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AICI GL BAL T H E

B O DY

I M A G E

I S S U E

RECLAIMING OUR BODIES BOOK REVIEW

BEAUTY SICK THE GIRL WITH THE PAINTED BODY

MEET ASH SOTO SILENT SUFFERERS

MALE BODY IMAGE MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

APLAILUCK TAN

JANUARY 2018


EDITOR’S NOTE 2018

AICI BOARD OF DIRECTORS President Riet de Vlieger, AICI CIP Secretary Gail Morgan, AICI CIP Treasurer Chris Fulkerson, AICI CIP, FFS VP Certification Ana Cheong, AICI CIP VP Education Shanna Wu Pecoraro, AICI CIP VP Business Development Lucy Liang, AICI CIP VP Marketing Dr. Carol Parker Walsh, AICI CIC, FFSM VP Conference Valeria Doustaly, AICI CIP VP Human Resources Lilian Bustamante, AICI CIP Executive Director Gigi Jaber AICI HEADQUARTERS 1000 Westgate Drive, Ste. 252 St. Paul, MN 55114-1067 Phone: 651-290-7468 Fax: 651-290-2266 www.AICI.org

IT’S NO SECRET that women have a love/hate (mostly hate) relationship with their bodies. In fact, surveys have found that 60 percent of adult women have negative thoughts about themselves weekly. On average, 9 out of 10 women do not like the way they look in front of a mirror and frequently engage in negative self-talk. While the numbers are considerably lower for my clients (43 percent say they are dissatisfied with their overall bodies), they struggle with wanting to lose weight, as well as the appearance of their abdomen, muscle tone, and chest. Negative body image contributes to eating disorders, obesity, steroid usage, depression, and distorted self-images. The media and its ever-changing definition of beauty is definitely a culprit. As a result I believe image consultants bear a responsibility to undo these negative perceptions and support women and men in finding ways to love themselves where they are right now. By helping men and women learn how to dress confidently, communicate, behave and show up in the digital space, we are teaching individuals how to shine authentically, just as they are. In this issue, we’re sharing stories, data, and inspiration that will serve to expand our thinking around body image and how we can better serve our clients. We’re also introducing you to our Member Spotlight, Apailuck Tan, who will share her story and passion around self-esteem and confidence, and we are paying our respects to a light we lost in the industry. As usual, I hope you find this issue informative and thought-provoking. Use this issue to change the conversation on body image.

From all of us at AICI Global Magazine, Happy New Year! Here’s to your best year yet!

Dr. Carol Parker Walsh, JD, PhD, AICI CIC Editor-in-Chief Comments about the magazine? editor@aici.org

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PUBLICATION CREDITS

Issue 19 EDITOR IN CHIEF Carol Parker Walsh, JD, PhD, AICI CIC, FFSM

VP MARKETING Carol Parker Walsh, JD, PhD, AICI CIC, FFSM

ASSOCIATE EDITORS Donna Cameron Jainee Gandhi, AICI CIP Kylie Stedman Gomes

COPY EDITORS Bernie Burson, AICI CIC Julie Kaufman AICI CIP

FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS Shanna Wu Pecoraro, AICI CIP

LAYOUT Limb Design AICI GLOBAL is produced quarterly by Association of Image Consultants International, a nonprofit dedicated to advancing the level of professionalism and enhancing the recognition of image consultants. AICI GLOBAL promotes AICI’s ideas, activities, interests and goals to its members. Responsibility is not assumed for the opinions of writers or other articles. AICI GLOBAL does not endorse or guarantee the products and services it advertises. 2017© Association of Image Consultants International. All rights reserved. No part of this online publication may be duplicated or reproduced without permission from the publisher. While every effort is made to ensure accuracy of information included in the magazine at the time of publication, the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising from errors or omissions.

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BOOK REVIEW Beauty Sick: How the Cultural Obsession with Appearance Hurts Girls and Women............ 7

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Inside This Issue

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT............... 6

PERSONAL STORY Body Image: A Personal Account.................... 10

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FEATURE ARTICLES The Girl With The World Painted on Her Body............ 13 Silent Sufferers: Body Image Issues Impact Men, Too...................................................... 17

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MEMBER SPOTLIGHT Apailuck Tan.................................................................. 19

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IN MEMORIAM Beauty Has No Boundaries............................................ 21

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BETWEEN US Board On The Move......................................................24 AICI Educational Conferences....................................... 25 Upcoming Events..........................................................27

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LET’S TELL OUR SONS AND DAUGHTERS...

