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Arlington Heights School District 25

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-2011

Arlington Heights School District 25

1200 S. Dunton Ave. Arlington Heights, IL 60005

T 847-758-4900 www.ahsd25.k12.il.us


Arlington Heights School District 25

Table of Contents Background Information

2

Stakeholder Involvement

3

Process for Involving Stakeholders in Technology Planning, Implementation and Assessment Stakeholder Participation Through Surveys Stakeholder Ongoing Involvement

3 3 4

Tech Plan 4 Committee Members

5

Vision Statement

6

Data Analysis

6

Report Card Data Local Assessment Data Attributes and Challenges of the District and Community That Have Affected Learning Educator’s Qualifications and Professional Growth and Development Data Parent/Community Involvement Technology Deployment

6 8 11 13 15 17

Gap Analysis

19

Strategies and Activities

22

Curriculum and Instruction Professional Development Community/Parent Involvement Technology Deployment

22 23 24 25

Monitoring Plan

27

Additional Documentation

28

2020 Strategic Vision Technology Summary - Community Conversation District 25 Technology Summary District 25 Policies Network Diagram District 25 Technology Learning Standards, Revised 2008

28 29 30 31 33 34

Background Information

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Arlington Heights School District 25

District 25 is completing a 3-year technology plan for two main purposes. First, the plan seeks to fulfill the compliance necessary for the Illinois State Board of Education. Through compliance, District 25 will be eligible for the E-Rate discount on services related to telecommunications and connectivity. The other purpose is to enhance student achievement and staff productivity by providing a plan for educational technology. This part of the plan is more diverse, visionary, and comprehensive. The compliance required for the state is reflected in the overall plan for the district. However, the state does not require that all strategies and activities be included in the plan. Therefore the content in this presentation includes the compliance information for the state as well as the overall plan for the district. To accomplish this important process, a committee was formed in the spring of 2007. The committee took several steps to identify the strategies and activities listed in this document. Time was spent reviewing the previous tech plan and discussing which activities were completed, which are no longer relevant, and which should be continued. The committee also identified areas of needs and wants in the area of educational technology by analyzing achievement, demographic, budget, and inventory data. Information from surveys was included in this process to establish the gaps between our existing program and the future vision. Once the gap analysis was complete, the committee set out to identify the strategies and activities to close the identified gaps. The collaborative and comprehensive effort resulted in an ambitious direction aimed at improving student achievement and enhancing productivity.

Stakeholder Involvement Process for Involving Stakeholders in Technology Planning, Implementation and Assessment A technology planning committee was established in the spring of 2007. Requests for participation and representation were sent to district staff, administrators, parents, neighboring school district personnel and the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. When the committee was confirmed, 29 individuals agreed to participate in shaping the technology plan. This included many district staff and administrators as well as several parents and the Reference and Electronic Resource Specialist from the Arlington Heights Memorial Library. The planning committee established a meeting schedule to develop the technology plan. Subcommittees were formed to address specific topics and work on designated components of the plan. Approximately 20 hours of committee time is represented by this plan. The time and efforts contributed by individuals beyond meeting times would increase that number significantly. The Technology Planning Committee established a comprehensive process to collect input from stakeholders. The process included determining what types of input were needed and how best to involve the stakeholders. Input was gathered primarily through three methods: committee meetings, surveys, and input sessions.

Stakeholder Participation Through Surveys District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

The Technology and Learning surveys used were originally from the Illinois NextSteps Toolkit and revised from surveys provided in 2005. Parent surveys on technology were conducted online from October 2007 to January 2008. A total of 390 surveys were submitted. The Teacher Technology and Learning Survey was taken by certified staff online. A total of 289 teachers completed the survey. All other staff (161 submitted) completed a technology needs assessment. Students in grades four and seven completed a Student Technology and Learning Survey. At grade four, 512 surveys were submitted. At grade seven, 552 students responded. The purpose of the parent survey was to ascertain student and parental uses of technology and to determine the levels of satisfaction with technology in the district. The purpose of the teacher technology and learning survey was to identify personal and instructional levels of comfort with technology. The purpose of the other staff needs assessment was to establish priorities for the acquisition and utilization of technologies and to determine professional development needs. The purpose of the student technology and learning surveys was to determine student use and instructional entry points of technology. Survey results were shared with parents, staff, and community members. The responses from all surveys have been incorporated into the goals and strategies.

Stakeholder Ongoing Involvement Quality in technology planning and implementation depends upon continued feedback and ongoing refinement of the process and procedures. Participants in the technology planning process will have an ongoing role in the implementation and monitoring of the Technology Plan. Representative members of the broad-based groups who participated in the planning process will reconvene to review progress to date and suggest changes. Contributions in the form of time, financial resources, direct services, and equipment donations will be reviewed and coordinated with district priorities as reflected in the technology plan. An evaluation of the technology plan includes systematic review of goals and strategies by examining outcomes against identified success indicators. The Board of Education receives quarterly updates on progress toward technology goals, which are closely aligned with the District's Vision 2020. Administrators have a crucial role in the implementation and assessment of the Technology Plan. Principals and program administrators observe classroom instruction and view student projects on a regular basis throughout the year. These administrators also meet with staff during the goal setting and review process to establish individual technology goals and classroom technology targets. Administrators are also instrumental in allocating time and other resources for the improvement of teaching and learning at the schools.

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Tech Plan 4 Committee Members Africa Anderson, Assistive Technology Facilitator, Administration Building Dawn Andrews, Technology Support Assistant, Administration Building Karin Beil, 3rd Grade Teacher and BTA, Ivy Hill Elementary School Donna Bingaman, Curriculum Learning Center teacher and BTA, Thomas Middle School Sherry Brand, Westgate Elementary School Parent Marilyn Briggs, Technology Teaching Assistant, Windsor Elementary School Hank Chiuppi, Technology Support Specialist, Administration Building Carla Cumblad, Assistant Superintendent for Special Services, Administration Building Becky Dufern, Learning Media Center teacher and BTA, Dryden Elementary School Shelley Fabrizio, Principal, Greenbrier Elementary School Chris Fahnoe, Director of Technology and Assessment, Administration Building (facilitator) Dee Hayenga, Teacher on Assignment in the Instruction Department, Administration Building Carla Heinlein, Tech 25 Secretary, Administration Building Carol Hirschtick, Curriculum Learning Center teacher and BTA, Thomas Middle School Deanne Howard, Teacher on Assignment in the Instruction Department, Administration Building Brad Katz, Information Technology Specialist, Administration Building Brian Kaye, Principal, Windsor Elementary School Caren Kimbarovsky, Curriculum Learning Center teacher and BTA, South Middle School Gail Komarek, Learning Media Center teacher and BTA, Windsor Elementary School Helen Kurtz, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, Administration Building Stacy Mallek, Assistant Superintendent for Business, Administration Building Brad Morgan, Westgate Elementary School Parent Judy Moskal, Reference and Electronic Resources, Arlington Heights Memorial Library Tom O’Rourke, Principal, Thomas Middle School David Page, Board of Education member Eleanor Rhee, Teacher on Assignment in the Instruction Department, Administration Building Ken Roiland, Director of Facilities and Maintenance, Miner School Sherry Ziolkowski, Web Specialist, Administration Building Renee Zoladz, Assistant Superintendent for Personnel and Planning, Administration Building

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Vision Statement To provide a superior education for a lifetime of learning, Arlington Heights School District 25 equips staff and students with the skills and tools to use current and emerging technology to solve problems and to be productive citizens in a global society. Seamless integration of technology in a standards-based curriculum maximizes productivity, innovation, and creativity. Accessibility and connectivity enhance collaboration and communication within the district and throughout the global community. The Technology Planning Committee will systematically review the plan and implementation of: • effective telecommunication including phone systems, cell phones, Internet and electronic communication such as e-mail; • instructional technology that engages students in rich electronic resources to support instruction and achievement; and • information technology to communicate information and data for collaboration between stake-holders.

Data Analysis Report Card Data Summarize the Data The Report Card Data provide important information regarding the composition and attributes of Arlington Heights School District 25. Attendance remains high with over 96% attendance rate for the last five years. There is a one-year increase in truancy rates in 2007 and a steady mobility rate over the last five years. The district population continues to increase and has done so over the last six years (from 4,877 in 2002 to 5,077 in 2007). The percentage of economically disadvantaged students has remained consistent, and the percentage of LEP students continues to slightly increase each year. Student ethnicity percentages have remained consistent over the last three years. Parent involvement remains at 100%. The percentage of teachers in the district with a Master's Degree continues to increase year after year. In 2007, 67% of district teachers have obtained their Master's Degree. Report Card Data analysis shows that students in District 25 continue to perform at a high level as measured by ISAT. Continued focus on literacy skills has led to measurable improvement in the area of reading. A rigorous math curriculum combined with consistent professional development has led to strong performance in the area of mathematics. The overall district performance on ISAT continues to be strong and consistent. The district aggregate score outperforms the state average in all performance areas. The percentage of students in the highest two quartiles increased in a majority of subject areas and grade levels. The district scale scores increased in a majority of subject areas and grade levels when compared to 2006.

