com. 803-215-4734. TACK & TACK CLEANING/REPAIR The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 538 Two Notch Rd. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166. YOGA/FITNESS Aiken Yoga. At Aiken Yoga we are passionate about sharing the benefits that regular Yoga practice has on one’s wellbeing, energy level and state of mind. In addition to Yoga classes, including Yoga for Equestrians, we offer Pilates, Barre and Teacher Certification. Sarah Acord, RN, 116B Pendleton St. Aiken. 803-524-8833, sarah@aikenyoga.com; www. aikenyoga.com for schedule.

The Aiken Horse

April-May 2018


Your Pet’s ! t e V r e h t O

Sybil Davis DVM: Rehab & Acupuncture Certified 307 Willow Run Rd. Aiken SC 29801 info@petfitnessandrehab.com

I-20 Exit 101 April 6-8 April 13-15 April 20-22 April 27-28 May 4-6 May 11-13 May 18-20 May 25-27 June 1-3 June 8-10 June 14-16 June 17

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Camden Spring Classic PSJ Spring Show scequinepark.com/calendar-2018 Palmetto Paint Horse for more information SCQHA Mini Circuit Palmetto Paint Horse Dressage Camden Spring Classic H/J South Carolina Quarter Horse Assn Dates Subject to Change Foothills H/J Show Dressage For Booking Information (803) 983-0366 NSBA Boot Camp info@scequinepark.com Open Show

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Eventing at Paradise Farm; Dressage at Bruce’s Field; Show


w Jumping at PSJ March Madness, Highfields Event Center

Photography by Gary Knoll


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The Aiken Horse

April-May 2018


Aiken Area Calendar of Events

APRIL 4 4 4 4-8 4-8 5-8 6-8 7

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HJ Schooling Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com CT & Dressage Show. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com, www. paradisefarmaiken.com NBHA Local Show. Crosby Arena, Walterboro, SC. Barbara O’ Leary: 843.368.7309, www.nbha.com The Fork at TIEC – WEG Eventing Test Event CIC 1*/2*/3*. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com WEG Vaulting Test Event CVI 1*/2*/3*. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com Camden Spring Classic USEF HJ Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com USEF/USEA Chatt Hills CIC*** HT. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com Backstretch Experience: Behind the Scenes at the Aiken Training Track. $30. 8:45am. Rye Patch parking lot, 100 Berrie Road, Aiken. 803.643.2121 or 803.642.7631, halloffame@cityofaikensc.gov, www. aikenracinghalloffame.com/Backstretch_Experience.html CEC Toopler Branch HJ Show. Toopler Branch Farm, 1035 Lee Lane, Lugoff, SC. 803.699.2282, www.camdenequinecircuit.com Jumping Branch Farm Derby Jump For Cash. Jumping Branch Farm, 179 Fox Pond Road, Aiken. Julie Zapapas, 803.645.1098, zapapasJ@bellsouth.net, jbfarm.com Windsor Derby Driving Finals. Katydid Farm, 359 State Park Road, Windsor, SC. 803.292.3064, www.katydidfarm.com Cheryl & Co. HJ Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark.com Southeastern Thoroughbred Showcase. Showcasing the talents of Thoroughbreds in 5 disciplines: Hunters, Jumpers, Dressage, Eventing and Freestyle. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com HQHA: The Stock Show. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com

April-May 2018

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Combined Training Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com Volunteer Appreciation and Serena’s Star Award. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, www. letlovelive.org Yappy Hour. 6-8pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, www.letlovelive.org Ride the Rail. $50. 11am-2pm. Aiken Training Track, 538 Two Notch Road, Aiken. Wendy Gutfarb: 508.265.3055, RideTheRailAiken@gmail.com USEF/USDF “Spring Fever” Dressage Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com Southern Pines CDE. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark.com Trick Training & Performance Liberty Immersion. Dragonfly Farm, 590 Implement Rd, Aiken, SC 29803. julierobinsinc@gmail.com, www.julierobins.com Tryon Welcome 3 – Hunter AA/Level 4. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com PSJ Camden Spring Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail. com, www.psjshows.com GQHA Pro Am. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com Dogwood Cup 2 Goal Tournament. Whitney Field, Mead Avenue, Aiken. Hotline: 803.643.3611, Billy Raab: 561.719.3318, www. aikenpolo.org GDCTA Schooling Show. Poplar Place Farms, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.582.3742 x209, donna@poplarplacefarm.com, www.poplarplacefarm.com Gwinnett 4-H Spring Open Horse Show. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark. com Block House Races. Tryon Block House Races, 6985 S. NC Hwy. 9, Columbus, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com Walk for Animals. 10am-1pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, www.letlovelive.org

