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EUGENE’S MISSING MIDDLE:

WE NEED MORE THAN SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES & HIGH-RISE DEVELOPMENT By Clay Roberts Neal In Eugene, we built most our housing after 1950, when national policies were directed almost entirely toward building single-family, suburban neighborhoods. In fact, 52% of our current housing stock was built between 1950-1979. If you moved to the Willamette Valley at that time, you arrived when we were building not only many new homes, but entirely new neighborhoods. While housing development before 1950 included a wide range of housing types (seen in many older neighborhoods throughout Eugene), new zoning trends through the mid-century effectively began to exclude any type of housing other than single-family homes or high-density apartments. The vast diversity of housing types in the middle went missing – hence the issue of “missing-middle housing.” Why are they still missing? Because we’ve yet to make a place for them. Modern regulations—including parking requirements, lot size minimums, and unit density maximums—have made it impossible to develop these housing types even where they are compatible and would contribute significantly to neighborhood vitality and housing affordability. This is something we can change.

Missing-middle housing types – cottage courtyards, duplexes, row houses, and others – have several characteristics that benefit their residential neighborhoods, including: • Walkable location • Small, well-designed units • Lower perceived density • Simple construction • Enronmental impact • Options for households of diverse age, size, and income • Lower maintenance • Energy efficiency

INTERSTATE 5 RIVER ROAD/ SANTA CLARA COBURG ROAD

HWY 99

DOWNTOWN

WEST 11TH 18TH AVE

SPRINGFIELD

FRANKLIN WILLAMETTE RIVER 30TH AVE

Sensitive missing-middle development along key corridors is one strategy that could more directly support a more inclusive, age-friendly, opportunity-rich, and affordable community. We want livability, low-cost development patterns, diverse opportunities, and energy and climate resilience. Missing-middle housing could help us get there. Key corridors are already served by city infrastructure and they often include transit options and schools, employment, and daily services. Missing-middle housing provides a wider variety of options for everyone interested in living in Eugene. If even one quarter of our expected population growth was accommodated by infill development along

KURT ALBRECHT AIA

ALBRECHT ARCHITECTURE, LLC 1740 WILLAMETTE STREET, EUGENE, OREGON 97401

SOUTH WILLAMETTE

LCC

Edge vs. Corridor Opportunities for Residential Growth

transit corridors, we would have the opportunity to reduce our carbon emissions due to daily commutes by 750,000 lbs. of CO2 per year. To recapture that much CO2, we would have to plant almost 9,000 tree seedlings and let them grow for 10 years. The benefits of providing missing-middle housing in our key corridors are compelling. With the right support from our

policy and development activities, we can create a livable, walkable, opportunity-rich future for this community. Unfortunately, middle-income housing remains difficult to develop, particularly in the very neighborhoods where people want to live. By 2032, we expect to need (Continued on pg. 16)

A RCHITECTURAL S PECIFICATIONS C ONSULTANTS

Paul Edlund,FCSI

Linn West,CSI

Consulng Specificaon Writer

Architctural Specificaons Consultant

The Stafford1200 Overlook Dr Apt 276

930 Lawrence Street Eugene, Oregon 97401

Lake Oswego, Oregon 97034 541-683-1426 pauledlund@msn.com

541-485-3315

MCKENZIE RIVER

541-206-0140 bogie07@comcast.net

kurt@albrechtarchitecture.com

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS | SOUTHWESTERN OREGON CHAPTER

AIASWO.ORG

Profile for AIA Southwestern Oregon

AIA-SWO 2017 Design Annual Publication  

The AIA Southwestern Oregon Chapter (AIA-SWO) publishes an annual newspaper insert to promote the value of design to the community.

AIA-SWO 2017 Design Annual Publication  

The AIA Southwestern Oregon Chapter (AIA-SWO) publishes an annual newspaper insert to promote the value of design to the community.

Profile for aiaswo
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