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Tracings January / February 2013

Monthly Newsletter of the AIA Santa Clara Valley Chapter AIASCV


Jan/Feb 2013

PARTNERS

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AIA Santa Clara Valley Corporate Partners play an important role in our Chapter. All of these local companies are proven leaders in their fields and provide continuing support to our local Chapter and our architects.


COVER:

ORGANIZATION OF WOMEN ARCHITECTS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S CORNER

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PRESIDENT’S LETTER

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OWA CELEBRATES 40 YEARS

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JULIA MORGAN

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NCARB GENDER BY THE NUMBERS

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PERSPECTIVES

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SCHOOL OF THE FUTURE CONTEST

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OBITUARY

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AIA SCV MENTOR PROGRAM

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AIA SCV CHAPTER NEWS

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PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATES

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AIASCV CHAPTER INFORMATION

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Jan/Feb 2013


Jan/Feb 2013

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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Steve Sowa, AIA President

Britt Lindberg, AIA

Vice President/President Elect

Ed Janke, AIA Secretary

Samuel Sanderson, AIA Treasurer

Chuck Campanella, Associate AIA Associates Director

Passion for Construction We love what we do. The buildings we choose to build can change lives. From research centers that eliminate diseases to institutions that educate tomorrow’s leaders, our work

Kay Mascoli

Executive Director Directors

Brigitte Williams, AIA Eugene W. Ely, AIA Thang Do, AIA Brian Mah, AIA David Regester, AIA Baraka Al Ramah (Keko) AIAS Student Liaison

Jeff Current, AIA

makes a difference. There is pride in all that we do, continually strengthening our commitment.

1600 Seaport Boulevard, Suite 350 2EDWOOD #ITY #!  s 4EL   www.rsconstruction.com

Rudolph and Sletten’s work ethics are one of the highest in the industry.� Jerry D. Jordan

$IRECTOR OF 2EGIONAL 3ALES$IRECTOR OF Estimating and Engineering SASCO

Past President

Š 2012 JOELLE CRUZ / AIA TRACINGS MAGAZINE ALL TEXT AND ARTWORK ARE COPYRIGHT OF THEIR RESPECTIVE CREATORS AND PUBLISHERS. NONE OF THE MATERIAL IN THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORM WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF TRACINGS OR THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS. EVERY EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO PROVIDE ACTUALLY ACCURATE INFORMATION. MADE IN PALO ALTO IS PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR. Online version is available VIA OUR WEBSITE WWW.tracings.COM WE ARE A SUBMISSION BASED PUBLICATION AND ARE ALWAYS ACTIVELY LOOKING FOR CONTRIBUTORS, COLLABORATORS AND VOLUNTEERS. PLEASE CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE tracings MAGAZINE™ is a publication of joelle cruz by aia santa clara Copyright Š 2011 by MADE LOCAL Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or part, without permission is prohibited

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Tsakopoulos Investments, Bank of the West Tower


Holiday Party, Member Appreciation, Silent Auction, Toys for Tots & More On December 6, we

held our Holiday Party at Porcelanosa’s new showroom in San Jose to celebrate the season, the end of 2012 and to acknowledge our members, especially those who made significant contributions of time and talent to our Chapter. Many of the attendees had a great time “shopping” and browsing through the Kay Mascoli showroom, which is a AIA SCV Executive Director spectacular space Photo: Bernardo Grijalva Photography featuring a multitude of tile, kitchen and bath products for both commercial and residential applications. Two U.S. Marine Corps Sergeants, Rendon & Scinto, also attended and mingled with the group as part of the Toys for Tots annual drive that our Chapter supports. Thank you all for your generosity, both at the event and other locations where barrels were set up for the Toys for Tots donations. Several members were recognized for their outstanding contributions to the Chapter: David Regester, AIA and Gary Crosman, AIA for their commitment and leadership of the 2012 Design Awards; Mary Follenweider, AIA for her untiring commitment to help reorganize and renovate the Chapter office, as well as reinvigorate our efforts to create an AIASCV 501c3 organization; Warren Jacobsen, AIA as the “go to guy” in supporting the AIASCV staff on many behind the scenes logistics for our Chapter meetings and Design Awards; Keko Al Ramah, Associate AIA for taking charge from day one as the AIA Student liaison to our Chapter, volunteering in the office, encouraging student involvement and stimulating new ways of supporting our future architects; and Kent Mather, FAIA for his thorough and dedicated mentorship, as well as his patience in training me in my new role as executive director.

Our Silent Auction was a huge success in support of our continuing education efforts. A special thank you to our donors (see next page). I want to thank all of our Committee Chairs and committee members that provided such fantastic support to the Chapter in 2012. We could never do it all without you! - Design Awards: Chair - David Regester & Gary Crosman led the amazing team who made this event a huge success. - Tracings: Scott Smithwick, AIA spearheaded the new design and layout of the Tracings “magazine”, providing expanded imagery and content for readers. - Associates/Emerging Professionals: Gordon Wong energized associates training to transition effectively into the profession and obtain licensure. - Continuing Education: Peter Duxbury, AIA organized many opportunities for continuing education credits, through “Lunch and Learns” held at HPS and HMC. - Programs: Bill Sowa and his enthusiastic committee organized numerous exciting and educational events in a multitude on venues throughout our locale. - Scholarship: Mary Ahern-Tang, AIA provided leadership in the application and selection of scholarships in support of students going into the field of architecture. - Students: Marcel Barboza (Jan-June) and Keko Al Ramah (July-Dec) had roles in supporting the West Valley College AIA Students, our future architects. - Membership R.O.A.R.: Natalie Thomas, AIA found new ways to reach out to prospective, new and existing members to grow our Chapter. - Environment/COTE: Gene Ely, AIA jumped in and created new approaches in support of education on CAL Green code implementation. - Fellows: Kent Mather, FAIA diligently pursued potential Fellows to be recognized for their achievements in our Chapter in the greater architectural community. - Architecture 101: Hari Sripadanna, AIA revived this important education and awareness-building tool within our local community. - Web Site/Chapter Communications: Britt Lindberg, AIA initiated new social media vehicles to broaden our communications options for members. - Ethics/By-Laws: Ron Ronconi, AIA continued to act as a resource for members in this area.

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S CORNER

Jan/Feb 2013


Jan/Feb 2013

HOLIDAY PARTY

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2012 Silent Auction Donors

Auction Items

AIASCV Keko Al Ramah Cinnabar Hills Golf Club Jeff Current Curtis Finger Mary Follenweider Graniterock Bernard Grijalva HMH Hunter Hill Winery Il Fornaio John’s of Willow Glen Kelly Kane Jennifer Kretschmer Britt Lindberg Gene Mascoli OneWorkPlace Porcelanosa Michael Roanhaus Margaret Seltenreich Neela Shukla Samuel Sinnott Slatter Construction Scott Smithwick Hari Sripandanna Mark Yanisker

Food Items: homemade goods, gift cards, dinner parties, cutting board Golf Items: balls, foursome round of golf Art: paintings, pictures, framed art Wine: bottles, basket, wine tasting Services: law, organizational, marketing, photography, car rental Electronics: cell phone, Kindle fire, digital audio recorder, computer Books Necklace Furniture Movie Gift Card

Bar Sponsor

Silent Auction Sponsor Member AppreciationSponsor

Chapter Meeting Sponsor

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Jan/Feb 2013

Welcome our newest Corporate Partner!

