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Tracings October 2012

Monthly Newsletter of the AIA Santa Clara Valley Chapter AIASCV

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA identity crisis? ALVISO

San Jose is a large, complex and multi-faceted city. Historically a colorful quilt of privately-owned farmland, San Jose transformed from its agricultural roots into the 10th largest city (by population ) in the USA, and 3rd largest city in California following Los Angeles and San Diego.

MILPITAS

BERRYESSA

The current landscape consists of multiple town centers, providing diverse destinations scattered throughout the area, but with no real focal point or connection between each main street.

NORTH

ALUM ROCK

Rapid rates of development have impacted the overall experience and design of this large city. The by-product is sprawl; a city made up of dozens of disconnected communities distributed amongst a

SANTA CLARA

CENTRAL

landscape of

180 square miles.

EVERGREEN SOUTH WEST VALLEY

WILLOW GLEN

CAMPBELL

LEGEND

EDENVALE

Malls / Shopping Centers / Retail

CAMBRIAN/ PIONEER

Parks & Open Space

MONTE SERENO

SAN JOSE

Schools / Education

COYOTE ALMADEN LOS GATOS

Areas of Food Distribution Arts and Entertainment CALERO

Landmark Architecture

URBAN PLANNING & ARCHITECTURE

Religion/Churches Designated Bike Paths Train Routes Main Auto MORGAN HILL

Expressway

SANTA CRUZ

Downtown


October 2012

PARTNERS

2

Tracings

AIA Santa Clara Valley Corporate Partners play an important role in our Chapter. All of these local companies are proven leaders in their fields and provide continuing support to our local Chapter and our architects.


COVER:

REDEFINING TOWN SQUARE (entry by Gensler San Jose)

LANDMARKS CALIFORNIA

5

PRESIDENT’S LETTER

8

AIA SCV EP AWARD

10

2012 DESIGN AWARDS

11

2012 DESIGN AWARDS JURY

12

REDEFINING TOWN SQUARE

14

JOINT VENTURE SILICON VALLEY

16

INNOVATION THROUGH INTEGRATION

18

SPUR SAN JOSE

24

2012 SOFTBALL CHAMPIONS

24

14

18

24

5

16

TABLE OF CONTENTS

October 2012

3


October 2012

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

4

Jeff Current, AIA President

Steve Sowa, AIA

Vice President/President Elect

Walter Rask, AIA Secretary

Samuel Sanderson, AIA Treasurer

Chuck Campanella, Associate AIA Associates Director

Passion for Construction We love what we do. The buildings we choose to build can change lives. From research centers that eliminate diseases to institutions that educate tomorrow’s leaders, our work

Kay Mascoli

Executive Director Directors

Ed Janke, AIA Hari Sripadanna, AIA Thang Do, AIA Brian Mah, AIA Britt Lindberg, AIA Baraka Al Ramah (Keko) AIAS Student Liaison

Linder Jones, AIA

makes a difference. There is pride in all that we do, continually strengthening our commitment.

1600 Seaport Boulevard, Suite 350 2EDWOOD #ITY #!  s 4EL   www.rsconstruction.com

Rudolph and Sletten’s work ethics are one of the highest in the industry.� Jerry D. Jordan

$IRECTOR OF 2EGIONAL 3ALES$IRECTOR OF Estimating and Engineering SASCO

Past President

Š 2012 JOELLE CRUZ / AIA TRACINGS MAGAZINE ALL TEXT AND ARTWORK ARE COPYRIGHT OF THEIR RESPECTIVE CREATORS AND PUBLISHERS. NONE OF THE MATERIAL IN THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORM WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF TRACINGS OR THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS. EVERY EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO PROVIDE ACTUALLY ACCURATE INFORMATION. MADE IN PALO ALTO IS PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR. Online version is available VIA OUR WEBSITE WWW.tracings.COM WE ARE A SUBMISSION BASED PUBLICATION AND ARE ALWAYS ACTIVELY LOOKING FOR CONTRIBUTORS, COLLABORATORS AND VOLUNTEERS. PLEASE CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE tracings MAGAZINE™ is a publication of joelle cruz by aia santa clara Copyright Š 2011 by MADE LOCAL Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or part, without permission is prohibited

Tracings

Tsakopoulos Investments, Bank of the West Tower


Landmarks California

Landmarks California: the Places of Our Diverse Cultures and Histories is a statewide collaboration intended to raise awareness and appreciation for historic and cultural preservation through public activities at historic and cultural sites throughout the state. The program is intended to be an ongoing opportunity to help tell the untold stories of California’s development, thereby raising cultural and historical understanding throughout the state.

Morgan’s life story is a powerful lesson about the strength of perseverance. The big opener will be the Festival Gala at the Berkeley City Club on October 12, 2012 at 6.30 p.m.

