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Volume  11  

       Issue  6              May  16,  2014

Inside  this  issue  .  .  . Op-­Ed Schools Features Sports Etc.  

Albemarle  High  School 2775  Hydraulic  Road Charlottesville,  VA  22901

pg  2  &  3 pg  4-­9 pg  10-­15 pg  16-­23 pg  24

´7KH/DQWHUQÂľ,OOXPLQDWHV6WXGHQWV¡:RUN Design Editor “The   Lantern,â€?   AHS’   lit-­ erary   magazine,   releases   their   newest   edition   today,   May   16,   featuring   the   work   of  students  who  shine  in  the   literary  and  artistic  spheres.   “It’s  a  magazine  designed   to  showcase  the  writing  and   art   of   Albemarle’s   student   body,â€?   senior   staffer   Ben   Mcafee  said.   The   lit   mag   serves   as   the   school’s  “foremost  forum  for   free   speech,â€?   according   to   senior   editor-­in-­chief   Mike   Dolzer.   “It’s   a   great   way   for   students   to   express   them-­ selves.   There   are   so   many   creative   people   around   this   school,   and   they   all   need   a   SODFH WR NLQG RI ÂżOWHU LQWR and  share.â€?   “Primordial,â€?   meaning   “from   the   origins,â€?   is   the   title  of  this  year’s  issue.  The   title   “really   worked   with   our   theme   of   the   elements,   ZKLFK DUH ÂżUH ZDWHU HDUWK and   air,â€?   Dolzer   said.   “We   thought   that   that   [theme]   would   be   something   kind   of   cool   to   do,   and   it’s   easy   enough  because  all  the  piec-­ es   incorporate   one   of   those   [elements],   even   if   they   don’t  mean  to.â€?   Having   a   unifying   con-­ cept   throughout   the   maga-­ zine  was  a  goal  of  the  lit  mag   staff   this   year,   according   to   advisor   Charlotte   Wood.   Additionally,   “we   wanted   to   feature   more   writing   and   art  than  in  the  past  and  still   place   highly   in   scholastic   competition,â€?  she  said.  “This   year’s  [lit  mag]  is  better  than   it’s   ever   been   before;Íž   we   achieved  all  our  goals.â€?  

The  front  cover  of  the  literary  and  art  magazine   featuring  senior  Kelly  Creighton’s  artwork.  “Pri-­ PRUGLDO´JRHVRQVDOHWRGD\IRUÂżYHGROODUV The  lit  mag  began  accept-­ ing   submissions   in   Novem-­ ber,  and  soon  after  faced  the   task  of  evaluating  the  entries   and  determining  which  ones   deserved   a   spot   in   the   pub-­ lication.   With   so   many   sub-­ missions   to   assess,   which   ones  stood  out? “A   good   submission   is   something   that’s   kind   of   relatable,   but   at   the   same   time   unique,â€?   Dolzer   said.   “Take   for   example,   every-­ body   has   a   story   of   their   ÂżUVW GD\ RI KLJK VFKRRO DQG how   they   felt,   and   that   is   something   that’s   universal.   But   if   you   can   present   it   in   a  more  unique  way,  whether   LWEHZLWKOLNHÂżJXUDWLYHODQ-­ guage,   or   just   anything   like   that,  than  it’s  interesting.â€? “We   don’t   just   want   a  

hum-­drum,   oh   seen-­this-­ everywhere-­else-­before  kind   of  thing,�  Dolzer  added.   Senior  Megan  Farabaugh   felt   honored   when   the   staff   selected   her   watercolor   and   drawing  piece,  “Lazy  Bones,�   for  the  magazine.  “I’m  happy   that   others   found   my   art   to   be   inspiring   and/or   amus-­ ing,�  she  said.  “I  had  a  great   time  creating  my  piece!�   After   determining   the   content,   next   came   spread   design.   “Spread   making   is   when   you   pair   writing   with   art   then   try   to   put   them   on   the   page   and   look   visually   appealing,�  Mcaffee  said.   “People   this   year   were   more   willing   to   take   risks   with   InDesign   [computer   design   software]   than   pre-­ vious   staffs,�   Wood   said.  

“They  weren’t  afraid.â€?   In  addition  to  giving  new   design  strategies  a  try,  the  lit   mag   introduced   new   forms   of   media   to   the   publication   this   year,   including   a   CD   to   accompany   to   magazine   itself.   The   CD   includes   12   original   songs   performed   by   students   and   features   a   variety   of   grade   levels   and   genres. “It   hits   pretty   much   ev-­ erything:   folk   music,   rap,   rock‌â€?   Dolzer   said.   “[It’s]   another   way   for   students   to   express   themselves   through   lit   mag.â€?   Featured   students   include   seniors   Will   Good-­ ing,  Brianna  Valine,  and  Lily   Garay.   “Primordialâ€?   also   fea-­ WXUHV D QRQÂżFWLRQ SLHFH Dolzer   interviewed   Good-­ ing   about   being   a   musician   for   the   magazine.   “It’s   nice   WR JHW PRUH QRQÂżFWLRQ LQ there,â€?   Dolzer   said.   “[Non-­ ÂżFWLRQ@NLQGRIGLVWLQJXLVKHV us  from  other  schools.â€?   The   staff   this   year   was   the   largest   in   the   history   of   the   program.   “There   are  

a   lot   more   differing   opin-­ ions,   which   create   tension   at   times,   but   provide   for   a   wonderful   learning   experi-­ ence  for  all  involved,â€?  Wood   said.   “It’s   really   rewarding   to   see  all  of  the  new  staff  mem-­ bers   learn   things,â€?   Dolzer   said.   “There  were  so  many  new   people,  a  lot  of  them  got  re-­ ally  into  it  and  worked  a  lot,   and  they’re  all  great  design-­ ers  and  editors  and  writers.â€? The   lit   mag   experience   gives   participating   students   the  opportunity  to  gain  “ca-­ reer   skills,â€?   according   to   Dolzer.   “The   program   teaches   you...how   to   use   the   com-­ puters   for   InDesign,   how   to   make  a  portfolio,  [and]  how   to   manage   large   groups   of   people   and   work   with   oth-­ ers,â€?  he  said.   “It’s  very  realistic  to  real-­ world   careers.   It   helped   me   ÂżJXUHRXWZKDWFDUHHUSDWK, wanted  to  be  on.â€?  

See  LITMAG  page  8 Photos  courtesy  of  Charlotte  Wood

Photo  by  Kieran  Rundle

KATE EDSON

The  staff  hard  at  work  in  the  classroom  sorting   through  submissions  and  in  the  lab  designing   pages  that  feature  the  art  and  writing  of  students.  


2 The Revolution

Schools

May 16, 2014

Blooming Where You Are Planted or Planting Blooms: M et apho rica l Ho rticu l tu r e fo r th e Yo u n g Adult

JULIA HARRISON Copy Editor

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Interested in voicing your opinion?

Vol.  11,  Issue  12 Managing  Editor 0HODQLH$UWKXU Copy  Editor -XOLD+DUULVRQ Design  Editor .DWH(GVRQ Online  Editors %DLOH\%XVK $OH[D+RGJHV Staff  Reporters ((GZDUGV $OH[/HVOLH Advisor /RUL5HDVHU Patrons -HQQLIHU-HVVXS 0RQLFDDQG%ULDQ -RKQVRQ $P\($QGHUVRQ WKHDKVUHYROXWLRQ# JPDLOFRP  H[W DKVUHYROXWLRQRUJ )ROORZXVRQ7ZLWWHU IRUXQLTXHXSGDWHVRQ $+6¶GD\WRGD\OLIH #DKVBUHYROXWLRQ

Write a letter to the editor! Drop your letter off in room 207 or send us an email at theahsrevolution@gmail.com

/LNHXVRQ)DFHERRN IRUWKHODWHVWDUWLFOHV $+65HYROXWLRQ


May 16, 2014

Schools

Seniors Say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auf Wiedersehenâ&#x20AC;?

Mission  Statement   The   Revolution   is   the   student   publication   of   Al-­ bemarle   High   School,   2775   Hydraulic   Road   Charlottes-­ ville,   Virginia   22901.     The   Revolution   will   attempt   to   LQIRUP HGXFDWH LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFH and   entertain   the   Albemarle   High  School  community  in  a   broad,  accurate  and  objective   manner.       The   Revolution   is   pub-­ lished   monthly   and   will   be   distributed   free   of   charge   to   all  students  and  staff  at  Albe-­ marle  High  School,  as  well  as   advisors,  the  superintendent   of  Albemarle  County  Schools   and  other  newspaper  staffs.

