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AICI GLOBAL B O DY

I M A G E

I S S U E

MEDIA’S CHANGING INFLUENCE ON BODY IMAGE

FASHION INDUSTRY EMBRACING CURVES?!

THE MAN IN THE MIRROR!

BRAGAIS’ TRIBAL FUSION

THE FAIR SKIN CRAZE MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: CARRIE CROSS

JULY 2014


WHERE PASSIONS MEET BUSINESS

Start Your Exciting New Career with us Five two day, individual, AICI CEU’d & Accredited Modules www.theinternationalimageacademy.net

Jane Seaman, AICI CIP 281 733-7929

Joanne Rae, AICI CIP 804 502-5141


Education. Experience. Excellence.

2014

EDITOR’S NOTE IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE, THE SUMMER HEAT IS ON. WITH THAT COMES BATHING SUITS,

AICI BOARD OF DIRECTORS

SHORTS AND SLEEVELESS TOPS… FOR MANY, IT

President – Jane Seaman, AICI CIP President Elect– Cynthia Bronson, AICI CIP Past President – Kimberly Law, AICI CIP Secretary – Lucy Liang, AICI CIP Treasurer – Joanne Rae, AICI CIP VP Certification – Delby Bragais, AICI CIP VP Chapter Relations – Riet M. de Vlieger, AICI CIP VP Education – Keiko Nagao, AICI FLC VP Communications – Coca Sevilla, AICI FLC VP Conference Cecilia Stoeckicht, AICI CIP VP Fund Development – Imogen Lamport, AICI CIP VP International Relations – Valerie Antoinette Berset-Price, AICI FLC VP Marketing – Hildeberto Martínez, AICI FLC VP Membership – Carolina Bejar, AICI CIP Executive Director – Andrew Shelp

ALSO BRINGS HEIGHTENED CONCERN ABOUT BODY

AICI HEADQUARTERS 1000 Westgate Drive, Ste. 252 St. Paul, MN 55114-1067 Phone: 651-290-7468 Fax: 651-290-2266 www.AICI.org Comments about the magazine? editor@aici.org

IMAGE. MOST PEOPLE WOULD RATHER GO TO THE DENTIST THAN SHOP FOR A SWIMSUIT. We image consultants hear negative self-image talk quite a bit, and are challenged with showing people how beautiful they are inside and out. It’s truly an uphill battle, as mass media glorifies narrow definitions of beauty with little tolerance for variation. This issue of AICI Global Magazine is dedicated to understanding negative body image, the impact media has on these perceptions, and what the industry is doing to encourage or discourage potentially destructive behaviors related to modern beauty ideals. May this information arm you with the ability to better serve clients who need a self-image makeover. Please be sure to read our Member Spotlight featuring Carrie Blustin Cross, who changed how AICI thinks about and designs education events. Wait until you hear about her “Seriously Styled Race Kits” — another example of her creative solution-based thinking. I’m thrilled to announce that Susan Hesselgrave will become the magazine’s new editor-in-chief, effective July 1, 2014. Susan has proven experience in managing teams, organizing marketing and PR campaigns, and editing/writing for newspapers and corporate/industry newsletters.We’re fortunate to have her leading the magazine through its second year. My time as editor-in-chief has been an amazing learning opportunity that’s brought me closer to all of you, and opened doors professionally and personally. Thanks to Magoe Johnson,AICI CIP, for believing in me; to Coca Sevilla,VP Member Communications, for her support and leadership; and to the magazine’s staff and contributors who bring these pages to life with their insights and inspirations. Proud To Be AICI! Thea Wood, AICI, FLC Editor-in-Chief

The Association of Image Consultants International | 3


PUBLICATION CREDITS

Issue 7 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Thea Wood, AICI FLC MANAGING EDITOR Grant Harris VP COMMUNICATIONS Coca Sevilla, AICI FLC VP FUND DEVELOPMENT (ADVERTISING) Imogen Lamport, AIC CIP FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS Yasmin Anderson-Smith, AICI CIP Debra Lindquist, MA, AICI, CIP Chris Loney Cindy Ann Peterson, AICI FLC Jane Seaman, AICI CIP Carolina D.Tan PROOFREADERS Bernie Burson, AICI FLC Susan Hesselgrave AICI GLOBAL is produced quarterly by Association of Image Consultants International, a nonprofit dedicated to advancing the level of professionalism and enhancing the recognition of image consultants. AICI GLOBAL promotes AICI’s ideas, activities, interests and goals to its members. Responsibility is not assumed for the opinions of writers or other articles. AICI GLOBAL does not endorse or guarantee the products and services it advertises. 2014© Association of Image Consultants International. All rights reserved. No part of this online publication may be duplicated or reproduced without permission from the publisher. While every effort is made to ensure accuracy of information included in the magazine at the time of publication, the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising from errors or omissions.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AICI_Global

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/AICI/123700737653232

4 | July 2014 magazine


Inside This Issue

07

PG

APPEARANCE & STYLE Delby Bragais’Tribal Fusion Is A Hit.......................................... 7 Bet I Can Guess Your Age.......................................................... 8 Season of Enchantment: Fall 2014 Color Report.................... 11 Fashion Industry Embraces Curves........................................ 12

14

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BUSINESS Amazon Books: Resources About Body Image....................... 14

16

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FEATURE Media’s Changing Influence on Body Image.......................... 16 Perfection Obsession Body Dysmorphic Disorder Explained................................... 18 Looking At The Man In The Mirror ......................................... 20 The Fair Skin Craze - Asian Women’s Beauty Ideal................. 23 Image Impact “Teens + Media + Body Image = Low Self Esteem”................ 24

26

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COMMUNICATIONS & ETIQUETTE 10 Right & Wrong Things To Say To A Client.......................... 26 AICI’s Image For A Cause Launches a “New Look” ................ 28

29

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BETWEEN US Member Spotlight: Carrie Blustin Cross................................. 29 President’s Letter..................................................................... 32 Certification Spotlight............................................................. 33 Upcoming Events.................................................................... 34

The Association of Image Consultants International | 5


Executive Presence System

Licensee Program EXECUTIVE PRESENCE

The Gold Standard for Corporate Training

Image Consultants

“Join my proven Executive Presence System Licensee Program and enter the lucrative world of corporate training.” – Diane Craig If you’ve always dreamed of acquiring the skills and strategies to become a high-flyer in the profitable corporate world then Diane Craig’s exclusive Executive Presence System Licensee Program is for you. For many years Diane, acclaimed for her Executive Presence Training System, has been successfully coaching key employees and leaders – from new recruits to C-suite executives. Her remarkable system combines leadership, communication and engagement expertise in a powerful mix that leads to continuous upward mobility. The core of Diane’s system is her conviction: “Executive Presence is neither exclusive nor elusive.TM It can be learned.”