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hen I found out that I had been beautiful as a girl and as a young woman, I was beyond 40. It was a shocking experience. In my country (The Netherlands) it is not a habit to admire beauty openly. Beauty is superficial and, according to the Christian culture in my country, life should not center around superficial matters. So when I discovered my beauty I was almost on the other side of the line - the line where we are supposed to start worrying about wrinkles and the first signs of aging. But wait a minute: Who says that? Where our grandparents appeared really old around 60, nowadays we are vital and good-looking way longer. When Jane Fonda turned 70 she gave a TED talk about aging. Yes, we age, and we also get an extra life stage of 30 years that the generations before us did not have. Do we want to use that stage to be unhappy about our looks again? Our work as image consultants is about the ultimate acceptance of who we are. The way we look is part of that, but your looks do not define who you are. Focusing on who you are will make you look wonderful, alive, sparkling, vital. You don›t need to change yourself in order to be beautiful. Marketing messages have brainwashed us into thinking that. If we could stand for authentic beauty unconditionally, what could we do? Let’s practice accepting our own beauty as it is and be wonderful. And let›s talk to our sons and daughters about beauty, before the media tells them there is something wrong with them. Beauty Pressure – A Dove Film

WARMLY, RIET DE VLIEGER, AICI CIP AICI International President

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BOOK FEATURE REVIEW

BY KYLIE STEDMAN GOMES, BA

“You cannot command the boardroom if you’re distracted by worries about the way your skirt fits or whether your hair looks okay.” (Beauty Sick, p. 332).

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enee Engeln, Ph.D. is a professor of psychology at Northwestern University and the author of Beauty Sick: How the Cultural Obsession with Appearance Hurts Girls and Women. Beauty sickness is her label for “the voice in back of so many women’s minds that’s too busy asking, ‘Do I look okay?’ to

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ask more important questions. The more you hear that voice, the more your body begins to feel like something that exists for other people instead of feeling like your home” (p. 60). Dr. Engeln has been studying beauty and body image for the past 15 years. Her passion for the topic and concern for the girls and women who struggle with it is evident in every page of Beauty Sick. Throughout the book, she engagingly walks the reader through a selection of personal anecdotes, interviews, and academic studies to illustrate various forms of beauty sickness, discuss its causes and consequences, and examine possible solutions.

“Even a positive answer to the mental question of “Do I look okay” can have distressingly negative effects, depending on the question’s timing, its frequency, and the questioner’s own deeper values.”

As you might expect, the consequences of negative body image – resulting from girls and women evaluating their own bodies against impossible beauty ideals and feeling shame as a result

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– are heartrending. Girls and women who have a negative body image are more likely to develop eating disorders, to be depressed, to think about suicide and to attempt suicide. They are more likely to avoid participating in sports and other activities where they feel they will be ‘on display’ to other people. However, even a positive answer to the mental question of “Do I look okay” can have distressingly negative effects, depending on the question’s timing, its frequency, and the questioner’s own deeper values. The very process of self-monitoring interferes with cognitive performance: thinking about how one appears to other people requires the use of cognitive resources (focus and attention) which then are not available for other tasks. This reduction in cognitive performance leads, in turn, to lower levels of motivation and self-efficacy.


Dr. Engeln’s examination of various potential solutions to beauty sickness proved especially thought-provoking for me. She argues, for example, that campaigns promoting a view that “everyone is beautiful in their own way” often have unintended negative consequences because they prompt women to immediately think about how they look, when they may otherwise have been thinking about something else altogether! (After reading that, I will definitely think twice before complimenting a young girl on her appearance!)

Beauty Sick is written by a psychologist who understandably focused on research conducted by academic psychologists. As such, the book did not directly address either the Body Positivity Movement or the profession of Image Consulting. Nonetheless, I believe that the approach Dr. Engeln recommends in Beauty Sick to promote positive body image is well aligned with the underlying philosophies of both the Body Positivity movement and our profession.