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SPECIAL OFFER ACCESS THE NEWS YOU NEED THE WAY YOU WANT. SAVE 25% TODAY, ONLY $71, REGULAR PRICE: $94. Contact Bill Schwee to take advantage of this offer! 408-299-1872Â bschwee@bizjournals.com Check out our calendar of events www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/calendar

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AIA MEMBERS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION INCLUDES: Complete online access Morning and afternoon email updates Weekly print edition The Book of Lists Archives and more

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Jan/Feb 2013

PRESIDENT’S LETTER

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What’s in Store for 2013 As this is my first article as the President of the

Santa Clara Valley Chapter, I wanted to thank everyone who was involved in the success we had last year. 2012 was a big year for our Chapter. So, for all those who attended program meetings, volunteered time on a committee, submitted to the Design Awards, ran the bases at the softball tournament, sunk putts at the golf tournament and shared in the learning events, thank you! A special thanks goes out to the entire Board, our Executive Director and our Membership and Communications Associate. I cannot possibly mention everyone who shared in our success by name, but you are appreciated. I also wanted to share, quickly, the Board’s mission for the coming year. Besides continuing the great foundation of 2012, it is really our desire to identify the needs of our membership and design community. We want to make our Chapter, our members and the amazing resources we can offer more visible, and in turn, more vital to the shaping of our valley. As architects, we should be the organization the general public, and both public and private organizations, look to for design expertise. We hope to spend the next year expanding our connections with and educating related organizations to the value we add and the importance of our organization. This includes expanding our Architecture 101 program, partnering with the new SPUR San Jose, joining with the Downtown Business Association in shaping the urban fabric and, simply, exposing our involvement in the design of major projects. It is also our goal to identify the needs of our members better, address them and, hopefully, expand our membership, provide better value and see a few new faces.

Steve Sowa, AIA AIA SCV Chapter President Photo: Bernardo Grijalva Photography

With that said, and in keeping with the theme of this month’s Tracings, I just wanted to leave everyone with my two cents. As with everything, when asked to draw our attention to a specific sector of our Chapter, (this month is women in architecture), we immediately conjure up images of the trailblazers such as Zaha Hadid, Kazuyo Sejima and Julia Morgan who overcame obstacles, established highly successful architecture careers, and designed landmark buildings. I do not want to overlook the role women continue to play in our own Chapter. We appreciate the efforts of women in administrative positions, interns, emerging professionals, architects, engineers, urban designers and all who contribute in both big and small ways. So I wish everyone a great year.


2013 Calendar of Events (Tentative) January

10th – Thursday – Board Meeting 17th – Thursday – Chapter Meeting

February

14th – Thursday - Board Meeting 20th – Wednesday - Chapter Meeting

March

14th – Thursday – Board Meeting 20th to 23rd – Grassroots, Washington, DC 27th – Wednesday – Chapter Meeting

April

11th – Thursday – Board Meeting 24th – Wednesday – Scholarship Awards

May

9th – Thursday – Board Meeting 15th – Wednesday – Chapter Meeting

June

13th – Thursday – Board Meeting 14th – Friday – Golf Tournament 20th to 22nd – National Convention, Denver

July

11th – Thursday – Board Meeting 17th – Wednesday – Chapter Meeting

August

3rd to 6th – CACE National Meeting, Atlanta 8th – Thursday – Board Meeting 21st – Wednesday – Chapter Meeting

September

12th – Thursday – Board Meeting 18th – Wednesday – Chapter Meeting

October

10th – Thursday – Board Meeting and Retreat 16th – Wednesday – Chapter Meeting

November

7th to Thursday – Corporate Partner Dinner 14th – Thursday – Board Meeting 20th – Wednesday – Chapter Meeting

December

4th – Wednesday – Holiday Party & Silent Auction 12th – Thursday – Board Meeting and Holiday Luncheon

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AIA SCV CALENDAR

Jan/Feb 2013


Jan/Feb 2013

ORGANIZATION OF WOMEN ARCHITECTS

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OWA Celebrates 40 Years by Inge Horton

In the late 1960s, the Women's Movement in the

United States helped women to become aware of their unequal status in society and pursue change. Women's studies courses at universities, popular magazines like Gloria Steinem's Ms for Women, and demonstrations for equal rights caused women to question the validity of male role models and rules in society and to demand equality. The unequal situation of women in the maledominated field of architecture was brought to light in a well-researched article by Ellen Perry Berkeley in the respected architectural magazine, Architectural Forum, in September 1972. The article gave many examples of overt and covert discrimination of women in architecture, landscape architecture and planning, most noticeably in lower pay and less opportunity for promotion than for men. Encouraged by the examples of other women's professional organizations around the country, women architects started to get together in support of each other and to overcome their second-class professional status. In California, a few women, among them Wendy Bertrand, Marie Laleyan, Mui Ho, and Danica Truchlikova, began informal gatherings in November of 1972 to discuss their experiences in the university and workplace. They named the group Organization of Women Architects and Design Professionals (OWA) and enthusiastically developed an organizational structure, drafted bylaws and pursued incorporation in 1973. Influenced by the women's movement and its emphasis on equality, they chose a horizontal structure. The hierarchical structure of officers was replaced by a steering committee working cooperatively and making decisions by consensus. The goal of OWA is to support women as whole persons, not only their careers in architecture. In the first years, the monthly meetings took place in members’ homes and started with an introduction of all participants, which facilitated networking.

Among the first speakers were Dolores Hayden, who shared her experience of founding a similar organization in Boston, and Beverly Willis, offering advice on improving skills for job hunting. Other meetings were planned on women architects' work, job-sharing, flexible work schedules, and childcare. In seminars we reviewed our portfolios for job interviews and improved public speaking skills. OWA arranged financial seminars to learn about money management, and health seminars to educate ourselves about women's health and occupational hazards. We also organized field trips to recently completed buildings as well as construction sites. Many members found new and often better jobs through the OWA job referral service. The programs vary with the interests and talents of the Steering Committee members and input from


Jan/Feb 2013

members. In the mid-eighties, OWA gained much publicity with its House Tours that showcased buildings and landscapes designed by women. The tours were a huge success.

women in mid-career but it is now open to all members as a time for renewing friendships, relaxation, reflection, and personal and professional growth.

Another important program is the annual weekend retreat at a lovely ranch in the wine country north of San Francisco. Marda Stothers initiated it in 1988 for

Besides providing opportunity for lifelong friendships and career support, OWA created many important programs to benefit architects and design professionals in general, not only women. For example, one of the outstanding contributions was the Mock Exam, intended to prepare and train young architects for the difficult California State licensing test. The mock exam was so successful that OWA sold it after some years to the American Institute of Architects. Another significant contribution is providing health insurance to uninsured professionals. In 1976, after lengthy investigations, Janet Crane set up a health plan for OWA members. Making it available to all architects and designers in small offices, as well as unemployed architects, is a great service to the community because affordable health care was not easily available in the United States. As OWA approaches its 40th anniversary in 2013, I would like to look at two factors, selected from many others, to comment on its condition: the professional environment and the internal organizational conditions. The professional environment for women in architecture has definitely changed in the last forty years. More women architects practice with admirable records and careers, as employees or in their own firms, and in specializations that make them leaders in their field. At a presentation of the film "A Girl is A Fellow Here" ~ 100 Women Architects in the Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright and the ensuing discussion, a woman architect in her early forties stated that she had never experienced discrimination. Wow! I would like to congratulate her but I am also a little ambivalent. While I would like to believe that she is right, there are many reports which show that women architects still earn about 20% less than their male counterparts, just to point out one indicator of many discriminatory practices. And what about the flight of women architects into other fields? Among the changes in the environment for women in architecture are some in several institutions that – to a lesser or greater degree - focus on women. The AIA has become more welcoming: starting by electing a few women to serve as national and chapter presidents and women being awarded the prestigious AIA Fellowship, to offering special programs such as the ongoing Forum for Women Architects of the AIA