The pilot project of Landmarks California, the Julia Morgan 2012 Festival, begins in October, 2012, and focuses on the life and work of Miss Julia Morgan. Julia Morgan was California’s first licensed female architect, the first female civil engineering graduate of UC Berkeley, and the creator of over 700 structures in California alone.  In addition to her personal accomplishments – her prolific and impressive contributions to the built landscape of our state — Miss

There is a calendar on the web listing all events www.landmarkscalifornia.org/ calendar-of-events/2012-09/ in California. www.landmarkscalifornia.org/ julia-morgan-2012/


October 2012

PRESIDENT’S LETTER

8

Urban Planning & Architecture Urban Planning is the focus of this month’s issue of Tracings. No doubt you’ve all heard the news that for the first time in history, over half of the world’s population lives in cities instead of suburban or rural locales. (…if not, where have you been?) The city is the place where the future is happening. No longer can the majority of the population live in the outskirts and avoid the city center. This just isn’t sustainable with gasoline prices at the pump nearing $5 per gallon and roadways becoming more and more congested. To keep your commute to under an hour and keep more of your income in your pocket, it’s becoming more and more necessary to live in the city and not in the country. Santa Clara Valley and San Jose has a place in this urban revolution. We are the third largest city in California (the largest state in the nation) and SJ is the tenth largest city in the country. San Jose’s latest version of the General Plan – Envision San Jose 2040 - lays out 12 major strategies for growth in the heart of Santa Clara Valley. Here is a quote from the City of San Jose’s General Plan: …”Strategy #5 is the promotion of “Urban Villages” – These are active, walkable, bicycle friendly, transitoriented, mixed use settings for new housing and job growth attractive to an innovative workforce and consistent with the Plan’s environmental goals. Urban Villages will enable the location of commercial and public services in close proximity to residential and employee populations, allowing people to walk to services while also providing greater mobility for the

Tracings

expanding senior and youth segments of the population. The Urban Villages Strategy fosters: • Mixing residential and employment activities • Establishing minimum densities to support transit use, bicycling and walking • High-quality urban design • Revitalizing underutilized properties with access to existing infrastructure • Engaging local neighborhoods through an Urban Village Planning process This new strategy of creating Urban Villages in the midst of suburban sprawl is a move toward sustainability and growing the population in areas that already have services in place to meet the needs of this growth. As architects, our own role in the growth of the urban environment is to embrace the challenge of creating higher density livable communities that help meet the needs of a growing population. We must understand the unique relationships between living, working, educating, playing, commuting, food production, waste management, energy creation… and many other components. It is our role to participate in shaping this new urban place that will function at a higher level and yet use less of our precious natural resources. We have many partners in this pursuit. Of course, the real estate development and banking communities are players in this arena. Likewise, our elected officials, educational institutions and corporate & business leaders are involved. Organizations such as The


October 2012

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Urban Land Institute (ULI), San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association (SPUR), American Planning Association (APA) and others are working with Architects, planners and communities to generate solutions to the complex issues surrounding urban growth. For you to take part in this revolution, you merely need to engage in the conversation that is taking place in our community already. Join those who are meeting with our neighbors and business leaders to educate, shape and dream of the future of the Santa Clara Valley. All you have to do is ask our Chapter office how you can get involved.

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9


October 2012

AIA SCV WINS AIA CC AWARD

10

Congratulations to the

AIA SCV Emerging Professionals! September  13,    2012     On  behalf  of  the  AIA  CC  Academy  for  Emerging  Professionals,       Congratulations  on  being  selected  as  the  2012  AEP  Chapter  Award  Recipient.      In  an  effort  to  advance  local  and   regional   excellence,   the   AIACC   Academy   for   Emerging   Professionals   developed   this   awards   program   to   recognize  those  supporting  Emerging  Professionals  in  pursuing  their  personal  and  professional  goals.  The  jury   felt  your  application  demonstrated  significant  contribution  to  the  future  of  architecture.         The   AEP   Chapter   Award   is   the   highest   award   given   to   an   AIA   chapter   for   the   development   of   superb   programming  and  fostering  the  highest  qualities  of  leadership  within  the  emerging  professional  membership.     The  jury  agreed  that  you  demonstrated  the  following  qualities:     x x x x x x

Outstanding accomplishment  in  the  creation,  development  and  delivery  of  creative  programs  for  its  Emerging   Professional  mentorship.   Exemplary  involvement  of  the  chapter  mentorship  in  community  and  professional  organizations,  as  well  as  local   business,  the  design  and  construction  industries,  and  others.   Active,  consistent,  and  involved  Emerging  Professional  mentorship  throughout  the  year.   Effective  chapter  executive  committee,  providing  consistent  leadership  and  chapter  representation  on  issues  affecting   Emerging  Professionals  in  the  chapter,  community  and  National  AIA  levels.   Recognition  within  the  chapter  regarding  the  value  of  Emerging  Professional  members.   Promotion  of  the  Intern  Development  Program,  mentoring,  and  continuing  education  for  Associate  members.  

We  are  pleased  to  invite  you  to  the  2012  AEP  Awards  ceremony,  Saturday  September  22  in  San  Francisco  at   our  µProgression¶  Conference.    We  will  recognize  all  of  this  year¶s  AEP  Award  recipients  at  3PM  and  hope  you   can  attend.    You  are  also  encouraged  to  attend  the  full  Conference,  more  information  and  registration   can  be   found  at  the  below  link:    

http://aiacc.org/progression/

News   of   your   award,   as   well   as   some   limited   content   from   your   application   packet   will   be   released   on   the   AIACC.org   website.     Please   fill   out   the   attached   Release   Form   and   return   to   Marian   Clark,   via   email:   MClark@aiacc.org  or  fax:  916-­442-­5346,  by  Monday  September  24th.         Again,  congratulations  on  your  Award  and  we  hope  to  see  you  in  San  Francisco.     Sincerely,         Tracings

Alexander J.C.  Tsai,  Assoc.  AIA     AIACC  2012  Vice  President  of  the  Academy  for  Emerging  Professionals    


Our Sponsors: Diamond

AIA Santa Clara Valley Join Us for this Celebratory Event!