In the last few chapters, Dr Engeln suggests some more effective ways we can all fight back against beauty sickness: 1. A  PPRECIATING your body as your home and your vehicle for doing things in the world (as opposed to an ‘object’ for other people to look at), 2. E  XERCISING CONTROL over the messages you receive, transmit and support about beauty and its relative importance (or lack thereof!), and 3. P  RACTICING SELFCOMPASSION, treating yourself with kindness and care, and accepting that imperfections are part of being human.

“As image consultants, we empower our clients to make the most of their unique appearance within the context of their lifestyle, values, age, shape and size.”

As image consultants, we empower our clients to make the most of their unique appearance within the context of their lifestyle, values, age, shape and size, and to present themselves in a way which both expresses who they are and helps them attain their goals. While – sadly! – this won’t magically translate into a completely positive body image for every client, it seems reasonable to hope that arming a client with a flattering, well-fitting wardrobe and knowledge of their personal style and how to use image “tools” to visually communicate with the world will help reduce the number of times they will mentally ask themselves: “Do I look okay?”

KYLIE STEDMAN GOMES, BA, started up her image consulting business “Presence of Mine” (www.presenceofmine.com.au) in Brisbane, Australia in 2016. She has 23 years’ experience in business and IT, and is currently working in partnership with her husband Manuel to launch an online store (indiqi) in 2018.

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PERSONAL FEATURE STORY

BODY IMAGE:

A PERSONAL ACCOUNT BY JAINEE GANDHI, CIP

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Body Image. “What is that?” many ask me. “It’s simple,” many say. Some are amused that there is something like this, some are intrigued.


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n layman’s terms, body image is what you think about your body when you look in the mirror or in your mind. There are various explanations for it; lots of articles written about it; and the media, fashion show organizers, and models are taking note of it nowadays.

be everything that others want you to be, but you will not be yourself.

Pregnancy is one time during which I know most of my friends suffer from negative self-talk about their body. Also, talking about one’s body and weight is a part-time hobby among women.

When this self-image is positive you feel positive about your physical body. Try and appreciate your body. Highlight the part of the body that you are proud of and camouflage the variation. Dress smartly and wisely. Our image depends on how we are groomed. If you focus on feeling that you don’t look good or you don’t dress smartly, others will sense your dip in confidence. This new year, take a pledge to not be a slave to the fashion trend, but instead use the trend and styles that suit your body, roles, and goals in life.

I had body image issues in my mid-20s. My confidence was at an all-time low, and with the birth of my son, my body image continued to dip. People seem to feel they are doing you a favor by telling you how much weight you have gained, or that you cannot/should not wear a certain outfit, or suggesting exercises and food for weight loss. All this and much more is body

As image consultants, influencers, role models for our kids, their friends, nieces, and nephews, it is our responsibility to bring about this change with every life we touch. We work with various people and train people on body shape, on what colors to wear, what styles to invest in. Making them comfortable with their body should be our top priority.

I am going to share my personal experience, learning, unlearning and responsibility as an image consultant, as an influencer, and more importantly as a mother.

Our body self-image should be a mirror of our thoughts. If you don’t respect yourself, if you don’t love yourself, if you don’t follow a passion, you may be everything that others want you to be, but you will not be yourself.

shaming if it is not done with the intent to gain a healthy, fit body rather than just a skinny one. When I started out as an image consultant and started working with female clients, I realized that most of the women, irrespective of age, suffer from negative body image. Our body self-image should be a mirror of our thoughts. If you don’t respect yourself, if you don’t love yourself, if you don’t follow a passion, you may

JAINEE GANDHI is an accomplished image consultant and one of the only CIP’s in India. She works with individuals and corporates on creating an authentic image for themselves. Her Moto is “refuse to be unseen”. www.ImageReDefine.com | www.StylingReDefine.com

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FEATURE ARTICLE

THE GIRL WITH THE WORLD PAINTED ON HER BODY BY DR. CAROL PARKER WALSH

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t is with great pleasure that I introduce you to a remarkable young woman who is redefining what it means to be beautiful, Ash Soto. Our joint values of selflove, body acceptance, and self-worth are only paralleled by the impact we both want to make on the world. Ash does so through her Instagram feed, virtually inspiring her over 150K followers. I interviewed Ash over the phone and learned about her journey to confidence and acceptance. After our interview I asked Ash if she would share her message in her own words to the world. I’m honored that through our reciprocal mentorship she happily agreed. Let’s continue the story.