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Jan/Feb 2013

East Bay, and the recent conference The Missing 32% of the AIA San Francisco chapter. Two other institutions exclusively promote women in architecture and design professions. The International Archive of Women in Architecture (IAWA) http:// spec.lib.vt.edu/IAWA/ at Virginia Tech, established in 1985 by the late visionary Milka Bliznakov, is building a significant collection of original records of women in the field and invites all women in architecture to donate their drawings and other records. The annual Milka Bliznakov Prize encourages researchers to use the mostly unknown records of women’s achievements for their studies. The Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation (BWAF) http://bwaf.org/foundation/foundation-about was founded in 2002 by the accomplished architect and philanthropist Beverly Willis. “BWAF is working to change the culture of the building industry so that women’s work – past, present and future – is acknowledged, respected and valued. BWAF achieves its mission by documenting women’s work, educating the public and transforming industry practice through collaborations with museums, professional organizations and other groups.” The “Making a Place for Women” program just issued a call for entries of women’s work in architecture worldwide. On the local level, two publications shed light on women architects in the San Francisco Bay Area. My Tracings

reference book Early Women Architects of the San Francisco Bay Area – The Lives and Work of Fifty Professionals, 1890 – 1951 shows that the well known architect Julia Morgan was not the only one but that there were many other women in architecture in the first half of the last century. While Early Women Architects offers a historic perspective and establishes the professional lineage of contemporary women in architecture, Wendy Bertrand’s fascinating memoir Enamored with Place: as Woman + as Architect, recounts her successes and struggles as a governmentemployed architect and as a single mother. As I browsed through her beautifully designed book, I was drawn to the Epilogue – If I Knew Then What I Know Now, which is in my opinion the most important part of her book for design professionals. Wendy argues for and envisions a new model for practicing architecture. She proposes creating a democratic and inclusive model in which masculinity is not replaced by femininity but integrated in a framework she calls placitecture. The star architect will be replaced by teamwork based on “social justice, planet peacefulness, respect for nature, diversity in history, ethical distribution of resources, and land stewardship.” Naturally, over the years, OWA grew into a mature organization with a growing membership ranging from students to active practitioners and retired professionals. Sadly, we lost members due to death,


relocation to other parts of the globe or career changes into other fields than architecture. In response to changing interests, new programs emerged such as the OWA Book Circle, an internship program and the scholarship award while other popular events such as the annual retreat, the holiday gift-giving party, and the health plan continue to draw members. The monthly meetings have been reduced to events every two months and still offer valuable programs for personal and professional development. OWA has a strong and well designed internet presence with a website containing the up-to-date Newsletter and an archive going back to 2002, programs offered by OWA, portfolios showing the work of members, among other information. Of course, a Facebook site is also available for social networking. OWA is proud that the Berkeley-Rupp Prize honors one of our late members (and AIASCV member – ed.), Sigrid Lorenzen Rupp. Sigrid donated the prize as a biannual award to a practitioner or academic who has made a significant contribution to promoting women in architecture and shown a commitment to sustainability and the community. In September of 2012, the College of Environmental Design at UC Berkeley announced that the respected architect Deborah Berke as the inaugural recipient of the Berkeley-Rupp Architecture Professorship and Prize of $100,000. Berke will deliver a public lecture on January 28, 2013 at 6.30 p.m. in Wurster Hall Gallery at the opening of an exhibit of her work. OWA takes pride in looking back on its 40 years of successfully promoting and furthering women in architecture and related design professions and confidently looks forward to many more years of active involvement in issues concerning women's advancement in design.

Inge Horton Retired City Planner turned Architectural Historian

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ORGANIZATION OF WOMEN ARCHITECTS

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Jan/Feb 2013

WOMEN IN ARCHITECTURE

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Julia Morgan, Architect by Jeff Current, AIA

In the hills of Oakland, at the Mountain View

Cemetery, is buried one of the giants of the architectural world. Julia Morgan is the First Lady of Architecture in California and a visionary whose work is still admired and emulated today. It is impossible to publish an issue of Tracings on “Women in Architecture” without mentioning this shining star. The only woman to graduate in her Civil Engineering class at UC Berkeley in 1894, Julia Morgan was accustomed to blazing trails in a world saturated with men. After being tutored by famous Bay Area Architect Bernard Maybeck in her senior year at UC Berkeley, she was encouraged to apply to the École de Beaux Arts in Paris. Maybeck himself was a graduate of the program and Julia Morgan was promptly denied entrance on the basis that they did not accept women applicants. The following year this policy was revised to allow “ladies” the opportunity to study at the École, and eventually Julia was admitted and became the first woman to graduate from the program.

Ms Morgan took a job with San Francisco architect John Galen Howard upon her return to California, working on several projects at the UC Berkeley campus where Howard was the supervising Architect. Projects such as the Hearst Mining Building, the Hearst Greek Theater and early concepts for the Sather Gate were on Julia Morgan’s drafting board. Howard remarked to a colleague that, “Morgan was an excellent draftsman whom I have to pay almost nothing, as it is a woman.” It wasn’t long before Julia set out to work on her own.

Hearst Castle, San Simeon Tracings

Photo: Bernardo Grijalva Photography


Jan/Feb 2013

Hearst Castle, San Simeon Photo: Bernardo Grijalva Photography

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In 1904 she received her license to practice Architecture in California, the first woman to do so. Julia Morgan went on to design 700 buildings in California and Hawaii in her 47 year career. It didn’t hurt that she opened her practice just prior to the 1906 San Francisco earthquake (or that Phoebe Apperson Hearst was an old friend – ed.); she received numerous commissions to rebuild after this disaster. Her small size (5 feet tall, 100 pounds) did nothing to reduce her impact on both clients and the profession. Julia Morgan was driven to work her entire life as an independent architect with no partners and no spouse, but a tireless dedication to her prosperous practice and her many clients, colleagues and staff members.

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Among the most notable projects that Julia Morgan produced are Hearst Castle in San Simeon, CA. for newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst, and the Women’s City Club in Berkeley. Ms Morgan also designed the Los Angeles Examiner building for Randolph Hearst in the Mission Revival style. Morgan designed several buildings for the YWCA, starting with her work on the Asilomar summer conference center in Pacific Grove, CA. at the recommendation of Phoebe Apperson Hearst. Asilomar (which means “refuge by the sea”) is a wonderful collection of Arts & Crafts lodges, meeting rooms, chapel and

Photo: Bernardo Grijalva Photography

Jan/Feb 2013

Chapel of the Chimes, Oakland

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administrative buildings. Exposed timber and fieldstone buildings frame views of the Pacific coast through large glazed openings. Other YWCA projects were done by Ms Morgan in Fresno, Hollywood, Honolulu, Long Beach, Oakland, Pasadena, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, San Jose and Vallejo. Several churches, chapels, residences and estates round out the body of work created by the first woman architect in our state. In Oakland, the Chapel of the Chimes was designed by Ms Morgan in 1926 as a series of white concrete Romanesque and Gothic spaces. The buildings meander thoughtfully around cloisters and gardens which highlight the California daylight and climate. Julia Morgan has inspired generations of young women to reach for their goal of becoming an Architect and helping to shape our world. Her legacy is one that we honor and continue to build upon today. Make a point to visit some of her projects this year. Her work is all over the Bay Area and California. You will be uplifted and refreshed by the thoughtfulness and attention to detail she put into her designs.

Jeff Current, AIA Past President


In June 2012, the National Council of Architectural

Registration Boards released a publication called “NCARB by the Numbers” to share years of data that has recently been organized to reveal trends in the industry. In this publication, NCARB states, “With our new information systems, we now have the ability to draw on Record data to answer important questions regarding not only our own programs, but also critical indicators for the profession.”

applications (for NCARB Certification and Reciprocity in other states). NCARB by the Numbers is a publication produced by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. The complete study can be found online at http://www.ncarb.org/About-NCARB/NCARB-bythe-Numbers.aspx.

In addition to several other informative charts and graphs, NCARB released tables showing the growing number of women in the profession, based on the number of NCARB record applications per year. The tables demonstrate a dramatic increase in women in architecture within the last 28 years. Shown below is an excerpt from the study. The first chart shows the total number of women applying for NCARB Records. The second and third charts split the data into Intern Record applications (for the Intern Development Program) and Architect Record

Stephanie Silkwood, AIA, LEED AP is the current IDP Coordinator for AIA California Council and NCARB. She works at RMW Architecture & Interiors in San Jose and can be reached at ssilkwood@rmw.com.

