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BETTER TOGETHER:

HOUSING CHOICE & AFFORDABILITY (Continued from pg. 3) lines, and they used to be everywhere. (See “Eugene’s Missing Middle Housing” in this issue.) BACK TO THE FUTURE OF HOUSING It’s worth looking back at how diverse housing types have supported American communities in the past. In fact, much of the housing that held the country’s emerging middle class a century ago were missing-middle types. In older American cities, these historic types are nearly indistinguishable from single-family homes. Housing with an extra unit or room was typical, and it allowed the home to flex with the various chapters of home life— young family, large family, unstable economy, and aging family. Modern families would benefit from a similar opportunity to accommodate change throughout life. Missing-middle housing is also more affordable to moderate incomes by design. Smaller, well-designed units allow residents to “buy less house,” and—as a result—the cost of missing-middle housing falls between subsidized housing and larger, market-rate units. When land and space are more highly valued, design has an even greater role to play. In the missing-middle conversations last April, experts advised the community

to “reverse engineer” design solutions that demonstrate the desired architectural quality, compatibility, and cost control—and then use these models to help improve local regulations and to plan for a changing future. Already, almost 30% of American households are comprised of a single person. By 2035, most households in America will be just one person, and more than 13 millions of those residents will be over 75. At the other end of the spectrum, the preferences of Millennials—for smaller homes close to walkable amenities and more interesting, diverse neighborhoods—are driving future housing demand. Facing a significant mismatch between their needs, buying power, and America’s suburban-focused housing supply, this generation has struggled to access the housing market. Yet owning a home remains the most effective way to build uninherited wealth in America.

COMMERCIAL . EDUCATION . HEALTHCARE . SPIRITUAL . RESIDENTIAL . RECREATION . INDUSTRIAL

A HOME FOR EVERYONE Join the discussion and learn more about how we can increase housing choice and affordability. Make plans to join us in February, and follow @betterhousingtogether on social media.

s! e d i u rty g e p o r p Your Sadie Dressekie, MBA Principal Broker

Brokers

Samantha Chirillo, MS, MPA Casilda Figueroa Jenna Fribley, AIA Linh Huynh Ashley Lyons AIASWO.ORG

office

541.344.3313

realnwgroup.com

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE ADVISORS

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS | SOUTHWESTERN OREGON CHAPTER

Profile for AIA Southwestern Oregon

AIA-SWO 2017 Design Annual Publication  

The AIA Southwestern Oregon Chapter (AIA-SWO) publishes an annual newspaper insert to promote the value of design to the community.

AIA-SWO 2017 Design Annual Publication  

The AIA Southwestern Oregon Chapter (AIA-SWO) publishes an annual newspaper insert to promote the value of design to the community.

Profile for aiaswo
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