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Reading Assessment Trends Grade 3 Reading • Year over year increase in the percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards over the last four years (85.7% in 2003-04 to 92.3% in 2006-07) and increased performance for students with disabilities (62.7% in 2003-04 to 71.4% in 2006-07). Grade 5 Reading • Year over year increase in the percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards over the last four years (85.7% in 2003-04 to 92.3% in 2006-07) and increased performance for students with disabilities (39.1% in 2003-04 to 60.0% in 2006-07). Grade 8 Reading • Year over year increase in the percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards over the last four years (86.4% in 2003-04 to 93.8% in 2006-07) and increased performance for students with disabilities (41.3% in 2003-04 to 65.0% in 2006-07). Math Assessment Trends Grade 3 Math • Notable increase in the percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards over the last four years (95.1% in 2003-04 to 98.3% in 2006-07) and increased performance for students with disabilities (85.2% in 2003-04 to 90.4% in 2006-07). Grade 5 Math • Notable increase in the percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards over the last four years (93.9% in 2003-04 to 97.3% in 2006-07) and increased performance for students with disabilities (73.9% in 2003-04 to 87.3% in 2006-07). Grade 8 Math • Year over year increase in the percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards over the last four years (78.4% in 2003-04 to 93.1% in 2006-07) and year over year increase for students with disabilities (28.4% in 2003-04 to 64.0% in 2006-07). Assessment Overall • All grades (3-8) had over 93% of students tested in mathematics meet or exceed standards in 2007. • All grades (3-8) had over 90% of students tested in reading meet or exceed standards in 2007. • All schools and subgroups in Arlington Heights School District 25 have met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) since it has been measured. • The percentage of students that meet or exceed standards in subgroups such as students with disabilities, economically disadvantaged, and Hispanic has increased over the last four years in both math and reading in every grade level.

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Key Factors • Student diversity continues to increase. • Student enrollment continues to increase. • Mobility, truancy, and student attendance rate remain steady. • Special education and ELL population show slight increase. • High parent involvement continues. • The district continues to attract and retain staff with advanced degrees. Conclusions • Maintain high performance as measured by ISAT in all grades and subjects through effective and targeted professional development, student support, and resource management. • The staff is well educated and the district should continue to provide robust professional development in the area of educational technology. • The district must adjust to the increase in special education, ELL, and overall population.

Local Assessment Data Description Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) - Grades 2-8, administered spring 2006 and fall 2007 Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) - Grades K-1, administered fall 2007 Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM) - Grades 2-5, administered fall 2007 Summarize the Data CBM and DIBELS Each child in kindergarten and first grade participates in the district assessment Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS). This monitoring tool is implemented three times a year - fall, winter and spring. Second through fifth grade students’ oral reading fluency is assessed through Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM). District 25 staff monitors DIBELS and CBM scores to determine which students would benefit from early intervention and support in reading readiness and beginning reading skills. DIBELS data indicate that kindergarten and first grade students are making good progress. The following information is based on fall of 2007 DIBELS and CBM administration: Initial Sound Fluency - Kindergarten 77% Low Risk 13% Some Risk 10% At-Risk Letter Naming Fluency - Kindergarten 87% Low Risk 9% Some Risk 4% At-Risk

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Phoneme Segmentation Fluency - 1st Grade 80% Established 17% Emerging 3% Deficit Letter Naming Fluency - 1st Grade 79% Low Risk 15% Some Risk 6% At-Risk Oral Reading Fluency - 2nd Grade 79% Low Risk 15% Some Risk 6% At-Risk Oral Reading Fluency - 3rd Grade 80% Low Risk 13% Some Risk 7% At-Risk Oral Reading Fluency - 4th Grade 76% Low Risk 12% Some Risk 11% At-Risk Oral Reading Fluency - 5th Grade 85% Low Risk 11% Some Risk 4% At-Risk MEASURES OF ACADEMIC PROGRESS (MAP) Each child in grades two through seven participates in the district assessment Measures of Academic Progress (MAP). Students in grades two through seven take both reading and math assessments in the spring and the fall. Some at-risk students participate in a winter testing session if their growth needs to be closely monitored. The following data are based on the students’ growth from the fall of 2006 to the spring of 2007. Reading RIT Scores

Grade 2

Fall 2006

Spring 2007

Growth Growth Target

185.9

197.8

11.9

10.4

Grade 3

198.9

206.2

7.3

6.9

Grade 4

208.4

213.8

5.4

4.7

Grade 5

214.3

219.4

5.1

3.9

Grade 6

219.7

223.4

3.7

3.2

Grade 7

224.0

227.3

3.3

2.7

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Mathematics RIT Scores

Fall 2006

Spring 2007

Growth Growth Target

Grade 2

186.6

198.2

11.6

11.7

Grade 3

200.4

211.0

10.6

9.4

Grade 4

214.2

222.3

8.1

8.0

Grade 5

223.7

230.9

7.2

7.6

Grade 6

229.6

234.1

4.5

6.6

Grade 7

234.6

239.8

5.2

5.4

Key Factors • A new literacy adoption for grades K-8 is currently in progress. • Staff regularly review assessment data to identify areas of need or at-risk students. • Several support mechanisms such as classroom interventions, referral to the literacy program or referral to a problemsolving team are in place to help at-risk students. • Professional development time is allocated to review school assessment information and make informed decisions regarding instructional strategies, school improvement goals and student interventions. • Literacy instruction is provided to all new staff during orientation. • Training for administering DIBELS and CBM has been provided to classroom teachers and support staff. • Literacy remains a top priority for the district and schools. • Differentiated math instruction remains in place to support at-risk and gifted students. Conclusions • An analysis of reading assessment data from DIBELS, CBM, and MAP assessments have demonstrated the need for continued instructional emphasis in reading comprehension, vocabulary, and literary elements. • The district will maintain strong academic growth in literacy and math through effective and targeted professional development, student support, and resource management. • The district will sustain curricular programs and adoptions by providing resources, training and support for technology integration.

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Attributes and Challenges of the District and Community That Have Affected Learning Description U.S. Census Bureau, reviewed fall 2007 National Center for Education Statistics, reviewed fall 2007 Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, reviewed fall 2007 Village of Arlington Heights Web site, reviewed fall 2007 Strategic Vision 2020, reviewed fall 2007 District Report Card 2007, reviewed fall 2007 District Measures of Academic Progress Results, reviewed fall 2007 Tech Planning Committee Parent Survey, administered and reviewed winter 2007 Summarize the Data District/Community Profile Arlington Heights School District 25 is located in Arlington Heights, a Chicago suburb of approximately 78,000 residents. District 25 is a K-8 district with seven elementary schools (grades K-5) and two middle schools (grades 6-8) and serves approximately 5,077 students. The elementary schools implement a variety of classroom organizational plans (single age, multi-age, looping, dual grade) to meet the needs of their students. The middle schools embrace middle school philosophy for their early adolescent populations. The district provides extensive programming for student groups with special needs (special education, English language learners, bilingual education, gifted). The district provides all of its students with rigorous curricular programming in the core subject areas. In addition to the comprehensive core curriculum, students at all grades are provided extensive opportunities in the creative and applied arts. All programs are part of a curriculum review cycle. Technology is seamlessly integrated throughout the curriculum, instruction, and assessment process. District academic achievement data consistently show performance in all subject areas exceeding state averages. The school district comprises a portion of Arlington Heights that is primarily residential and receives approximately 85% of its operating tax revenues from these properties. The district’s facilities include twelve buildings: nine schools, one administration center which provides rental space for private childcare, one maintenance facility which provides rental space for the special education cooperative, and one food service facility which provides rental space to a private education group. Library and park district programs support and enhance the District 25 educational program. The Arlington Heights Park District, District 25, and the Village of Arlington Heights work together to provide before and after school care for District 25 students. Every District 25 school has an active PTA (Parent Teacher Association) which works to foster close relationships between home and school. The school district partners with ABC/25 Foundation, a not-for-profit agency that sponsors various fund-raisers. ABC/25 donates its proceeds to the school district for special projects and teacher grants. The school district maintains collaborative relationships among the various groups that comprise the employee work force (certified and non-certified staff, support staff, custodial/maintenance, food service).