Titanium

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RESOLVE DIFFERENCES FACILITATE COMMUNICATION

Gold

ENCOURAGE CREATIVITY PROVOKE ORIGINALITY IMPROVE ACCESS REINFORCE TEAMWORK ENHANCE COLLABORATION DESIGN EXCELLENCE CONVEY EXCITEMENT

DESIGN AWARDS 2012

INVENT CONNECTIVITY INCITE EVOLUTION

SUSTAINING INNOVATION

FOSTER COOPERATION SILICON

INJECT ENERGY

VALLEY

INSTILL OWNERSHIP REMOVE BARRIERS

Silver

Wednesday, October 17 5:30 pm to 9:00 pm

Bronze

Computer History Museum, Mountain View Design Awards Celebration Tickets

Individual: Table of Ten: Students:

$80 $750 $35

Ruby

Register at www.aiascv.org Contact us at (408) 298-0611

Media

Bar

Centerpieces

Photography

AV


October 2012

2012 DESIGN AWARDS

12

Jury Members Alan Hess Architect, Critic, Author & Historian Alan Hess received a B.A. from Principia College, a Master's degree in architecture from the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture, and is a licensed architect. After working with architects William Coburn, and Callister Payne and Bischoff, Hess started his own firm specializing in residential work and historic preservation. Hess is a prominent California architecture critic, and has written a column for the San Jose Mercury News since 1986.

Mark Cavagnero, FAIA Principal, Mark Cavagnero Associates Mark Cavagnero, FAIA, began his professional career in the New York office of Edward Larrabee Barnes Associates. In 1989, he co-founded Barnes and Cavagnero in San Francisco, later renamed to Mark Cavagnero Associates in 1993. Mark’s notable project experience has garnered more than 70 awards from local, state, national and international architectural organizations. Most recently, the firm was recognized with the AIA California Council Firm Award. Notable projects include the renovation and expansion of the historic California Palace of the Legion of Honor; the Oakland Museum of California Renovation and Expansion; the Community School of Music and Arts in Mountain View; the Sava Pool in San Francisco; the Community Foundation Santa Cruz County; the ODC Theater Center in San Francisco; the Park City Museum; the UC Berkeley Durant Hall; the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts in Richmond; the San Francisco Public Safety Building (with HOK); and the SFJAZZ Center. A Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, Mark holds a Master of Architecture degree from the University of California, Berkeley and a Bachelor of Arts degree, Magna Cum Laude, from Harvard University. He is a licensed architect in California, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, Oklahoma and Utah.

Tracings

His first book, Googie: Fifties Coffee Shop Architecture (Chronicle Books 1985) focused on a neglected and popular Modern form. His following books continued to explore overlooked chapters in twentieth century architecture and urbanism. He is responsible for qualifying several landmark buildings for the National Register of Historic Places, including the oldest operating McDonald's in Downey, Stuart Company Plant and Office Building and Bullock's Pasadena in Pasadena, and the Hotel Valley Ho in Scottsdale, Arizona. Hess was a National Arts Journalism Program Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism in New York, and received a grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to research the work of Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx. Hess has taught at the Southern California Institute of Architecture and UCLA.      


October 2012

Joshua Aidlin, AIA Aidlin Darling Design Joshua Aidlin is a founding partner of Aidlin Darling Design, formed with David Darling in 1998. He brings over twenty five years of design experience in architecture, interiors, furniture design and sculpture. Aidlin Darling Design rigorously explores design across a wide range of scales, programs and disciplines with the goal of enabling poetic, sustainable and appropriate solutions. The firm has been twice selected as a National Design Award Finalist for Interior Design by the Smithsonian’s Cooper- Hewitt National Design Museum. Additionally, the firm has been awarded over forty regional, national and international design awards in the past two years, including an AIA/ COTE Top Ten Green Project Award, an international Civic Trust Award, a National IIDA Interior Design Award, and a James Beard Award. Mr. Aidlin’s work explores the principles of design for multi-sensory human experiences through a broad range of project scales including research and development for Herman Miller, the design of a rustic yet urban artisanal restaurant, and the adaptive re-use of an industrial historic structure for a media arts cultural center. Mr. Aidlin’s dedication to design is augmented by his lifelong interest in the arts and by his strong sense of responsibility towards the environment. Through public and private projects, Joshua has developed relationships with artists and art

collectors, and has gained a comprehensive understanding of art and the environment in which it is both made and experienced. His tireless pursuit of sustainable design has been recognized locally, nationally and abroad through various publications, lectures and symposia. His recently completed work includes the first LEED NC Gold commercial building in San Francisco and a LEED CI Platinum restaurant. Mr. Aidlin’s current work includes a contemplative chapel on the campus of Stanford University, a new residence on a nature preserve near Carmel, a multidisciplinary arts center for underprivileged youth, and a new waterfront residence in Belvedere overlooking San Francisco Bay.

Anne Fougeron, FAIA Principal, Fougeron Architecture

Anne Fougeron is principal of Fougeron Architecture in San Francisco. Born of French parents and raised in Paris and New York, she credits her bicultural upbringing as the source of her aesthetic values: a European respect for historic precedent and a comfort level with melding old and new. After earning a B.A. in architectural history at Wellesley College, and a Master of Architecture degree at the University of California, Berkeley, she worked for San Francisco architect and urban designer, Daniel Solomon, for three years, an experience that informed her awareness of the interplay between buildings and the urban environment. In 1986 she founded Fougeron Architecture, designing award-winning, private-and-public-sector projects, that have made an original statement – in a decidedly modernistic vocabulary. Fougeron has taught architectural design to undergraduate and graduate students at the University of California, Berkeley.