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Click here for more details Email: dcraig@corporateclassinc.com Call Diane direct: 1-416-967-1221 Ext: 101

and guide you on a one-to-one basis. “FromI coach start to finish, I walk you through proven strategies and formulas to ensure you master the confidence and skills to become an authoritative, successful Executive Presence Licensee.

Diane Craig 6 | July 2014 magazine

President & Founder


STYLE

DELBY BRAGAIS’

TRIBAL FUSION IS A HIT Congratulations to AICI member Delby Bragais, AICI CIP, who showed her “Tribal Fusion” collection at Philippine Fashion Week.

Watch this video for a look at her designs and an interview with Delby herself from Philippine Fashion Week TV.

The Association of Image Consultants International | 7


STYLE

BET I CAN GUESS YOUR AGE

(5 MAKEUP TRICKS THAT BET THEY CAN’T) By Debra Lindquist, MA, AICI, CIP 8 | July 2014 magazine

IMAGE CONSULTANTS OFTEN HEAR CLIENTS EXPRESSING A NEED TO “LOOK YOUNGER” IN OUR YOUTHORIENTED CULTURE. IN TODAY’S VISUAL SOCIETY, LOOKING ATTRACTIVE AND YOUTHFUL CAN LAND YOU THAT WONDERFUL JOB OR ATTRACT EXCITING NEW LOVE THROUGH ONLINE DATING SERVICES.


MANY TIMES, PEOPLE TURN TO COSMETIC SURGERY AS A QUICK (YET RISKY) FIX THAT THEY THINK WILL PRODUCE WONDERS AND CURE PROBLEMS LIKE LONELINESS, LOW SELF-ESTEEM OR LOST JOB OPPORTUNITIES. “I’VE HAD SO MUCH PLASTIC SURGERY, WHEN I DIE THEY WILL DONATE MY BODY TO TUPPERWARE.”— JOAN RIVERS Comedienne Joan Rivers has done everything possible to evade an aging appearance through cosmetic procedures. Her preoccupation with image is critical to her comedic role of an aging diva obsessed with her appearance. Rivers is over 80 years old and she openly defends and pokes fun at her love affair with cosmetic surgery to welcoming audiences. Actress Kim Novak, age 81, was a presenter at the 2014 Academy Awards and experienced how cruel an audience can be when it comes to aging and cosmetic procedures.The online criticisms ran rampant. Even real estate mogul Donald Trump tweeted,“Kim should sue her plastic surgeon!” The onslaught of public “bullying” threw Novak into a tailspin.“For days, I didn’t leave the house, and it got to me like it gets kids and teenagers who are attacked,” she said as reported by People Magazine. “I’m not going to deny that I had fat injections in my face. They seemed far less invasive than a face lift,” Novak wrote in an open letter on the subject. “In my opinion, a person has a right to look as good as they can, and I feel better when I look better.” If cosmetic procedures seem too invasive for your tastes, there are makeup tricks that are low-risk alternatives to cosmetic procedures. Invest in the services of a talented makeup artist. Voice your concerns and goals. Learn their techniques so you can apply them daily. Here are five makeup tricks for common issues we all face (excuse the pun) as we age.

The Association of Image Consultants International | 9


STYLE

BROWS. Avoid eyebrow tattoos. If your face drops, your brows drop.Avoid sharp eyebrow pencil lines simulating eyebrow hair. Choose colors (pencil and powder or combination of both) that look natural and blend easily.

IF COSMETIC PROCEDURES SEEM TOO INVASIVE FOR YOUR TASTES, THERE ARE MAKEUP TRICKS THAT ARE LOWRISK ALTERNATIVES TO COSMETIC PROCEDURES.

SAGGING SKIN AND JOWLS. Apply a slightly darker shade of foundation over your regular foundation in the jowl area and set with a translucent powder. Then highlight the cheekbones and brighten the eyes to bring the focus upward. WIDE NOSE. Subtle application of flesh-toned or slightly darker eye shadow can serve as a contour along the sides of your nose, elongating and slimming through use of shadow.

THIN LIPS. Use lipsticks that subtly contrast the skin rather than dark or intense lipsticks. Permanent makeup can fade and discolor over time; opt instead for longlasting stains with an all-over lip liner as a base. HAIR. While it’s not makeup, hair color and shape can affect the face like makeup. Beware of the “inky black hair” look. Unbelievable hair color that is too dark is aging. Clients may use highlights and lowlights to add texture and authenticity to hair while blending with lines in the face for a soft, healthy combination. Gray or silver hair looks vibrant with a modern cut as worn by actress Jamie Lee Curtis.

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STYLE

SEASON OF

enchantment FALL 2014 COLOR REPORT by Thea Wood, AICI FLC

EACH SEASON, WE LOOK FORWARD TO THE PANTONE® FASHION COLOR REPORT COMPILED BY PANTONE COLOR INSTITUTE’S® EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LEATRICE EISEMAN. HER TEAM SURVEYS DESIGNERS FROM NEW YORK FASHION WEEK AND VARIOUS FASHION INDUSTRY INFLUENCERS, AND SHARES THE SEASON’S IMPORTANT COLOR TRENDS. Fall 2014 features atypical colors that are more about enchantment and hints of exotic travel than traditional gemstone hues with robust earth tones. “Radiant Orchid” sets the tone as the color of the year—playful and vibrant. Perhaps a social statement of how men and women’s tastes and roles are converging, the color palette is fairly unisex. The only difference in the men’s color report is a more masculine “Sea Fog” replacing the women’s “Mauve Mist.” All the other colors are the same. Top designers including Rebecca Minkoff, Nanette Lepore, Tadashi Shoji, Bibhu Mohapatra and Kenneth Cole report on their favorite color combinations and inspirations, alongside eye-catching illustrations in the Fall report. “Although many of our signature silhouettes and styles have been around for years, our customers get so excited to shop them in new, fresh colors, which is a testament to how essential color is to our jewelry,” states jewelry designer Kendra Scott in the report. Likewise, image consultants can use these colors to invigorate client wardrobes and sense of style. Thea Wood specializes in helping women create a Signature Style through custom color and body analysis and nonverbal communication strategies. She is also a public speaker and coauthor of the book, Socially Smart & Savvy. The Association of Image Consultants International | 11


