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Page 36

Feature

The New Code... Again BY JAMES DOLAN, P.E., LEED AP

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Although many design professionals are still working to understand some of these changes, we are upon another code update which will be effective October 3, 2016. The revisions will be based on IECC 2015 and includes many items, some of which are:

• Increased requirements for building envelope (glazing, insulation, air barriers, vestibule requirements, etc.) • Control of lighting and daylighting • Building Mechanical Systems -

Minimum efficiency requirements

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Economizer and Energy Recovery requirements

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Fan Efficiency

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Service Water Heating Efficiency, insulation and piping length limitation

• Commissioning of systems (although listed in IECC 2012 its worth mentioning that most Service Water Heating, Lighting and HVAC are required to be commissioned.) • The New Code will include additional“mandatory” requirements.

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The New York City Energy Conservation Code (NYCECC) is also moving to a new code in October based on the IECC 2015. Both New York State and NYC allow for multiple paths for energy code compliance (Prescriptive or Performance methods). Each project should be assessed for the most appropriate path. It is anticipated that "Whole Building" or Energy Modeling will become a predominant performance path for compliance and will rely on Architects and Engineers working together early in design to ensure the project both meets the code and, where the owner has higher expectations, exceeds the code. This performance path allows for trade-offs which enable the designer/owner to have the most flexibility. Com Check can still be used to trade-off lighting and envelope items to show compliance. In either path, the design must meet the “mandatory” requirements and the update in October will include more mandatory items. The Code also allows an ASHRAE 90.1 2013 path for whole building analysis that can be beneficial for certain

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metrics or trade-offs not allowed under the IECC or NYSECC. These changes in codes are leading the industry on a path to “Net Zero”. A designer or client looking to be progressive should target deep energy savings or go the extra distance to achieve a Net Zero Building (i.e. as much energy is generated on site as is consumed). NYSERDA is encouraging analysis for these types of high performance projects through the New Construction Program (NCP) with increased cost share of the energy analysis and incentives to offset some of the costs of high performance lighting, equipment, and envelope measures. Net Zero Buildings are typically still “Grid” connected, so you can still get your energy from Con Edison, O&R, Central Hudson etc., when necessary. The Net Zero path often drives the project towards an all-electric option so energy can be offset by solar PV (photovoltaic) power. At a minimum, staying on top of these code requirements will help benchmark realistic energy goals as well as pave the path for expeditious Code Official approval.

ArchPLUS Spring 2016 Vol.3 No.2  

Sustainability

ArchPLUS Spring 2016 Vol.3 No.2  

Sustainability

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