13


October 2012

Redefining Town Square Gensler’s Innovative Firmwide Initiative Gensler’s Town Square initiative seeks to generate project ideas in the cities in which they practice and beyond. By reacquainting themselves with their cities, they can learn why it has become what it is now and deepen their understanding of what it could become in the future.

The Plan: Form a cross-practice collaboration within each of Gensler’s offices, which will bring unique sensitivities to the problem. Each team will generate a list of possible projects. These proposals should carry visionary ambition without losing sight of the realities of each city. The Goal: Generate ideas, concepts and interventions that can be funded and supported within today’s cities while demonstrating a vision for the sustainable cities of tomorrow. Each team will identify an urban public open space, initiative or system project that the team is passionate about.

Gensler’s San Jose office is utilizing the Redefining Town Square Initiative as an opportunity to connect deeper with its surrounding community, and to gain insight into how their efforts may help downtown San Jose become a vibrant and innovative destination with a readily visible identity. The impressive work and efforts including, but not exclusive to the City Planning/Design Committee and San Jose Downtown Tracings

The Theme: How cities create and support community-supporting places - town squares, commons, and “third places”.

The Gensler San Jose Team (pictured left to right) Pikesh Desai, Tracey Ariga, Julia Baikova, Tasneem Dalal, Megan McDonnell, Aparna Sainath, Yoko Kato, Meera Agrawal, Ryan Sur, Jennifer Habelito, Jacqueline Zuhoski, Vlatka Bojer, Joanne Rarangol, John Mabe, Tay Othman, Keith Macdonald (photo courtesy of Mickey Mazerac)

PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

14

Association continue to be a great inspiration to Gensler. The local San Jose office would like to align themselves with the Envision 2040 General Plan in efforts to define a complimentary system that engages residents, commuters, and tourists alike, stimulating local economy and helping San Jose become the primary Urban Center of the Silicon Valley. by Tracey Ariga and Keith Macdonald


October 2012

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA identity crisis? ALVISO

San Jose is a large, complex and multi-faceted city. Historically a colorful quilt of privately-owned farmland, San Jose transformed from its agricultural roots into the 10th largest city (by population ) in the USA, and 3rd largest city in California following Los Angeles and San Diego.

MILPITAS PALO ALTO

BERRYESSA

MOUNTAIN VIEW

The current landscape consists of multiple town centers, providing diverse destinations scattered throughout the area, but with no real focal point or connection between each main street.

NORTH

SUNNYVALE

ALUM ROCK

Rapid rates of development have impacted the overall experience and design of this large city. The by-product is sprawl; a city made up of dozens of disconnected communities distributed amongst a

SANTA CLARA

CENTRAL

landscape of

180 square miles.

EVERGREEN

CUPERTINO SOUTH WEST VALLEY

WILLOW GLEN

CAMPBELL

LEGEND

EDENVALE SARATOGA

Malls / Shopping Centers / Retail

CAMBRIAN/ PIONEER

Parks & Open Space

MONTE SERENO

SAN JOSE

Schools / Education

COYOTE ALMADEN LOS GATOS

Areas of Food Distribution Arts and Entertainment CALERO

Landmark Architecture Religion/Churches Designated Bike Paths Train Routes Main Auto

PACIFIC OCEAN

MORGAN HILL

Expressway SANTA CRUZ

Downtown

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 1953

1961

1973

TODAY

HISTORIC SAN JOSE

Gensler is a global architecture, design, planning and consulting BEDROOM COMMUNITY

firm with over 3,000 employees and 42 offices around the world. As architects, designers, planners and consultants, Gensler partners with their clients on someLIVE 3,000 projects every year. These projects can be as small as a wine label or as large as a new urban district. Their work reflects an enduring commitment to sustainability and WORK the belief that design is one of the most powerful strategic tools for securing lasting competitive advantage.

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ALMADEN LOS GATOS

MONTE SERENO

SAN JOSE COYOTE

ALMADEN LOS GATOS

MONTE SERENO

SAN JOSE COYOTE

ALMADEN LOS GATOS

MONTE SERENO

SAN JOSE

ALMADEN COYOTE

ALMADEN LOS GATOS

COYOTE

SAN JOSE COYOTE

ALMADEN LOS GATOS

COYOTE

LOS GATOS

ALMADEN LOS GATOS

ALMADEN LOS GATOS

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October 2012

URBAN PLANNING

16

Urban Planning from Our Perspective At Joint Venture Silicon Valley, we see urban planning as a local issue in a regional framework – individual manifestations of common ideals. A major priority for Joint Venture is to work with cities on the rejuvenation of State Highway 82 -- El Camino Real -- from Daly City (where it is called Mission Street) to San Jose (where it is The Alameda). The

Tracings

Image courtesy of GBI.