ACPS  Nondiscrimina-­ tion  Notice: Albemarle   County   Public   Schools   does   not   discrimi-­ nate   on   the   basis   of   race,   color,   religion,   age,   sex,   disability,   national   origin,   pregnancy,   or   marital   sta-­ tus.    Title   IX   of   the   Educa-­ tional   Amendments   of   1972,   86&Â&#x2020;Â&#x2020;HWVHTSUR-­ hibits   discrimination   on   the   basis   of   sex   in   educational   programs  or  activities  receiv-­ ing   federal   funds,   including   discrimination   in   employ-­ ment   and   student   admis-­ sions.   All   Albemarle   County   Public   Schools   students,   ap-­ plicants   and   employees   are   covered   by   this   law.   Ques-­ tions   or   concerns   regarding   compliance   with   the   School   Divisionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  nondiscrimination   policies   may   be   directed   to:   Director  of  Human  Resourc-­ es,  401  McIntire  Road  Char-­ lottesville,  VA  22902  Phone:   

your  last  year  before  you  go   out  on  your  own.   Online Editor Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   what   I   thought   would   be  my  senior  year.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Wow.   That   is   all   that   I   can   say   about   these   past   pretty   unrealistic   though.   couple   of   months.   Wow,   I   Just   like   many   other   things   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  believe  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  senior  year.   in  life,  some  things  just  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   Wow,   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   believe   I   am   turn   out   the   way   that   you   applying   to   college.   Wow,   I   planned,   but   that   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   believe   that   I   got   into   necessarily   mean   anything.   a   college.   Wow,   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be-­ It   was   because   I   had   such   lieve   that   I   will   be   leaving   high   expectations   of   what   everything   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   ever   known   certain   moments   this   year   would   be   like   that   I   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   behind.  Just  wow.   I  honestly  feel  like  it  was   able  to  realize  how  amazing   just   yesterday   when   I   got   the  actual  moments  were.   Prom   is   the   perfect   ex-­ off   the   bus   and   nervously   ZDONHG LQWR P\ ÂżUVW FODVV ample   of   that.   I   was   a   bit   of  high  school,  English  with   upset   for   not   having   a   date   Ms.   Stone.   I   vaguely   re-­ and   I   let   that   put   a   damper   member   walking   past   the   on  the  night  because  once  I   FODVVURRPDWOHDVWÂżYHWLPHV got  there,  I  felt  like  I  needed   because   of   how   lost   I   was.   a  date  in  order  to  have  fun.   I   was   a   mess,   but   I   was   so   It   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   until   after   prom   excited  and  anxious  for  this   when  I  was  sitting  around  a   new   experience   called   high   ERQÂżUHZLWKP\IULHQGVWKDW I   realized   that   having   such   ex-­ pectations   makes   you   o v e r l o o k   the   greater   m o m e n t s ,   like   be-­ ing   able   to   spend   the   entire  night   with   your   best  friends   instead   of   being   tied   to  a  date.   Life   is   a   lot   more   Seniors  Alexa  Hodges  and  E.  Ed-­ fun   when   wards  say  a  tearful  (ecstatic)  good-­ bye  to  Albemarle.  Though  they  leave   you   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   The  Revolutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  staff,  the  terrifying   have   such   crazy   ex-­ memories  of  J-­Squad  will  forever   pectations   haunt  their  minds  and  leave  scars   and  you  are   upon  their  hearts. able   to   just   let  it  be.   school. My  advice  to  seniors  next   Now   in   my   senior   year,   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   what   I   would   year   would   be   to   just   enjoy   say   about   it.   I   would   say   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   in   front   of   you   and   that   it   hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   been   what   I   accept  life  for  what  it  is.   Listening   to   myself,   I   expected,   both   in   good   and   bad  ways.  I  think  when  you   sound  incredibly  cheesy,  but   ÂżUVW DSSURDFK VHQLRU \HDU I  mean  it.  My  biggest  regret   you  have  a  kind  of  a  YOLO-­ in  high  school  was  trying  to   mindset,   where   you   think   be  like  everyone  else  and  do   that   it   is   going   to   be   full   of   what   everyone   else   wanted   adventures   and   you   are   go-­ to  do.   I   often   forced   myself   to   ing  to  live  it  out  because  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  

ALEXA HODGES

Photo  by  Julia  Harrison

Editorial  Policy   The   editorial   page   pro-­ vides  a  forum  for  The  Revo-­ lution  staff  members  and  the   Albemarle  High  School  com-­ munity.     All   materials   are   subject   to   editing   for   libel,   obscenity,   grammar,   style   and   space.   Signed   commen-­ taries   represent   the   opinion   of  the  writer,  and  do  not  rep-­ resent  the  views  of  the   staff,   RUDQ\RILWVDI¿OLDWLRQV8Q-­ signed   commentaries   are   a   consensus  of  The  Revolution   staff.

The Revolution 3

do   things   just   because   ev-­ eryone   else   was   doing   it,   like  going  to  football  games.   I   hate   football,   and   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   particularly   care   for   many   of   the   people   that   go   to   the   games.   Yet   I   would   go   just   because  I  felt  like  I  was  miss-­ ing   out   if   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   go,   even   though   I   much   preferred   to   stay   in   for   the   night   and   KDYHDQHYHUHQGLQJ 1HWĂ&#x20AC;L[ marathon   with   my   friends.   I  never  understood  that  it  is   okay   to   do   your   own   thing.   It  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  mean  that  you  are   boring,   it   just   means   that   you   like   to   do   things   that   you  enjoy.   Looking  back  on  my  high   school   years,   it   seems   that   the  main  thing  that  I  am  go-­ ing  to  miss  about  Albemarle   are  my  friends.   To  Sydney,  you  have  been   my  best  friend  since  second   grade   and   I   am   grateful   ev-­ ery  single  day  to  have  some-­ one   that   has   had   my   back   for   so   long.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   not   about   to   write   an   Oscar   speech   and   name   everyone,   so   to   my   other   friends,   I   want   to   thank   you   guys   for   giv-­ ing   me   a   reason   to   come   to  

school  everyday.   Finally,  I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  end  my  se-­ nior   goodbye   without   men-­ WLRQLQJ P\ -6TXDG PDWHV You   guys   are   the   most   tal-­ ented   and   hilarious   people   that   I   have   ever   met.   You   mean  the  world  to  me  and  I   can  honestly  say  that  I  have   never   smiled   or   laughed   so   hard   in   a   class   before,   but   you   guys   are   truly   remark-­ able.   Whenever   I   go   to   Chi-­ potle  in  college,  I  will  think   of   you.   And   for   the   record,   I   will   not   be   complaining   about   crappy   buns   since   -08LVUDQNHGQXPEHUWZR in   the   nation   for   the   best   campus   food.   Anyway,   to   say   that   you   will   be   missed   is  an  understatement.  I  may   in  fact  have  separation  anxi-­ ety  just  by  not  being  able  to   watch   YouTube   videos   to-­ gether,   bond   over   food   and   gossip   during   late   nights,   or  laugh  at  Bailey  and  Julia   while  they  try  to  drop  it  like   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hot.                       But   I   wish   you   all   the   best   of   luck   for   next   year,   I   know   you   will   continue   to   make  The  Revolution  great.    

Senior  Goodbye,  illustrated  by  E.  Edwards.


2 The Revolution

Schools

May 16, 2014

Seniors Going to Virginia Schools Cecilia  Richards

Haley  Hall Antiga  Maaiam Murat  Wusmano  

Rachel  Braden Krister  Briehl Matthew  Crist Jenn  Leider Allie  Morris Abby  Weaver Nick   Winstersteiger Andrew  William-­ son

Emma  Meadors

Nick  Brown Adam  Denton Andrew  Dickason Mohamed  Diraz Lane  Giannini Fred  Gortler Andrea  Mendoza Kevin  Rinald

Hunter  Brown

Ireti  Akinola Cynthia  Amaya Kevin  Bernadino Carolyn  Chapman Hannah  Deal Richie  DeLoria Mike  Dolzer Autumn  Eavey Gabe  Giacalone Evan  Gibbons Christian  Hargett Alexa  Hodges Samira  Hussaini Ryan  Leary

Sarah  Brenner Victoria  Catch-­ ings   Rachel  Kerl Lily  Straka

Grace  Dalton Claire  Hogan Molly  Napolitano Catherine   Petrella /DXUHQ6KLIÀHW Sarah  Vrhovac

-DVPLQH6KLIÀHWW Maria  Yanez

Arelya  Alvarez Christopher   Alex  Arce Moats Thomas  Banks Austin  Nelson Mia  Brunai Evan  Nelson Emily  McAllister Drake  Bryant Joel  Nunez Becca  Mendelsohn Maurice  Bwizeze   Katherine   Briggs  Moyers Devon  Campbell Pearson: Joanna  Mueller Aunisha  Catoe Nursing  Pro-­ Matt  Natale Steven  Chandler gram Annie  Newman Casey  Chen Nisa   Justin  Parks Spencer  Clem: Peethomnognsin Tyler  Poole EMT/Paramedic   David  Piirto: Melika  Rahmani Program ROTC  –  Army Dylan  Rose 0LFKDHO&RI¿QG-­ Allison  Quillon Jenny  Russell Abby  Smith affer Tyler  Radar Ali  Starr Krystal  Collins Mikayla  Reid Samantha  Webster Rudy  Garcia MJ  Reid Felicia  Garrison Nyanni  Reid Cordeja  Godfrey Christian   Brandon  Green Rodriguez Brook  Grimaldi Kevin  Salazar Amin  Haghtalab Kiandria  Scott Amber  Hamilton 'UHZ6KLIÀHWW Bobby  Leytham Shaun  Hand Morgan  Sparks Sophie  Pugh Lester  Hernandez Flyura  Tairova Chloe  Herring Anthony   Khalil  Hillery Tamburo Bradley  Jones Sarah  Thomas Desmen  Jones Diana  Torres Gary   Sheshia  Turner Robert  Bossinger Kellenberger Briasia  Warren Vincent  Chang Benjamin  McAfee Kaila  Washington Sydney  Daniel Kayce  Miller David  Webb Kaitlyn  Greene Tre  Mills Kaitlyn  Wood LaQuisha  Hyman Vincent  Huynh Ryan  Londree: Football   Brehanna  Burley McKenna  Rohm Scholarship Renas  Gadow Jayla  Simmons Tyler  Missig Gabby  Jones Taeshun  Wells Gaelen  Rickard


May 16, 2014

Schools

Priscillia  Koirala

Camron  Hatchett Caroline  Wagoner

Justin  Richardson

Rhys  Aglio Eva  Lucy  Alvarado Michael  Balaban Sam  Byers Will  Cheng Linda  Cohen Fiona  Dale Ana  Daley Reece  Echelberger   Rodman  Scholar   Abby  Egner Becca  Elder Rachel  Gardella Kaitlyn  Grossman Aamna  Khan Jeannie  Kim

Amber  Baine Annie  Barnes Richard  Boamah Niloufar  Boghdeh Sav  Costabile: Arts Kelly  Creighton: Arts Kiara  Croswell: Arts Garen  Dorsey