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WOMEN IN ARCHITECTURE

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Jan/Feb 2013

PERSPECTIVE

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Women Architects in AIA Santa Clara Valley Being a Woman President of an AIA Chapter As part of the 40th year celebration of the Organization of Woman Architects, I have been asked to reflect on my time as the President of the AIA Santa Clara Valley Chapter 2002 from the perspective of being a woman. At first, I found no relevancy to the issue of being a woman as a Chapter President. So it took some thinking back, over a decade, to what it was like to be President. As with all things in my life, I like to have a plan, a strategic one whenever possible, and work to achieve a balance between my home, work and volunteer life. Although I had been on the Board of Santa Clara Chapter of the AIA for years, and had willingly volunteered to be in line for the Presidency, my term came a year earlier than planned when the Vice President suddenly moved and left the Chapter. This meant that I had no official training, no shadowing and my perfect plan to have my daughter, Isabel, be in kindergarten by age 5 was not to be. I considered declining, but those who know Kent Mather, our Executive Director at the time, know that he is incredibly good at persuading even the most staunch members of the “just say no” club. So my Presidency happened the year my daughter turned 4, with no particular plan on how to balance my time with her, my work as President of our firm and my new duties as President of the Chapter. As my understanding of my duties unfolded, I began to realize that there was a great deal of traveling, evening events and duties beyond the daily routines of the Board. My response to this situation was to consider the possibility of having my daughter join me, whenever possible, at every event throughout the year. This required asking my mother to volunteer to travel with Isabel and me, and her answer was “sure”. So my presidency became a wondrous year of spending time with my child and my mother, traveling to places like Washington D.C., Charlotte N.C. and many evening events. My daughter learned to pack and unpack her own bags, she understood that Mommy was helping others, and she and Grandma were able to develop a special bond. On the last day of the Grass Roots Conference in Washington D.C. my daughter pleaded to stay with me all day. I explained that it was very adult stuff and she would be quite bored. She said she

Tracings

Pamela Anderson-Brulé, AIA would not and I agreed as long as she could be a very good and quiet girl for the day. She dressed herself in a navy blue dress and patent leather shoes, very DC, and sat on my lap for each and every event. She would ask questions and want to know more about what was being said but she did an amazing job of sitting still. I watched as my male counterparts gave me looks that ranged from disbelief, to annoyance and only occasionally a smile. My daughter, who is now 15, is a very self-assured young woman. She is quick to volunteer and help others, and she continues to strongly support and understand my need to lead the things that I believe in and forgives my many hours of absence in her life. Since those years, I have seen many more children at these events; I have seen nursing mothers and even fathers taking their children with them. I enjoyed leading the Chapter, getting to know our members, and setting the strategic direction for our planning that I believe is still in place today. I learned a great deal about advocacy and connecting our Chapter’s voice to our City. Above all else, I learned that I could find creative ways to balance my life with the help of the two most important women in my life – my mother and my daughter. It is this support, and that of my husband, that has allowed me the privilege of being a woman leader in architecture.


One of my cherished possessions is the book: “Women in American Architecture: A Historic and Contemporary Perspective,” edited by Susana Torres, copyright 1977. Ms. Torre ends the Introduction with: “The views and ideas presented here will hopefully stir some healthy controversy, as well as contribute to change in the professional and cultural status of women in American architecture. When such a change occurs, this book will only represent a curious (albeit necessary) document of our times.” What would any new chapter(s) say about the present professional and cultural status of women in architecture? I believe that we as women in the profession are more mainstream than in the 1970s. Is this any better? Now we are more equal partners with our male counterparts, although from personal experience I will say I have not always been treated that way. Women in architecture as a whole have not reached the critical mass needed to have a profound influence on the profession nor on the visual language that speaks architecture. In recent years the economy and the environment have had a greater influence, but this may have always been the case. Whether designed by a woman or a man, in many ways these two influences are still no more than patriarchal pawns in the game of commerce. Talking economy, I went back and read through some of my President’s letters. In January 2010 I wrote that “although the recession may be over, most architects would say that we are the last to know. The road ahead could be just as bumpy as the road we have just traveled.” Myself, a public sector architect, 2010 does look worse that 2009, leaving very little comfort in our hearts that the recession is over, but we may not survive the recovery.” Although the economy improved, I did not survive. My position as Senior Architect with the City of San Jose was eliminated in 2011, which left few architects, female or male, in City capital projects and none in City upper management talk about lack of influence. Not much more to say about that except, I went off to the mountains of Colorado and renovated a log cabin – such a trade-off after working for five years on the renovation of the San Jose Airport; just as challenging but more fun. Those mountain contractors are a breed unto themselves. There’s a reason they’re in the mountains they still consider themselves part of the Wild West. For example, in discussing the work scope with a concrete contractor, he started in on me with a whole series of questions, firing one right after another without a break, meant to intimidate me. I finally did get to ask him if he had read my email and the attachments. His response was “Kinda.” (Why use

technology when the old methods are the best – telephone? As one contractor said, “I like to hear a voice.”) I then pulled out a paper copy and he paged through it saying, “You do have it put together.” After that he could not be more cooperative – “Whatever you want, Mary.” I did tell him I was an architect and I got the impression that he thought that I might know more than he did and he wasn’t willing to find out. I did have to sit my GC down and explain that he was not listening to me, nor was he keeping me in the loop about schedule and budget and if I wasn’t in the loop, I wouldn’t be happy and if I wasn’t happy, I would have to use my “professional” voice and then he wouldn’t be happy. He heard me after asking me what kinds of projects I had been responsible for. Another approach that these contractors liked is talking to my husband, even if I made the initial contact and I am standing right there. The funny thing is my husband barely has a remodeling bone in his body. Before coming to California ten years ago, I worked in both the private and the public sector in Colorado and I served as the Building Official for the City of Boulder for over five years. I was responsible for a wide range of programs, but being a building official was among the most challenging. I was misidentified as a permit clerk, a wife of a building official and even some of the building inspectors I supervised, believed that since I had not pulled myself up by my boot traps through the trades that I was not really “qualified” to be a building official. One thing I did discover about these inspectors is that they were the whiniest group of men I had ever encountered. As I say, even my children never whined that much. Of course that was many years ago and we can only hope for improvement. I think it was hard for them to be “Big Cheese” in the field and then come into the office and report to a woman. Somehow it just sat badly with them. But seriously, as a woman in architecture, I would not trade my experience for anything in the world. In high school, I was told I could not take drafting because I would be the only girl in the class and I accepted that answer, but very few since then. My hope is that my presence has not only bettered the path for women in the profession but also for the profession of architecture itself.

Mary Follenweider, AIA

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Although 500 words seem modest, the communication tool I enjoyed most was the monthly President’s letter. As I met Chapter colleagues, the AIACC team, and experienced the depth of professional pride and energy at the AIA Grassroots, these letters to the members highlighted issues that seemed of the most immediate relevance to me. Then again, I enjoyed the Chapter meeting introductions, when I tried for a three minute primer on the timeliest HOT TOPICS specific to AIASCV.

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My best wishes and support to my fellow Architects as we venture through the quagmire of the future of our profession. Communication is a good mechanism.