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Arlington Heights School District 25

School, Staff & Community Demographics The population of Arlington Heights is primarily middle and upper-middle class. Arlington Heights School District 25 is one of four elementary districts that serve the community. Students from District 25 attend Township High School District 214. Arlington Heights School District 25 demographic data indicate that 5.9% of the students come from low-income families. The district’s ethnic breakdown is approximately 87% white, 1% black, 4.5% Hispanic, 5.6% Asian/Pacific Islander, and less than one percent American Indian. The district’s average attendance rate is 96.2%. The majority of district students are native speakers of English; 4.7% have limited English proficiency. Special education students comprise 13% of the student population. The district’s mobility rate is 4.3%. Class size across the district averages 22.6 students per class. Average operating cost per student is $10,583. The school district’s certified staff exemplifies a variety of teaching experience with an average of 11.5 years experience, 33% holding bachelor’s degrees and 67% holding master’s degrees. The average pupil to teacher ratio is 17.8:1, below the state average of 18.8:1. The staff is 85% female and 15% male; its ethnic breakdown is 98% white, less than one percent Hispanic, and 1.5% percent Asian/Pacific Islander. Key Factors Following is a list of attributes that exist in the Arlington Heights community and school district: • Partnerships between the school district and the many community agencies and civic organizations • Shared values and high expectations regarding public education • District-wide curricula aligned to the Illinois Learning Standards delivered through coherent instructional practices within schools and across the district • Consistently strong student academic performance on local and national assessments • A history of strong economic operations and political stability • A stable district work force and collaborative relationships among the various stakeholders The current educational landscape is experiencing rapid change and District 25 recognizes the numerous internal and external factors that have an impact on its overall performance. District 25 and the community of Arlington Heights face the following challenges: • Managing in an environment of diminishing financial resources, including state imposed tax caps and the impact of local tax increment financing (TIF) districts • Meeting performance expectations and requirements as defined in the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) 2001 law • Meeting the changing needs of students in special programs (special education, English language learners, bilingual education, gifted education) • Addressing staff turnover with effective recruitment, retention, and training practices • Meeting state certification requirements • Sustaining a safe, caring and supportive learning environment for all students • Maintaining strong parent and community engagement and involvement Conclusions • The district should maintain and enhance collaborative relationships to ensure a supportive, safe and engaging learning environment. • The district needs to maintain a stable work force to preserve professional development experiences and a strong economic position to provide funding for integrating the growth of technology in education.

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Educator’s Qualifications and Professional Growth and Development Data Description Illinois District Report Card 2007, reviewed fall 2007 Teacher Survey, administered and reviewed winter 2008 State of the District Report, reviewed fall 2007 Professional Development Database September, 2006 - present, reviewed fall 2007 Illinois Report Card: Educator Data - Staff Demographics 2007, reviewed fall 2007 Staff Development Executive Summary - March 1, 2007, reviewed fall 2007 District 25 Vision 2020 developed through Community Conversation Committee, reviewed fall 2007 Summarize the Data District 25 currently employs 758 full and part-time staff, of which 438 are certificated. Sixty-seven percent of the 336 total teachers FTE have Master's degrees. Many of the teaching staff have their teaching experience within the district. The average teaching experience of the staff is 11.5 years. The state average is 13 years. Ninety-eight percent of District 25 teachers are white, with the remaining 2% being Hispanic or Asian/Pacific Islander. In contrast, 87% of the students are white, while 1% are black, 4.5% Hispanic, 5.6% Asian/Pacific Islander and the remaining 1.8% are American Indian/ Multi-racial. The district goal for staff development is to provide staff with the strategies and skills required to improve academic achievement for all students. Staff development opportunities are based on District goals and building school improvement plans. The eight School Improvement Planning/Institute Days, one of which is devoted to technology, are valuable times for staff development and ensure the attendance of staff. Current staff development for technology consists of one School Improvement Day and a voluntary two-day Tech Academy held every summer. There is “as-needed” training in each school building. There is also a one-day training in the summer for technology staff. Some staff members attend the annual Illinois Computing Educators Conference each year. Teachers and administrators need to become more familiar with NETS-T and NETS-A and begin to systematically implement the technology standards for each user group. Inconsistent implementation of educational technology among classroom teachers is noted and indicates the need for continued staff development and support. Staff members indicate the need to know how to use various components of technology in their buildings. Teachers indicate they need skills for designing, managing, and assessing learning projects that incorporate technology. Surveys were prepared by the Tech Planning committee and administered online to all teachers, administrators and other staff. Survey questions addressed the effectiveness of staff development opportunities, technology needs in terms of hardware, software and training, and the strengths and needs of technology learners.

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Key Factors • Teachers and administrators need to become more familiar with NETS•T and NETS•A. • Consistent implementation of technology is needed. • A focus on 21st Century skills should be included in staff training. • The pilot Technology Facilitator position at one school has effectively helped teachers bridge the gap between ideas and implementation. • Professional development should extend beyond the walls of the district through distance and online learning. • Follow-up sessions to SIP day and Tech Academy would be beneficial for continued growth. • Staff needs to be aware of the wide range of copyright guidelines as it pertains to computer usage, video, publishing student work on the Web, creating school/teacher Web pages, using software, or copying from print material. • Assessment data is used to guide professional development choices. Conclusions • Staff and administrators need additional opportunities to participate in various professional development activities that align with National Staff Development Council (NSDC) standards, NETS•A and NETS•T. • Staff and administrators need additional opportunities to participate in various professional development activities about the ethical uses of technology, assessing student technology products, and district technology standards.

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Parent/Community Involvement Description Parent Technology Survey, administered and reviewed winter 2007 District 25 Vision 2020 developed through Community Conversation Committee, reviewed fall 2007 Meeting notes from Community Conversation Committee (2006), reviewed fall 2007 School Report Card 2007, reviewed fall 2007 State of the District Report 2005, reviewed fall 2007 Summarize the Data From the December 2007 Parent Technology Survey: • 96% of parents say their children use a computer at home, same as 2004 • 69% of parents say their children use a computer at home for school work, down 4.5% from 2004 • 93% of parents responded that they have high-speed Internet access at home, up 14% from 2004 • 78% of parents have either Comcast or WideOpenWest cable service • 87% of parents strongly agree or agree that children have access to appropriate technology in school; 9.4% do not know • 81% of parents strongly agree or agree that technology is effectively used at school; 14.2% do not know • 84% of parents strongly agree or agree that their child is developing age appropriate tech skills; 10% do not know • 73% of parents strongly agree or agree that technology has motivated their child to be more involved in learning; 14.4% do not know Top 5 methods (in order) of communication to acquire information about the school:

1) Friday packet / Backpack mail

2) District Website

3) School Web pages

4) Classroom teacher Web page

5) Listserv / Email

• Email and instant messaging were noted as the most used methods to communicate with family, friends and community • Parents were most interested in attending workshops on student safety while using the Internet and attending demonstrations of student work • Community Conversation Committee identified several areas to address as part of the District’s Vision 2020 plan. Those areas included 21st Century Skills, effective use of technologies, global understanding, application of learning to real life, ethical decision making, interdependence and collaboration, communication skills and technologies to solve problems.

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Key Factors • High percentage of families have broadband Internet access at home. • Highly involved community as noted on School Report Card (100% parent involvement) • Highly educated parents and community • Strong community resources such as park district and libraries • High parent participation in school and district functions, activities and committees • Stable mobility rate for families • Stable economic condition within district and community • High percentage of parents believe that technology is being used effectively, their children are acquiring appropriate technology skills, and have motivated their child to be more involved in learning. However, a notable percentage (9-14% depending on the question) of parents responded that they “did not know” to these same questions Conclusions • The district needs to enhance communication with staff, community members, and parents regarding district information, student safety, and student achievement • The district needs to enhance existing partnerships and develop new collaborations with community organizations and members to support the integration of technology and learning beyond the school • A consistently updated District web presence must be a vehicle for communication and provide electronic information through a variety of formats.