Cammy  Leech Cyrus  Legard Abigail  Leonard Yizhou  Li Kevin  Martin Savannah  Maxwell Joey  Michel   Elise  Mollica     Echols  Scholar Victoria  Stagnaro Melissa  Symmes Shep  Walker Hannah  Williams Sarah  Woods   Kathie  Xie

Justin  Fishe: School  of  Nursing Elena  Gavrilovic Hannah  Hahn Caroline  Hazlett Lis  James Irma  Nalic Julien  Rigaldies Julie  Shaw Kara  Simons Alexa  Taveras Emily  Wharam Gavin  Wiehl Beth  Yi Xinbei  Yi Ann  Yu

The Revolution 3

Anne  Brady Sophie  Bromberger Jason  Davis Jay  Gillenwater John  Harris Mila  Milatovic Alex  Nolan: Engineering

Sammi  Rocker: Engineering Zach  Petty Garrett  Shaffer Jordan  Shelton Rex  Willis William  Xie Austin  Yoon

Alexus  Anderson

Marty  Cooke Jessica  Davis Elizabeth  Lewis

Erin  Smith   Jesse  Smyth Lauren  Visokay


6 The Revolution

Schools

May 16, 2014

Out-of-State and Miscellaneous Senior Plans Listed Alphabetically by Surname A Peyton     Alley       Hunter     Alving Joshua       Anderson     Elizabeth     Angeley     Pabla  Andrade         Elai  Arsala                

Touring  with   band Year  Off 2-­Year  LDS   Mission Dental Assistant Univ.  of  Mass.-­   Amherst Medical   Institute  of   Georgia

B Ben  Beiter            

University  of     Notre  Dame

Susi  Beltran         Brian  Best                 Eileen  Boyle   Ben  Breece                

Business  of   cosmetology Boston   Community   College Joffrey  Ballet Rose-­Hulman   Institute  of   Technology

C Sam  Calhoun         Morgan       Campbell           Melanie       Callihan    

Grove  City   College West Virginia   University Ohio  State University

Audrey     Carpenter Matthew     Carpenter N-­Bushie     Chambers     Thomas  Crow  

JTCC Air  Force Focusing  on   dancing  career Army

D Randrell       Davis             Matt  Dean           Kathryn       DeFrank    

“Stacking   Paper”/ military Gap  year  in   Germany Point  Park University

E-­F E.  Edwards     Air  Force Michael  Fagan   Adventuring


May 16, 2014 Shassata       Fahim     Megan       Farabaugh     Carson     Fanning Chad  Finch          

Schools Davidson College St.  Mary’s   College Gap  Year

Zach  Mayo             Erin  McCullen        

UNC  Chapel   Hill   Marshall   University

Kizy  Milla     Minnesota         State         University,   G-­H       Mankato Lacey  Gagg     High  Point   Dylan  Mitchell   Military       University Towson  State-­   Will  Gooding   Berklee  College     Corie  Morton         Swimming         of  Music       Scholarship Jordan       Williams Carly  Moulis   Au  Pair  in   Grimsley     Baptist         Spain       College Aaron       Universal   Hannah     Penn  State Mullinax       Technical   Harper     Swimming       Institute-­   Jessica     Auburn       Charlotte Hopkinson     University Ryann  Murray   Clemson Kelsey  Hunt   University  of         South  Carolina N-­O Mhia       Joining  Law   J-­K Enforcement Jalen  James   Aspiring  artist/ Neiderman     Ross  Nuckols   Working  as  an         military       Arborist Madelyn     Traveling Loren     Thomas  Moore   Jensen Oliver-­Balerna     College   Abi  Johnson   Houghton   Matthew     Rochester         University Olowin       Institute  of   Sophie  Kays   France       Technology  -­ Allison  Keenan   Travel       Industrial       Dustin     Air  Force       Design Kenney Terry  Kim     Rutgers   P       University Claire     Savannah   Pavlosky       College  of   L       Art  and  Design Cory  Lesher   University  of   Cooper  Perry   Hunter  College       Pennsylvania Marissa  Phillips   Ohio  State   Kira  Lewis     Classes  in         University       Phoenix,  AZ Olivia  Lewis   Gap  year R Evy  Luong     Savannah   Victor  Ramos   Air  Force       College  of   Eneida  Redden-­   South  American       Art  and  Design Gonzalez     Medical         Mission M Elizabeth     Rochester   Sadie  Mackay   University  of   Rintels     Institute  of         Victoria       Technology Kendall       UNC   Masterson       Wilmington ROTC  -­  Air   Force

The Revolution 7 Nick  Ryan          

Working  with   the  disabled

S Libby  Sawyer   Tim  Schauer        

Messiah  College USC  Film       School

Megan     Schnell       Kyle  Shafer     Emily  Smith   Bence  Szaloki        

Iowa  State   University Penn  State Smith  College United  States   Marine  Corps

T Dominique     Talley                   Ryan  Thomas         Elizabeth       Thorne     Andrew       Tichenor                 Lauren     Tornrose       Daniel  Trujillo              

Monterey   Peninsula   College  –   Football Columbia   University American   University University  of   Illinois   Urbana-­ Champaign Grove  City   College Working  at   Bob’s  Wheel   Alignment

U-­V Kaleen     Underwood     Brianna     Valine      

Gap  Year/ Traveling Belmont   University  

W Victor  Witcher         Dwayne  Wood         Kaila  Wood   Chelsea     Woodfolk      

Aspiring   musical  artist Working  at   UVA UNC-­  Charlotte   University  of   Maryland


2 The Revolution

Schools

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May 16, 2014

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May 16, 2014

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community  College   has  nothing  to  offer   a  student  like  me.â&#x20AC;? Community   College   is   a   place   that   is   a   great   option   for   anyone   to   pursue   any   path.     It   is   not   restricted   to   students   with   a   2.3   GPA   or   a  1200  SAT  score.    Commu-­ QLW\ &ROOHJH EHQHÂżWV WR DQ\ student.   Saving  Money Tuition  prices  are  consid-­ erably  cheaper  when  attend-­ ing   a   community   college.     PVCC   has   a   tuition   rate   of   $133.65   per   credit   hour   for   the   2014   summer   semes-­ ter.  To  compare  that,  James   Madison   University   asked   for  $410  per  credit  hour  this   year. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   savings   of   over   $250  per  credit  hour.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   so   much   more   inex-­ pensive   to   receive   a   quality   education  that  is  recognized   across  the  state,â&#x20AC;?  PVCC  First   Year   Programs   Counselor   Jan  Reed  said. Transitioning   Adulthood   is   a   scary   thing,   and   not   everyone   is   ready  for  it  after  high  school   graduation.     Some   people   simply  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  legally  an  adult   or  mature  enough  to  go  into   a   major   university   and   act   responsibly   on   their   own.     Some   people   need   a   transi-­ tional   period.     Community   college  provides  this. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some   students   admit   that   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   ready   for   college   yet,â&#x20AC;?   Reed   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   you   go   to   a  four  year   s c h o o l   and   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   like   what   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   do-­ ing,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   c o s t i n g   you  an  arm   and  a  leg.â&#x20AC;? Community   college   pro-­ vides   a   good   middle   ground   for  students  to  cultivate  suc-­ cessful   habits,   mature   into   DGXOWV DQG ÂżJXUH RXW ZKDW they  want  to  do  with  the  rest   of  their  lives.

The Revolution 9 Reed. Clubs  cover  interests  from   art,  computer  science,  game   development,   outdoors   and   investments.   Intramural   sports   including   basketball,   soccer,   tennis,   golf   and   vol-­ leyball   are   also   available.   There  is  even  a  Brony  club.

Chances are, if you live anywhere QHDU&KDUORWWHVYLOOH\RX¡YHKHDUGRI Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC). But what have you heard? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community college is for losers.â&#x20AC;? ´7KHUH¡VQRFDPSXVOLIHÂľ ´7KHFODVVHVDUHQ¡WUHDOFROOHJH classes.â&#x20AC;? ,W¡VWLPHWRSXWDVLGHWKRVHVWHUHRW\SHV and see those

Myth  3 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  classes  are   dumbed  down.â&#x20AC;?

Photo  by  Katie  Pajewski

Myth  1

Schools

s h t y M JUSTIN FISHER Staff Correspondent

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quite   to   the   contrary,â&#x20AC;?   Reed  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  order  to  enroll   in  any  college  level,  transfer-­ able  course,  a  student  needs   to  test  into  college  level  Eng-­ lish   and   math.     Four   year   institutions,   including   UVA   and   William   &   Mary,   will   accept   PVCC   transferrable   courses   with   grades   of   C   or   better   as   equivalent   to   their   own  courses.    D/F  grades  do   not  transfer,  of  course.  â&#x20AC;&#x153; Community  College  class-­ es   have   to   be   held   to   a   cer-­ tain   standard,   because   they   are  recognized  and  accepted   by   colleges   throughout   the   state.    

Myth  4 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community  College   is  for  people  who   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  what  they   want  to  do  with  their   lives.â&#x20AC;? While   PVCC   does   have   a   great  many  students  who  are   not  sure  what  their  next  step   is,  this  does  not   represent  a  dis-­ advantage.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   would   say   honestly   about   50%   of   students   who   come   from   high  school  are   still  undecided.   But   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   beauty   of   a   community   college   because   you  can  take  your  core  class-­ es  while  undecided,  and  still   explore  your  options.    Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   here   to   get   you   ready   for   wherever   you   want   to   be,â&#x20AC;?   PVCC   First   Year   Programs   Counselor  Jan  Reed  said. So   if   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   feeling   stress   about  making  a  decision  that   might   impact   your   entire   life,   maybe   take   a   breather   and   look   into   community   college.