THE GIRL WITH THE PAINTED BODY As some of you may not know, my name is Ash Soto, also known as the girl with

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the world painted on her body. They say your body is a canvas; I’m just painted differently. I’m finally at a point in my life where I can say I love the skin I’m in. It’s a learning experience each day but I’m getting there. I hope this post inspires all girls to be comfortable with themselves and their bodies because everyone is beautiful and unique. You may not see it, but trust me, you’re special. We need more self-love these days. “Accept yourself and everything else will fall into place,” were the exact words I wrote the day I decided to reveal my vitiligo to the world. I remember being so scared and afraid before I posted it. Yes, I knew I was mentally prepared to do it and I was ready to make a difference. Once I did I have never felt so liberated in my life. I felt free - just a girl finally celebrating the skin she was in. Through that I basically put myself out there to the world, striving to inspire other young girls or anyone to embrace their beauty. Beauty is not only on the outside, but it’s so important to also have a kind and pure heart (beauty on the inside).

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HOW THE ARTISTRY EMERGED I started creating art using my skin condition. It was a way to show the world that we are art. I have learned with time and the experiences that I’ve faced that there is always a positive way to look at things. It’s so easy for us to let things that we truly have no control over define us and how we are going to live our lives. My skin no longer defines my life in a negative way. It’s a part of me. It’s who I am and I wouldn’t change it for the world. This project where I create art pieces is a way to show that what we might perceive as flaws are actually what makes you beautiful and sets you apart from the rest. No, it’s not easy. You will have bumps along the way but it’s your job to pick yourself up and fight for the self-love you deserve to feel. Being diagnosed at such a young age, it was hard for me to comprehend why this was happening to me. I felt like I had monster skin and I just wanted it to disappear so I could feel happy. When I was younger, I wasn’t really focused on how I looked, but as I started getting older and I started comparing myself to other


girls who to me were the definition of beautiful, my confidence slowly started to fade away. My self-esteem was so low that I covered myself head to toe in long leggings and sweaters so I would be considered normal and not be judged or made fun of.

things that you may not find beautiful make you so much more special because they make you who you are. We live one life and I want you to make it worth it because life is too beautiful to live it in self-hatred. Empower yourself every single day with love.

BELIEVE IN THE BEAUTY OF YOU I decided that enough was enough. After growing tired of the jokes and feeling miserable, I took the initiative to turn my life around. I worked on myself every single day and challenged myself, whether it was wearing shorts for a day or a tank top. Little things like that, along with surrounding myself with positive people and doing the things I loved again, resulted in really starting to see myself in a different light. When life gives you lemons what do you do? You make lemonade and that’s exactly what I did. To whichever beautiful individual is reading this, I want you never to forget to love yourself, even on those days when you feel the lowest. You are enough; never question your worth. Those little quirks or

DR. CAROL PARKER WALSH, JD, PHD, FFSM, AICI CIC, is an award winning bestselling author, columnist, image strategist, international speaker, and television personality. She’s the founder of Evolve Image Consulting, LLC, a personal and professional development company that educates entrepreneurs, professionals and women of influence on developing an empowering presence and confident image. She serves as editor in chief for AICI Global Magazine and VP of Global Marketing & Communication on the AICI International Board.

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FEATURE ARTICLE

SILENT SUFFERERS:

BODY IMAGE ISSUES IMPACT MEN, TOO BY DR. CAROL PARKER WALSH

H

ave you noticed a shift lately in what the “average” man is supposed to look like? From the images we see of Superman to Batman or the always without-a-shirt Bachelor we’ve watched season after season, the “average” guy is much bulkier than his predecessors from even 15 or 20 years ago. While tall and lean may have been the norm before, massive muscles and rippling six-packs are fast becoming the new norm. Body image issues for women have been a pervasive problem in our body-perfect society and have contributed to everything from eating disorders, to plastic and gastric surgeries, to even death. It’s beyond a pandemic. However, the population that’s

not often talked about are our male counterparts. I was having dinner with a friend recently and he lamented over his recent 20-30 pound weight gain and how he didn’t feel good about himself since he picked up the extra weight. Now, like most people who roll their eyes at seemingly fit people who proclaim weight issues, I remarked, “You look great.” However, he replied, “I don’t feel great.” The truth is, he’s not alone and this kind of cavalier response can further isolate those who may be silently struggling with body image issues. One of the reasons men don’t discuss these issues is because of the stigma placed on a man talking about his weight in open or mixed company. After all, that’s