STYLE

Is the Fashion Industry

EMBRACING ITS CURVES? by Yasmin Anderson-Smith, AICI CIP

When it comes to the full-figured woman, fashion and style have come a long way. Many styles and fashion lines are now available in the beautiful designs and colors all women can be proud of. This was not so 20 years ago when there were few choices for the plus-size woman. Now a growing trend, retailers and brands like Nordstrom, Michael Kors, Calvin Klein, Bloomingdales and Lane Bryant provide full-figured women with clothing and style options for business, evening, casual, lingerie, glam and more.While this trend is steadily unfolding in the USA, particularly in the last five years, the change is moving much more slowly in other parts of the world. Marie Denee, creator and owner of The Curvy Fashionista blog/website, has been a “curvy” girl since her early youth. Since age 16, Marie navigated her way to the heights of the retail clothing industry and now holds an MBA. A leading voice for women with a Rubenesque body type, Marie boasts over 250,000 followers on social media where she empowers a global community of women with her fashion and style expertise. Marie noticed from an early age that women equated their feeling of self-worth with the clothes they wore.When their clothing fit well and looked flattering, women felt great about themselves. Particularly for plus-size women, when this experience was denied because of limited choice, they felt unworthy. It was not until the late 1990s that retailers began seriously catering to plus-size women. Designers replaced drab, boxy styles with more fashionforward clothing. Marie believes social media is the biggest source of change on the industry. Terri Murray is an international model, trainer, and image consultant who educates groups about dressing the voluptuous woman and has appeared on The Tyra Banks Show.

“Tap your resources, support your communities and exercise your buying power.” 12 | July 2014 magazine


“Plus-sized women’s clothing generated a whopping $16.2 billion in sales for the year ended November 2013, up 7.2% from the year-ago period, according to market research firm the NPD Group.” - forbes.com article by Barbara Thau.

Terri credited Marie as a major influencer in the explosion of knowledge about plussize fashion and helping women feel great about their bodies.With a global platform for women to socially share their voices, retailers and brands like Eloquii, Simply Be and Ashley Stewart responded to customers. This attracted media attention and raised awareness about this market niche. The effect is cyclical. New York Fashion Week finally got with the program and featured plus-size designer Eden Miller’s line “Cabiria” in 2013. Shopping for clothes is all about the experience, and access, variety, quality and price make the difference. Marie and Terri point out that women in this market segment are smart, have buying power, desire, and (based on research by companies like Mod Cloth) often spend more money per shopping transaction than other women. Marie’s message to plus-size women: “Tap your resources, support your communities and exercise your buying power.”

While the women’s plus-size fashion industry has come a long way, there is still a long way to go. A major challenge is changing public perception and acceptance which is largely shaped by the lack of body diversity in the fashion and beauty industries. Groups like ALDA, a group of professional models representing overall concepts of beauty, are leading the charge to force designers to consider curvy girls (size 10 or larger) as models as well as relying on samples from designers that are typically size 0 or size 2. Their members and other models are landing editorial features and front covers in high-profile fashion and beauty magazines like Elle and Harper’s Bazaar. Catherine Schuller, AICI CIP, a former plus-size model, noted in Serena Solomon’s May 2014 article on body diversity in fashion that with more representation from plus-size models, designers will be pressured to use them. There is a growing trend to remove the “plussize” labels from models and retailers who make no distinction between plus-size and straight size in their stores.

The Association of Image Consultants International | 13


BUSINESS

FROM AMAZON

SIX BOOKS ABOUT

BODY IMAGE

Here are six books that shed light on the issues many men and women face related to negative body image, how it can affect anyone and how to address it. Click on the links below to purchase any of these books through AICI’s affiliate program with amazon.com. By doing so, you’ll contribute to AICI’s non-profit programs.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT.

SHATTERED IMAGE: MY TRIUMPH OVER BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER by Brian Cuban HHHHH

BODY IMAGE, SECOND EDITION: A HANDBOOK OF SCIENCE, PRACTICE, AND PREVENTION

Brian Cuban is a successful lawyer, activist and TV host, living with an enemy that haunted him for over 30 years – his own reflection in the mirror. Through a series of very personal, witty and poignant anecdotes, the younger brother of Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban opens up about his personal battle with a mental disorder known as Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD), in which the sufferer is preoccupied with a distorted sense of self-image and is often afflicted with eating disorders, depression and addiction.

HHHHH

BODY DRAMA: REAL GIRLS, REAL BODIES, REAL ISSUES, REAL ANSWERS by Nancy Amanda Redd HHH “You’d think a Miss America swimsuit winner would feel completely confident about her body, right? Not always! So I decided to write the book I wish I’d had as a teen and in college—an honest, funny, practical, medically accurate, totally reassuring guide to how women’s bodies actually look, smell, feel, behave, and change.”

by Thomas F. Cash, PhD, Linda SMolak, PhD.

The standard reference for practitioners, researchers,and students, this acclaimed work brings together internationally recognized experts from diverse mental health, medical, and allied health care disciplines. Contributors review established and emerging theories and findings; probe questions of culture, gender, health, and disorder; and present evidence-based assessment, treatment, and prevention approaches for the full range of body image concerns.

LET’S JUST SAY IT WASN’T PRETTY by Diane Keaton HHH In her one-of-a-kind voice, Keaton offers up a message of empowerment for anyone who’s ever dreamed of kicking back against the “should’s” and “supposed to’s” that undermine our pursuit of beauty in all its forms. From a mortifying encounter with a makeup artist who tells her she needs to get her eyes fixed to an awkward excursion to Victoria’s Secret with her teenage daughter, Keaton shares funny and not-so-funny moments from her life in and out of the public eye.