Grand Boulevard Initiative (GBI) is led by a partnership of the San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), Santa Clara Transportation Authority (VTA), San Mateo City/County Association of Governments (C/CAG), SAMCEDA (San Mateo

Economic Development Association), and Joint Venture. The vision of GBI is that “El Camino Real will achieve its full potential for residents to work, live, shop, and play, creating links between communities that promote walking and transit and an improved and meaningful quality of life.” Most importantly, the goals that our region’s cities set themselves have built a larger framework, the Guiding Principles, to which the overall initiative aspires: 1. Target housing and job growth in strategic areas along the corridor 2. Encourage compact mixed-use development and high-quality urban design and construction 3. Create a pedestrian-oriented environment and improve streetscapes, ensuring full access to and between public areas and private developments 4. Develop a balanced multimodal corridor to maintain and improve mobility of people and vehicles along the corridor 5. Manage parking assets 6. Provide vibrant public spaces and gathering places 7. Preserve and accentuate unique and desirable community character and the existing quality of life in adjacent neighborhoods 8. Improve safety and public health


October 2012

9. Strengthen pedestrian and bicycle connections with the corridor 10. Pursue environmentally sustainable and economically viable development patterns While each city will implement the principles differently to fit local conditions, we believe that longterm improvement of the corridor will come from the judicious applications of shared principles.

www.jointventure.org goals – and what we risk by not taking a more regional approach. We look forward to sharing the results of this inquiry in our 2013 Index of Silicon Valley.

Similarly, the Silicon Valley Economic Development Alliance (EDA) is a collaboration of local economic development officers who share a goal of promoting the region, but have differing priorities for growth in their own communities. The EDA looks at key business clusters, such as cleantech and life sciences, and recognizes that each driving industry has a variety of supporting industries behind it – from manufacturing to professional services. While not every city will have all types of businesses, the region as a whole benefits from success in the clusters. And that means more development overall.

Kara Gross, Vice Presdident, Joint Venture Silicon Valley and Executive Director, Silicon Vally Economic Development Alliance

Image courtesy of GBI.

At the Silicon Valley regional level, we think there are some solid foundations for collaboration and policy development, and we’ll keep working on them. When it comes to the larger Bay Area, we have questions – and we’re exploring them now. We have partnered with SPUR to analyze key issues facing us, including land use development patterns, transportation systems, and the challenges presented by climate change, to help us determine if there are better means to achieve our

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October 2012

URBAN LAND INSTITUTE

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Innovation through Integration: Urban Planning and Real Estate in the 21st Century Changes are afoot in the fields of urban planning and real estate development, and the implications are exciting. In order to manage and enhance an increasingly built-out urban landscape in an economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable manner, it is essential that urban planners and real estate professionals collaborate in all aspects of development. As an in-house urban planning analyst for a local real estate investment company, it has become clear to me that integrating each discipline’s way of thinking into the other is a win-win situation, yielding more effective solutions across the board. For example, sharing real estate development experience with city staff and elected officials about successful parking ratios, commercial ceiling heights, or storefront design, can help local government make more informed decisions about zoning changes or resource allocation to retail districts. In turn, an urban planning perspective can help developers realize that improving pedestrian accessibility or public gathering space can yield significant benefits both to nearby real estate holdings and to the community. Unfortunately, these two sectors have often been siloed; they are traditionally taught and practiced

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separately, often breeding disconnect and misunderstanding. Yet urban planning and real estate are inextricably linked and are each critical to the other’s success. Both professions are motivated to create a successful and enduring built environment, which requires a deep understanding of the political, economic, environmental, and land use context of a place. Both planners and developers are keenly aware that whether buildings, infrastructure, or open space, projects must be appropriately placed and programmed else they fail - either the investors and tenants in the case of developers, or to the taxpaying community in the case of planners. Although the metrics for success are measured somewhat differently - planners may look for public benefit while developers may look to market returns integrating both can reveal a more comprehensive picture of how and where to allocate public and private investment in the built environment. Integrating Urban Planning into Real Estate Development Real estate professionals can benefit from standard urban planning approaches in several ways. To best assess where and how to prioritize real estate investment, it is important to understand local planning and political processes. Keeping abreast of local politics, understanding the goals and priorities of the local government, and maintaining positive relationships with elected officials and city staff, can greatly inform the private sector’s decisions about existing and future development opportunities. Second, adopting an urban planning attitude of “doing what’s right” rather


October 2012

than simply “doing what’s profitable” can go a long way towards creating successful development projects. It is useful conceptually to expand the client base for a development project to include the local community, regardless of the project’s actual function. Projects that have the support of the community often get approved faster, may require fewer costly revisions, and may be more likely to be well-regarded and thus increasingly desirable for occupants over time. Doing what’s right can often result in truly context-appropriate projects that are more likely to be successful over the long term. Third, particularly here in Silicon Valley it will be the real estate professionals who embrace the interdisciplinary approach and comprehensive scope of urban planning, who will be able to create projects that endure successfully - in other words that are well suited to place, time, and community. Today the ramifications of ill-fitting commercial, office, and residential projects are ubiquitous, in the form of vacancies, high turnover, and bankruptcy. Thinking holistically and innovatively about not just conventional return on investment but also the quality of the pedestrian environment, transit access, proximity to open space, and local government priorities, may help make the difference between a short-lived problematic development project and one that continues to flourish over time. Integrating Real Estate into Urban Planning In turn, “urban planning 2.0” must collaborate with and value the development community as an important ally in our collective quest to better the built environment. With the dissolution of redevelopment agencies and with cities still cashstrapped by Proposition 13, city planners must increasingly turn to public private partnerships (P3s) to achieve innovative and effective projects. Private development projects can typically be constructed more quickly and cost-effectively than public projects, and private funding can supplement limited public resources on projects.

www.ulisf.org/get-involved/south-bay/ Additionally, planners should better recognize and incorporate feedback from developers regarding their experience with project entitlements and permits. Developers have lived and breathed their projects and have valuable feedback about how zoning, land use, incentives and limitations influence development, and whether or not these planning tools actually have their intended effect on the built environment. Developers can recommend ways to streamline existing processes, and have the experience to insightfully critique local government policies that may be misguided or shortsighted. As a whole, the urban planning community would do well to solicit more feedback from local real estate voices, to ensure that it is optimally allocating finite public resources to the best projects that will yield the greatest positive change in the community. The 21st century is seeing greater interdisciplinary collaboration across nearly all disciplines, as the complexity of problems in our built and natural environment increases. In the face of a sluggish economy, increasing urban population density, changing demographics, and climate change, the stewards of the built environment - planners, architects, engineers, developers - must work together to ensure that our future cities are economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable.