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14-15 FENCE HT. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828-859-9021, horseshow@fence.org, www.fence.org 14-15 Joe Fargis Clinic. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www.aikenhorsepark.org 14-15 Eventing Academy. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com 14-15 Brownwood HJ Show.. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark.com 14-15 Williamston Spring Dressage. Bob Martin Eastern Agricultural Center, 2900 NC Highway 125 S, Williamston, NC. www. carolinadressage.com 14-15 Kim Barteau Clinic. Samantha Charles Spitler’s Farm, 286 Haywire Place, Aiken. 803.257.7407, julie@julierobins.com 18-19 Lucinda Green Clinic. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com 18-22 Aiken Spring Classic Masters USEF HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www. psjshows.com 18-29 Jack Kneece Memorial 4 Goal Tournament. Whitney Field, Mead Avenue, Aiken. Hotline: 803.643.3611, Billy Raab: 561.719.3318, www.aikenpolo.org 19-22 FEI WEG Tryon International Combined Driving Test Event. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Drive, Mill Spring, NC. Peggy Dils: 803.295.6785, dilsaiken@gmail.com, www. americandrivingsociety.org 19-22 Tryon Spring Dressage 1 CDI3*/CPEDI3* Test Event & National show. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Drive, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 20-22 Palmetto Paint Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. Anne Louise Miller, 803.900.1253, millawayranch@windstream.net 21 USEF/USEA Sporting Days Farm Horse Trials III. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass, 610.613.2010, jhallglass@aol.com, www.sportingdaysfarm.com 21 CEC Southern Comfort HJ Show. Southern Comfort Farm, 53 Hickory Hill Road, Camden. 803.432.0745, www. camdenequinecircuit.com 21 GDCTA Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 21 NBHA Local Show. Sandrun Arena, Aiken, SC. Brenda Garrison: 803.507.0604, www.nbha.com 21 NBHA Local Show. Double B Arena, Easley, SC. Cory Brown: 864.414.1003, www.nbha.com 21 Horses and Harmony II. $80 pp. Aiken Symphony Guild. Stableview Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. Pat Kirk: 803.644.7433, aikensymphonyguild.org/horses-harmony 21-22 USEF/USDF Poplar Place Farm Dressage Show. Poplar Place Farms, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.582.3742 x209, donna@poplarplacefarm.com, www.poplarplacefarm.com 21-22 USEA/USEF Longleaf Pine HT. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark. com 21-22 H. J. Fox Spring Premier Classics I & II. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark. com 21-22 Atlanta Youth Dressage Challenge. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark. com 21-22 Karen O’Connor Clinic. Chime Bell Chase, Aiken. Shelley Page: 352.266.3970, ShelleyHPage@gmail.com, www.useventing.com 24 Nutrition Tips For The Show & Performance Horse. 6-8pm. The Willcox, 100 Colleton Avenue, Aiken. 25-29 Aiken Spring Classic Finale USEF HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www. psjshows.com 25-May 13 Members Cup 8 Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. New Bridge Polo Hotline: 803.644.7706, www.newbridgepolo.com 26-28 WEG Endurance Test Event CEI 2*. Tryon International Equestrian