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Technology Deployment Description District technology software and hardware inventory, updated fall of 2007 and reviewed winter 2007 District network map and infrastructure design, updated and reviewed fall 2007 Technology budget, reviewed fall 2007 Acceptable Use of Online Resources, reviewed and updated fall 2007 Previous Technology Plan (2005-2008), reviewed fall of 2007 Previous telecommunications bills and e-rate information, reviewed winter 2007 Technology replacement cycle, reviewed winter 2007 Summarize the Data District 25 has a total of 4976 K-8 students with 336 teachers and 22 administrators. All school buildings (instructional and non-instructional) have high-speed Internet access and a minimum of 100 Mb Ethernet cable connections at all facilities. The computer labs in all buildings received upgraded computers in the summer of 2007. The laptop cart computers were upgraded in 2006. A new phone and voicemail system was put into place throughout the district during the summer of 2007. Currently the district has 100 Mb fiber connection between buildings and a10 Mb Opt-Eman connection to the Internet . Additional equipment includes: • 36 servers, 29 Macs and 7 PC (13 five years or older) • 90 Windows operating systems and 2191 Mac OS X operating systems • Network equipment includes: 157 hubs, 22 routers, 79 switches, 93 wireless access points • 1506 desktop Macs and 73 desktop PCs - total of 1579 or 70.5% of total computers in district • Age of desktop Macs - 30.3% under two years old, 29.3% are between 2 and 5 years and 40.3% are 5 years or older • 656 laptop Macs and 5 laptop PCs - total of 661 or 29.5% of total computers in district • Age of laptop Macs - 50.3% under two years old, 30.5% are between 2 and 5 years and 19.2% are 5 years or older • 2240 total Mac and PC desktops and laptops

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Key Factors • Current Acceptable Use Procedures have recently been updated and reviewed for legal compliance • Significant resources have been allocated to the technology budget for infrastructure • Supportive Board of Education and administration is open to advancing technology education and the infrastructure necessary for a quality program • A variety of vendors and solutions are available for many projects. Continued emphasis on finding the best partnerships and financial choices will be necessary to maximize budgets • Demands from users and parents continue to increase for collaboration, communication, and information • A variety of products that are in demand continue to drop in price and become more feasible for school/classroom implementation • Hardware and software need to be explored, budgeted for and implemented to support and enhance the acquisition of 21st Century Skills, District 25 tech standards and District 25's Vision 2020 • New operating systems, processors and updated software continue to pose a challenge for compatibility, equity, replacement, and troubleshooting • The demand for wireless connectivity continues to increase as staff become more comfortable with using this technology in the classroom • The need for electronic file storage for staff and students continues to increase dramatically • Security and safety needs continue to expand with the growth of social networking, electronic communication, and ever increasing use of the network   Conclusions • Provide equitable and reliable access to highly effective technologies that enhance achievement and productivity for students and staff members • Sustain a reliable and robust data and telecommunications network to facilitate communication, collaboration, productivity, and student achievement • Supply ongoing technical support necessary to sustain functional learning environments, curriculum integration, and professional development

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Gap Analysis Gaps in Professional Development • The content on the district cable channel has increased significantly in the last year. However, not all community members are able to see the cable channel because of television service or schedules. We know that the traffic on our web page is consistent and parents look to the web page for district information including information videos. • Teachers and administrators need to become more familiar with NETS-T and NETS-A and begin to systematically implement the technology standards for each user group. Inconsistent implementation of educational technology among classroom teachers is noted and indicates the need for continued staff development and support. Staff members indicate the need to know how to use various components of technology in their buildings. Teachers indicate they need skills for designing, managing, and assessing learning projects that incorporate technology. • A pilot program introduced a new position at one building called a Technology Facilitator. This position assists with professional development, curriculum integration and technical support. This position has effectively helped teacher bridge the gap between ideas and implementation. This position could provide the same services to other schools if more positions are established. • Professional development can extend outside the meeting room through distance learning or online learning. Presentations and training sessions can be available on-line to assist with staff development as well as the acquisition of CPDUs. • District 25 provides several technology professional development opportunities throughout the year such as Tech Academy and Tech SIP Day. Staff have indicated that follow-up to these sessions during the year would be beneficial for continued growth. • The creation of various training/professional development materials has created more opportunities for staff to access information. Production of training content in a variety of formats (videos on-demand, techtorials, how-to guides) should continue. • As staff use of technology continues to increase, staff members need to be made more aware of the wide range of copyright information as it pertains to computer usage, videotapes, publishing student work on the Web, creating teacher Web pages, using software, or copying from print material. Reminders of appropriate use of print and electronic resources must be communicated on an annual basis and practiced by all users. • Assessment data (achievement scores, survey data, feedback) should continue to be used to guide instructional decisions and professional development choices effectively.

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Gaps in Community Involvement • Collaboration between the school district and community organizations has increased over the past three years. Additional opportunities to work with organizations such as the senior center, library, community colleges should be explored. • The District operates a cable access channel that is carried on the two local cable companies providing service to subscriber homes but lacks the staff, hardware, and facility to produce professional videos. • The District currently has methods to reach out and communicate with parents but limited methods to all community members. • The District has limited resources to produce community communications such as color copiers. • The number of staff and district web pages continues to increase. Accuracy and timeliness are essential and a plan is not in place for accountability. • Expansion and consistent updating of the district and school Web sites is needed and requires personnel, time and equipment for this method of communication to continue to be effective. Gaps in Curriculum and Instruction • The current standard is two computers per classroom. There is also a laptop cart of 30 computers available for checkout. However, demand for access to computers throughout the day continues to rise and the current supply is not meeting the demand for staff and students. • The use of laptop computers by staff and students has increased significantly in the last three years and will continue. A managed, robust wireless infrastructure is not in place to provide adequate coverage for future expansion. • A consistent approach and timeline for keyboard instruction is not defined for the schools. • Updating hardware or operating systems can cause some software or peripherals to become obsolete. A plan is not in place to account for or replace software and peripherals that cannot work with new hardware or operating system. • The district currently provides monochrome and color laser printers for staff and student use. Printers for non-traditional size paper (poster size) and color copiers are not available in the school. • A continuum of technology skills is not present and a curriculum map would assist in communicating these skills and providing a framework for accountability and assessment. • Each student saves their work to a server at their school. They do not have access to those files to continue working from outside the school. • While we have a strong academic assessment plan, systematic evaluation of student technology skill acquisition is limited and is not present on progress reports. • New educational technologies that will be developed in the next few years may offer special opportunities to enhance student learning. We need to explore the feasibility of bringing these technologies to our students. We need to position ourselves to be able to explore and adopt emerging technologies as they become available. • Adequate time is not available for the LMC/CLC directors to co-plan with teams.

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Gaps in Technology Deployment • Technology purchases go through both the school and district offices causing increased time in managing inventories, assets and licenses. • School and district inventories are kept separately and in some cases are in database formats that need to be updated. • Currently the school district purchases all software and hardware. Leasing is an option that was used successfully in the past to acquire necessary equipment. • The current replacement cycle is 5-6 years on computers. This timeline has allowed for maximum use of equipment. However, technology continues to change and the replacement timeline should be reviewed. • The amount of technology and expectations to support student learning continues to increase. Existing amount of staff will have a hard time covering all of the technical and instructional responsibilities to support the Technology Plan. • Increased technology requires additional infrastructure needs such as power and HVAC for cooling. The current infrastructure will lack in handling the power requirements for future expansion and not all data centers have temperature management options. • Currently there is a limited system for document management. Additional options for organizing, managing and retrieving documents is needed to improve efficiency and conservation. • Requirements for data storage continue to increase with media files and archiving. Current storage capacity will not be sufficient and needs to be reviewed. • Supporting existing technology is a critical component of the technology plan. However, emerging technology may provide additional opportunities for staff and students and should be explored for educational relevance. • With the increased use of equipment and servers, electronic storage of confidential/sensitive information on district equipment continues to increase. Current security measures are robust but need to be reviewed in order to provide a highly secure network environment. • The district needs to evaluate the existing student information system to ensure that the features and functions meet the needs of the district including staff access, attendance, and web access. • Larger schools have greater demands for LMC/CLC lab time. Access to LMC/CLC computers needs to be equitable for all students. • Even with the infusion of new equipment, teachers and students have identified the need for additional access to computers. An increase in our inventory also escalates the demand for technical support. Although technical support is adequate today, increased student use of computers will significantly impact our ability to provide timely repairs and maintenance. • The standard for video is scheduled to be changed in the next 2-3 years to high definition. A majority of district video equipment does not handle high definition.