 Busted

College  Acceptance

Community   College   is   a   great  way  to  earn  acceptance   into   a   university   you   might   not   have   gotten   into   right   out  of  high  school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through   system-­wide   agreements,   students   who  

graduate  from  one  of  Virgin-­ iaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   23   community   colleges   with   an   associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree   and  a  minimum  grade  point   average   may   obtain   GUAR-­ ANTEED  admission  to  more   than   20   of   the   common-­ wealthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   colleges   and   uni-­ versities,â&#x20AC;?   according   to   the   Virginia  Community  College   Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  website  (vccs.edu).   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Colleges   all   around   the   state   accept   you,   no   ques-­ tions   asked,   as   long   as   you Â�� perform   well   here,â&#x20AC;?   Reed  

said. So,   if   you   hold   a   grudge   against  your  favorite  univer-­ sity  because  you  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  make   the   cut,   there   could   still   be   time   for   you   to   attend   that   institution,  through  commu-­ nity  college.

Myth  2 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community  College   is  more  like  the  13th   grade!    Boring!!!â&#x20AC;?

While  community  college   PD\QRWIXOÂżOO\RXULQQHUGH-­ sire  for  Project  X  frat  parties   and  House  Bunny  Sororities,   there  is  still  much  social  life   to  be  had. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   over   49   clubs   and   organizations,   there   is   a   social   life.     If   you   go   to   our  website  there  is  a  list  of   all   our   activities.     We   have   many   strong   clubs,   intra-­ murals,  and  student  associa-­ tions.  We  certainly  do  not  re-­ semble  the  13th  grade,â&#x20AC;?  said  


10 The Revolution

Features

May 16, 2014

Photo  by  Katie  Pajewski

Students Take Advantage of Local Job Opportunities SARAH LEMLEY Staff Correspondent   Over  the  summer,  many   teenagers   are   looking   to   earn   a   few   extra   dollars.   Whether   it’s   helping   out   with   energetic   children   or   lending   a   hand   to   custom-­ ers   at   a   local   retail   store,   Charlottesville   has   an   abundance  of  job  opportu-­ nities  for  teens.      “A  positive  aspect  of  hav-­ ing   a   job   is   the   real   world   experience   you   gain   from   interactions  and  actual  job   experience,”   senior   Tyler   Poole   said.   Poole   works   at   Harris   Teeter,   one   of   the  many  grocery  stores  in   Charlottesville.   “I   think   it   definitely   helps   a   lot   and   can   prepare   kids   for   life   after  high  school.”        “You  get  to  meet  a  whole   different   society   and   so-­ cial   class.   It’s   very   inter-­ esting,”   junior   Blair   Doby   said.   Doby   works   at   Tar-­ get,   a   popular   retail   and   grocery   store.   “You   get   to   meet   a   whole   different   part  of  Charlottesville.”      According  to  sophomore   Elizabeth   Baber,   having   a   job  can  even  help  you  with   some  of  your  subjects,  like   counting   out   the   change   with  math.  Baber  works  at   Chandlers,  a  family  owned   bakery.   “I   learn   a   lot   of   people  skills  while  doing  it   and  later  on  in  life  I’m  go-­ ing  to  need  to  learn  how  to   balance   a   job   with   school   and  social  activities.”   “Some   of   the   positives   of  having  a  job  would  defi-­ nitely  be  not  having  to  rely   on   my   parents   for   money   every   time   I   want   to   go   to   the  movies  with  friends  or   go   shopping,”   freshman   Emily   Peery   said.   Peery   works   at   a   children’s   gym   called   Bounce   and   Play.   “It’s   nice   to   feel   indepen-­ dent  and  responsible.   Sophomore   Izzy   Pfund,   chose   to   babysit.   “The   hours   are   really   relaxed   and   they   just   call   you   in   when  they  need  you.”   All  though  the  cash  and   freedom   is   nice,   there   are   also   some   drawbacks   to  

Junior  Lisa    Schölkopf  works  at  Panera  Bread.  AHS  Students  work  in  a   variety  of  establishments,  ranging  from  restaurants  to  retail  stores.   having  a  job.       “You   don’t   have   as   much   time  to  spend  with  friends  

Getting   paid   is   great   but   it’s   not   worth   sacrificing   your   grades   and   social   life.”   said   senior   Han-­

“A  positive  aspect  of  having  a   job   is   the   real   world   experi-­ ence   you   gain   from   interac-­ tions   and   actual   job   experi-­ ence.”   ~  Senior  Tyler  Poole as   you   want,   it’s   a   lot   harder   to   find   free   time,”   sophomore   Shoshana   Hoffman   said.   Hoffman   is   a  lifeguard  at  Forest  Lakes   pools  during  the  summer.         Along   with   a   busier   schedule,   you   also   might   not   always   get   along   with   your   fellow   co-­workers,   according   to   sophomore   Ayushi  Singh.  Singh  works   at  the  clothing  store  Amer-­ ican  Eagle  Outfitters.    “The  negative  aspects  are   obvious....a   reduced   so-­ cial  life,  you  are  tired  a  lot   of   the   time,   and   you   just   get   frustrated   sometimes   if   you’re   in   AP   classes,”   Poole  said.   These   hardworking   teens   also   had   some   advice   for   upcoming  employees.   “Manage   your   time!  

nah   Williams.   Williams   works   at   the   sandwich   shop   called   Which   Wich.   “This   job   was   actually   one   of  the  few  hiring  last  sum-­ mer,   and   it   was   the   first   I   applied   to   so   I   just   rolled   with  it.”       “Moderate   how   many   hours  you  work.  Ease  your   way   in   so   you   know   the   kind   of   workload   you   can   handle  added  onto  school-­ work,”   senior   Tyler   Poole  

said.  “Be  prepared  to  be  up   really  late  a  few  nights.”       The   Virginia   Workforce   Center   held   a   job   fair   on   April   29th.   There,   many   teens   went   to   learn   about   available  job  opportunities   and  talk  to  employers.       “We   look   for   great   com-­ munication  skills.  We  look   for   great   customer   service   skills.   We   look   for   specifi-­ cally  in  our  temporary  em-­ ployees,  people  that  would   be  flexible  and  adaptable,”   Manager   Janet   Turner-­ Giles   said.     Turner-­Giles   manages   the   temporary   search  group  at  University   of  Virginia.        “ We  a re  l ooking  f or  s ome-­ one   who   has   a   positive   at-­ titude   and   a   smile,”   Cook-­ out   general   manager   Paul   Hook   said.   “We   can   teach   them  how  to  do  the  job,  we   just   can’t   teach   them   how   to  have  the  right  attitude.”       Target   looks   for   people   with   a   really   good   work   ethic.   “At   Target,   we   ex-­

pect   a   lot   out   of   the   em-­ ployees  from  the  time  they   clock   in   ‘till   the   time   they   leave,”   Target   Human   Re-­ sources   employee   Jamie   Pitts.   “It   takes   a   lot   to   make   a   store   look   as   neat   as   Target;;   and   we   expect   everyone   to   pitch   in,   but   more   important,   is   a   good   attitude.”         Having   a   strong   work   ethic   and   positive   attitude   is   a   good   advantage   when   applying   for   a   job.   How-­ ever,  some  habits  that  you   may   think   are   harmless   can   keep   you   from   getting   employed.        According  to  Vic  Garber,   Albemarle   County   Parks   and   Recreation   are   dis-­ couraged   when   potential   employees   act   like   they   know  i t  a ll,  a nd  h ave  a  p oor   attitude   or   work   ethic.   “They   want   to   make   mon-­ ey,  but  they  just  don’t  want   to   work.   We   want   to   work   with   you,   and   we   want   to   pay   you,   but   there’s   a   cer-­ tain   amount   of   integrity   and  respect  that  goes  both   ways  and  you  have  to  want   to  work.”     “Complaining   about   pre-­ vious   employers.   Com-­ plaining   about   previous   managers   and   just   overall   negativity.”  Hooke  said.       “When   they’re   asking   questions   that   are   just   about   themselves   and   not   asking  questions  about  the   team   or   about   the   store   that’s   a   red   flag,”   Pitts   said.     “I   don’t   know   that   anything   truly   turns   us   off   because   we’re   always   looking   for   great   people,”   Turner-­   Giles   said.   “Ev-­ eryone   has   something   to   bring.   Whether   it’s   a   skill   or   whether   it   is   the   right   attitude.”  

“I   learn   a   lot   of   people   skills   while   doing   [a   job]   and   later   on   in   life   I’m   going   to   need   to   learn  how  to  balance  a  job  with  school  and  so-­ cial  activities.” ~Sophomore  Elizabeth  Baber


Features

SCHOOL CALENDAR May  16  -­  Senior  Movie  and  Picnic May  16  -­  Lit  Mag  Release  Party May  21  -­  23  -­  Senior  Exams May  22  -­  Senior  Awards  Night May  23  -­  Seniors’  Last  Day May  23  -­  Jazz  Band  Dance May  26  -­  Memorial  Day May  29  -­  Graduation  Practice May  31  -­  Graduation June  7  -­  SAT June  9  -­  2nd  &  6th  period  exams June  10  -­  1st  &  5th  period  exams June  11  -­  4th  &  8th  period  exams June  12  -­  3rd  &  7th  period  exams June  12  -­  Last  Day  of  School

The Revolution 11

Student  Art Photo  by  Alex  Leslie  

May 16, 2014

Eli  Vidano

Follow us on Twitter this summer to stay up-to-date on all things Albemarle! @AHS_Revolution

Augusta Defensive Driving School Sign up with 2 friends for Behind the Wheel and all 3 Coupon must be presented students will receive $25 off! at time of registration RHighly trained instructors

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RCalm/Patient Instruction at YOUR pace