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Center, 25 International Drive, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 26-29 Tryon Welcome 4 – Hunter AA/Level 4. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 26-29 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event. Kentucky Horse Park, Lexington, KY. Ticket Line: 859.254.8123, www. kentuckythreedayevent.com 27-28 3rd Annual American Hero Pro Rodeo. Columbia Coounty Fairgrounds, 562 Columbia Road, Grovetown, GA. www.ipra-rodeo. com 27-28 SCQHA Mini Circuit. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. Billy Prather, 803.669.1325, bpquarterhorse@bellsouth.net 27-28 3rd Annual Hero Pro Rodeo. Columbia County Fairgrounds, 562 Columbia Road, Grovetown, GA. www.ipra-rodeo.com 27-May 13 USPA Sportsmanship 6 Goal Tournament. Whitney Field, Mead Avenue, Aiken. Hotline: 803.643.3611, Billy Raab: 561.719.3318, www.aikenpolo.org 28 Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 28 FENCE Open Horse Show. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828-859-9021, horseshow@fence.org, www.fence.org 28-29 Ride Better Clinic with Lellie Ward. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail. com, www.paradisefarmaiken.com 28-29 Primetime Dressage Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark.com 28-29 GHF/Massey Ferguson Dressage at the Horse Park. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www. georgiahorsepark.com 28-29 Newton County Saddle Club Open Horse Show. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www. georgiahorsepark.com 28-29 National Youth Polo Tournament. Whitney Field, Mead Avenue, Aiken. Hotline: 803.643.3611, Billy Raab: 561.719.3318, www. aikenpolo.org 28-29 Horseshow Ventures HJ Show.. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark. com 29 Combined Training Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com 29 Wateree CHA Spring Championship Show. Georgia Sports Arena, Swainsboro, GA. Judy Boozer: 864.876.6272, www.nchacutting.com

MAY 1

1-6 2 2 2-13 2-20 3-6 4-6 4-6

The Aiken Horse

Jumping Branch Farm Real Estate Auction. 11am. Jumping Branch Farm, 179 Fox Pond Road, Aiken. www.jpking.com/properties/179fox-pond-road-aiken-sc-29801 Tryon Spring 1 – CSI 2*/Hunter AA/Level 6. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com HJ Schooling Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com Yappy Hour. 6-8pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, www.letlovelive.org Aiken Charity USEF Horse Show. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www.aikenhorsepark.org Pete Bostwick Memorial 12 Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. New Bridge Polo Hotline: 803.644.7706, www.newbridgepolo.com USEA/USEF Heart of the Carolinas HT. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www. carolinahorsepark.com BRHJA Mothers Celebration HJ Show. Harmon Field, Tryon, NC. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com Palmetto Paint Horse Show. SC Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Rd, Camden. 803.900.1253, millawayranch@windstream.net

April-May 2018


Woofstock Doggie Derby Day. 10am-2pm. Citizens Park, 1069 Banks Mill Road, Aiken. 803.514.5313, woofstock@fotasaiken.org, www.fotasaiken.org 5 Kitten Shower and Supply Drive. 5-8pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, www.letlovelive.org 5 Combined Test and Dressage Test of Choice. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass, 610.613.2010, jhallglass@aol.com, www.sportingdaysfarm.com 5 CEC Tally Ho Show. Tally Ho Equestrian Center, 3962 Lawson Grove Road, Timmonsville, SC. 843.383.0593, katstallyho@yahoo. com, www.camdenequinecircuit.com 5 Rolling Hills Saddle Club Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark. com 5 Saturday Night Lights Jumper Show. 5-10pm. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 5 Kentucky Derby. Churchill Downs, Louisville, KY. 502.636.4400, www.kentuckyderby.com 5-6 Area 18 CHA Championship Weekend. Hippodrome Arena, 5540 Jefferson Davis Hwy, North Augusta, SC. Judy Boozer: 864.876.6272, www.nchacutting.com 5-6 USEF/USEA Poplar Place Farm H.T. Poplar Place Farms, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.582.3742 x209, donna@ poplarplacefarm.com, www.poplarplacefarm.com 9 Schooling Dressage Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com 9-19 Aiken Saddlery 6 Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. New Bridge Polo Hotline: 803.644.7706, www.newbridgepolo.com 10-13 Carolina Classic – WEG Reining Test Event CRI 1*, 2*, 3*. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 10-13 Tryon Spring 2 – Hunter A/Level 4. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www. tiec.coth.com 11-12 Freedom Rodeo. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark.com 11-13 Dressage in the Sandhills. Pinehurst Harness Track, Pinehurst, NC. ww.carolinadressage.com 11-13 Dressage Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. Janet Hennessey, softwindsfarm@gmail.com 11-27 Spring Trophy Challenge 8 Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. New Bridge Polo Hotline: 803.644.7706, www.newbridgepolo.com 12 WHES Schooling Day. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark.com 12 Historic Stables Experience at the Aiken Training Track. $30. 9-11:15am. Rye Patch parking lot, 100 Berrie Road, Aiken. 803.643.2121 or 803.642.7631, halloffame@cityofaikensc.gov, www. aikenracinghalloffame.com 12 Saturday Night Lights Jumper Show. 5-10pm. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 12 NBHA Local Show. Double J Arena, Pendleton, SC. Barbara Moore: 864.918.0270, www.nbha.com 12 Dog Wash. 10am-1pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, www.letlovelive.org 12-13 PSJ Highfields Mother’s Day HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com 12-13 Greater Atlanta Dressage Southern I/II. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark. com 13 WHES May HT, CT and Dressage Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www. carolinahorsepark.com 13 FENCE Hunter Pace. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828-859-9021, horseshow@ fence.org, www.fence.org 16-Jun. 3 Tommy Hitchcock 12 Goal New Bridge, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. New Bridge Hotline: 803.644.7706, www.newbridgepolo.com 5