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Strategies and Activities Curriculum and Instruction Strategy #1 Students will use integrated technology to increase achievement and enhance learning. Activities • Support collaboration between departments to support, test, and implement technology associated with curriculum adoptions • Provide student access to their files off-site • Review the expectations and instruction of keyboarding • Include specific strategies for accessing, recording, evaluating, and synthesizing information into the curriculum mapping process • Address NETS-S standards through technology-enhanced learning activities in each curriculum area as described by Illinois Learning Standards and Applications of Learning • Promote the concept of technology integration as a shared responsibility among the classroom teacher, LMC/CLC staff, and technology staff Strategy #2 Students will develop authentic, engaging, multidisciplinary learning projects that use instructional resources and information literacy skills. Activities • Provide students opportunities for global connections, distance learning, and online skill acquisition • Support opportunities for LMC/CLC staff to co-plan with instructional team • Support the development of our Library Media Centers into the information hub of the school • Maintain and enhance online resource subscriptions • Facilitate teacher collaboration in the area of technology by providing time and resources • Maintain and update Middle School Industrial Tech modules and curriculum • Develop and implement online units of study and Websites that incorporate engaged learning strategies Strategy #3 Students will receive differentiated instruction and be assessed through technology-enhanced methods to attain District 25 technology learning standards. Activities • Explore the inclusion of technology assessment information on student progress reports • Explore and adopt emerging technologies to enhance student learning • Coordinate with Assistive Technology Facilitator to review and support assistive technology for students with special needs • Advance student acquisition of 21st century learning skills

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

• Instruct students in District 25 Appropriate Use Guidelines, Internet safety, copyright issues and the ethical use of technology • Develop a continuum of technology skills and/or curriculum map of district technology standards and skills • Sustain and improve technology-based assessment activities in the district • Enhance efforts to collect, analyze, and report student assessment data through the use of technology • Provide appropriate software to support special education students

Professional Development Strategy #1 Staff and administrators will participate in various professional development opportunities in technology that align with National Staff Development Council (NSDC) standards, NETS•A and NETS•T. Activities • Continue providing a Technology Academy prior to the start of school to immerse staff in technology learning • Continue offering a SIP day focused on technology as a tool for teaching and learning • Provide professional development resources and opportunities at a variety of times throughout the year with a variety of methods • Develop district technology standards for teachers and administrators and support its implementation and accountability • Structure professional development opportunities around strands to provide organized and sequential sessions • Support professional development opportunities with resources, space, time, and compensation as needed • Develop a district technology certification program linked to rigorous professional development and implementation tools • Provide training for staff in information literacy • Explore feasibility of a district technology-training lab Strategy #2 Staff and administrators will participate in various professional development opportunities about the ethical uses of technology, assessing student technology products, and district technology standards. Activities • Develop strategies and methods for assessing technology standards and skills for staff and students • Provide opportunities and support for district staff to attend and present at technology conferences • Provide explicit professional development on district technology learning standards and skills • Continue paying for technology conference registrations and/or substitutes, release time, etc. for all staff • Provide information to staff regarding copyright information, site licensing, video-taping television programs, and publishing on the Web • Review with staff the Appropriate Use Guidelines and complete the required signature form • Regularly review district policies and procedures related to student and staff technology use • Provide building level training on available software, hardware, and identified skill needs

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Community/Parent Involvement Strategy #1 Enhance communication with staff, community members, and parents regarding district information, student safety and student achievement. Activities • Continue to acquire equipment for videotaping and editing cable programs • Provide additional support and methods for enhancing the cable channel/video-on-demand productions including videotaping after-school presentations • Develop methods or procedures to maintain accurate and current Web pages • Provide parents with additional access to student, district and school information on the Web • Increase the amount of videos on demand available on the district Website so that content is more accessible • Investigate options with cable companies to provide a digital signal for the cable channel Strategy #2 Develop new partnerships and enhance existing collaborations with community organizations/members to support the integration of technology and learning beyond the school. Activities • Acquire or develop electronic storage and delivery system for informational videos • Develop collaboration opportunities outside the school community such as the Senior Center and Arlington Heights Memorial Library • Designate district space for production of cable channel content • Improve school presentation systems used for community programs including microphones, speakers, and projectors. • Continue summer school computer/technology classes for children and communicate to all elementary students in the community • Communicate regularly with community members regarding technology planning, implementation, effectiveness, and budgets via newsletters, Web site and cable channel • Expand Web presence to possibly include online registration, payment, and training videos • Provide opportunities for parents to develop an understanding of student technology use such as school tech nights, informational videos, and online project galleries • Explore methods to promote availability of resources and information

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Technology Deployment Strategy #1 Provide equitable and reliable access to highly effective technologies that enhance achievement and productivity for students and staff members Activities • Provide adequate hardware and equipment for engaging classroom instruction such as interactive whiteboards, projectors, student response systems, and audio amplification • Assist with updating Industrial Technology classroom equipment • Explore alternatives to existing classroom monitors • Implement OS X 10.5 and OS X 10.5 Server • Provide mounted video projectors for all middle school instructional classrooms • Improve technology access by increasing number of computers available in the classroom for students • Improve access by increasing number of computers for staff use • Provide hardware and software for document management • Provide adequate storage space for district and building servers • Explore alternatives to desktops and laptops to improve access for staff and students • Explore and adopt emerging technologies to enhance efficiency and productivity • Explore financing options including grants for future technology purchases • Explore the financial implications of accelerating the current replacement cycle for computers • Develop a plan to address software obsolescence • Provide additional hardware such as a color copier and poster printer to produce community information • Provide additional file servers to provide storage for student and staff files, data backup, and media • Provide staff access to their files off-site • Budget for maintenance agreements for operating systems, service, FileMaker, student management system and other software Strategy #2 Provide a reliable and robust data and telecommunications network to facilitate communication, collaboration, productivity, and student achievement Activities • Provide personnel, budget and other resources to maintain business, phone, food services, facilities, and personnel systems • Provide a robust and managed wireless solution to handle computer, camera, and IP phone traffic • Evaluate existing infrastructure such as HVAC, electrical capacity and temperature management to support future expansion • Investigate the implications of pending high-definition video standards • Budget for the ongoing services and equipment involved with the wired LAN/WAN • Continue to sustain and increase bandwidth between buildings and to the Internet in order to meet expansion and demand • Maintain T1 lines as network backup until contracts expire • Maintain budget for consulting services related to managing, securing and improving the LAN/WAN

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Strategy #3 Provide ongoing technical support necessary to sustain functioning learning environments, curriculum integration, and professional development Activities • Equip new classrooms and new staff with standard technology • Purchase computers to replace aging computers as indicated by the replacement cycle. Placement of new computers must always consider the redeployment of computers that are being replaced and make use of "cascading" older computers to appropriate assignments either in the same building or other district locations. Computers that are determined to no longer be of use to the district must be salvaged for parts, donated to appropriate organizations, or disposed of properly with compliance with all local, state, and federal laws • Replace end-of-life networked printers and other equipment when no longer economical to repair • Centralize purchasing of software and hardware through the district office to improve management and accountability • Update and maintain a centralized hardware and software inventory database • Provide additional technology support personnel within the constraints of the personnel budget • Review existing security and back-up equipment and procedures • Evaluate existing student management system's ability to meet future needs • Investigate key server to monitor licenses • Assist with the implementation of district energy conservation measures

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Monitoring Plan Curriculum and Instruction Strategies • Administrators and staff will utilize state and local assessment data to make data informed decisions about curriculum and instruction. These decisions will ensure appropriate use of technology and integration in instruction. • Staff will review curriculum guides and integrated units of study in conjunction with curriculum review cycles. • Staff will monitor usage and creation of district created, interactive Websites. • Staff will share examples of differentiated instruction using technology enhanced strategies and assessment in professional development opportunities. • Staff will use district created tools to assess student technology skills. Professional Development Strategies • Staff will record and review the frequency, duration, attendance, agendas, and topics of professional development opportunities. • Staff will document, monitor and review the alignment of professional development opportunities with the National Staff Development Council (NSDC) standards, NETS*A and NETS*T . • Administrators will track and document the effectiveness of training opportunities with surveys and evaluations in the areas of: ethical uses of technology, assessing student technology products, and district technology standards. Parent/Community Involvement Strategies • Staff will keep logs tracking new partnership projects at both the district and school levels, including purpose, goals, projects, and evaluations. • Staff will monitor and report the number of district cable video programs, technology summer school courses, communications with the community, and opportunities for the community to better understand educational technology in the district. Technology Deployment Strategies • District staff will regularly monitor and review the inventories of hardware and software. • Administrators will create deployment plans to address increased need for access to computers for staff and students. • Tech staff will monitor server usage and storage space to determine necessary purchases. • Administrators will use District enrollment projections to plan for additional classrooms and necessary equipment needed. • Teachers will provide feedback about classroom tech components such as video projectors and interactive whiteboards, including ease of use and instructional impact. • Tech staff will review the replacement cycle and adjust it to meet the needs for staff and student usability. • Staff will evaluate the effectiveness of emerging technologies to provide information about further implementation. • Tech staff will regularly review network usage and repair logs.