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a women’s issue, right? Don’t you believe it! Men are just as susceptible to the body-perfect model imposed on society as women. Moreover, women are far less forgiving of a man with a “dad bod” than their plussize sister. Why? Because the media has sexualized and focused on the female body since….well, since there was media. So in some ways, women believe their struggle with this issue is more legitimate than men’s. While we struggle with these issues in greater numbers, men are no less susceptible to the damaging effects of society’s obsession with the perfect body. Women have internalized these impossible standards of perfection for years and only recently have rebelled and rejected these imposed labels and advocated for a “love at any size” movement. However, while we’ve been given permission and space to deconstruct these damaging stereotypes and heal the wounds of selfdoubt, men are still being held to their own perfection standards. Look at the transformation of Chris Evans in Captain America from a small, weak man to a taller, handsome, muscular savior. Or the men on the Big Bang Theory who are periodically subjected to ridicule because of their stature, or the absolute shock on the faces of anyone that sees the beautiful Penny with the small and less-muscular Leonard. I recently came across an image of a man holding up a piece of paper on which he wrote, “It’s just as hard to be Ken as it is to be Barbie.” This picture is a bold move considering, as I noted before, it’s not a subject men talk about. Instead they pump weights, engage in steroid use, and focus on protein-packed diets in order to “get hard.” These activities can have as deleterious

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an impact on the mental and physical health of men as anorexia or bulimia nervosa (eating disorders men suffer from in small numbers as well) have on women. I believe it’s time we not only changed the conversation on body image issues for both men and women, it’s time as image consultants for us to lead the charge. As we teach our clients how to dress impeccably for their shapes, develop their own unique sense of style, and develop a presence to conquer the world, let’s not forget to encourage and inspire them to love themselves unconditionally where they are right now. Let’s become more conscious of the ways in which our clients are struggling with self-esteem issues because of the deprecating messages fed to them by the media and our society. Let’s reject the idea of body perfection and embrace the idea of being perfectly imperfect.

DR. CAROL PARKER WALSH, JD, PHD, FFSM, AICI CIC, is an award winning bestselling author, columnist, image strategist, international speaker, and television personality. She’s the founder of Evolve Image Consulting, LLC, a personal and professional development company that educates entrepreneurs, professionals and women of influence on developing an empowering presence and confident image. She serves as editor in chief for AICI Global Magazine and VP of Global Marketing & Communication on the AICI International Board.


MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT:

APAILUCK TAN BY DONNA CAMERON

This past summer at the AICI Global Conference, our Member Spotlight was honored with the distinguished Rising Star Award. I sat down with her to learn a bit more about our award winner and any glean any advice she’d like to share with our membership. WHY DO YOU BELIEVE YOU WON THE AWARD? I didn’t expect to win, but I do hope that my work will speak out to the world. What I deliver comes from why I deliver and I want to be the voice for the world.

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WHAT DID WINNING THE AICI RISING STAR AWARD MEAN TO YOU? It means a lot to win the award. This reward is not just for me, but for my country and also for Asia in general. It represents the work we do, what we’ve established, and how we dedicate our efforts to others.

WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO BECOME AN IMAGE CONSULTANT? My passion comes from the personal pain I have experienced. Being an image consultant helps me to turn my pain into passion. So the motivation behind my work is to inspire other people and to encourage others to increase their self-esteem.

WHAT AREAS DO YOU SPECIALIZE IN? I specialize in three areas: • I mage and personal branding from the inside out • Communication through three avenues: story telling, presentation and public speaking • Leadership training. I teach leadership through many processes, including Neuro-Linguistic Programming, Process Work, Satir Technic, 360 Degree, and Enneagram.

WHERE DO YOU WORK? I work mainly in Bangkok and within Asia across four to five countries.