Brooke Ray Smith

Urban Planning Analyst, LEED AP Brooke Ray Smith is an urban planning analyst with the Passerelle Investment Company based in Los Altos. She holds a Master of City Planning and a Master of Landscape Architecture from UC Berkeley, and a B.A. in Biology from Williams College. A Mountain View native, she now lives in San Francisco and can often be found cycling down the Peninsula to work or playing ultimate frisbee.

19


October 2012

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATES

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Arborists Consultants Monarch Consulting Arborists LLC Richard Gessner (831) 331-8982 rick@monarcharborist.com

Acoustics Consultants Charles M. Salter Associates Josh Roper (408) 295-4944 josh.roper@cmsalter.com Charles M. Salter Associates Philip Sanders (408) 295-4944 philip.sanders@cmsalter.com Colin Gordon & Associates Michael Gendreau (650) 358-9577 michael.gendreau@colingordon.com

Valli Construction, Inc. Chad Lanza (408) 377-5000 angela@valliconstruction.com

Hillhouse Construction Co., Inc. Kenneth Huesby (408) 467-1000 kenh@hillhouseconstruction.com

Builders Exchange of Santa Clara County Michael Miller (408) 727-4000 mm@bxscco.com

Level 10 Construction Paul Moran (408)747-5000 pmoran@level10gc.com Lundquist Construction Management Keith Lundquist (408) 280-2081 keith@lcm-inc.net

Dome Construction Company Melody Spradlin (408) 938-5770 mspradlin@domeconst.com

Attorney

Matarozzi/Pelsinger Builders Inc. Billy Lee (415)652-4704 blee@matpelbuilders.com

Blach Construction Michael Blach (408) 244-7100 mike.blach@blach.com

Law Offices of Jonathan J. Sweet Jonathan Sweet (408) 356-0317 jonathansweetlaw@comcast.net

Mehus Construction Paul Mehus (408 )395-2388 paul@mehus.com

Turner Construction Company Jeff Clifton (408) 295-7598 jclifton@tcco.com

Construction / General Contracting

Milroy Construction Samuel Milroy (650) 625-0300 smilroy@milroyinc.com

XL Construction Steve Winslow (408) 240-6000 steve@xlconst.com

Barry Swenson Builder Steve Andrews (408) 287-0246 sandrews@barryswensonbuilder.com Bauman-Turley Builders, Inc. Craig Bauman (408)376-0488 craig@baumanturleybuilders.com BCI General Contractors, Inc. Michael Buller (209) 835-1370 mbuller@bcigcinc.com David Brett Company, Inc. David Brett (650) 364-0456 davebrett@davidbrettco.com

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Garden City Construction James Salata (408) 289-8807 jsalata@gardencityconst.com

Dolan Development, Inc. David Dolan (408)846-9930 dave@dolandev.com

PH Winters Construction Peter Winters (831) 239-8327 peter@phwinters.com Q Builders, Inc. John Olsson (650) 321-9110 john.olsson@qbuilders.net San Jose Construction Erin Conte (408) 566-1502 administrator@sjconstruction.com Slatter Construction, Inc. Matthew Slatter (831)425-5425 mslatter@slattcon.com Tico Construction John Marmesh (408) 487-0700 john@ticoinc.com

Curtain Wall & Panel Subcontractor Walters & Wolf George Chrisman, III (510) 490-1115 georgec@waltersandwolf.com

Electrical Contractor Rosendin Electric Larry Hollis (408) 286-2800 lhollis@rosendin.com


October 2012

Engineering (Civil) Carroll Engineering Bryce Carroll (408) 261-9800 bryce@carroll-engineering.com

Rinne & Peterson, Structural Engineers Patrick Chow (650) 428-2860 patchow@rpse.com

Materials Supplier / Construction Svc Graniterock Steve Bosco (408) 210-0766 sbosco@graniterock.com

Engineering (Geotechnical)

Underwood & Rosenblum, Inc. Mark Sorenson (408)453-1222 mark@uandr.com

Murray Engineers, Inc. Andrew Murray (650) 326-0440 andrew@murrayengineers.com

Food Facility Planning

Engineering (Multi-Service)

Breit Ideas Arnold Breit (408) 996-9362 breitideas_2000@yahoo.com

Woodwork Institute Dick Cavanaugh (916) 214-9330 thomas@woodinst.com

Alfa Tech Reza Zare (408) 436-8300 reza.zare@atce.com

Furniture Dealer

Reprographics

One Workplace Donna Musselman (408) 263-1001 dmusselman@oneworkplace.com

Insurance

Hackley Architectural Signage Dr. Richard Chambers (510) 940-2610 rchambers@hackley.net

Dealey Renton & Associates Richard Gibson (510) 465-3090 rgibson@insdra.com

Arc Rick Ferry (408) 736-7912 rick.ferry@e-arc.com

Hefferman Insurance Brokers Young Suk (714) 997-8100 marshb@heffins.com

Specification Services

BKF Engineers Herica Assilian (650) 482-6433 hassilian@bkf.com PM Greene Engineers Christopher Greene (408) 200-7200 chris.greene@pmgreeneengineers.com Walter P. Moore & Associates William Andrews (415) 963-6300 bandrews@walterpmoore.com