THE ADONIS COMPLEX: HOW TO IDENTIFY, TREAT AND PREVENT BODY OBSESSION IN MEN AND BOYS THE BODY MYTH: ADULT WOMEN AND by Harrison G. Pope, Katharine A. Phillips, THE PRESSURE TO BE PERFECT Roberto Olivardia HHH by Margo Maine, Joe Kelly HHHHH Trying everything from compulsive weightlifting to

steroids, more and more boys and men are taking the quest for physical perfection beyond the bounds of normal behavior. The Adonis Complex, the groundbreaking book that first gave a name to this phenomenon and sparked nationwide interest in the subject, identifies for the first time the symptoms and warning signs of this dangerous problem.

14 | July 2014 magazine

Clinical psychologist Margo Maine has been successfully helping adult women overcome eating disorders and body image problems for over 20 years. In The Body Myth, she explains the toll these problems can take on women’s lives, and provides healing insights and proven techniques for reclaiming readers’alives from the debilitating belief that a woman’s self-worth and her worth to others are derived from how she looks, how much she weighs, and what she eat—the Body Myth. Using poignant real-life stories, Dr. Maine explores the complex emotional, social, and cultural forces that perpetuate the Body Myth.


FEATURE

MEDIA’S CHANGING INFLUENCE ON

BODY IMAGE THE PROVERBIAL QUESTION “WHICH CAME FIRST, THE CHICKEN OR THE EGG?” SEEMS TO RELATE BEST TO THE TOPIC OF BODY IMAGE. IS TODAY’S BODY IMAGE A REFLECTION OF WHAT IS SEEN IN THE MEDIA, OR IS

THE NATURAL PRESSURE WE PUT ON OURSELVES TO BE “PERFECT” BEING RELAYED BY THE MEDIA? by Chris Loney and Thea Wood, AICI FLC

16 | July 2014 magazine


“GIRLS SEE ENOUGH OF THE BODY THAT WE’LL NEVER BE ABLE TO OBTAIN, THESE UNREALISTIC EXPECTATIONS... IT’S BETTER TO LOOK STRONG AND HEALTHY.”

- Jennifer Lawrence

Let’s examine how the modeling industry has evolved through the years. In the mid-1800s, various sizes were used to demonstrate how the looks could appeal to a variety of women’s body types. Fast-forwarding to the the mid-1900s, models were still very voluptuous and curves were coveted. Especially since this was the era when pinup modeling was introduced to the industry. Marilyn Monroe comes to mind as the era’s beauty icon. Many people believe she was a size 10, 12 or even a 16. All of these are false. She was extremely curvy with her size 6 hourglass figure with a 22-inch waistline. As mass media developed and expanded, its impact on beauty definitions grew and morphed. The biggest transition for modeling ideals happened in the 1960s when Twiggy Lawson became an international sensation at age 16 with her arresting eyes and lean figure. The concept became the standard for editorial models. Editorial models like Kate Moss start modeling fashion and beauty products as young as 13 years old, meet strict body measurement requirements (size 00 to 0), and have an edge or unique presence that appeals to editors, fashion designers, retail buyers and stylists. Commercial models like Heidi Klum tend to look like “the girl next door” with less restrictive body and age requirements and appeal to a wide audience for advertising products and services you might use every day. These models may be curvy and/or athletic and work for clients like Victoria’s Secret and Sports Illustrated. By today’s standard,Tyra Banks (a size 6) is considered a plus-size model. As fashion designers and editors trended toward hiring thinner and thinner models, the rise of eating disorders and drug abuse became a controversial black eye for the industry as described by Kirstie Clements, former editor of Australian Vogue. Over the last decade, some major fashion brands like Vogue banned using models under age 16 and/or appearing to have an eating disorder. Seventeen Magazine pledged not to alter body or face shapes in response to pressure from readers and their parents. Israel passed a law in 2012 placing Body Mass Index minimums on models and requiring disclosure on photos that are digitally manipulated.

The issue of photoshopping, social media and vanity sizing adds pressure and may create delusions of what is a “healthy” body image. Young or naive consumers are at high risk for developing unrealistic goals and harmful behaviors. Some celebrities like Brad Pitt and Jessica Simpson refuse to allow digital manipulation of their photos. NBC’s Today Show anchors appeared on air without makeup in a “Love Your Selfie” series. Some celebrities post untouched photos on social media like Instagram and Twitter as a reality check. Every day we all see a “selfie,” whether it is our own, a celebrity’s or a friend’s.What is a selfie or celfie? A picture taken of yourself using your cell phone.You can use images to showcase an achievement–a new outfit, weight loss or going on vacation. Unfortunately, the pressure to be “camera-ready” at all times can be psychologically damaging, according to Psychology Today. Vanity sizing adds a confusing twist to the madness as retailers assign smaller sizes to ready-to-wear clothing. The motivation behind this strategy is to sell more garments to women who relate a smaller size label to higher self-esteem or beauty. Sizes and corresponding measurements are not government mandated in many countries, so they are moving targets. In the U.S., a bust size of 32 inches was considered a size 14 in 1937, a size 8 in 1967 and a size 0 in 2011. How women and men are portrayed in the media will continue to influence the public’s sense of beauty as more media outlets for sharing images emerge. Perhaps the fashion industry will decide to evolve its beauty ideals, or government will take a more active role in industry standards, or people will simply start to become immune to the tactics, even distributing their own realistic images as an anti-establishment lens cap. It remains to be seen. Meanwhile, we may want to live by Marilyn Monroe’s philosophy: “Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are.”

