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E-PARK AND MORE By Jeff Petry Parking and Technology Manager, City of Eugene Parking. What is the first thing that comes to mind when you see the word parking? Is it parking tickets? How about a parking meter, or, perhaps a parking garage? What emotion does the word ‘parking’ make you feel? Parking is not traditionally viewed in a positive light, especially if payments and tickets are involved. Eugene’s Parking Services program, Epark Eugene, aims to change that by combining technology with parking to positively influence our community and the world. As our country urbanized and the Federal Highway Act of 1921 began to connect cities, downtowns across the nation began to face a new problem: lots of vehicles on the street. Business owners and their customers became frustrated with the lack of on-street parking turnover—customers could not access the stores.

will use resources collected to maintain its existing $100,000,000 in parking structures and assets and put money back into the community. We work with new and current business to meet customer and employee parking needs, including finding less expensive commute options through carpooling, EmX, and biking. Parking Services funds onstreet bike corrals to create easier customer access to many downtown amenities. In addition to funding of over $800,000 to support downtown Eugene police services, Parking Services also provides 24/7 security services for downtown garages. The Parking Services program continues to invest in our creative community. Parking revenue helped fund the amazing downtown murals that are part of the 20x21 mural project. We showcase local writers in our Step into Poetry, Stories, and Theatre project in the stairwells of the Overpark

Photography by Erik Bishoff

“Framing Parklet” by Propel Studio, Portland OR

The solution came from a new technology: the parking meter. The first parking meter was installed in 1935 in Oklahoma City, OK. It was a technological solution to managing crowded downtown business districts that automated parking time restrictions by requiring payment to park. It also moved long-term vehicle parking out of the high demand areas and provided easier customers access to businesses. The parking meter solution spread throughout the country during the Great Depression, and by 1939, The City of Eugene had installed 145 meters in the Broadway and Willamette Street area. For the next eighty years, the Eugene’s downtown would oscillate between periods of free and paid parking. Epark Eugene is using new technologies to meet current challenges, enhance people’s parking experience, and reinvent in our community. Our goal is to use the money collected at parking meters and garages to invest in the projects and activities that benefit the places and people around them. Our Parking Reinvestment program AIASWO.ORG

Photography by Erik Bishoff

“Pin You Gene” by Cameron McCarthy, Eugene OR AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS | SOUTHWESTERN OREGON CHAPTER

Profile for AIA Southwestern Oregon

AIA-SWO 2017 Design Annual Publication  

The AIA Southwestern Oregon Chapter (AIA-SWO) publishes an annual newspaper insert to promote the value of design to the community.

AIA-SWO 2017 Design Annual Publication  

The AIA Southwestern Oregon Chapter (AIA-SWO) publishes an annual newspaper insert to promote the value of design to the community.

Profile for aiaswo
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