April-May 2018

17-20 Triangle Sandhills Spring Classic USEF ‘A’ HJ Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www. carolinahorsepark.com 17-20 Tryon Spring 3 – CSI 3*/Hunter AA & WCHR/Level 4. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 17-Jun.3 USPA Congressional Cup 4 Goal Tournament. Whitney Field, Mead Avenue, Aiken. Hotline: 803.643.3611, Billy Raab: 561.719.3318, www.aikenpolo.org 18-20 Grassy Pond Arena CHA Championships. Grassy Pond Arena, 1524 Boiling Springs Hwy, Gaffney, SC. Judy Boozer: 864.876.6272, www.nchacutting.com 18-20 GQHA Summer Kickoff. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com 18-20 Camden Spring Classic HJ Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. Janet Black, 828.606.0708, threesprings@windstream.net 19 Just for Fun Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com 19 Atlanta Youth Dressage Challenge. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark. com 19 CEC Foothills HJ Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. www.camdenequinecircuit.com 19 Saturday Night Lights Jumper Show. 5-10pm. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 19-20 Eventing Academy. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com 19-20 USEF/USDF Poplar Place Farm Dressage Show. Poplar Place Farms, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.582.3742 x209, donna@poplarplacefarm.com, www.poplarplacefarm.com 19-20 Bolshoi Benefit HJ Show.. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark.com 19-20 USEF/USEA Chatt Hills HT. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 19-20 Carolina Carriage Club DT & CT. Windridge Farms, 882 Goodes Creek Church Road, Mooresboro, NC. Ariel Holt: 828.748.5223, asdragongirl@yahoo.com, www.WindridgeFarmsNC.com 20 Combined Training Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com 23-Jun. 2 USPA Congressional Cup 6 Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. New Bridge Polo Hotline: 803.644.7706, www.newbridgepolo.com 24-27 Tryon Spring 4 – CSI 3*/Hunter AA/Level 5. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 25-27 SCQHA Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. Billy Prather, 803.669.1325, bpquarterhorse@ bellsouth.net 25-27 Wateree CHA Spring Championship Show. Georgia Sports Arena, Swainsboro, GA. Judy Boozer: 864.876.6272, www.nchacutting.com 26 USEF/USEA Paradise Farms HT. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail. com, www.paradisefarmaiken.com 26 GDCTA Schooling Show. Poplar Place Farms, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.582.3742 x209, donna@poplarplacefarm.com, www.poplarplacefarm.com 26 Seasons at the Grove CT Show Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark.com 26 Rolling Hills Saddle Club Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark. com 26 Saturday Night Lights Jumper Show. 5-10pm. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 26-27 May Day Dressage. Highfields Event Center, Aiken. Kay Whitlock, 910.692.8467, www.carolinadressage.com 26-27 Horse Show Ventures - The Southeastern Hunter/Jumper Series. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA.