Liz Gibbons, AIA Women in Architecture and as President of the AIASCV Observations: There is a significantly higher percentage of women than men participating in promotion and public outreach for the profession of Architecture, notably among those women who are registered. There are more women working in the field of architecture than ever before. Of these, fewer than half may have the opportunity to become registered. This is an improvement over 30 years, as when I was in graduate school, the class was 50% women yet only 10% became registered. Even today, there are women in leadership roles in the public sector in a far greater percentage than in the private sector unless, as is often the case, women establish their own firms or partnerships. It is of note that allied professions, particularly structural engineering, have steadily increased the number of licensed women professionals within the firm environment and at management level. During my tenure on the AIASCV Board and 2009 President, there were nearly a dozen women architects contributing to the Chapter’s success. The annual percentage was disproportionally higher than the demographics of our Chapter. Oversimplified, my perception is that women focused on “communication”. The focus of their corresponding efforts was in improving the public awareness of the architecture in everyday life and the value of AIA membership. Recently, these activities seem to be honing in on emerging professionals and mentoring. Tracings

Way back in 1990, I was the "first woman president" of our Chapter. Being the president was a never dreamed-of honor and responsibility; the woman part, to me, seemed insignificant. That is until Kathy Davis, our marvelous Executive Director and I went back to Washington, D. C. for Grass Roots. That year I was the only woman president out of over 600 chapters nationally. Fortunately, times have changed and women are much more involved, but the honor and responsibility remain. We have always had an innovative and rewarding Chapter in a robust, exciting economic environment. Keep up the good work, Santa Clara Valley Chapter!

Elspeth Newfield


Women Architects in AIA Santa Clara Valley I became AIASCV president in 1997, Kathy Davis was the executive director, and my sons were over twenty one. I wanted to do things differently from what I had observed presidents doing in prior years. Trying something new makes the experience memorable; when I was treasurer, all my reports were graphs. My year as president ended up being the most profitable to date, in my twenty years of private practice. I was the second woman president since the Chapter's founding in 1946. Since I was elected by the membership, I need to acknowledge their thinking out of the box, by accepting me knowing I had a wife. The membership was mostly all men back then. I felt my presidency as a solo role, the board and committee members had minimal contact beyond perfunctory duties. A few woman members stood out as going above and beyond. They were Judith Wasserman, AIA, Sigrid Rupp, AIA and Elsbeth Newfield, AIA. During my term, I chose to rearrange the seating at the board meetings. I moved the executive director to the head of the table and I sat at a different seat each month. I moved the president's report to be the last item on the agenda. I had the executive director make the first comments at the board meeting and I added her report to Tracings, then still a mailed newsletter. Faxes were at their height. Another woman's touch was that I increased the number of Certificates of Appreciation to seventeen, which I presented at Chapter meetings. As for internal Chapter changes, I introduced a salary/benefit written agreement, as well as asking for an audit in January. Politically, we were active with PECG Initiative to level the playing field for competitive bidding for architectural services of state public works projects. These were all ground-breaking experiences for me, since I never worked in another architect's office or on any other board. I lacked the benefit of experience, so as when I started my own practice, being president was a major learning curve.

Viole McMahon One thing that I did, that was way out there, was my monthly president's article in Tracings. Since I had our executive director doing an article for Tracings, I was free to do something else. I wrote a series of monthly pep talks to the membership to enhance their own well being. I don't believe this went well since no one ever made a comment to me about them. They were speechless. I kept my finger on the pulse by taking the executive director to lunch monthly. I soon learned she was leaving the Chapter after eleven years.  She kindly stayed through the remainder of my term. I also kept in touch with each committee by attending 129 meetings. So for me, being president was like an unhindered exploration. I found it very novel and rewarding.

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Women Architects in AIA Santa Clara Valley Perspective from an Emerging Professional I consider myself an architect, not a ‘woman architect’ or ‘female architect.’ I am sure I owe this in large part to the many female architects who have opened the path before me, and to my family, friends, teachers, employers, and co-workers along the way, who have always supported me and trusted in my abilities. Perhaps it is also that when I was in architecture graduate school at UC Berkeley 1998-2001, my class was equally split between men and women, and so being a woman pursuing a career in architecture was already not uncommon. I actually came to architecture as a second career. After studying chemistry as an undergraduate and working in analytical laboratories for a few years, I realized I needed a profession that would better balance my talent for linear, scientific thought with the more challenging and rewarding qualities (to me) of creativity and diversity. Architecture was and is the perfect fit: working every day to arrive at creative and inspiring design solutions to satisfy a client’s real-world functional needs, while also meeting constraints of budgets, schedules, building codes, materials, and the structural laws of nature. No two projects are alike, no two clients are alike, no two project teams are alike, and so there is truly never a dull moment in this profession. And, architecture and the built environment are all around us, influencing the ways we all work, live, play, travel, and gather. Thoughtful and inspiring design makes positive impacts on peoples’ lives, helping to offer more opportunities to bring us together, to better connect us with our traditions and communities, to inspire us with new insights when we travel, and to work more collaboratively toward future innovations. To be a successful woman architect, we need to do the same as any successful architect: problem-solving that balances many complex factors for our clients, educating ourselves on all sides of the issues, portraying ourselves with confidence, communicating effectively with all team members, and leading the way to a successful project completion.

Tracings

Design matters, and our profession matters. Reach for the sky, give your best every day, and the world becomes a better and more inspiring place, one project at a time!

Britt Linberg, AIA, LEED AP AIA SCV Vice President Renewed Interest in the Status of Women Architects Recently, I was made aware of several independently authored discussions of the status of women in architecture in the online magazine Places – Forum of Design for the Public Realm at places.designobserver.com. This led to additional discovery of several provocative articles in the Australian online magazine Parlour: women, equity, architecture at www.archiparlour.org. They are worth reading, as the conditions in Australia don’t appear to be much different from those in the United States. The first Parlour survey, ‘Where do all the women go?’ generated an enormous echo – they are currently analyzing 1,200 responses. Now Parlour issued another survey about men of Australian architecture. I am looking forward to the results of these two surveys. Just to give you a flavor of the thought provoking articles in Places I will quote one article by Despina Stratigakos, Associate Professor at State University of New York at Buffalo, and author of A Women’s Berlin: Building the Modern City (Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2008), who reports on a series of roundtable discussions on Feminist Practices at the Van Alen Institute in Manhattan that took place in the spring of 2012. The occasion was the publication of the book, Feminist Practices: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Women in Architecture (Ashgate, 2011) edited by Lori A. Brown, a professor at Syracuse University, who also organized the discussions.


Renewed Interest in the Status of Women Architects Despina’s article is titled "Why Architects Need Feminism" and states: “Whether ‘old’ or ‘new’, feminism remains an inherently positive approach: it insists not only on the necessity but also on the possibility of change. Feminism weds theory to practice and encourages us to rethink the relationship between architecture schools and the larger professional world. By linking individuals to systems, feminism allows us to perceive structural limitations and to envision dissolving barriers. And feminism's attention to practice — and not just to practitioners — fosters new ways of understanding and experimenting with process. “For those of us who have long fought for greater diversity in architecture, the slow pace of change is less alarming than the emergence of cynical voices, both male and female, that dismiss the viability of architecture as a profession. At the final Van Alen roundtable, Dagmar Richter relayed the opinion, expressed by some in the field, that the declining status of the discipline is reflected in the growing presence of women in architecture schools —in other words, women are making headway because men are bailing. This stance suggests the impossibility of both a strong and integrated profession. Embracing a broader definition of feminism undermines this zerosum, winner/loser dynamic by making clear how architecture in toto gains from addressing ‘women’s’ concerns, which — as it turns out — belong to everyone.” For those women who prefer a group setting over reading an article there are many opportunities for meetings. This year the Organization of Women Architects and Design Professionals owa-usa.org will celebrate its 40th anniversary with a symposium where prominent speakers will address the topic Gender Matters on Saturday, April 13, 2013 in the Wurster Hall auditorium on UC Berkeley Campus. Another series of events exploring issues related to women in architecture is the OWA Book Circle, initiated a year ago by Wendy Bertrand. Eight women and men have been reading and discussing books about women and architecture, sharing their insights in the OWA newsletter, and gifting the books to public libraries and libraries of high schools and colleges to spread the information.