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11 The Revolu-

Schools

May 16, 2014

The Halls areTheAlive wit Speak-Easies The Kairos Effect

MELANIE ARTHUR Managing Editor

MELANIE ARTHUR Managing Editor With   years   of   perfor-­ mance   experience   all   over   Virginia   under   its   belt,   The   Kairos   Effect   (TKE)   launch-­ HV LQWR LWV ÂżUVW UHFRUG ODEHO deal  and  a  developing  career   in  the  music  industry.   A   Charlottesville   grown   Christian,   Alternative   Rock   band   with   roots   in   AHS,   TKE  produces  original  songs   that   resonate   with   â&#x20AC;&#x153;those   who  are  looked  down  uponâ&#x20AC;?   and   communicate   its   band   membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  beliefs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   all   are   very   expres-­ sive,   and   we   all   have   a   vi-­ sion  and  a  belief  that  there  is   something   bigger   than   just   us,â&#x20AC;?  senior  lead  vocalist  and   guitarist   Peyton   Alley   said.   The  bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  music  and  lyrics   also  serve  a  connection  with   the   listener.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   music   is   relational   more   so   than   try-­ LQJ WR Âż[ VRPHRQHÂśV SURE-­ lem,â&#x20AC;?  Alley  said.   An   even   larger   concern   of   TKE,   however,   has   been   recording  and  traveling  with   an  album  of  their  own.  They   are  currently  in  the  midst  of   beginning  that  journey.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   I   was   15,   I   saw   this   Tate   Music   label   com-­ ing   through   Roanoke   look-­ ing   for   artists   that   are   on   the  middle  ground,  so  I  sub-­ mitted   something   to   them   online  and  they  bought  into   that,â&#x20AC;?  Alley  said.  After  years   of   pursuing   that   label,   The   Kairos   Effect   signed   with   Tate   Music   Group   in   Okla-­ homa  City.   On   May   9,   TKE   left   for   OK,  touring  on  the  trip  down   and   back.   When   there,   the   group  recorded  their  album,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eternal   Sound   Within.â&#x20AC;?   Tate  then  supplies  the  band  

with  radio  promotion,  send-­ ing   their   songs   out   to   about   400   different   stations,   and   music   management   includ-­ ing  a  deal  with  iTunes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   should   have   the   re-­ cord   with   artwork   and   ev-­ erything,   wrapped,   within   a   month   or   two   months   fol-­ lowing.   So   beginning   of   fall   is   when   the   album   comes   out,  and  then  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  try  to  do  a   fall  and  winter  tour  with  that   album  in  mind,â&#x20AC;?  Alley  said.   The   other   three   band   members   of   TKE   include   lead   guitarist   Josiah   Rag-­ land,   drummer   Tyler   Mor-­ ris,   and   bass   guitarist   and   vocalist   Kirt   Gray,   all   of   whom   graduated   from   AHS   in   2012.   The   four   enjoyed   coalescing  with  each  other  at   an   early   age,   bonding   their   talent  and  interest  in  music.   The   bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   name   fol-­ lowed,   originating   from   the   two   kinds   of   Greek   time:   Kronos  and  Kairos.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kronos   is   chronological   [time],   and   Kairos   is   the   time   that   we   FDQÂśW UHDOO\ GHÂżQH DQG ,ÂśP a   big   believer   that   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really   know   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   happen   tomorrow,â&#x20AC;?   Alley   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living  in  the  moment.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  Kairos  is.â&#x20AC;?   Alley,   who   does   most   of   the   bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   songwriting,   re-­ gards   originality   as   one   of   the   most   important   aspects   of  their  music.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   like   other   people   hearing   our   own   art   instead  

of  someone  elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the   way   art   should   be,â&#x20AC;?   Alley   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   biggest   thing   for   me  in  songwriting  is  the  idea   of   melody   and   lyric   coming   together   and   writing   songs   not  necessarily  focussing  on   the   singing   part   as   much   as   the   feeling   with   melody   and   lyric,   and   believing   in   those   lyrics.â&#x20AC;?   Choosing  a  favorite  piece,   however,   is   not   as   simple.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  of  the  songs  that  I  write   as   far   as   lyric   wise   and   that   we  write  together,  I  see  them   almost   as   children.   I   know   that   sounds   really   weird,â&#x20AC;?   Alley  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;  You  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really   have  a  favorite  child,  but  you   have   ones   that   are   just   dif-­ ferent  than  other  songs.â&#x20AC;? Singles  such  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let  Light   Be   Foundâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Across   the   Streetâ&#x20AC;?   are   songs   that   Al-­ ley   feels   are   most   popular   among  fans.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Individually   we   are   all   pretty   talented   players,   but   I  think  that  as  a  group,  with   the   songs   that   we   write   to-­ gether...we  are  seen  as  more   of  an  entity  more  so  than  just   four  individuals,  and  we  like   that  idea,â&#x20AC;?  Alley  said.   Listen   to   a   live   recording   of  the  single,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tide  of  Love:â&#x20AC;?   http://thekairoseffect.band-­ camp.com/track/tide-­of-­ love-­live-­not-­ashamed-­ral-­ ly-­summer-­2013 Find   TKE   on   Face-­ book:   www.facebook. com/thekairoseffect

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eclectic,  would  be  some-­ thing   to   describe   the   music   and   myself,â&#x20AC;?   senior   Devin   Dougharty  said.   About  a  year  ago,  Dough-­ arty   and   sophomores   Mat-­ thew   Barber   and   Jacob   Grissom  formed  a  trio,  later   adding  Doughartyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  brother,   sophomore   Darren   Dough-­ arty.   They   combined   their   mutual   interests   in   music   to   form   a   diverse   band   that   plays   â&#x20AC;&#x153;all   kinds   of   weird   stuff:â&#x20AC;?  The  Speak-­Easies.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   just   joke   around   about   everything,   so   we   came   up   with   really   terrible   names,â&#x20AC;?   Devin   said   about   the   origin   of   the   bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   name.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then   someone   just   said,   The   Speak-­Easies,   and   we   were   like,   alright,   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   good  enough.â&#x20AC;? Ranging   in   all   tastes   of   music,   The   Speak-­Easies   mix  styles  that  unexpectedly   ÂżWWRJHWKHU They   play   â&#x20AC;&#x153;rock,   blues,   funk,   jazz,   psychedelic,   in-­ die.  A  little  bluegrass.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   working   on   everything,â&#x20AC;?   Devin   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything   ex-­

cept   country   or   opera,   or   anything  too  far-­out  weird.â&#x20AC;? The   Speak-­Easies   play   covers  of  popular  songs,  but   also   write   their   own   mate-­ rial,   which   always   features   something   a   little   different,   such  as  in  their  single  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rhi-­ no.â&#x20AC;?     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   always   throw   in   a   bridge   somewhere   that,   theory-­wise,   it   makes   sense   and   it   sounds   good,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   the   typical   type   of   thing   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   listen   to,â&#x20AC;?   Devin   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   this   song,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flick   It,â&#x20AC;?  [where]  we  switch  parts.   We   have   a   blue   grass   part   and   a   hard   rock   part,   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rhinoâ&#x20AC;?   of   course   is   really   psychedelic.   We   just   like   to   throw   in   aspects   to   it   that   just  make  it  fun  for  us.â&#x20AC;?   Spontaneity   shows   up   in   the  groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  music  as  well  as   their   personalities   and   per-­ formances.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   favorite   time   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   performed   together   was   at   Dr.  Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Humble  Pie  and  we   were   closing   the   show.   We   had   absolutely   zero   mate-­ rial  ready  because  it  was  two   hours   and   [we]   just   kind   of   decided  we  would  wing  it.  At   the   end   of   the   show   we   just  


May 16, 2014

Schools

The Revolution 13

thFourthe Sound of Music student bands will heat up the summer with original songs, gigs and record deals

made  up  this  chord  progres-­ sion,  and  they  let  me  solo  on   it   for   like   ten   minutes.   That   was   probably   my   favorite   thing  ever,â&#x20AC;?  Devin  said.   Recently,   sophomore   Kate   Bollinger   from   Tan-­ dem   Friends   School   joined   the  group  as  lead  singer,  and   with  this  addition,  the  group   KRSHV WR VWDUW RIÂżFLDOO\ UH-­ cording  their  songs.   The  group  has  posted  vid-­ eos  from  gigs  on  their  Face-­ book  page,  but  since  venues   can   get   loud,   the   quality   is   not  always  that  great.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  record,   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   probably   the   worst   place   to   record   yourselves.   If   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   nervous   or   if   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   FROGDQG\RXUÂżQJHUVDUHQRW warmed   up   it   can   be   really   bad,  or  it  can  be  totally  great   when   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   improvising,â&#x20AC;?   Devin   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   wish   we   had   recordings   of   some   of   the   songs  we  just  improvised  on   the  spot.â&#x20AC;? Students   and   the   public   have   the   opportunity   to   ex-­ perience  The  Speak-­Easies  at   their  upcoming  gig  at  Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ville   Coffee  on  May  29.  Doughar-­ ty  says  this  is  the  best  way  to   reach  their  mu-­ sic,   but   at   the   same   time,   the   band   looks   for-­ ward  to  sharing   more   material   online.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   just   say,   ZKHQ ZH ÂżQDO-­ ly   get   around   to   recording   something,   just   give  it  a  listen,â&#x20AC;?   Doughary  said. Find   them   on  Facebook:   w w w . f a c e -­ book.com/ T h e S p e a k -­ EasiesVA