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25 Dryden • Greenbrier • Ivy Hill • Olive-Mary Stitt Patton • Westgate • Windsor South • Thomas

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

AHSD 25 provides a comprehensive, cohesive, and student-centered education that optimizes the capabilities of the whole child. Excellence defines the core subject areas–literacy, mathematics, the sciences, foreign language, social studies, health and wellness, and the arts–needed to live and contribute in a global community. Core subjects include emerging content areas critical to the future success of our students in the work place and in the world. Core subjects emphasize... • an engaging, rigorous, and meaningful curriculum • effective use of technologies • high level thinking skills and creativity • global understanding - geographical - cultural - second language acquisition • personalized learning to address all learners - access to high quality curriculum and instruction - instruction that matches capability and learning style - academic, behavioral, social, and emotional support - enrichment and accelerated learning • application of learning to real life • relevance and timeliness • financial, economic, business, and entrepreneurial literacy • civic literacy and service learning • awareness of the world of work

Core Subjects And Content

AHSD 25 provides students with the skills to be productive citizens in a global society in partnership with families and community. Life skills include... • persistence and perseverance • communication skills • interdependence and collaboration • social and diplomacy skills • personal responsibility • understanding diversity • the ability to adapt to change • demonstrating leadership • taking responsible risks • ethical decision making • conflict resolution • healthy living choices • character education

Life Skills

AHSD 25 students are prepared to learn throughout their lives by making effective and innovative use of what they know. Students learn to generate questions, pose problems, and come to well-reasoned conclusions. Lifetime learning requires reasoning skills, such as... • applying past knowledge to new situations • solving problems through analysis and evaluation • striving for accuracy, clarity, and precision in thinking • finding humor and expressing wonderment • gathering and assessing relevant data • flexibility in thinking • self-reflection about learning • creating, imagining, and innovating • remaining open to continuous learning • using information and communication technologies to solve problems

Reasoning Skills

21st Century Learning AHSD 25 utilizes purposeful assessments which are the building blocks for continuous improvement and serve as essential components of a 21st century education. These assessments include national, state, district, school, classroom, program, and individual assessments that provide information about student learning to teachers, students, parents, and community. Purposeful assessments emphasize... • mastery of content and evidence of successful learning • self-assessment, self-reflection, and self-monitoring (metacognitive strategies) • reporting student progress • timely access for parents to monitor grades and assignments • meaningful communication of results • progress toward standards • academic and non-academic areas

21st Century Assessment

Provide a superior education for a lifetime of learning.

Our Mission

Approved by the Board of Education 4/12/07

System-wide evaluations assure attention to the continuous improvement process and include... • screening to guarantee the hiring of high quality staff • performance evaluations for all employees • organizational health surveys • audits (i.e., finance, staffing, energy, space,enrollment, board policies and procedures)

AHSD 25 provides the community with a school district that has structurally sound foundations through fiscal planning; hiring and retaining quality staff; providing safe, up-todate facilities; and the involvement of community as constituents who support learning. These foundations include... • responsible resource allocation • varied means of communicating information • multiple opportunities for community involvement • data-informed decision making

Structural Foundations

Within a framework of learning for the 21st century, AHSD 25 creates a nurturing environment and provides a world class education for all.

Our Vision

Strategic Vision 2020

Arlington Heights School District 25

Additional Documentation

2020 Strategic Vision

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District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

• Utilize Web site and access channel for information distribution

• Various training opportunities for all levels of staff

January 2007 - Department of Technology and Assessment

• Maintain professional development opportunities

olvement v In y it n u m m Co

• Information sharing with parents

• Online professional development for staff

• Develop trainers through staff incentive programs

• Develop business and community partnerships such as the Library and the Village

• Bridge the technological gap between the ones who can afford technology and those who cannot

• How to stay ahead with technological advances and ensure that staff knows enough to teach students

pment

Professional Develo

ability

t and Sustain

Deploymen

• Teacher laptops and classroom projectors

• Create and maintain robust infrastructure

• Continue to support emerging technology

• Continue replacement cycle of computers

• Schools using tech to make learning mobile

• Laptops for all intermediate level and middle school students

Technology Summary Community Conversation

• Appropriate staffing for technical and instructional needs

• Provide means for staff sharing and collaboration

• Information and Digital Literacy

• Integrate 21st Century Learning Skills and NETs

• Using technology and multi-faceted means of communicating with others that open two-way communication

• Tech standards on report cards

ion Curriculum and Instruct

Arlington Heights School District 25

Technology Summary - Community Conversation

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Infrastructure

N CO

N

Communication

• District policies on confidentiality and acceptable use • Engaged Learning Resources • 4-6 year • Secure Web-based email • Technology as a tool for learning replacement • District Web page • District developed web resources cycle • Voicemail system • NTAC/NETS Standards for students in • 1,400+ networked • Student Information System curriculum desktop computers • Web-based IEPs for staff and student use • Information literacy in the LMC • Homework Hotline (middle school) • Integrated technology lessons • Classroom TV/VCR/DVD • Web safety presentations • Data-informed decision-making • 30+ servers for web, databases, • Technology Planning storage, student files and staff files • Assistive Technology • District Cable Channel • Networked Xerox machines/printers • Web based entry Staff Training • Industrial Tech labs in middle school of progress reports (K-5) • Technology SIP Day (39 PC, 2 servers) • Document sharing • Building-based training • Portable multimedia presentation systems through file servers (20+ in the district) • On-demand district • Video conferencing tech training • 75%-90% wireless coverage per building • Recent redesign of • Tech Academy (staff) • Video distribution center in each building District Web page • Tech Support • 1 mobile lab per building (30 laptops) • Recent phone and Academy (tech) • 2 computer labs per middle school, voicemail system • Tech 25 Blog 1 lab per elementary school (30 computers) upgrade • 10Mb Fiber connection for internet, 100Mb fiber between schools • Recent cable • Daily offsite backup of district data channel • Security for Web mail, district servers and wireless connections upgrade

Educational Technology

TY

AC CE

c

Ma

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Ca nd

SS

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pla tfo

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

IVI T EC

District - Director of Technology and Assessment • Technology Support Specialist • Information Technology Specialist • Web Specialist • Technology Support Assistant • Technology Secretary Building - Building Technology Advocate (stipend position) • Technology Teaching Assistant (15-30 hrs/wk per school) • Computer lab teacher (1-2 per middle school) • LMC Director (1 per building) • Technology Facilitator (1 position - pilot program)

INFORMATION

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Staffing

Technology and Learning

Arlington Heights School District 25

District 25 Technology Summary

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Arlington Heights School District 25

District 25 Policies Arlington Heights School District 25 6:235

Access to Electronic Networks Electronic networks, including the Internet, are a part of the District’s instructional program and serve to promote educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communication. The Superintendent shall develop an implementation plan for this policy and appoint system administrator(s). The School District is not responsible for any information that may be lost or damaged, or become unavailable when using the network, or for any information that is retrieved or transmitted via the Internet. Furthermore, the District will not be responsible for any unauthorized charges or fees resulting from access to the Internet. Curriculum The use of the District’s electronic networks shall: (1) be consistent with the curriculum adopted by the District as well as the varied instructional needs, learning styles, abilities, and developmental levels of the students, and (2) comply with the selection criteria for instructional materials and library-media center materials. Staff members may, consistent with the Superintendent’s implementation plan, use the Internet throughout the curriculum. The District’s electronic network is part of the curriculum and is not a public forum for general use. Acceptable Use All use of the District’s electronic network by students and staff must be: (1) in support of education and/or research, and be in furtherance of the goals stated herein, or (2) for a legitimate school business purpose. Use is a privilege, not a right. Students and staff members have no expectation of privacy in any material that is stored, transmitted, or received via the District’s electronic network or District computers. General rules for behavior and communications apply when using electronic networks. The District’s Appropriate Use of Online Resources contains the appropriate uses, ethics, and protocol. Electronic communications and downloaded material, including files deleted from a user’s account but not erased, may be monitored or read by school officials. Internet Safety Each District computer with Internet access shall have a filtering device that blocks entry to visual depictions that are: (1) obscene, (2) pornographic, or (3) harmful or inappropriate for students, as defined by federal law and as determined by the Superintendent or designee. The Superintendent or designee shall enforce the use of such filtering devices. An administrator, supervisor, or other authorized person may disable the filtering device for bona fide research or other lawful purpose, provided the person receives prior permission from the Superintendent or system administrator. The Superintendent or designee shall include measures in this policy’s implementation plan to address the following: 1. Ensure staff supervision of student access to online electronic networks, 2. Restrict student access to inappropriate matter as well as restricting access to harmful materials, 3. Ensure student and staff privacy, safety, and security when using electronic communications, 4. Restrict unauthorized access, including “hacking” and other unlawful activities, and 5. Restrict unauthorized disclosure, use, and dissemination of personal identification information, such as, names and addresses.

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Authorization for Electronic Network Access Each staff member must sign the District’s Appropriate Use of Online Resources as a condition for using the District’s electronic network. Each student and his or her parent(s)/guardian(s) must sign the Appropriate Use document before being granted unsupervised use. All users of the District’s computers to access the Internet shall maintain the confidentiality of student records. Reasonable measures to protect against unreasonable access shall be taken before confidential student information is loaded onto the network. The failure of any student or staff member to follow the terms of the Appropriate Use document or this policy, will result in the loss of privileges, disciplinary action, and/or appropriate legal action. LEGAL REF.:

No Child Left Behind Act, 20 U.S.C. §6777. Children’s Internet Protection Act, 47 U.S.C. §254(h) and (l). Enhancing Education Through Technology Act, 20 U.S.C §6751 et seq. 720 ILCS 135/0.01.