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE TO PASS ON TO OTHER IMAGE CONSULTANTS WANTING TO MAKE THEIR MARK? There are three recommendations I would like to give to other image consultants that are based on the following; true passion, find your why, and be your own voice. • F  ind your true passion and work accordingly • If you know why you do what you do, you will not feel like you’re working each day • f you know what message you want to share with the world, you will own your voice.

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DONNA CAMERON is the co-founder of Body Map Well-Being & Style Strategies, along with her sister, Dr. Nadine Cameron. Current president of the AICI Melbourne Chapter in Australia, she also serves as associate editor for AICI Global Magazine.


IN MEMORIAM

BEAUTY

HAS NO BOUNDARIES BY SHANNA WU PECORARO, CIP, VP EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL BOARD

M

y dear friend, colleague, and longtime lunch buddy, Susan Sommers, was a fashion editor, author, traveler, stylist and image consultant. She was full of life! And in her final days, which were very difficult for her and all who loved her, she maintained a level of composure, dignity, and strength that I hadn’t seen before. In mid-October, I received a message from Susan. She said that she was dying and that she hoped she could hold out until I got back from the trip I was on. She said how nice it was to have known me. Quickly, I went to see her in the hospital. She immediately asked about my trip and my business. She asked about my husband and wanted to say “Goodbye” to him. She then became very tired, and I encouraged her to rest, saying that I would come back tomorrow.

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The next morning, I came back to see her. She said she’d slept well, that her nurses had given her all her medication at once, so she didn’t have to be woken up constantly. Her sister had helped her change into a beautiful cotton tunic dress and had her nails done while I was there. She even managed a “dada” pose, which made us all laugh. Always beautiful and stylish, my Susan. That was my last time seeing her. Susan meant so much to me. It’s hard to put into words how much I miss her, and how much of her incredible, stylish energy carries on in a little flame inside me.

There are a few things I learned from Susan’s experience, and from my own experience with getting older. First, aging starts in mind – not the body. Second, we all grow more beautiful when wisdom is on our side.

There are a few things I learned from Susan’s experience, and from my own experience with getting older. First, aging starts in mind – not the

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body. Second, we all grow more beautiful when wisdom is on our side.

Besides keeping a positive attitude, there are a few basic things each of us can do to ensure a healthy life and slow the physical and mental process of aging. Drinking plenty of water, eating tons of fruits and veggies as well as healthy fats, having a good night’s sleep, staying active, staying away from sugars and artificial ingredients, and finding quiet moments to reflect and breathe each day – will help you mentally and physically deal with the effects of getting older. I hope you can take a moment to think of those who’ve inspired you by their energy for love and life. For me, today’s moment is a toast to Susan!


BETWEEN US

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nternational Board Members Valeria Doustaly, VP Conference and Lilian Bustamante, VP Human Resources joined AICI Spain Chapter President Carie Mercier Lafond, who served as the organizer, at the XVI International Congress of Protocol in Valladolid, Spain.

Valeria Doustaly, VP Conference & Carie Mercier Lafond, AICI Spain Chapter

Valeria Doustaly, VP Conference (left) & Lilian Bustamante, VP Human Resources (right)

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AICI Spain Chapter President, Carie Mercier Lafond


BETWEEN US

AICI EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCES BY DR. CAROL PARKER WALSH

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ith the Global Conference set for April 4-7, 2019, AICI Chapters around the world are getting ready to host local educational conferences for the membership in 2018. If you’re interested in traveling the world, connecting with old friends, and making new ones then keep your eyes and ears open for these amazing upcoming events. You can follow all of the chapters Facebook pages to stay abreast of the dates. The award-winning AICI San Francisco Bay Area Chapter is starting things off with their bi-annual Education Conference

on February 24, 2018. The education conference will feature thought leaders who will provide insight on strategies for business growth, practical tips for personal development and advice on working with clients from diverse backgrounds and experiences. Topics covered will include Color Analysis for diverse ethnicities, Mens Styling and Image Consulting, Social and Business Etiquette and Photography for Social Media & Marketing. Early Bird pricing for AICI members ends on Friday, January 19, 2018. Register TODAY!

If you’re interested in traveling the world, connecting with old friends, and making new ones then keep your eyes and ears open for these amazing upcoming events.