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26-27 Chatt Hills Dressage Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 27 FEH/YEH Show. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com, www. paradisefarmaiken.com 29-Jun. 3 Tryon Spring 5 – CSI 3*/Hunter AA/Level 6. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth.com 30 Twilight Jumpers. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 30-Jun.10 Polo Museum Cup 2 Goal Tournament. Whitney Field, Mead Avenue, Aiken. Hotline: 803.643.3611, Billy Raab: 561.719.3318, www.aikenpolo.org

JUNE 1-2 1-3 2 2 2-3 2-3 3 3 5-10

6 6 8-10 9 9 9 9 9 9 9-10 9-10 9-10

84

Blythewood Community Center Rodeo. Blythewood Community Center Park exit 27 off I-77, Blythewood, SC. www.ipra-rodeo.com Foothills HJ Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. Janet Black, 828.606.0708, threesprings@ windstream.net Atlanta Youth Dressage Challenge. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark. com GQHA Novice Show Series. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com Capital Dressage Classic. Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. Horse Complex, 4601 Trinity Road, Raleigh, NC. www.carolinadressage.com USEF/USEA Poplar Place Farm H.T. Poplar Place Farms, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.582.3742 x209, donna@ poplarplacefarm.com, www.poplarplacefarm.com Connemara Celebration. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com Combined Training Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com Tryon Spring 6 - 90th TR&HC Charity Horse Show - CSI 4*/ Hunter AA/Level 6. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www.tiec.coth. com HJ Schooling Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com Yappy Hour. 6-8pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, www.letlovelive.org Dressage Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. Janet Hennessey, softwindsfarm@gmail.com Dog Wash. 10am-1pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 803.648.6863, www.letlovelive.org GDCTA Schooling Show. Poplar Place Farms, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.582.3742 x209, donna@poplarplacefarm.com, www.poplarplacefarm.com CEC Pine Tree HJ Show. Pine Tree Show Stables, 1265 Sanders Creek Road, Cassatt, SC. 803.424.1952 or 803.669.0697 Rolling Hills Saddle Club Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark. com Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com NBHA Local Show. Latigo Farms, Landrum, SC. Robin: 864.505.2846, www.nbha.com Ride Better Clinic. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com, www. paradisefarmaiken.com PSJ Mullet Hall Summer Classic. Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, Johns Island, SC. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www. psjshows.com GHF/Massey Ferguson Dressage GA Int. HP 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com

Save the Horses Charity Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark.com 13 USEF/USDF “Summer Solstice” Dressage Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com 13 Twilight Jumpers. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 13-17 Atlanta Summer Classic I. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com 14 Fix-A-Test with Natalie Lamping. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com 14-16 NSBA Boot Camp. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. www.scequinepark.com 15-16 South Carolina Special Olympics State Equestrian Games. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@ aikenhorsepark.org, www.aikenhorsepark.org 15-16 Carl Black Classic IPRA Rodeo. Jim Miller Park, Marietta, GA. www.ipra-rodeo.com 15-17 Tryon Summer Dressage 1 National. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. 828.863.1000, www. tiec.coth.com 16 WHES Schooling Day. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark.com 16-17 Summertime Blues Dressage Show. Pinehurst Harness Track, Pinehurst, NC. www.carolinadressage.com 16-17 Good Old Summertime Horse Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark. com 17 USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com 17 WHES June HT, CT and Dressage Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www. carolinahorsepark.com 17 Open Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. www.scequinepark.com 20-24 Atlanta Summer Classic II. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark.com 21-24 SCQHA Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden. Billy Prather, 803.669.1325, bpquarterhorse@ bellsouth.net 23-24 June HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com 23-24 USEA/USEF “Summer” Horse Trials. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, www.stableviewfarm.com 23-24 Elite Showjumping HJ Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11915 Wills Road. Alpharetta, GA. 678.297.6120, www.willspark.com 23-24 Dressage Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 27 Twilight Jumpers. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 28-Jul.1 Stars and Stripes Circuit Show. GA Int. Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway Conyers, GA. www.georgiahorsepark. com 29 Fence Equestrian Center Pro Rodeo. Fence Equestrian Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. www.ipra-rodeo.com 29-Jul. 1 Grassy Pond Arena CHA Championships. Grassy Pond Arena, 1524 Boiling Springs Hwy, Gaffney, SC. Judy Boozer: 864.876.6272, www.nchacutting.com 30 Tall Boots HJ Schooling Day & Derby Cross. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www. carolinahorsepark.com 30-Jul.1 USEF/USEA Chatt Hills HT. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Fairburn, GA. Hugh Lochore, 770. 892.2117, chatthillseventing.com 10