CROSS REF.:

5:100 (Staff Development Program), 5:170 (Copyright), 6:40 (Curriculum Development), 6:210 (Instructional Materials), 6:230 (Library Media Center), 6:260 (Complaints About Curriculum, Instructional Materials, and Programs), 7:130 (Student Rights and Responsibilities), 7:190 (Student Discipline), 7:310 (Publications)

ADOPTED: October 11, 2007

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

Network Diagram

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

District 25 Technology Learning Standards, Revised 2008

Arlington Heights School District 25 Tech Standards Revised – Realignment version April 14, 2008 Students will be able to: Grade K • use basic creativity tools such as painting and drawing programs • share projects with appropriate audiences • discuss how computers are used for communication

use age-appropriate electronic media resources with guidance use an Internet browser to go to a bookmarked Web page use teacher-directed technology tools and resources such as skill-building software, word processing, and drawing software create graphs using age-appropriate software discuss the use of technology as a resource for solving problems

• • • • •

demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use basic computer skills with teacher support such as launching and quitting an application; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/task bar; and using the print command utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as click and drag, icon, delete, mouse, highlight, dock, and monitor/screen practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use a variety of media and technology resources for directed learning activities across the curriculum

• • • • • • • • Grade • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 use basic creativity tools such as painting and drawing programs to create projects create graphs to represent information use graphics in projects share projects with appropriate audiences understand how the Internet allows you to access information and to connect to people across the world

use age-appropriate electronic media resources with guidance use an Internet browser to go to a bookmarked Web page locate and retrieve information from teacher-selected Internet resources use teacher-directed tools and technology resources such as skill-building software, word processing, and drawing software discuss the use of technology as a resource for solving a variety of problems create graphs

demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use basic computer skills with teacher support such as launching and quitting an application; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/task bar; and using the print command utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as click and drag, icon, delete, mouse, highlight, dock, and monitor/screen demonstrate word processing skills practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use a variety of media and technology resources for directed learning activities across the curriculum

Grade 2 • use basic creativity tools such as painting and drawing programs to create reports and projects • create developmentally appropriate projects with support from teachers or student partners April 14, 2008

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

share multimedia projects with appropriate audiences understand how the Internet connects people across the world

• • • • •

locate and retrieve information from teacher-selected Internet resources locate and retrieve information from age-appropriate electronic reference materials use electronic library catalog system use a bookmarked Web page to navigate to links and to go back and forward through previously loaded pages use teacher-directed tools and technology resources such as skill-building software, word processing, and drawing software select graphics from another source and insert into a project discuss the use of technology as a resource for solving a variety of problems and as a method of conveying information create graphs understand that different applications, such as presentation software, skill-building software, word processing, drawing software, and electronic reference materials, have different purposes

• • • • •

demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use Internet sites and resources appropriately use basic computer skills with teacher support such as launching and quitting an application; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/task bar; and using the print command utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as click and drag, icon, delete, mouse, highlight, dock, and monitor/screen demonstrate word processing skills select graphics from another source and insert into a project and integrate text and graphics practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use a variety of media and technology resources for directed learning activities across the curriculum

• • • • • • • • • • • Grade • • • •

• • • • •

• •

• • • • • • •

3 use basic creativity tools such as painting and drawing programs to create reports and projects create multimedia projects with support from teachers or student partners understand the concept of using e-mail to correspond share multimedia projects with appropriate audiences understand how the Internet connects people across the world

locate and retrieve information from age-appropriate electronic reference materials use electronic library catalog system locate and retrieve information from teacher-selected Internet resources use a browser to enter a URL to access a specific Web site, know the difference between a URL and a search engine, use a bookmarked Web page and navigate to links, go back and forward through previously loaded pages, reload/refresh a Web page as necessary, and differentiate between cursor functions (pointer, arrow, hand, flashing slash) use a child-friendly search engine to initiate a search using key words cite information sources with teacher assistance understand that different applications, such as presentation software, skill-building software, word processing, drawing software, electronic reference materials, and Internet search engines, have different purposes discuss the use of technology as a resource for solving a variety of problems develop an awareness of the relevance and appropriateness of Web-based information demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use Internet sites and resources appropriately

April 14, 2008

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

develop an awareness of copyrighted materials and their appropriate use use basic computer skills such as launching and quitting an application; resizing windows; switching applications; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/task bar; saving files appropriately and securely; using the print command; logging in and logging out as required; adjusting the volume control; and operating peripheral devices with assistance utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as dock, user ID, password, click and drag, delete, highlight, desktop, icon, folder, mouse, monitor/screen, select, and hard drive create graphs, tables, and time lines using age-appropriate software demonstrate word processing skills such as font formatting, text wrap, alignment and line spacing, and editing tools (e.g., spell check, thesaurus) select graphics from another source and insert into a project and integrate text and graphics operate other technologies with assistance practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use a variety of media and technology resources for directed learning activities across the curriculum recognize that applications have different purposes develop awareness of the proper keyboarding techniques of body posture, home row positioning, and use of both hands

• •

• • • • • • • • • Grade • • • •

• • • • •

• • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

4 use basic creativity tools to create reports and engaged learning projects create projects that may include appropriate content, sounds, digital images, and transitions understand the concept of using online communication to correspond use technology tools to author and present projects to appropriate audiences understand how the Internet connects people across the world

locate and retrieve information from age-appropriate electronic reference materials use electronic library catalog system locate and retrieve information from teacher-selected Internet resources use a browser to enter a URL to access a specific Web site, know the difference between a URL and a search engine, use a bookmarked Web page and navigate to links, go back and forward through previously loaded pages, reload/refresh a Web page as necessary, and differentiate between pointer functions use a child-friendly search engine to initiate a search using key words cite information sources with teacher assistance select and use the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a variety of tasks and projects such as: presentation software, skill-building software, word processing, drawing software, electronic reference materials, Internet search engines, and graphing and timeline software use technology resources for problem solving and extended learning activities analyze the usefulness of information by evaluating Web-based information for relevance and appropriateness differentiate between fact and opinion as presented in electronic information sources evaluate how current the Web site information is and how frequently the Web site is updated identify the author of the Web site to determine the source and reliability of the information demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use Internet sites and resources appropriately cite sources appropriately use copyrighted materials appropriately use basic computer skills such as launching and quitting an application; resizing windows; switching applications; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/task bar; saving files appropriately and securely; using the print command; logging in and logging out as required; adjusting the volume control; and operating peripheral devices with assistance

April 14, 2008

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

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Arlington Heights School District 25

utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as restart, shut down, sleep, dock, user ID, password, click and drag, delete, highlight, desktop, icon, document, folder, mouse, monitor/screen, select, and hard drive demonstrate word processing skills such as selecting font, font size, color, and style; using text wrap; determining alignment and line spacing; copying, cutting, pasting, and editing text and graphics; and using editing tools (e.g., spell check, thesaurus) select graphics from another source and insert into a project and integrate text and graphics use the Internet or computer input devices such as digital cameras, scanners, or CD-ROMs to capture and integrate images into projects practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use the proper keyboarding techniques of body posture, home row positioning, and use of both hands use a variety of media and technology resources to enrich or extend specific learning activities across the curriculum

• • • • • Grade • • • •

• • • • •

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

5 use basic creativity tools to create reports and engaged learning projects create projects that include appropriate content, sounds, digital images, and transitions understand the concept of using online communication to correspond use technology tools to author and present projects to appropriate audiences understand how the Internet connects people across the world

locate and retrieve information from age-appropriate electronic reference materials use electronic library catalog system locate and retrieve information from teacher-selected Internet resources use a browser to enter a URL to access a specific Web site, know the difference between a URL and a search engine, use a bookmarked Web page and navigate to links, go back and forward through previously loaded pages, and reload/refresh a Web page as necessary use a child-friendly search engine to initiate a search using key words cite information sources independently select and use the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a variety of tasks and projects such as presentation software, skill-building software, word processing, drawing software, electronic reference materials, Internet search engines, graphing and timeline software use the Internet or computer input devices such as digital cameras, scanners, or CD-ROMs to capture and integrate images into projects use technology resources for problem solving and extended learning activities analyze the usefulness of information by evaluating Web-based information for relevance and appropriateness differentiate between fact and opinion as presented in electronic information sources evaluate how current the Web site information is and how frequently the Web site is updated identify the author of the Web site to determine the source and reliability of the information

demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use Internet sites and resources appropriately cite sources appropriately use copyrighted materials appropriately use basic computer skills such as launching and quitting an application; resizing windows; switching applications; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/ task bar; saving files appropriately and securely; using the print command; logging in and logging out as required; adjusting the volume control; and operating peripheral devices with assistance utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as restart, shut down, sleep, dock, user ID, password, click and drag, delete, highlight, desktop, icon, document, folder, mouse, monitor/screen, select, and hard drive