The Association of Image Consultants International | 17


FEATURE

PERFECTION OBSESSION

BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER EXPLAINED by Thea Wood, AICI FLC

18 | July 2014 magazine


THE NUMBERS FROM THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS TELL THE STORY: 15.1 million cosmetic and reconstructive procedures in 2013 (up from 11 million in 2007 and 7.4 million in 2000) 6.3 million botulinum toxin Type A injections (2013) 300,000 teens (18 and younger) had major and minor plastic surgical procedures in 2012 91% of cosmetic procedures are for women 9% of cosmetic procedures are for men Research shows that women internalize and accept negative feedback regarding their appearance more so than their male counterparts (wiley.com).Women ages 30 and over continue to lead plastic surgery/procedure industry growth, while men’s procedures stagnated, and the 13 to 29 year-old demographic slightly waned in 2013. While many people have a negative body image to one degree or another, at what point is it considered harmful? When working with clients who seem to obsess about a perceived body flaw and feel it’s so vile it cannot be ignored, this person may be suffering from a mental illness called body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Look for the symptoms as outlined by the Mayo Clinic. BDD patients underutilize parts of the brain used in seeing the face’s overall shape and size. “If you just see the pieces of your face, and not seeing how they fit into the whole, then it’s going to look distorted,” said Dr. Jamie Feusner, psychiatrist at the University of California, Los Angeles, in a CNN.com report explaining research studies.

Typically, addressing the perceived flaw through cosmetic procedures doesn’t lead to satisfaction, or the sufferer may simply focus on another body part. The distorted self-image can be crippling and lead to depression, even suicidal thoughts or behaviors, in both men and women. Celebrities are just as susceptible to BDD. Dr. Feusner claims he and colleagues have treated celebrities at UCLA, but cannot disclose which ones.“Everyone else would consider them attractive–they don’t consider themselves attractive,” he said. Causes may be genetic or neurochemical. However, environmental factors such as cultural norms, bad experiences and negative feedback can also be to blame. Most people with BDD don’t believe they have a mental health problem, or are too ashamed to talk about it. Many think the only way to solve their concerns is through a plastic surgeon, dentist or dermatologist. In fact, the way to overcome these behaviors is through professional help from a psychologist/psychiatrist who is familiar with BDD or similar disorders, such as eating disorders or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

HOW DO YOU HELP A CLIENT, FRIEND OR FAMILY MEMBER WHO SUFFERS FROM BDD? THE COUNSELORS AT BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY HAVE PUBLISHED A SIX-STEP METHOD TO GET THE CONVERSATION STARTED. The Association of Image Consultants International | 19


FEATURE

Since biblical times, man has been overly concerned with his physical image. After all, being made “in God’s image” is a lot to live up to. Since Adam and Eve ruined the party for the rest of us and become aware of their nakedness, man has been on a mission to enhance, improve, cut, trim and even suck his body into what he thinks it ought to look like. Throughout history, man has suffered from a state of “image consciousness”–a psychological predisposition to be continuously dissatisfied with his natural body in its god-given form. Unfortunately, this lack of self-confidence has lead to an overabundance of men with physical eating disorders, emotional inhibitions and psychological dysfunction. A study conducted by The Guardian of 394 British men revealed these statistics: • 80.7% of men talked about their own or others’ weight, lack of hair, or slim frame • 30% of men have heard someone refer to their “beer belly” • 19% have been described as “chubby,”19% have overheard talk about their “man boobs (moobs)

LOOKING AT THE MAN IN THE MIRROR by Grant Harris

20 | July 2014 magazine

• 23% said concerns about their appearance had deterred them from going to the gym • 63% thought their arms or chests were not muscular enough • 29% thought about their appearance at least five times a day • 18% were on a high-protein diet to increase muscle mass • 16% were on a calorie-controlled diet to slim down It is abundantly clear that men in general, (not just women), have significant image issues that manifest themselves on a daily basis. A follow-up study showed that more than four in five men (80.7%) talk in ways that promote anxiety about their body image, referring to perceived flaws


and imperfections (as compared with 75% of women). Similarly, 38% of men would sacrifice at least a year of their life in exchange for a perfect body–a higher proportion than women. Although these statistics may be startling, there is hardly a cause and effect correlation. There are other factors at work, such as socioeconomic and political status.These force the Western male to look at his body differently than in the rest of the world. Many of the religions in Asian culture praise and worship fat/obese men. They are considered wealthy, even divine, because they can afford to buy food and eat, as much of it as they desire. In Western society, men exhibiting obesity, baldness, and other nonconformist body characteristics are viewed as lacking wealth, (i.e., access to quality, expensive dining options), whereas those who are thin are presumed to exercise regularly, and are praised for their ability to pay for gym memberships, personal trainers, organic food (and the leisure time to pursue self-care). As males grow older, they may encounter a mid-life crisis, coined “male menopause”

(typically in the age range of 45-55), when they are most likely to be dissatisfied with their appearance. An American study reported that attractive applicants had a better chance of getting jobs and of receiving higher salaries. One U.S. study found that taller men earned, on average, $600 per inch more than shorter executives. Another study revealed that in court, attractive people are found guilty less often and, when found guilty, they receive less severe sentences.The “bias for beauty” operates in almost all social situations – all experiments show we react more favorably to physically attractive people. Western society also believes in the “what is beautiful is good” stereotype – an irrational belief that physically attractive people possess other desirable characteristics, such as intelligence, competence, social skills, confidence, and even moral virtue. Ultimately, man must look himself in the mirror and accept or reject what he sees.This is the daily (uphill) battle that man must wage on his own, no matter what society – or his mother – says. Let’s just hope he comes out looking the better for wear.

The Association of Image Consultants International | 21


GLOWING PORCELAIN SHINING BRIGHT

PALE

CHALKY

MILKY

22 | July 2014 magazine

GHOSTLY SNOW-LIKE


FEATURE

THE FAIR SKIN CRAZE: ASIAN WOMEN’S BEAUTY IDEAL by Carolina D. Tan Porcelain. Shining. Ghostly. Pale. Chalky. Milky. Bright. Glowing. Snow-like.All pertain to descriptions of “white-skinned” women. This has been the craze from observation of South Asian women from Korea, China, Thailand, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan and Philippines. Some 3,000 years ago, Greek and Roman women smeared lead paint and chalk to “fake” whiter skin.Today, light-colored skin is a direct result of Western influence brought about by advertising. Why fair skin? It is associated with many, if not all, of the following positive attributes: opportunities at work, success, wealth, affirmation of beauty, desirability, sophistication, innocence, femininity, a fulfilling lifestyle and the higher social status of the rich and privileged. It is the emblem of a life well-lived.