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April-May 2018


Business Cards

April-May 2018

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85


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Index of Advertisers Advertiser

Page Section

Advertiser

Page

Section

Advertiser

Page

Section

Adams Horse and Pet Supplies

55

2

Estrella Equine

55

2

Progressive Show Jumping, Inc

54

2

Adopt a Pet

70

3

Fencing Solutions

49

2

Red Horse Stable

43

2

Aiken County Farm Supply

63

2

Foy Insurance

13

1

ReMax -S.Dale

16

1

Aiken Fine Homes and Land

19

1

Gary Knoll Photography

80

3

SCQHA

35

1

Aiken Horsemanship Academy

12

1

Great Oak ATRC

36

1

Scribble Horse

27

1

Aiken Luxury Rentals

23

1

Happily Ever After Dressage

49

2

Seminole Feeds

51

2

Aiken Pest Control

49

2

Hitchcock Woods Foundation

38

1

Shadow Trailer World Inc.

92

3

Aiken Pet Fitness

77

3

Horses and Harmony

13

1

South Carolina Equine Park

77

3

Aiken Polo Club

34

1

Houndslake Realty

7

1

Southern Equine Service

29

1

Aiken Saddlery, Inc.

22

1

Johnson’s Farm & Garden

43

2

Aiken Tack Exchange

59

2

JP King Auctions

6

1

Southern States Cooperative, Inc.

17

1

Akindale Thoroughbred Rescue

46

2

Julia Kubicek

59

2

SPCA

66

3

Auto Tech

71

3

Keller Williams- Gutierrez

27

1

Sporting Days Farm

55

2

Banks Mill Feeds

24

1

Kentucky Derby Party

12

1

Stable View Farm, LLC

50

2

Barnware

36

1

Kim Barteau Clinic

7

1

Subscribe!

70

3

Be Fly Free

50

2

Larlee Construction

5

1

Sweet PDZ (PDZ Co. LLC)

35

1

Buckingham Farm

23

1

Lightning Protection Systems

33

1

Tennyson Horsemanship

43

2

Carolina Real Estate Company

14

1

Marrinson Stables

27

1

The Tack Room

33

1

Carolina Real Estate Company

15

1

Meybohm (Sullivan/Turner)

18

1

The Willcox

23

1

Clint Bertalan Farms LLC

91

3

Meybohm RE Haslup

3

1

Three Runs Plantation

40

1

Coldwell Banker

36

1

Meybohm RE Vaillancourt

2

1

Tod’s Hill/ReMax

64

2

Cooper Home and Stable

25

1

Meybohm Realtors Stinson

4

1

Deceased Pet Care, inc.

77

3

Morton Buildings

33

1

UGA Veterinary Teaching Hospital

27

1

Designer Builders

39

1

Northington

26

1

Wagons to Wagener

71

3

DFG Stables

51

2

Oak Manor Saddlery

59

2

Warneke Cleaners

49

2

Epona

35

1

Optimum Equine LLC

35

1

Windsor Court

33

1

Equine Divine

19

1

Palmetto Feed Exchange

36

1

7

1

Equine Rescue of Aiken

37

1

Paradise Farm

59

2

Wolf Construction

42

2

Estancia La Victoria

67

3

Patty Merli Saddles

50

2

Woofstock

62

2

90

The Aiken Horse

Windswept Farm

April-May 2018


April-May 2018

The Aiken Horse

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