The American Institute of Architects is slowly taking note of women in the profession and established a Diversity and Inclusion program that celebrated last year’s Women’s History month with a webpage showcasing eight women architects. The AIA San Francisco recently hosted an event, The Missing 32%. It referred to the gap between 50% of female students enrolled in architecture programs and only 18% licensed persons are women. Participants talked about women’s architectural practice and presented their sometimes opposing assessment of the situation and what can be done about it. The AIA East Bay aiaeb.org is actively engaged, and sponsors the Women in Architecture Forum which meets at their office at 1405 Clay St Oakland, CA 94612 at the second Thursday of the month for discussion of relevant issues within the design and construction industry. The meetings are open to all. The next event will be a joint meeting with OWA on February 12, 2013 at 6 p.m. featuring Clare Cooper Marcus, Professor Emerita, College of Environmental Design and author of a memoir Iona Dreaming - The Healing Power of Place (Lake Worth, FL, Nicolas-Hays, 2010), and Wendy Bertrand, retired architect and author of a memoir Enamored with Place – As Woman + As Architect (San Francisco, Eyeonplace press, 2012), discussing and reading from their memoirs about place. Looking forward to 2013, I hope that the many beginnings in new and provocative thinking will multiply and result in changes to the status of women in the profession of architecture and to women’s contribution in establishing a new or revised model of architectural practice. In the Epilogue of her book Enamored with Place, Wendy Bertrand envisions a new model called placitecture for practicing architecture in a socially and environmentally equitable way. I would wish that these ideas will find wide dissemination, discussion, and eventually implementation.

Inge Horton Retired City Planner turned Architectural Historian

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AIASCV SCHOOLS OF THE FUTURE

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About the School of the Future Design Contest Where: Quimby Middle School, San Jose Sponsored by: Santa Clara County Association of REALTORS® and the American Institute of Architects Santa Clara Valley Chapter Five teams consisting of 165 eighth-graders from San Jose’s Quimby Oak Middle School competed in the local contest on January 11th. The students enrolled in the elective course, 21st Century Project Based Learning and have worked on their projects, focused on the redesign of their school spaces to enhance learning, save energy, preserve resources and make connections, since November of 2012. The contest was judged by three individuals, including Barbara Lymberis, 2012 SCCAOR President and Kay Mascoli, Executive Director of the AIA Santa Clara Valley. Throughout the project, students were mentored by local architects including Thang Do, Myron Kong, Fanny Wu, and Gwen Torres of Aedis Architecture & Planning; Brigitte Williams and Mani Farhadi of Steinberg Architects; and Eugene Ely.

“REALTORS® build communities, and well-planned schools are critical to the growth of those communities. There is a new focus on designing state-of-the-art schools that are energy efficient, are costeffective to maintain, and better places for students to learn and educators to teach.” Barbara Lymberis, 2012 SCCAOR President All Photos by: Bernardo Grijalva Photography

Tracings

“By sponsoring this contest, we hope to introduce the concepts of sustainable design to these young students and encourage them to be innovative thinkers,” said Kay Mascoli, Executive Director of the AIA Santa Clara Valley.


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The winning team will participate in the statewide contest where finalists will receive a free trip to Washington, D.C. in April to present their projects to the national design jury. The competition is an annual program supported by the Council of Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) along with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, American Institute of Architects and over 20 other organizations.

Benefits of the Competition The School of the Future Competition challenged the students at Quimby Oak Middle School to design a school that enhances learning, conserves resources, is environmentally responsive and engages the community. During the process, Steinberg Architects came away with the following insights: • Visionary Leadership: It takes a visionary teacher, brave enough to take on this challenge, but also a futurist principal to support this curriculum by encouraging the competition and group learning. • Learning Environment: The classroom environment that the students worked in was cramped and poorly lit, not conducive to learning innovatively, but the students pulled it off anyway. • Project-Based Learning: Working in groups has certain dynamics to contend with, at times connected, at times chaotic, but always interactive. • Pedagogy: The group teaching style is representative of how learning will occur in the future with multiple techniques and tools – switching back & forth on the computer/laptop/iPad, doing research or writing, working hands on, thinking and discussing ideas, strategizing and collaborating, writing on the board or making presentations to each other. • Universal Principles: The final list of design ideas the students developed was beyond their age group. In fact, college clients have come up with similar lists. This exemplifies that solid design features of any future educational architecture are universal.

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Envisioning a School of the Future through Project-Based Learning When we think of classic classrooms, we think of teachers standing in front of a classroom lecturing their students, and a few students here or there with vacant expressions on their faces waiting for the bell to ring. It has typically been a one-way conversation that happens in a box with one board at the front. If we ask our grandparents, parents and even the kids of today, what a classroom looks like, it is exactly this. However, as technology helps access information more quickly and connect with each other in ways we never had before, preparing the youth for the future means teaching them the value of working together, actively listening, sharing the workload, respecting each other’s opinions and, most of all, how to respect the world we live in and preserve it for the next generation. The Schools of the Future Competition at Quimby Oaks Middle school addresses just that. Architects all over the country volunteer to mentor middle school students to create designs for the

Schools of the Future Design Competition. At Quimby Oaks Middle School in San Jose, the school integrated the competition into their pilot program: 21st Century Project-Based Learning. Each day, the students worked on a design for their school of the future from picking a suitable site, creating adjacencies, conceptualizing the building’s design, picking materials & technology, and ultimately producing scale models, drawings & presentations. Quotes from architect mentors from each class had this to say about the experience:

“Being a mentor has been an exceptionally rewarding experience for me because, in our industry, it is rare for us to be so immersed and engaged with the end users of our design. Introducing fresh minds to the appreciation of their built environment is what motivated me through the whole process. Myron Kong, Aedis Architecture & Planning “ Throughout my architectural career I was taught that an architect’s primary role is to be responsible for the community. Mentoring middle school students has been an eye-opener and an experience of professional growth for me. I was given the opportunity to work with the teacher and students very closely as a team and offer the knowledge I have to bring their vision into reality. For me, the most rewarding experience was not about winning the competition but in seeing the joy and confidence in the students when they learnt something new about architecture.   Fanny Wu, Aedis Architecture & Planning All Photos by: Bernardo Grijalva Photography

Tracings


“ First, I have to say that being a teacher is NOT an easy job; you really have to have a lot of energy to guide your students and pay attention to what their interests are. In projectbased learning, there are many, many tasks to accomplish between the start of the project and the completion of it. You can see that each student has particular interests and it’s almost like you are juggling to see which ball (student) fits with a certain hole (task). Even in the short 1-hr periods we were with the students, I felt as if I had a chance to really get to know them. This would not have been possible through a traditional lecture style. Gwen Torres, Aedis Architecture & Planning

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OBITUARY

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Carroll Sears Rankin September 17, 1917 - December 2, 2012 Resident of Palo Alto. Born in Junction City, KY, only child of Luther T and Ethel Sears Rankin. Moved to Lexington, KY where he attended local schools and University of Kentucky (BS Civil Engineering). Drafted in 1940, he served a year in the Quartermaster Corps, then joined the Army Air Corps, flying 29 B24 combat missions over the Pacific. Returned to California, took full advantage of the GI Bill and received his BA in Architecture from USC in 1950. 1948, married Laura Jane Freeman of Racine, WI. Architectural affiliations were with Ernst J. Kump Associates, partner in Worsley, Rankin Williamson, and Stanford University. Projects included Foothill, DeAnza and Cabrillo Junior Colleges; Gunn, Awalt, Mountain View, Mt Pleasant and Carmel Valley High Schools; numerous elementary schools; San Jose Superior Court Building; All Saints, and St. Thomas, Episcopal churches. President Menlo Park Chamber of Commerce 1968-69 and President of the Santa Clara Valley Chapter of the AIA, 1970. Survived by wife Laura Rankin, daughter Gratia Rankin, and grandson Andrew Dolph. Services at noon, January 19, 2013, at St Thomas Episcopal Church, 231 Sunset, Sunnyvale CA. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Los Altos Neutra House Project. Published in San Jose Mercury News/San Mateo County Times on December 9, 2012

FURNITURE AVAILABLE

Architect in Menlo Park has surplus furniture for sale including desk, chairs, drafting table, plan rack, and flat drawer files. If interested, call (650) 322-5366 or email pkkdarch@pacbell.net

Tracings


Introducing the Mentor Program The Concept of Laddership:

Mentoring is an integral part of the architectural profession. In the past, mentoring has generally been thought of as a one-on-one relationship between a mentor and mentee, the licensed architect and the intern. The recently revamped and successful mentor programs at AIA chapters in Seattle, San Francisco, Iowa and Kansas City have broken this mold as they employ the concept of “Laddership”. Laddership mentoring expands the one-on-one relationship to a mentor group of four individuals with different levels of experience. The added benefit of this approach is that with the diversity in project types and the rapid changes in technologies, there is always something new to learn and knowledge to be shared by all members. By creating a group of four, with varying levels of experience and expertise, all members of the group are always engaged as both the mentor and mentee. This more collaborative spirit and the removal of the traditional roles have brought forth much greater satisfaction and success from all participants.