THE MAIN SKIN-WHITENING METHODS USED INCLUDE: SKIN BLEACHING AND PEELING via medical-grade chemical masks with alpha hydroxy acids (AHA’s) to

trichloroacetic acid (TCA). LED light therapy is a non-chemical approach administered at skin therapist offices. Laser therapy is becoming increasingly popular. SKIN WHITENING PILLS such as Glutathione capsules, which can also be infused to the body

intravenously.

OVER-THE-COUNTER PRODUCTS containing hydroquinone, kojic acid or glutathione and other whitening agents.The last one provides the most practical alternative, and includes a wide range of product choices: soap, whitening cream, lotion, gel and sunscreen. Others use natural products with lightening properties for the skin, such as grinding pearl from seashells, soybean milk, white fungus and pearl barley. How does all of the above work? Results are achieved either by suppressing melanin; sluicing off dead skin cells (revealing supple, healthy layer underneath); using liquid nitrogen to destroy the top layer of skin; or, in the case of lasers, stimulating skin regeneration. Just as with any procedure or product use, one should weigh the pros and cons. Illegal products containing mercury chloride can leave a woman disfigured. Skin irritation is another issue. Loss of melanin also makes one prone to skin damage and, ultimately, skin cancer. Vitamin D deficiency has its disadvantages too, especially when one shuns the sun. Dermatologists would advise that consistency of regimen holds the key to achieving better results. Psychologists, on the other hand, would hold that one should just love and work with your face and body color as an integral part of self-acceptance and personal identity. The Association of Image Consultants International | 23


REAL BEAUTY SKETCHES

AN AMAZING EXPERIMENT DEPICTS HOW WOMEN VIEW THEMSELVES VERSUS HOW OTHERS SEE THEM.

24 | July 2014 magazine


A Public Service Announcement brought to you by

TEENS + MEDIA + BODY IMAGE =

LOW SELF

ESTEEM

TODAY’S WOMAN IS BOMBARDED WITH IDEALS OF A “STANDARD” WEIGHT THAT IS WAY BELOW WHAT IS PHYSICALLY HEALTHY. WE SEE REPRESENTATIONS EVERYWHERE OF WOMEN’S BODIES THAT ARE SMALLER THAN A REALISTIC SIZE. THESE IMAGES DO NOT CORRESPOND TO REALITY OR REPRESENT THE TYPICAL SIZE OF MOST WOMEN TODAY. THIS SITUATION MAKES WOMEN DEVALUE THEIR IMAGE.

CONSIDER THESE AMERICAN STATISTICS: • 47% of girls in 5th-12th grade reported wanting to lose weight because of magazine pictures. (Michael Levine, 1998) About 80% of American women are dissatisfied with their appearance. (Linda Smolak, 1996).This survey revealed that 70% believe encouraging the media and advertisers to use more average-sized people in their advertising campaigns would reduce or prevent eating disorders. In Argentina, most women and some men merely nibble at the country’s famed steaks or survive on little more than salads. Drastic dieting is an effort to be as rail thin as the models who grace magazine covers. This pressure and need for acceptance are indicators of women who often develop eating disorders. A 2003 study in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence was conducted with male and female adolescents, ages 13 to 15 who were shown 20 commercials.There were two cohorts: those that viewed commercials containing idealized, thin females, and those who viewed commercials with no idealized female forms. For the female participants in the study, those who viewed idealized thin commercials reported greater body dissatisfaction than those who did not.The girls later participated in a word completion task.Those who had viewed thin subjects generated more appearance-related words. It is a grim fact that women’s magazines present pictures of “perfect women” altered in post-production editing. The media creates unreal, theoretical beauty that teenagers believe is real. In 2012, an eighth-grader named Julia Bluhm petitioned Seventeen Magazine, using change.org to reach teen girls, demanding truthful images of young women. Bluhm generated over 80,000 signatures from around the world. In response, Seventeen Magazine created a Body Peace Treaty promising not to alter natural body shapes and feature only “real girls and models who are healthy.” The Spark Movement claimed the treaty was violated when Seventeen Magazine partnered with the reality show “The Biggest Loser,” which announced three teens as contestants. One teen quit the show because of a past history with bulimia, and couldn’t handle the humiliation.

By Maritza Desjonquères Anazco President, AICI France Chapter Contact Maritza Desjonquères Anazco at mda@franceimagecoaching.com or Pamela Judd, AICI CIP at juddpamela@aol.com to get involved.

Adolescent girls tend to see everything as realistic and attainable; they try to emulate media images.They will attempt to model themselves (both physically and through their actions), after the images viewed. In response, the international project “Responsible Beauty” created by AICI France, www.beauteresponsable.org, educates teens in schools about the ABC’s of image to help them to understand that we are all unique. Image Impact International has created the Disability Meets Fashion non-profit course, and upcoming disability surveys will also help us to discover what true beauty really means. The Association of Image Consultants International | 25


COMMUNICATION & ETIQUETTE

TRY THIS WHEN DEALING WITH SENSITIVE MATTERS – SING THIS JOHNNY MERCER BALLAD

“AC-CENT-TCHU-ATE THE POSITIVE WITH ME...”

RIGHT/WRONG THINGS TO SAY

TO A CLIENT

SIZE Don’t Say...“You won’t fit into this store’s clothes.” Do Say... This store doesn’t cater to your needs.”

SHAPE Don’t Say... “We need to get you looking like an hourglass figure, which is considered the perfect figure.”

by Cindy Ann Peterson, AICI FLC International Secretary and AICI Philanthropy Chair

Do Say... “Let’s find your body shape and work with styles to define the look for your desired effect, as we are all precious works of art, each unique and amazing.”

WEIGHT OR AGE Don’t Say...“Your weight and age are a major factor in your style decisions.” Do Say... “We are not concerned with your weight or age, since this doesn’t matter. Let’s look at your measurements and find the perfect looks for your body shape and style you want to project.”

26 | July 2014 magazine


COLOR Don’t Say…“Since you want to hide your body, wear black.” Do Say…“Let’s look at your personal coloring and find your best colors, so no color sabotage allowed. You come alive when you wear your best colors. Let me show you.”