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Later in the year the 2nd AICI Asia Image Conference will be held from October 5-7, 2018 in Seoul Korea. Join them for a new wave of paradigm, learning experience and business insights tailored for image consulting in this dynamic city! The conference will offer one-of-a-kind seminars, a variety of product exhibitions, tour programs and awesome performances which will bring your competencies to the next level as an international image consultant. Come see, hear and feel the surprising moments of Korea. The poster displays all the colors of the Korean National Flag, also known as Taegueggi. The location and date are in white, representing South Korea, a people who love peace. Blue is for peace and faih, while red stands for passion, energy and AICI. Finally, black, which is the blend of every color, was chosen to express power and elegance. With all the full spirit you could imagine from the poster your host would like to invite you to join them for an eye opening experience of sharing, education, and the inspiring beauty of South Korea which you can only imagine from the poster.

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DR. CAROL PARKER WALSH, JD, PHD, FFSM, AICI CIC, is an award winning bestselling author, columnist, image strategist, international speaker, and television personality. She’s the founder of Evolve Image Consulting, LLC, a personal and professional development company that educates entrepreneurs, professionals and women of influence on developing an empowering presence and confident image. She serves as editor in chief for AICI Global Magazine and VP of Global Marketing & Communication on the AICI International Board.


BETWEEN US

UPCOMING EVENTS MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2018

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2018

AICI CIP Q&A – CHINESE Ana Cheong, vpcertification@aici.org Time: 12:00 pm Shanghai, China Time

AICI TELECLASS: GROW YOUR IMAGE CONSULTING BUSINESS: CREATE, COLLABORATE, CAPITALIZE

MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2018

Clarisse Ringwald, FFSM Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm EST

AICI CIP Q&A – ENGLISH Ana Cheong, vpcertification@aici.org Time: 9:00 pm CST WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2018

AICI TELECLASS: DO YOU SUCCESSFULLY MAXIMIZE YOUR STRENGTHS?

SATURDAY, FEBRURY 24, 2018

AICI SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA CHAPTER: EDUCATION CONFERENCE: EXPANDING THE POSSIBILITIES REGISTER HERE.

Ann Reinten, AICI CIP Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm EST Price: $20/AICI members; $30/Non-members To register, please email Kelly Duggan, Chicago Midwest Chapter Treasurer, at kd@kellyduggan.com.

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REACH THOUSANDS OF AICI MEMBERS AND OTHER INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS WORLDWIDE AND BOOST YOUR EARNING POTENTIAL. OUR READERS ARE LOOKING FOR: Color Systems Body Styling Training Industry-Related Books & Magazines Multi-level and Network Marketing Opportunities Business Tools Continuing Education Units for AICI certification Health and Beauty Products Professional Development Workshops & Webinars Hotel & Travel Services Website Design and Support Career Coaches Sales Tools Clothing & Accessories CONTACT GIGI JABER AT ADVERTISING@AICI.ORG FOR CURRENT AD RATES AND DEADLINES. NEXT ISSUE: APRIL 2018

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E D I T I O N

L E S S O N S & H I G H L I G H T S F R O M T H E 2 0 1 7 G L O B A L C O N F E R E N C E

THE BUSINESS OF IMAGE

A NEW HORIZON

MASTER’S SERIES

FIVE SIMPLE STEPS

P R O F E S S I O N A L

A N D

E D U C AT I O N A L

D E V E L O P M E N T

THE 2017 AICI INTERNATIONAL GLOBAL CONFERENCE

TO UPGRADE YOUR MONEY MANAGEMENT SKILLS AND BECOME THE CFO YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS

THE NEW CLASS OF CERTIFIED MEMBERS INTERNATIONAL BOARD ON THE MOVE

BIENVENIDOS:

WELCOME TO MEXICO

BEAUTIFUL IN MY WAY:

GREAT TIPS

LESSONS FROM LADY GAGA

TO MAXIMIZE YOUR CONFERENCE EXPERIENCE

MEET YOUR NEW

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

ZAYNA ROSE

INTERNATIONAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS

CERTIFICATION

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT:

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT:

WHY YOU NEED YOUR CIC

MIA LAMOTTE OCTOBER 2017

KAREN TSUO JULY 2017

APRIL 2017

Profile for Association of Image Consultants International

AICI Global Magazine January 2018  

AICI Global Magazine January 2018

AICI Global Magazine January 2018  

AICI Global Magazine January 2018

Profile for aici