Jenna Petty and the Broken Hearts ALEX LESLIE Staff Reporter The   four   freshmen   emerge  from  the  band  rooms   after   hearing   the   bell.   The   JURXSÂżQLVKHG:HGQHVGD\ÂśV practice   during   CHAT   with   all   members   present,   noth-­ ing  short  of  a  miracle. Jenna  Petty  and  the  Bro-­ ken  Hearts  practice  Wednes-­ days   and   Thursdays   during   CHAT.   The   band,   consist-­ ing  of  Anthony  Hoang,  Sam   Rainey  and  Sam  Nordbrock,   just   started   off   this   year   and   record   their   music   on   the  closest  cell  phone  in  the   band  practice  rooms. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  bored  one  day  and   there   was   a   practice   room  

open,â&#x20AC;?   freshman   Anthony   Hoang  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;  So  we  went  in   there   and   made   some   mu-­ sic.â&#x20AC;? The   Broken   Heartsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   mu-­ sic   ranges   from   jazz   to   pop   and   everywhere   in   between.   They  have  recently  done  cov-­ ers   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get   Luckyâ&#x20AC;?   by   Daft   Punk   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   Soulâ&#x20AC;?   by   Yael   Naim.   For   their   origi-­ QDO WKH\ H[SDQGHG WKH ÂżHOG of  creativity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  call  it  Number  One,â&#x20AC;?   Petty  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  I  wrote  it.â&#x20AC;?     The   Broken   Hearts   con-­ sist  of  Anthony  Hoang,  Sam   Rainey  and  Sam  Nordbrock. This   new   band   got   their   ÂżUVW JLJ DW WKH FRIIHHKRXVH hosted   by   Sutherland   Mid-­

The Strangest Angels ALEX LESLIE Staff Reporter The   process   begins   with   a  simple  scribble  of  a  pen.  It   leads   to   the   satisfying   click   as   the   pen   is   placed   on   the   desk.  After  minutes  of  revis-­ ing   there   comes   a   thump   of   the   drums.   The   beat   of   the   heart   sets   the   rhythm   and   everything   blossoms   from   there. The   Strangest   Angels   is  

an   all-­girl   indie   rock   band   composed   of   freshmen   Tess   Przyuski,   Emma   Umberger,   Abigail   Treece   and   Kayla   Gavin. Przyuski,   the   guitarist,   scratches   down   some   words   and  hands  it  to  the  rest  of  the   girls.  The  girls  choose  the  in-­ struments   they   think   best   ÂżWVWKHVRQJ â&#x20AC;&#x153;[We]   come   up   with   our   own  part  on  our  instrument   of   choice   and   basically   play  

dle  School  on  Feb.  14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  nice  to  get  back   to   the   place   where   we   all   started,â&#x20AC;?   Petty   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;   The   performance   went   great   and  everyone  loved  us.â&#x20AC;? Jenna   Petty   and   the   Broken   Hearts   capital-­ ize   on   the   pianist,   Jenna   Pettyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   similar   name   to   rock  and  roll  Hall  of  Fam-­ er   Tom   Petty.   The   bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   witty   name   and   humble   beginnings   give   listeners   both   a   laugh   and   a   nice   tune. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   band   loves   mak-­ ing   music   and   having   fun,â&#x20AC;?   said  Hoang. Jenna   Petty   and   the   Broken   Hearts   will   per-­

form   on   May   16   at   the   Lit-­mag   Release   Party   and  Open  Mic  from  7:00   to  9:00  PM.

it   a   million   times,â&#x20AC;?   Przyuski   said. After  â&#x20AC;&#x153;two  to  four  daysâ&#x20AC;?  of   recording,  Przyuski  the  girls   upload   their   work   into   the   computer.   After   some   edit-­ ing  and  tuning,  the  comput-­ HUPDJLFDOO\VSLWVRXWWKHÂżQ-­ ished   product:   locally   made   indie  rock. The  band  started  in  2010,   and   were   inspired   by   a   middle   school   choir   perfor-­ mance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   choir   at   my   middle   school   was   singing   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boule-­ vard   of   Broken   Dreamsâ&#x20AC;?   for   a   performance   and,   after   some   pleading,   my   friend   and  I  were  given  permission   to   back   up   the   choir   with   a   band,â&#x20AC;?   Pryzuski   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   got   some   people   together   and   then   decided   that   we   liked  playing  together.â&#x20AC;? They  began  their  journey,   practicing  every  Friday.  The   girls   faced   their   biggest   gig   in  2012,  a  Battle  of  the  Bands   at   the   Music   Resource   Cen-­ ter  in  Charlottesville. Middle-­schoolers   at   the   time,   they   stood   alongside  

four   high   school   bands   and   before  a  panel  of  judges.  The   stage  overlooked  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  largest   group  of  complete  strangers   we  had  ever  played  for,â&#x20AC;?  Um-­ berger  said. The   girls   were   too   young   to   formally   compete,   but   were  the  opening  act. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  big  for  us  because   we   were   way   younger   than   everyone   else   competing,   but   we   still   did   fairly   well,â&#x20AC;?   Umberger  said. Since   then   the   girls   have   made   a   radio   appearance.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;   It   was   a   simple   interview   with   Wendy   Edwards   on   1070   WINA.   They   played   one   of   our   songs,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Stars,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   Przyuski  said.   The   Angels   hope   to   con-­ tinue   performing   and   ex-­ pand   their   song   selection.   For   now   they   will   continue   practicing  in  their  makeshift   recording   studio   in   their   basement. The   Strangest   Angelsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   music  can  be  download-­ ed  for  free  at:  thestrang-­ e st an g e l s. b an d c amp . com.  


14 The Revolution

Features

May 16, 2014

/((7</(5 6WDII&RUUHVSRQGHQW

Samira  Hussaini Senior

“I’ll  be  getting  my  tan  on   at  the  beach  as  much  as   possible.”

Photo  by  Alexa  Hodges

Sam  Casey Junior

“Getting   ready   for   the   upcoming   football  season.”

Emily  Henderson

advance  and  $20  on  the  day   of  the  show. AT   THE   SOUTHERN   CAFÉ  AND  MUSIC  HALL Jeremy   Messersmith   plays  dark  and  slightly  mor-­ bid   alternative   June   12.     Doors  open  at  7:30  PM  and   the   show   will   start   at   8:00   PM. Ki:  Theory,  an  alternative   rock   and   electronic   band,   will   be   performing   on   June   18.    Think  Passion  Pit  sound   without   chimpmunk-­esque   vocals.    The  doors  will  open   at   8:30   PM   and   the   show   will  start  at  9:00  PM.    Tick-­ ets  $10  advanced  $12  day  of   show. Ha   Ha   Tonka   will   be   playing   on   July   19.     Their   sound  is  sort  of  a  slow  Mum-­ ford   and   Sons   with   an   elec-­ tric   guitar   added   in.     Doors  

open   at   8:30   PM   and   the   show   will   start   at   9:00   PM.     Tickets  are  $10  if  bought  in   advance  and  $12  if  bought  at   the  door. NTELOS   WIRELESS   PAVILLION Vampire   Weekend   with   the   Cults   will   perform   June   10.    They  will  be  performing   their   third   album,   Modern   Vampires.     Some   of   their   songs   more   popular   songs   are   “Unbelievers”,   “Diane   Young”,  and  “Step”.    Tickets   are  $41;;  doors  open  at  6:00   PM   and   the   concert   will   start  at  7:00  PM.   Sara  Bareilles  will  play  on   July   12.     Some   of   her   songs   are   “Brave”,   “Love   Song”   and   “King   of   Anything”.     Ticket   prices   start   at   $35.     Doors  open  at  6:00  PM  and   the   show   will   start   at   7:00  

PM. Sarah   McLachlan,   also   recognized   as   the   SPCA   lady,   will   perform   July   27.     The  majority  of  her  music  is   piano  driven  ballads.    Doors   open   at   6:00   PM   and   the   show   will   start   at   7:30   PM.   Tickets  start  at  $39.   FRIDAYS   AFTER   FIVE:  5:30-­8:30  PM Terrance   Simien   and   the   Zydeco   Experience   with   Curtis   Prince   and   Associ-­ ates,   a   Cajun   and   blues   band,  will  play  on  May  30. Johnny   Sportcoat   and   the   Casuals   with   Buzzard   Hollow  Boys  will  perform  on   June  6.    Their  music  is  rock   and  R&B  with  a  progressive   sound   strong   melody   that   you   can   dance   to.     They   do   covers   of   songs   and   origi-­ nals.

Sophomore Photo  by  Alexa  Hodges

Top:  Sara  Bareilles  and  Vampire  Weekend  will  perform  at  Charlottesville’s   Ntelos  Wireless  Pavillion  this  summer,  among  other  popular  groups.   Bottom:  The  Gypsy  punk  band  Gogol  Bordello  will  come  to  the  Jefferson   on  July  17  with  their  opening  act,  the  experimental  band  Man  Man.    

“I’m  going  to  relax  and  go  to   summer  camps.”

Sophia  Bain Freshman Photo  courtesy  of  Sophia  Bain

Now   that   the   end   of   school   is   approaching,   \RX FDQ ¿QDOO\ JR WR WKRVH Wednesday   night   concerts   to  check  out  the  music  scene   of  Charlottesville.    All  of  the   concerts   are   all   ages   so   no   need  to  worry  about  getting   in.     Both   local   and   national   acts   will   perform   and   bring   the   sound   of   music   to   the   Downtown  Mall. AT  THE  JEFFERSON Zoso   brings   their   trib-­ ute  to  Led  Zeppelin  on  May   30.     Doors   open   at   7:00pm   and   the   show   will   start   at   8:00pm.     Fans   of   “Stairway   to   Heaven”   should   arrive   at     Admission  is  $15  if  ticket  is   bought  in  advance  and  $17  if   bought  the  day  of  show. Fitz   and   the   Tantrums   will   be   playing   on   June   13.     Doors  open  at  8:00  PM  and   the   show   will   start   at   9:00   PM.     Their   neo   soul/indie   pop  music  is  upbeat  and  fun   to   dance   to.     Some   of   their   popular   songs   are   “Mon-­ eyGrabber”,   “The   Walker”,   and   “Out   of   My   League”.   Tickets   are   $23   in   advance   and  $25  day  of  show. The   Legwarmers,   a   band   reliving   the   ‘80s,   will   be   playing   on   June   27.     Doors   will   open   at   8:00   PM   and   the   concert   will   start   at   9:00  PM.    Tickets  are  $16  if   bought  in  advance  and  $18  if   bought  the  day  of  the  show. Gogol   Bordello   with   opening   act   Man   Man   ar-­ rives   on   July   17.   Combine   punk   rock   vocals   with   a   Ukrainian  accent,  add  an  ac-­ cordion,   guitar   and   a   violin   with  a  rock  beat  and  you  get   Gogol  Bordello.    Doors  open   at   7:00   PM   and   the   concert   will  start  at  8:00  PM.    Tick-­ ets   bought   before   the   day   of   the   show   are   $29.99   and   $35  the  day  of  the  show. The  Milk  Carton  Kids  are   folk   revival,   but   those   two   words   do   not   describe   their   dulcet  voices  singing  in  har-­ mony   with   their   acoustic   guitar.    If  you  are  in  a  more   relaxed   concert   mood,   then   consider   going   to   the   con-­ cert   on   July   19.     The   doors   open   at   7:00   PM   and   the   show   starts   at   8:00   PM.     Tickets  are  $18  if  bought  in  

What are your plans for the summer?