UPDATED LOOK Don’t Say…“Your wardrobe is out of date.” Do Say…“Looking at your wardrobe, would you be interested in adding some new styles that will be perfect for the office and also carry out to a night on the town?”

FOOTWEAR Don’t Say…“Unusual size feet or bunions are problematic in finding shoes.” Do Say…“Let’s find some shoes to fit your needs. I know a number of good brand/retail options.”

FOUNDATION GARMENTS Don’t Say…“Your body needs extra support and your current undergarments aren’t working.” Do Say…“One great way to look and feel good in everything you wear is to wear foundation garments that fit. Did you know that you should get a new bra every six months, or if you gain or lose weight? Let’s find some that fit for you and make you feel fabulous.”

HAIR AND MAKEUP Don’t Say…“Your hair and makeup say you’re trying too hard to look young.” Do Say…“Keys to beauty are finding the styles that work best for you now. Could we take a look at an idea book? When you look at your face we have internal and external lines. Let me show your how we can work on this to your advantage.”

PROPER FIT Don’t Say…“Did you know when you wear clothes that are too tight you look ten pounds heavier? And when you wear clothes a size too big you look ten pounds heavier too?” Do Say…“You say it’s been a while since you went shopping, let’s try a few items and see what works the best. We want it to fit and make you feel fabulous. Would you like to try this? Okay?”

WARDROBE TRANSITION Don’t Say…“I can see you have lost your edge for dressing. It’s so sad when you see a person lose their identity.” Do Say…“I am so glad you called me. I am thrilled that we get this time to work together and define your next great life adventure. Let’s get started. This is what I’m trained to do, you’re in great hands! It’s my pleasure to help you today.”

The Association of Image Consultants International | 27


AICI Image For A Cause Launches “New Look” to hurricane survivors, Wardrobe for Opportunities clothing drive, Cancer Awareness walks, helping the disabled, blood drives, donating apparel to Dress 4 Success, and more. “My heartfelt participation in AICI’s Image for a Cause initiatives, both as an individual and with other members of the AICI Philippine Chapter, has opened doors for me in business and beyond. Without a doubt, sharing and giving has led me to more money and meaning in my life.”

The AICI International Board is excited about the new artwork supporting the “Image For A Cause - AICI Gives Back” initiative. Every year, local AICI chapters contribute to their communities above and beyond the average industry association. A few examples include free image consulting for chemotherapy patients, local food bank food drives, makeovers at nursing homes, collecting shoes for Soles4Souls, a fund drive after natural disaster for the Red Cross, serving soup

To support these local initiatives, AICI ramped up artistically and launched a new set of graphics for chapters and members to use. Thank you to Coca Sevilla AICI FLC, Arturo León Resendiz, Ursula Medina Bazán and Anna Wrisky of Ewald Consulting for creating the campaign and to Cindy Ann Peterson, AICI FLC, for her unwavering support as International Secretary and International Philanthropy Chair. CLICK HERE TO VIEW AND DOWNLOAD GRAPHICS (MEMBERS ONLY)


BETWEEN US

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

CARRIE BLUSTIN CROSS by Thea Wood, AICI FLC

AICI PRESIDENT JANE SEAMAN RECOMMENDED CARRIE BLUSTIN CROSS, EDUCATION VICE PRESIDENT OF AICI WASHINGTON, DC CHAPTER, FOR OUR MEMBER SPOTLIGHT, AFTER ATTENDING THE WDC EDUCATION DAY THIS SPRING. CARRIE ORGANIZED THE EVENT IN A NEW FORMAT THAT GENERATED A NOT ONLY A BUZZ, BUT A BONDING TIME FOR ALL WHO ATTENDED. HERE’S WHAT CARRIE HAD TO SAY ABOUT HER EVENT STRATEGIES AND HER PERSONAL PASSION FOR TRIATHLON. THEA: Tell us about the format of the WDC educational event and why you chose to set it up that way?

CARRIE: This year, the WDC chose to hold a multi-session event with seven speakers, presenting in a variety of formats: hands-on working sessions, panels, and interactive keynotes. Having worked with the Association for Training and Development for several years, I have spent a lot of time researching and experimenting with different learning formats. I have found that people, no matter what industry they are coming from, respond best to blended learning techniques that combine delivery methodologies, to enhance the effectiveness of training.We felt it was also important to incorporate several focus areas within the field of image consulting, ranging from appearance to business skills, and have sessions for people at all levels within the profession, from novice to advanced.

THEA: What advice would you give other chapter education VP’s in organizing an event like this? The Association of Image Consultants International | 29


BETWEEN US

“WITHOUT A DOUBT, IT WAS INTERACTING WITH ALL OF THE INTERESTING SPEAKERS AND ATTENDEES. EVERYONE HAD A UNIQUE STORY TO SHARE ABOUT THEIR EXPERIENCE IN THE IMAGE CONSULTING AREA. EVERY TIME I’VE ATTENDED AN EVENT WITH AICI, I’VE COME AWAY THINKING HOW LUCKY I AM TO WORK ALONGSIDE SUCH A KNOWLEDGEABLE AND HELPFUL GROUP OF PROFESSIONALS.” CARRIE:

CARRIE:

Have fun, and don’t be afraid to take a few risks! If you think about some of the most rewarding training events you have attended, they probably included more than standard panel presentations over multiple hours. Also, a large portion of the benefit of organized training events has nothing to do with the program itself, it is the networking and knowledge-sharing with other attendees. That is necessary for any successful program, so including time for informal learning is important.

This was really a team event, and I had the best team there is. Between our Acting President, Roxy Rowton of Everyday Refinement, and our VP of Communications, Yelena Jackson of PersonaStyled, we had a lot of fun and worked hard together to make sure all of the details came together. The event was a great success because of all their hard work and past experience with putting on a chapter education day.  

THEA: What was your favorite “highlight” of this daylong event, and why?

CARRIE: Without a doubt, it was interacting with all of the interesting speakers and attendees. Everyone had a unique story to share about their experience in the image consulting area. Every time I’ve attended an event with AICI, I’ve come away thinking how lucky I am to work alongside such a knowledgeable and helpful group of professionals.