April 14, 2008

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

37


Arlington Heights School District 25

demonstrate word processing skills such as selecting font, font size, color, and style; using text wrap; determining alignment and line spacing; copying, cutting, pasting, and editing text and graphics; and using editing tools (e.g., spell check, thesaurus) select graphics from another source and insert into a project and integrate text and graphics create multimedia projects that include appropriate content, sounds, digital images, and transitions practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use the proper keyboarding techniques of body posture, home row positioning, and use of both hands use a variety of media and technology resources to enrich or extend specific learning activities across the curriculum

• • • •

• Grade • • • • • • •

• •

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

6 use basic creativity tools to create reports and engaged learning projects create multimedia projects that may include appropriate content, sounds, digital images, and transitions understand the concept of using communication tools to correspond electronically design, develop, publish, and present projects that demonstrate curriculum concepts to appropriate audiences collaborate with peers, experts, and others to investigate curriculum-related issues in order to develop solutions to be shared with appropriate audiences use the Internet to connect to people across the world use communication tools to engage students in other cultures use models and simulations to explore systems and issues

access and ethically use: o information from electronic reference materials o electronic library catalog system o information from teacher-selected Internet resources o use search engines to select sites and resources and to develop effective keyword strategies including simple Boolean logic analyze the usefulness of information by evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and comprehensiveness of the source differentiate between fact and opinion as presented in electronic information sources identify the bias of electronic information sources evaluate how current the Web site information is and how frequently the Web site is updated identify the author of the Web site to determine the source and reliability of the information use content-specific technology tools, software, and simulations to support learning and research select and use the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a variety of tasks and projects such as: o create spreadsheets by defining columns and rows, entering a formula for calculations, inputting data, sorting information, creating a table/chart, and generating a report o using a spreadsheet, create graphs/charts using data generated through experimentation o understand and use databases by defining fields, inputting data, sorting information, and creating a report o use word processing skills o select and manipulate graphics from another source and insert into a project, creating a multimedia project use technology resources for problem solving and extended learning activities demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly demonstrate an understanding of how technology impacts the classroom, the workplace, and society honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use Internet sites and resources appropriately cite sources appropriately use copyrighted materials appropriately use basic computer skills such as launching and quitting an application; resizing windows; switching applications; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/task bar; saving files appropriately and securely; using

April 14, 2008

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

38


Arlington Heights School District 25

the print command; logging in and logging out as required; adjusting the volume control; and operating peripheral devices with assistance utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as restart, shut down, sleep, log in, log out, dock, user ID, password, click and drag, delete, highlight, desktop, icon, document, folder, mouse, monitor/screen, select, and hard drive use a browser to enter a URL to access a specific Web site, use a bookmarked Web page and navigate to links, go back and forward through previously loaded pages, jump locations to previously loaded pages, reload/refresh a Web page as necessary, and differentiate between pointer functions utilize appropriate terminology in the use of applications such as field, record, calculation, formula, cell, download, hyperlink, and render practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use a variety of media and technology resources to enrich or extend specific learning activities across the curriculum

• •

• Grade • • • • • • •

• •

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

7 use basic creativity tools to create reports and engaged learning projects create multimedia projects that may include appropriate content, sounds, digital images, and transitions understand the concept of using communication tools to correspond electronically design, develop, publish, and present projects that demonstrate curriculum concepts to appropriate audiences collaborate with peers, experts, and others to investigate curriculum-related issues in order to develop solutions to be shared with appropriate audiences use the Internet to connect to people across the world use communication tools to engage students in other cultures use models and simulations to explore systems and issues

access and ethically use: o information from electronic reference materials o electronic library catalog system o information from teacher-selected Internet resources o use search engines to select sites and resources and to develop effective keyword strategies including simple Boolean logic analyze the usefulness of information by evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and comprehensiveness of the source differentiate between fact and opinion as presented in electronic information sources identify the bias of electronic information sources evaluate how current the Web site information is and how frequently the Web site is updated identify the author of the Web site to determine the source and reliability of the information use content-specific technology tools, software, and simulations to support learning and research select and use the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a variety of tasks and projects such as: o create spreadsheets by defining columns and rows, entering a formula for calculations, inputting data, sorting information, creating a table/chart, and generating a report o using a spreadsheet, create graphs/charts using data generated through experimentation o understand and use databases by defining fields, inputting data, sorting information, and creating a report o use word processing skills o select and manipulate graphics from another source and insert into a project, creating a multimedia project use technology resources for problem solving and extended learning activities demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly demonstrate an understanding of how technology impacts the classroom, the workplace, and society honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use Internet sites and resources appropriately

April 14, 2008

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

39


Arlington Heights School District 25

cite sources appropriately use copyrighted materials appropriately use basic computer skills such as launching and quitting an application; resizing windows; switching applications; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/task bar; saving files appropriately and securely; using the print command; logging in and logging out as required; adjusting the volume control; and operating peripheral devices with assistance utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as restart, shut down, sleep, log in, log out, dock, user ID, password, click and drag, delete, highlight, desktop, icon, document, folder, mouse, monitor/screen, select, and hard drive use a browser to enter a URL to access a specific Web site, use a bookmarked Web page and navigate to links, go back and forward through previously loaded pages, jump locations to previously loaded pages, reload/refresh a Web page as necessary, and differentiate between pointer functions utilize appropriate terminology in the use of applications such as field, record, calculation, formula, cell, download, hyperlink, and render practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use a variety of media and technology resources to enrich or extend specific learning activities across the curriculum

• •

• •

• Grade • • • • • •

• • •

• • • • • • •

• • •

8 use basic creativity tools to create reports and engaged learning projects create multimedia projects that may include appropriate content, sounds, digital images, and transitions understand the concept of using communication tools to correspond electronically design, develop, publish, and present projects that demonstrate curriculum concepts to appropriate audiences collaborate with peers, experts, and others to investigate curriculum-related issues in order to develop solutions to be shared with appropriate audiences use the Internet to connect to people across the world use communication tools to engage students in other cultures use models and simulations to explore systems and issues

access and ethically use: o information from electronic reference materials o electronic library catalog system o information from teacher-selected Internet resources o use search engines to select sites and resources and to develop effective keyword strategies including simple Boolean logic analyze the usefulness of information by evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and comprehensiveness of the source differentiate between fact and opinion as presented in electronic information sources identify the bias of electronic information sources evaluate how current the Web site information is and how frequently the Web site is updated identify the author of the Web site to determine the source and reliability of the information use content-specific technology tools, software, and simulations to support learning and research select and use the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a variety of tasks and projects such as: o create spreadsheets by defining columns and rows, entering a formula for calculations, inputting data, sorting information, creating a table/chart, and generating a report o using a spreadsheet, create graphs/charts using data generated through experimentation o understand and use databases by defining fields, inputting data, sorting information, and creating a report o use word processing skills o select and manipulate graphics from another source and insert into a project, creating a multimedia project use technology resources for problem solving and extended learning activities demonstrate positive social and ethical behavior by using technology responsibly demonstrate an understanding of how technology impacts the classroom, the workplace, and society

April 14, 2008

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

40


Arlington Heights School District 25

• • • • • •

• • •

honor the District 25 Acceptable Use Policy respect the work of others understand the consequences of the misuse of technology use Internet sites and resources appropriately cite sources appropriately use copyrighted materials appropriately use basic computer skills such as launching and quitting an application; resizing windows; switching applications; using the scroll bar; navigating the menu/task bar; saving files appropriately and securely; using the print command; logging in and logging out as required; adjusting the volume control; and operating peripheral devices with assistance utilize developmentally appropriate and accurate terminology such as restart, shut down, sleep, log in, log out, dock, user ID, password, click and drag, delete, highlight, desktop, icon, document, folder, mouse, monitor/screen, select, and hard drive use a browser to enter a URL to access a specific Web site, use a bookmarked Web page and navigate to links, go back and forward through previously loaded pages, jump locations to previously loaded pages, reload/refresh a Web page as necessary, and differentiate between pointer functions utilize appropriate terminology in the use of applications such as field, record, calculation, formula, cell, download, hyperlink, and render practice responsible use and care of hardware and software such as media, keyboards, mice, and monitors use a variety of media and technology resources to enrich or extend specific learning activities across the curriculum

April 14, 2008

District 25 Technology Plan 2008-11

41

District 25 2008-2011 Technology Plan  

State approved technology plan for the next 3 years.

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