Photo  courtesy  of  Samira  Hussaini

Graphic  by  Kate  Edson  using  photos  courtesy  of  Flickr.com  creative  commons  

&YLOOH·V6XPPHU0XVLF6FHQH/LJKWV8S Rev  Reaction

“I’m  going  to  be  doing  tennis   lessons   every   day   and   I   am   JRLQJWRÀ\RXWWR&DOLIRUQLD for  a  week  at  the  end  of   summer.  


May 16, 2014

Features

The Revolution 15

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ALEX JONCAS Staff Correspondent Have   you   ever   wondered   what  there   is  to  do  in  Char-­ lottesville   in   the   summer?   You   have   come   to   the   right   place.   You   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   to   travel   far   to   experience   all   the   fun   Charlottesville   has   to  offer.  Listed  below  are  the   top  10  things   to   do   over  the   summer. 10.   The   Paramount-­   Ash  Lawn  Opera  is  perform-­ ing   the   Fiddler   on   the   Roof   at   the   Paramount   from   July   31   to   August   8.   Tickets   for   students  are  $12.50.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The  Paramount]  is  nice,   it   has   a   jazzy   feeling.   I   saw   two   plays   there   with   good   actors  and  directors,â&#x20AC;?  junior   Tracy  Villa  said. Classic  movies  such  as  Dr.   Dolittle,   Bad   News   Bears,   and  Dazed  and  Confused  are   all   being   shown   in   June   for   $6   a   ticket.   The   World   Cup   is   being   shown   in   July.   The   Paramount   is   showing   the   USA  vs.  Ghana  and  the  USA   vs.  Portugal  for  free  on  their   enormous  screen.     9.   Cooking   classes   at   Boars   Head-­   Ever   wanted   to   bake   delicious   foods   in   one   of   the   prettiest   spots   in   Charlottesville?  You  can  now   take  cooking  classes  at  Boars   Head.  Learn  to  prepare  pas-­ tries,   pork   tenderloins,   fruit   salsas,   and   salads.   The   add-­ ed  perk,  you  get  to  cook  with   the  chef  himself.  The  classes   are   designed   for   groups   between   10-­40   people.   To   make   cakes   or   desserts   it   is   $40   and   to   make   an   entree   is  $90.     8.   Bowling   League-­   Have  you  always  known  you   belong  on  the  bowling  team,   MXVW WR ÂżQG RXW WKDW $OEH-­ marle  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  one?  You   can   join   a   summer   league   at   Keglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Lanes.   Practice   your  game  for  weeks  during   the  summer  so  you  can  show   your   friends   that   you   have   what  it  takes  to  be  the  bowl-­ ing  champion.   Each  league  starts  in  May  

Photos  courtesy  of  Flickr.com  creative  commons

10 Things to Do in VA This Summer

2   and   runs   for   14-­16   weeks,   where  you  practice  one  day  a   week.  You  can  sign  up  online   if  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  interested.     7.   Shenandoah   Na-­ tional   Park-­   Shenandoah   is   located   in   the   Blue   Ridge   Mountains,   just   west   of   Al-­ bemarle.   You   can   do   any   outdoor   activity   imaginable,   such  as  hiking  to  see  beauti-­ ful  views  of  the  mountains  or   ZDWHUIDOOV ÂżVKLQJ DQG ELN-­ ing.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   is   a   huge   water-­ fall   where   people   jump   off,â&#x20AC;?   Villa  said. Horseback   riding   is   also  

songs   you   know   by   heart.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The   Jefferson]   is   very   festive   with   a   wide   range   of   ages,â&#x20AC;?   Madame   Sharon   Lloyd  said. On   June   13,   Fitz   and   the   Tantrums,  who  most  recent-­ ly   toured   with   Bruno   Mars   on   his   Moonshine   Junglwe   Tour  in  2013,  make  a  stop  at   The  Jefferson.   5.  Forest  Lakes  Farm-­ ers   Market   and   the   City   Market-­  In  Forest  Lakes  on   Tuesdays   from   4-­   7pm   you   FDQÂżQGWKHIDUPHUVPDUNHW They   sell   all   kinds   of   goods  

9  

popular   in   the   mountains.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   took   my   horse   up   to   the   mountain  for  a  50  mile,  four   day   trail   ride,â&#x20AC;?   sophomore   Ashley  Divine  said.   Visitor   centers   are   open   daily  from  9am-­5pm.   6.   The   Jefferson-­   One   of  Charlottesvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  best  kept   secrets,  it  showcases  unique   vocal   artists,   some   artists   who   you   have   never   heard   of   before,   and   others   whose  

from   plump,   red   tomatoes,   to   sweet   delectable   honeys   and  jams.   The   Charlottesville   City   Market   is   open   Saturdays   7am-­12pm.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   lot   of   good   food,   such   as   donuts,â&#x20AC;?   Divine  said.         4.   Monticello-­   Every-­ one  knows  of  Monticello,  but   did  you  know  about  the  An-­ nual  Naturalization  Ceremo-­ ny?  The  ceremony  welcomes  

naturalized  citizens,  non-­cit-­ izens  who  are  now  becoming   US   citizens.   It   includes   the   Charlottesville   Municipal   Band   and   always   has   a   fea-­ tured   speaker.   Past   speak-­ ers   have   included   President   George   W.   Bush   and   actor   Sam   Waterston,   who   is   fa-­ mous   for   portraying   Jack   McCoy  in  Law  and  Order.     3.   Upcoming   Movies-­   Many   highly   anticipated   movies  happen  to  be  coming   to   theaters   this   summer.   In   May,  the  true  story  of  Indian   cricket   players   recruited   to   play  American  baseball,  Mil-­ lion   Dollar   Arm   comes   to   town  May  16.  Action  packed   movies  such  as  Godzilla  and   X-­Men:  Days  of  Future  Past   enter   theaters   May   16   and   May   23.   In   June   and   July,   the  young  adult  novel  turned   movie,   The   Fault   in   Our   Stars   hits   theaters   June   6.   Sequels   such   as   Transform-­ ers:   Age   of   Extinction   and   Dawn   of   the   Planet   of   the   Apes  will  appear  in  theaters   June  27  and  July  11. 2.   Carter   Mountain   Orchard-­   The   Peach   Festi-­ val   comes   to   Carter   Moun-­ tain   July   26   and   27.   During  

the   Peach   Festival   you   can   enjoy   hayrides,   pie   eating   contests,   and   peach   pick-­ ing.   At   the   bakery   you   can   enjoy   such   sweets   as   warm,   fresh   peach   cider   donuts,   kettle   corn,   peach   pie,   ice   cream,   and   cider   slushies.   On   Thursdays   various   art-­ ists   come   by   to   show   off   their     talents.   Music   genres   include   country,   folk,   rock,   jazz,   contemporary,   and   bluegrass.   Apple   picking   is   also   available   throughout   the  summer.         1.   Rocky   Top   Climb-­ ing-­   Test   your   skills   on   the   rock  walls  and  see  how  high   you   can   make   it   before   fall-­ ing.  There  is  also  an  exercise   room   equipped   with   tread-­ mills,   free   weights,   ellipti-­

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cal  machines,  stair  steppers,   and  life  cycles.  In  addition  to   climbing   and   working   out,   you  can  also  try  your  hand  at   racketball.   Located  in  Charlottesville   is   the   Rocky   Top   Climb-­ ing  Center,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  big   room,   three   of   the   four   walls   have   actual   rock   climbing   walls.   [Rock  climbing]  is  a  fun  ex-­ perience   and   I   enjoyed   the   challenge,â&#x20AC;?   sophomore   Car-­ rie  Chang  said.  