Engineering (Structural) Interior Design Biggs Cardosa Associates, Inc. Mark Cardosa (408) 296-5515 mcardosa@biggscardosa.com Duquette Engineering Steven Duquette (408) 615-9200 spd@duquette-eng.com Hohbach Lewin Douglas Hohbach (650) 617-5930 dhohbach@hohbach-lewin.com Riddle Group Jeff Tarter (408)261-4176 jtarter@IESEngeering.net

AP + I Design, Inc. Carol Sandman (650) 254-1444 csandman@apidesign.com

Landscape Architecture HMH Engineers Bill Sowa (408) 487-2200 bsowa@hmh-engineers.com Verde Design, Inc. William Drulias (408) 850-3402 bill@verdedesigninc.com

Millwork Standards

JKB Architectural Specification Julie Brown (408) 778-0633 julie@jkbspecs.com

Stone Surfaces CaeserStone Quartz Surfaces Gina Raney (415) 887-8220 gina.raney@caesarstoneus.com Pacific Interlock Pavingstone Dean Tonder (408) 257-3645 dtonder@pacinterlock.com

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October 2012

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATES

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Tracings

Windows & Doors Associated Building Supply Scott Thurber (916)874-2997 sthurber@absnorcal.com Murray Window & Door, Inc. Carole Murray (408) 871-6990 carole@murraywindow.com Viking Door & Window Chris Beaumont (408)294-5546 www.vikingdoor.com


September 2012

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October 2012

SPUR SAN JOSE

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www.spur.org

SPUR - San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association About SPUR San Jose SPUR San Jose launched in January 2012 and is located within the office of 1stACT Silicon Valley. Our goal is to promote good planning and good government in San Jose through research, education and advocacy. We approach this work by bringing together a broad spectrum of people who share our interests in urbanism to work on the most important issues and opportunities facing northern California's largest city. Building on a century of urban policy work, this is the first foray SPUR has made into a city outside of San Francisco. We will experiment with novel approaches to policy change, new ways to convene thought leaders and creative strategies for making a positive impact on the city. We will be facilitating a series of public events starting in late spring 2012 and will begin undertaking focused policy studies later in the year. Join our movement!

AIA SCV Softball League Champions CONGRATULATIONS Hohbach-Lewin defeats Blach

First row: Stephanie Shiraki, Phyllis Mak, Phoebe Mak, Dan Lewin, Sam Shiotani  Second Row: George Lee, Jason Ludwig, Greg Rodrigues, Paolo Resmini, Sean Arbic, Mike Resch  Not Pictured: Vicky Rundorff, Joaquim Roberts, Kerry Macdonald

The “Scoreboard”

Playoff Results - Week 2

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Thursday, September 13th #1 Blach defeated #4 Alfa Tech #2 Hohbach-Lewin defeated #3 AP+I


October 2012

Bay Area Cities Adjust to Life After Redevelopment

The renovation of the California Theater was one of San Jose's many downtown redevelopment projects. Redevelopment agencies across the state closed their doors on February 1, marking the end of an era for planning in California. SPUR has written previously about what the end of redevelopment means for the state. But how are the Bay Area’s central cities — San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose — dismantling their agencies? What’s going to happen to the on-going projects and existing assets held by redevelopment agencies? Is this the last word — or will we witness the creation of other planning tools to do some of the work that was previously done by redevelopment agencies? San Jose Established in 1956, the San Jose Redevelopment Agency (SJRA) invested billions of dollars in four program goals: 1. Creating jobs and expanding business through investments in projects such as Cisco’s campus in North San Jose and Adobe’s headquarters in the downtown, 2. Building public facilities such as the Repertory Theater and the 4th Street Parking Garage, 3. Developing and preserving affordable and market rate housing and 4. Strengthening neighborhoods through the Strong Neighborhoods Initiative and Neighborhood Business Districts. The agency used the tax increment from its roughly 19,000 acres of designated redevelopment areas to borrow against and reinvest in other areas. In doing so in an arguably overly robust way, they became the state’s second largest redevelopment agency as

measured by tax revenue, and the City of San Jose’s “go to” for funding and approval of almost all major projects in the last several decades. The SJRA began planning for its own shuttering a few years ago when the state began withdrawing funds from all redevelopment agencies. With the realization that it was overleveraged and would be unable to continue even if the option to “pay to play” was made available, the agency began reducing its workforce from 119 employees in 2009 to 10 employees today — just enough to manage its obligations on $3.8 billion of remaining debt. The San Jose City Council took its final action to end the agency in late January by: 1. Creating an official successor agency to manage the majority of the remaining debt, 2. Naming the city manager as the executive officer of the successor agency and 3. Creating the Successor Agency Fund, which allows the city to take over the debts of the affordable housing assets and activities that had been funded by the SJRA. Because of the SJRA’s debt obligations, it will be decades before any tax increment is available to Santa Clara County or the state. The end of redevelopment in San Jose will have farreaching and likely yet unknown impacts, and there are many questions still to be answered. What happens to the Strong Neighborhood designations and areas of investment? How will the San Jose Department of Housing replace the 20 percent of its budget that came from SJRA affordable housing funds? How will the City of San Jose continue to provide the necessary infrastructure in downtown and offer incentives for future development? By Sarah Karlinsky, Tomiquia Moss & Leah Toeniskoetter - Article courtesy of SPUR San Jose, originally published on their website on February 23, 2012. The article is excerpted from the original which can be found at www.spur.org/blog/2012-02-23/bay-areacities-adjust-life-after-redevelopment