THEA: Congratulations on your recent nuptials! How did you coordinate a wedding and an education day all at the same time?

30 | July 2014 magazine

THEA: In your business, Seriously Styled, your personal passion for competing in triathlon has turned into a professional niche with “Seriously Styled Racing Kits.”Tell us about this product, how it works, and why it’s a benefit to athletes.

CARRIE: I have been a part of the triathlon and cycling communities for many years, and as a female athlete who also cares about fashion, I was frequently approached by other women who were frustrated by the all-spandex cycling and racing kits that weren’t built to flatter our figures.Working with a designer and online triathlon clothing company, we were able to design a kit that was fashion-forward and high quality. Once a few women started wearing them, the men jumped on board too.We now have a multi-product triathlon and cycling line for both men and women.There is no need to put style aside–even while you sweat!


The Association of Image Consultants International | 31


BETWEEN US

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

By the time this goes to print it will have been one year since I took on the role of president. It’s been an incredible ride. Everyone seems to have settled into our new AICI website, and we continue to make weekly updates. Our chapters around the world have been extremely active. The AICI San Francisco Bay Area Chapter and AICI Sydney Chapter had very successful education events in February. AICI Mexico City had their National Congress of Image & Perception in March, closely followed by AICI France’s Chapter Conference in April. AICI Washington DC Metro Chapter and AICI Philippine Chapter had their events in April. I just recently returned from the AICI Guadalajara Chapter event and the AICI Mexico City event. Along with all this Chapter activity, we have seen our membership numbers begin to climb again, and we’re receiving more certification applications. AICI welcomed back to the international board Cecilia Stoeckicht, as VP Conference. The AICI International Conference preparation has started at our management company, Ewald Consulting along with the international board. So don’t forget to block off the dates of August 27-30, 2015. We’re looking forward to welcoming you to the beautiful capital of Washington, D.C. Your international board has also being very active with exciting new chapter, member benefit, marketing, and preferred partner programs under development. AICI welcomes a new community manager, Ursula Medina Bazán, who is maintaining all of AICI’s social media. Already we’ve seen a huge amount of activity on our AICI Facebook page and we are up to 3,255 likes. If you haven’t already, please go to our Facebook page and LIKE US. Ursula will also be working on setting up AICI YouTube and Pinterest pages. Now that we have a community manager, I need your help in my next project: Let’s Go Viral! Mother Teresa said,“Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless.” We need to talk about us. We need to let the world know all the amazing ways we touch the lives of people every day. For example, I worked with a client who had a stroke that left her with little arm movement. I helped her build a closet collection that was stylish, yet all the items were pull-on, no buttons or zips. She said that after her stoke, she never thought she’d be stylish again, but an image consultant made it happen. I know there are a million stories just like this out there. Please share your success stories with us. There’s no need to mention client names or always send pictures, but we can still shout about what we do. Send your stories to mail to: Janeaici@comcast.net. I want to share with the world how lucky I am to do what I do and be associated with so many incredible image professionals who touch, in the most positive way, the lives of so many. Don’t be shy, let’s tell the world who we are. I look forward to hearing from you.

JANE 32 | July 2014 magazine


The Association of Image Consultants International | 33


BETWEEN US US BETWEEN

UPCOMING EVENTS

THERE ARE OVER 40 CEU EVENTS SCHEDULED BETWEEN JULY 1 AND SEPTEMBER 30, 2014. PLEASE CLICK ON THE 2014 CEU CALENDAR FOR DETAILS AND TO REGISTER.

FREE TELECLASSES (NOT CEU CREDITED) ENHANCE PUBLIC RELATIONS, PROFESSIONAL PERFORMANCE, AND PROFIT Speaker: Judith Rasband, AICI CIM Date: July 9, 2014 @ 12:00 pm EST (New York - US) Register Here

LAS 4 FORTALEZAS DE TU MARCA PERSONAL Speaker: Raúl Nava Salazar Date: August 8, 2014 @ 12:00 pm (Guadalajara – México) Register Here

34 | July 2014 magazine


WEBINARS FOR CEU’S Please visit AICI.org Webinars Page for more information.

BUILDING A BLOG TO BUILD YOUR IMAGE BUSINESS Imogen Lamport, AICI, CIP August 21 & 28 7:00 PM EST

EASY SEO STRATEGIES: GET YOUR BUSINESS ON THE FIRST PAGE OF GOOGLE Sylvie di Guisto September 18 & 25 10:00 AM EST

REVENUE TRIPLING SECRETS: EARN 6 FIGURES FAST Sarah Hathorn, AICI CIP October 13 & 20 9:00 AM EST

CREATING CONFIDENCE FOR YOUR GROWN UP CLIENTS Sue Donnelly, AICI CIP November 4 & 11 7:30 AM EST

OTHER UPCOMING PROGRAMS THIS FALL 2014 STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS ON DATES AND TIMES HOW TO GET 100 IDEAS FOR YOUR NEWSLETTER AND TURN THEM INTO PROFIT Clare Maxfield, AICI, CIP

PUTTING THE I INTO IMAGE Sue Donnelly, AICI CIP

The Association of Image Consultants International | 35


ADVERTISE YOUR PRODUCTS & SERVICES

IN AICI GLOBAL MAGAZINE! REACH THOUSANDS OF AICI MEMBERS AND OTHER INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS WORLDWIDE AND BOOST YOUR EARNING POTENTIAL. OUR READERS ARE LOOKING FOR: Color Systems Body Styling Training Industry-Related Books & Magazines Multi-level and Network Marketing Opportunities Business Tools Continuing Education Units for AICI certification Health and Beauty Products Professional Development Workshops & Webinars Hotel & Travel Services Website Design and Support Career Coaches Sales Tools Clothing & Accessories CONTACT IMOGEN LAMPORT AT IMOGEN@AOPI.COM.AU FOR CURRENT AD RATES AND DEADLINES. NEXT ISSUE: JULY 2014

AICI GlobAl D i r e c t

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36 | July 2014 magazine

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April 2014

Aici global magazine July 2014  

Aici global magazine July 2014, Body Image Issue

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