Mentor Levels:

The AIA SCV Emerging Professionals Committee will be rolling out a mentor program for our Chapter over the course of the next two months. The goals of the program are to build a network for architectural professionals beyond the office environment, promote personal and professional development in the areas of leadership, mentoring, and relationship building, and provide supplemental tools and support for emerging professionals to fulfill the requirements for licensure. It is being modeled on the AIA San Francisco Chapter’s successful Mentorship program. The experience level of the four mentor group members will be: Seasoned licensed professional (SP): 15+ years of experience Mid-level licensed professional (MLP): 5+ years of experience

Mid-level unlicensed professional (MLU): 5+ years of experience Emerging unlicensed professional (EUP): 0-5 years of experience

Program Schedule:

March 20th: Program Kick-off Event A key factor in determining the success of any mentoring relationship is the chemistry between the individuals. To that end, rather than arbitrarily assigning individuals to a group, there will be an event in March in conjunction with the March Chapter meeting, where all the individuals who signed up to participate will get to meet each other and provide feedback on who they would like to be matched with. The event will be structured like a speed-dating event. Prior to the event, each participant will fill out and submit a 10-question survey (see Survey Sidebar). The survey responses will be compiled and distributed to all participants prior to the event. At the event, there will be 10 tables with four seats each. A person of each experience level will be at the table, the group will talk for approximately 5 minutes and then the MLP, MLU and EUP individuals will move to another table to meet another three individuals. This will be repeated nine times until each participant meets all thirty participants from the other experience levels. Before leaving, each participant will identify five individuals from each of the other three experience levels that they would like to be matched with. The mentor program committee will use this input to create the groups. April (Date TBD): Mentor Groups Announcement Event In April, another event will be held where the groups will be announced and the new groups will have time to meet for the first time. Remainder of the Year: Groups meet on their own as often as they like, a minimum of three additional times.

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AIA SCV MENTOR PROGRAM

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Tracings

Mentor Program (continued) After the Announcement event, the groups are on their own to determine how often they will meet and what they will discuss. The only requirement is that someone from the group report back to the mentor committee each time they meet. This information will be used to gauge the success of the program. I am interested, how do I get involved?: If you are interested in participating please email aiascv.epc@gmail.com and identify your experience level. Being the inaugural year, we are limiting the program to 10 groups, and the allotted spaces will be filled on a first-come basis. If we have more participants than slots, we will put people on a wait list. If groups lose a member or feel that they would like to add a fifth member to their group, they can contact the committee for the names of people on the wait list. Mentor Program Committee Chuck Campanella Associates Director Britt Lindberg Vice President Brian Corbett EPC Marketing ************************ Survey Sidebar - What are your source(s) of inspiration? - What is your proudest professional achievement? - What are you currently reading/favorite book? - Where is your hometown, how many years have you been in the Bay Area? - What is your favorite restaurant in Bay Area? - What is your favorite place you’ve traveled to or place you would like to visit? - What do you want to get out of this mentorship program? - What do you have to offer to a mentorship group? - What is your favorite website? - If you weren’t an architect, what would you be? - Name one favorite architect or designer? - What’s on your bucket list?


The COTE Committee Needs You The COTE Committee has languished since the Pecha Kucha event held last February at the San Jose Museum of Art. I know there is a strong group of young architects out there committed to the environment based on the success of that event and on the terrific presentations that were the foundation of that success. We need a few of you committed professionals to help restart our COTE Committee this year with one goal being to plan and run another Pecha Kucha event in the fall, tentatively October. The door is wide open to make this committee be what you want, and make it a meaningful resource for the Chapter’s members. I would like to schedule a meeting of those interested in participating in the re-establishment of the COTE committee in early March at the latest. I propose to convene the meeting at the AIASCV offices in San Jose, but this is flexible depending on the locations of those interested in participating. I look forward to meeting you and moving forward in the new year with a renewed commitment to raising environmental awareness among our members. Please contact, Gene Ely @ 408.398.4474 or eely@att.net; or the Chapter office @ info@aiascv.org, to express your interest in this venture.

SAVE THE DATE 2013 AIA Santa Clara Valley 26th Annual Golf Tournament 14 June 2013 12:30 pm CINNABAR HILLS GOLF CLUB

Tell your friends and mark your calendar!

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PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATES

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Arborists Consultants Monarch Consulting Arborists LLC Richard Gessner (831) 331-8982 rick@monarcharborist.com

Acoustics Consultants Charles M. Salter Associates Erika Frederick (408) 295-4944 erika.frederick@cmsalter.com Charles M. Salter Associates Philip Sanders (408) 295-4944 philip.sanders@cmsalter.com Colin Gordon & Associates Michael Gendreau (650) 358-9577 michael.gendreau@colingordon.com

Audio / Visual Consultants Adio Visual Design Group Stephen Spears (415) 455-9913 stephens@avdg.com

Chandler Building & Development Will Chandler (408) 730-5626 will_chandler@comcast.net Dolan Development, Inc. David Dolan (408)846-9930 dave@dolandev.com Hillhouse Construction Co., Inc. Kenneth Huesby (408) 467-1000 kenh@hillhouseconstruction.com Level 10 Construction Paul Moran (408)747-5000 pmoran@level10gc.com Lundquist Construction Management Keith Lundquist (408) 280-2081 keith@lcm-inc.net

Attorney

Matarozzi/Pelsinger Builders Inc. Billy Lee (415)652-4704 blee@matpelbuilders.com

Law Offices of Jonathan J. Sweet Jonathan Sweet (408) 356-0317 jonathansweetlaw@comcast.net

Mehus Construction Paul Mehus (408 )395-2388 paul@mehus.com

Construction / General Contracting

Milroy Construction Samuel Milroy (650) 625-0300 smilroy@milroyinc.com

Barry Swenson Builder Steve Andrews (408) 287-0246 sandrews@barryswensonbuilder.com Bauman-Turley Builders, Inc. Craig Bauman (408)376-0488 craig@baumanturleybuilders.com BCI General Contractors, Inc. Michael Buller (209) 835-1370 mbuller@bcigcinc.com Tracings

David Brett Company, Inc. David Brett (650) 364-0456 davebrett@davidbrettco.com

PH Winters Construction Peter Winters (831) 239-8327 peter@phwinters.com Q Builders, Inc. John Olsson (650) 321-9110 john.olsson@qbuilders.net San Jose Construction Erin Conte (408) 566-1502 administrator@sjconstruction.com

Slatter Construction, Inc. Matthew Slatter (831) 425-5425 mslatter@slattcon.com Tico Construction John Marmesh (408) 487-0700 john@ticoinc.com Valli Construction, Inc. Chad Lanza (408) 377-5000 angela@valliconstruction.com Builders Exchange of Santa Clara County Michael Miller (408) 727-4000 mm@bxscco.com Dome Construction Company Melody Spradlin (408) 938-5770 mspradlin@domeconst.com Blach Construction Michael Blach (408) 244-7100 mike.blach@blach.com Turner Construction Company Jeff Clifton (408) 295-7598 jclifton@tcco.com XL Construction Steve Winslow (408) 240-6000 steve@xlconst.com