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October 2012

STAFF

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Tracings Committee Kay Mascoli

Executive Director EMAIL

Ana Bonifacio-Cruz

Membership & Communications Associate EMAIL

ADDRESS: 325 South First St., Suite 100        San Jose, CA 95113

Scott Smithwick, AIA Editor EMAIL

Joelle Cruz

Creative Director + Co-Publisher EMAIL

Judith Wasserman, AIA Copy Editor

Margaret Seltenreich Phone: (408) 298-0611 Fas: (408) 298-0619 OFFICE HOURS: Monday through Friday   9am to 4pm

Tracings Tracings

Arnold Breit Bernie Grijalva Jeff Current, AIA


sustainable design.

wwwStudioCurrent.com Architectural Furniture Interior Design


SANTA CLARA VALLEY CHAPTER OF

THE CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS INSTITUTE presents an educational seminar on

Designing with, and Specifying, Natural Stone, Tile and Glass to the New Industry Standards A unique opportunity to get education and interact with Industry experts on new tile standards, products and installation material and method. If you specify and select stone, glass or ceramic tile, you will be interested.

Date: Location: Continuing Education: COST:

Friday, November 9, 2012 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. XL Construction 851 Buckeye Court Milpitas, CA 95035 This program meets AIA/CES criteria. Participants will receive: 4 AIA Learning Units

$95.00

Session I: Success With Tile: The TCNA Handbook and New Glass Tile Standards Instructor: Greg Mowat, FCSI, CDT, CTC, CMRS, CFC. Changes and expansion of the 2012 TCNA Handbook have increased the size fourfold from the 2009 TCNA Handbook. Special emphasis in materials has separated stone tile from glass tile and ceramic tile methods and assemblies. In this session Greg will educate attendees on using the current TCNA Handbook for Ceramic. Glass, and Stone Tile Installation. The many changes to the handbook will be reviewed. Tile types, substrates, patterns, joint width, warpage and specifications will be covered. New tolerances for flatness depending on tile size, lippage tolerances, new ISO specifications, membranes, and wet areas will be discussed. Green Building Standards with respect to tile will be reviewed. Also, Greg will focus on the new glass tile ANSI Standards, and particulars with specifying and working with glass tile.

Session 2: What You Are Not Being Told About Natural Stone Instructor: David Bonasera: CTC, CSI In this session David will educate attendees on the current state of the stone market and new products that are all being sold as â&#x20AC;&#x153;natural stoneâ&#x20AC;?. Discuss the current TCNA Handbook for Ceramic, Glass and Stone Tile Installation related to stone and the intricacies of working with stone materials. A variety of stone enhancements are appearing in the U.S. Discussion will also cover resin enhanced products, which are becoming a majority of the products seen on the market. David will educate on stone alteration, dyes, resin enhancement and other qualities of stone that are critical to avoid stone failure, fade and problems. There will be discussions on how to specify and select stone for a variety of environments, including outdoor, indoor and wet environments, also substrate conditions and traffic conditions. Stone sealing, care and maintenance will be discussed, also different types of stone, and matching natural stone types and qualities to their appropriate uses. The appropriate use of water-based and solvent-based sealers will be reviewed. Agglomerates, composites, porosity and iron content of stone will be reviewed. Stone failure and how to avoid them and correct them, including subjects such as color fade, staining and rusting, and delamination. UV damage and proper stone selection for UV exposed environments

Demonstration: Shower Pan Installation Dan Curtis of Schluter Systems will demonstrate installation of one of the most troublesome areas of tile installation: a waterproof shower pan. The waterproofing installation will be exhibited step by step, and the interface between the waterproof area and surroundings.

GO TO www.csiscv.org/calendar to download a complete registration form.


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AIA Santa Clara Valley

A Chapter of The American Institute of Architects

CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM-2012 October 2012

“Innovators in LED Lighting” Presented by: Therese Lahaie, Apparatus Design This highly informative program focuses on the challenges, solutions, appropriate applications and imaginative possibilities of Solid State Lighting Technology. In this 1-hour CES approved program, participants will: • • • •

Identify 3 technical challenges of working with LED lighting technology. Identify 3 different solutions that LED lighting manufacturers have used to address these challenges. Learn what you need to know to successfully specify LED lighting products. Develop knowledge of testing programs and procedures that help specifiers reduce risk when specifying LED lighting products.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012 Noon-1:00 pm HMC GROUP 1570 The Alameda, Suite 330 San Jose

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Noon-1:00 pm Hawley Peterson & Snyder 444 Castro Street, Suite 1000 Mountain View

Program qualifies for 1 LU credit. Bring your AIA number and your credits will be registered automatically.

Programs are free. Please RSVP jose@apparatusdesign.net. Lunch is not provided, so please plan accordingly. SPONSORED

BY:


ADA Seminar – Nov 9 9:00am – 3:30pm Pipe Trades Training Center 780 Commercial Street San Jose, Ca 95112

Register online! Sponsored by

Profile for The American Institute of Architects (AIA)

Tracings October 2012  

monthly newsletter of the santa clara vally chapter of the AIA

Tracings October 2012  

monthly newsletter of the santa clara vally chapter of the AIA

Profile for aiascv
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