Curtain Wall & Panel Subcontractor Walters & Wolf George Chrisman, III (510) 490-1115 georgec@waltersandwolf.com


Jan/Feb 2013

Electrical Contractor Rosendin Electric Larry Hollis (408) 286-2800 lhollis@rosendin.com

Engineering (Civil) Carroll Engineering Bryce Carroll (408) 261-9800 bryce@carroll-engineering.com

Engineering (Geotechnical) Murray Engineers, Inc. Andrew Murray (650) 326-0440 andrew@murrayengineers.com

Engineering (Multi-Service) Alfa Tech Reza Zare (408) 436-8300 reza.zare@atce.com BKF Engineers Herica Assilian (650) 482-6433 hassilian@bkf.com PM Greene Engineers Christopher Greene (408) 200-7200 chris.greene@pmgreeneengineers.com Walter P. Moore & Associates William Andrews (415) 963-6300 bandrews@walterpmoore.com

Engineering (Structural)

Hohbach Lewin Douglas Hohbach (650) 617-5930 dhohbach@hohbach-lewin.com Riddle Group Jeff Tarter (408)261-4176 jtarter@IESEngeering.net Rinne & Peterson, Structural Engineers Patrick Chow (650) 428-2860 patchow@rpse.com Underwood & Rosenblum, Inc. Mark Sorenson (408)453-1222 mark@uandr.com

Event Planning Celine Marcipan (510) 645-2574 cmarcipan@16500.com

Food Facility Planning Breit Ideas Arnold Breit (408) 996-9362 abreitidea@yahoo.com

Furniture Dealer

HMH Engineers Bill Sowa (408) 487-2200 bsowa@hmh-engineers.com Verde Design, Inc. William Drulias (408) 850-3402 bill@verdedesigninc.com

Materials Supplier / Construction Svc Graniterock Steve Bosco (408) 210-0766 sbosco@graniterock.com RMS Supply, Inc. Emery Smith (408) 271-8017 emery@mssupply.com

Millwork Standards Woodwork Institute Dick Cavanaugh (916) 214-9330 thomas@woodinst.com

One Workplace Donna Musselman (408) 263-1001 dmusselman@oneworkplace.com

Photography

Insurance

Bernardo Grijalva Photography Bernardo Grijalva (408) 891-3358 archpix@sbcglobal.net

Dealey Renton & Associates Richard Gibson (510) 465-3090 rgibson@insdra.com

Biggs Cardosa Associates, Inc. Mark Cardosa (408) 296-5515 mcardosa@biggscardosa.com

Hefferman Insurance Brokers Young Suk (714) 997-8100 marshb@heffins.com

Duquette Engineering Steven Duquette (408) 615-9200 spd@duquette-eng.com

Interior Design

Landscape Architecture

AP + I Design, Inc. Carol Sandman (650) 254-1444 csandman@apidesign.com

Reprographics Hackley Architectural Signage Dr. Richard Chambers (510) 940-2610 rchambers@hackley.net Arc Rick Ferry (408) 736-7912 rick.ferry@e-arc.com

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Jan/Feb 2013

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATES

34

Tracings

Specification Services JKB Architectural Specification Julie Brown (408) 778-0633 julie@jkbspecs.com

Stone Surfaces Pacific Interlock Pavingstone Dean Tonder (408) 257-3645 dtonder@pacinterlock.com

Windows & Doors Associated Building Supply Scott Thurber (916)874-2997 sthurber@absnorcal.com Murray Window & Door, Inc. Carole Murray (408) 871-6990 carole@murraywindow.com Viking Door & Window Chris Beaumont (408)294-5546 www.vikingdoor.com


September 2012

35


Jan/Feb 2013

AIA SCV STAFF & INFORMATION

36

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Tracings Committee Kay Mascoli

Editor

Executive Director EMAIL

Scott Smithwick, AIA

Kelly Kane

Copy Editor

Membership & Communications Associate EMAIL

ADDRESS: 325 South First St., Suite 100        San Jose, CA 95113 Phone: (408) 298-0611 Fas: (408) 298-0619 OFFICE HOURS: Monday through Friday   9am to 4pm

EMAIL

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Curtis Finger Baraka Al Ramah (Keko) Advisors

Margaret Seltenreich Arnold Breit Bernie Grijalva Jeff Current, AIA Kay Mascoli Kelly Kane


sustainable design.

wwwStudioCurrent.com Architectural Furniture Interior Design


ARCHITECTURE – GENDER MATTERS ORGANIZATION OF WOMEN ARCHITECTS 40TH ANNIVERSARY SYMPOSIUM WURSTER HALL, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 SPEAKERS: Annemarie Adams – McGill University Annemarie Adams is Director of the School of Architecture at McGill University. Eleni Bastéa – University of New Mexico Eleni Bastéa was born and grew up in Thessaloniki, Greece. She holds a B.A. in art history from Bryn Mawr and M.Arch and Ph.D. in history of architecture from UC Berkeley. Today, Eleni now teaches Architectural History and Design at the University of New Mexico, where she is a tenured faculty member in the School of Architecture & Planning. Topic: Eleni’s work has focused on the place of memory and the creative process Lori Brown – Syracuse University Lori Brown is an architect and artist with a B.S. from Georgia Institute of Technology, the Ecole d’Architecture in Paris and M.Arch from Princeton. At the intersections of architecture, art, geography, and women’s studies, her work emerges from the belief that architecture can participate in and impact people’s everyday lives. Her design, speculative work, and classes all engage with the larger idea of broadening the discourse and involvement of architecture in our world. Focusing particularly on the relationships between architecture and social justice issues, she has currently placed emphasis on gender and its impact upon spatial relationships. Lori is currently an Associate professor at Syracuse University. June Williamson – City College of New York/CUNY June Williams is Associate Professor of Urban Design at the City College of New York/CUNY. DISCUSSANTS: Mary Hardy – Architectural Conservator, Siegel & Strain Architects Alison Kwok – University of Oregon Alison Kwok is a professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of Oregon. Jennifer Wolch – University of California, Berkeley Jennifer Wolch is Dean of the College of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley. Mui Ho – University of California, Berkeley Mui Ho is retired Professor of Architecture at UC Berkeley. A founding member of the Organization of Women Architects, she initiated the biannual OWA symposiums. REGISTER EARLY! Seating in Wurster Auditorium is limited. Deadline for registration: March 15, 2013 OWA Member: $40.00 before 15 March 2013 & $60 after Student: $20.00 before 15 March 2013 & $30 after Non member: $75.00 before 15 March 2013 & $100 after For more information about OWA, updates about the OWA Symposium, and details regarding registration, check the OWA website owa-usa.org Tracings


Tracings


B101™–2007 Standard Form of Agreement Between Owner and Architect

Design with an added layer of protection. PLUS download the all-new Guide for Sustainable Projects, FREE at aia.org/sustainableprojectsguide

Take peace of mind to the next level with AIA Contract Documents. We are pleased to announce the new D503™-2011, Guide for Sustainable Projects, including Agreement Amendments and Supplementary Conditions. This guide provides users with a valuable reference tool when using key AIA standard contracts like B101-2007, the most widely used standard Owner/Architect agreement in the industry, to help address the unique concerns of sustainable design. This includes information on certification systems, codes and legislation affecting sustainable design and construction projects. It also includes model language to assist all project participants in appropriately allocating risks and responsibilities. AIA Contract Documents are easy-to-use, widely accepted, and fair and balanced for all parties involved.

Download the new Guide for Sustainable Projects and learn more about our full library of Contract Documents at aia.org/contractdocs or call 800-242-3837.

Profile for The American Institute of Architects (AIA)

2013 January/February Tracings  

Monthly newsletter of the AIA Santa Clara Valley

2013 January/February Tracings  

Monthly newsletter of the AIA Santa Clara Valley

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