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16 The Revolution

Sports

May 16, 2014

Photos  courtesy  of  Summer  Maxwell

*LUOV¡/DFURVVH6WLFNVLWWR7KHLU&RPSHWLWLRQ KATE EDSON Design Editor   The   girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   lacrosse   team   has   had   an   increasingly   winning   season   this   year,   recently   defeating   several   local   rivals   and   striving   to   reach  the  postseason.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   was   definitely   a   rebuilding   year   for   the   team,â&#x20AC;?   sophomore   Gwen   Pattison   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last   year,   we  graduated  eight  seniors,   three   of   which   went   on   to   play   college   ball.   [This   year]   we   have   more   sophomores  than  any  other   class.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   team   has   had   a   bumpy   start   but   everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   spirit   is   still   high   which   is   really   important,â&#x20AC;?   senior   captain   Rebecca   Mendelsohn   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Especially   in   our   [earlier]   games,   despite   the   outcome,   ([losing]   26-­ 25   against   CHS   and   18-­14   against   Salem)   we   all   were   proud  of  how  we  played.â&#x20AC;?     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone   supported   each   other   and   kept   positive   the   whole   way   through,â&#x20AC;?   Mendelsohn   added.     Following   these   losses   early   in   the   season,   the   team   went   on   to   defeat   Monticello   13-­11   on   April   18   and   Fluvanna   15-­5   on   April  25.     According   to   Pattison,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;until  [Monticello],  we  had   lost  every  game  by  at  least  8   points,  so  we  were  ready  to   end  that  losing  streak.  Our   transitions   were   beautiful,   we  passed  the  ball,  and  we   played  Patriot  lacrosse.â&#x20AC;?     More   recently,   the   team   triumphed   over   Western   12-­11   in   triple   overtime   on   May   2   and   beat   the   previously   undefeated   Patrick   Henry   Roanoke   team  7-­5  on  May  7.     The   winning   streak   continued   with   a   21-­11   victory  over  CHS  on  May  9.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beating   Western   gave   me   such   an   indescribable   feeling,â&#x20AC;?   Pattison   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last  year,  we  lost  to  them   three   times   by   one   or   two   points   each   time.   We   lost  

7RS6HQLRU$QQLH%DUQHVWDNHVWKHEDOOXSÂżHOGDQGĂ&#x20AC;LHVSDVWKHU:HVWHUQ Albemarle  opponent  in  their  game  on  May  2.   %RWWRP7KHWHDPFHOHEUDWHVWKHLUZLQDJDLQVW:HVWHUQ7KH\ZRQ the  close  game  in  triple  overtime.   by   eight   the   first   time   we   played   them   this   season,   and   that   completely   changed   our   team   mentality.â&#x20AC;?     She  added  that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;we  came   out   ready   to   win   and   we   did.   We   worked   as   a   unit   and   applied   everything   we   know   and   it   served   us   well.â&#x20AC;?   At   the   beginning   of   the   year,   the   team   came   up   with   30   goals   for   the   season.   These   goals   cover   a   broad   array   of   topics,   ranging   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;little   things  

like  stay  hydrated,  to  more   specific   goals   like   win   States,â&#x20AC;?  Pattison  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  favorite  goal,  which   I   think   we   have   achieved   and  maintained,  is  play  like   a  family,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  pick   each   other   up   when   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   down,   we   motivate   each   other,   we   give   each   other   constructive   criticism,   and   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   harp   on   the   little   mistakes.â&#x20AC;?   According   to   Mendelsohn,  some  of  these   goals   â&#x20AC;&#x153;we   have   already   accomplished,   like   [to]  

stay   classy   and   respectful.   Some   goals   we   need   to   keep   working   on,   like   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;win   80%   of   the   draws   [start   of   the   game]   every   game.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   So   we   are   on   our   way   to   achieving   our   team   goals   that   we   have   not   already   accomplished   with   hard   work  and  practice!â&#x20AC;?   Senior   captain   Carolyn   Chapman  said  that  because   the   team   is   young   this   year   â&#x20AC;&#x153;there   was   a   lot   of   confusion   with   positions   [at   first]...   but   as   the   season   has   gone   on   we   are  

all   learning   our   roles   and   really  coming  together  as  a   team.â&#x20AC;?   Pattison   agreed   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   definitely   getting   there.  We  just  need  to  keep   a  winning  mentality.â&#x20AC;?   She  thinks  that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;we  have   improved   on   every   aspect   of   the   game,   especially   the   fundamentals.   Our   stick   work   is   improving   every   day,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   communicating   more,   and   our   team   dynamic   is   getting   better   with  every  practice.â&#x20AC;?   This   positive   team   dynamic   is   essential   to   success  on  the  field.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  all   have   a   lot   of   fun   together   but   also   know   when   to   be   serious   and   know   how   to   push   each   other   to   work   harder,â&#x20AC;?  Mendelsohn  said.     Lacrosse   requires   not   only   physical   effort,   but   intense   mental   concentration.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   hardest   part   about   playing   lacrosse,   or   any   sport   for   that  matter,  is  keeping  your   head  in  the  game,â&#x20AC;?  Pattison   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   get   cocky   when   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   winning   and   you   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   sulk   when   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   losing.   You   just   have   to   play  like  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  0-­0.â&#x20AC;?   According   to   Chapman,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   hard   to   have   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;move   on   from   your   mistakes   right   after   they   happen.   The   game   is   so   fast   that   you   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   dwell   on   your   mistakes  and  you  just  need   to  stay  positive.â&#x20AC;?   The  team  maintains  this   positivity   through   spirit.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  team  has  great  spirit,â&#x20AC;?   Chapman   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Off   the   field   we   do   spirit   during   school  and  the  whole  team   participates   and   on   the   field  we  are  all  getting  hype   so   we   have   energy   to   get   a   win  for  the  Patriots.â&#x20AC;?   Mendelsohn   added   that     â&#x20AC;&#x153;we   all   love   the   sport   and   have   good   skills,   which   is   so   great   to   be   around,   especially   for   my   last   year   at  Albemarle.â&#x20AC;?   She   thinks   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;we   all   see  our  great  potential  and   skill,  so  we  know  the  end  of   the  season  will  go  well  if  we   try  our  hardest.â&#x20AC;?


May 16, 2014

Sports

The Revolution 17

Photos  by  Katie  Pajewski

%R\V·/DFURVVH*HDUV8S)RU5HJLRQDOV %$,/(<%86+ 2QOLQH(GLWRU   With   a   new   head   coach   and   dedicated   players,   the   lacrosse   team   is   working   toward   a   winning   season.   As   of   May   12,   their   record   is  11-­1  with  only  two  games   left  until  Regional  playoffs.     New   head   Coach   Dave   King   has   been   part   of   the   program   for   the   last   three   years,   working   as   an   assistant  coach.  “I’ve  really   enjoyed   my   time   being   the   an   assistant   coach   for   the   last   two   years   here,   and   I   love   the   game.   I’ve   just   been   overwhelmed   by   the   players  here  and  how  much   they  just  love  to  play.  They   all   want   to   get   better   and   they  listen.”       Having   experience   as   a   midfield   player   at   University   of   Pennsylvania   and   with   refereeing,   King   decided  to  take  the  position   when   it   opened   up   last   year.   In   addition   to   losing   a   coach,   last   year   the   team   lost   ten   seniors,   “We   lost   a   lot   of   defense   players,   but   the   good   thing   about   Albemarle   is   that   we   have   a  good  pipeline  of  players,”   King   said.   “My   aim   has   been   to   focus   a   lot   on   the   defense   and   have   our   assistant   coaches   working   on  the  attack.”     This   year,   the   school  

Top:  The  team  celebrates  their  goal  against   Western  Albemarle  on  May  2. Bottom:  Sophomore  Nate  Smoot  gets  ready  to   take  on  the  Western  player. adopted   a   new   district,   with   new   opponents   to   play.  The  team  has  adapted   well   to   the   new   Jefferson   District,   winning   most   of   their  games  with  unusually   high  scores,  allowing  only  a   few  goals  per  game.     In   their   April   11   game  

against   Salem,   they   won   15-­0.   Against   Fluvanna   on   April   25   Albemarle   dominated   with   a   score   of   17-­2.       On   May   2,   they   played   Western   Albemarle   for   the   second   time,   this   time   at   home.   In   their   first   game  

against  the  team  that  many   consider   to   be   Albemarle’s   greatest  rival,  Western  won   with   a   close   score   of   16-­ 14.   This   time   around   was   different,   and   Albemarle   came  out  on  top  7-­5.   “It’s   been   a   pretty   equal   effort   by   both   offense   and   defense,”   sophomore   defensive   player   Malcolm   Meistrell  said.   However  he  said  that  the   Western   game   was   mostly   a   defensive   effort.   “It   was   awesome.  We  led  the  entire   game   but   it   was   still   really   close.”     This   year   the   team   has   eleven   seniors   leaving,   “I   think   having   to   fill   those   places   will   always   be   an   issue.   We   lose   a   lot   of   players   every   year,   but   we   have   a   really   young   team,”   King  said.   “The  thing  we’ll  miss  about   our   senior   class   right   now   is  that  a  lot  of  them  having   been   playing   together   for   a   long   time,   since   middle   school   at   a   minimum,”   King  said.   Senior   captain   and   attack   player   Matt   Crist   is   one   that   has   been   playing   with  a  lot  of  his  team  mates   for  six  years.     “They’re  some  of  my  best   friends  now,”  Crist  said.   The   seniors’   chemistry   is   something   the   team   will   miss,   but   there   are   many   other   developing   players  

that   aren’t   seniors,   such   as   sophomores   Ian   Davis,   Nate   Smoot   and   Meistrell,   and   juniors   Justin   Moran   and  Cameron  Green.   While   most   seniors   will   be   moving   on   to   college   without   playing   sports   or   to   work   many   are   moving   on   to   play   lacrosse.   Bobby   Leytham   is   going   to   play   at  Mary  Washington,  Chris   McDaniel   at   Tusculum,   Nathaniel   Gaspar   at   Marymount,   Sam   Calhoun   at   Grove   City,   Hunter   Brown  at  Hampden-­Sydney   and   Crist   at   Christopher   Newport.     Moran   has   already   verbally  committed  to  play   at  Jacksonville.       “The   guys   have   set   high   goals   for   themselves   and   I’m  here  to  help  them  reach   those  goals,”  King  said. Meistrell   said   that   he   thinks   the   team   will   play   well   into   June,   making   it   past  Regional  and  Districts,   hopefully  winning  States.     “In   the   past   Albemarle   lacrosse   typically   makes   it   to   Districts,   but   I   think   we   have   the   drive   and   skill   to   make   it   further,”   Crist   said.   “Playing   into   June   would   mean   that   the   seniors  would  have  to  miss   beach   week,   but   that’s   a   sacrifice  we’re  all  willing  to   make.   We   all   want   it   and   I   think  we  have  to  power  and   dedication  to  get  there.”  

Track and Field Tramples Their Opponents $VLD:DOOHUG 6WDII&RUUHVSRQGHQW With   the   Conference   Tournament   still   to   come   on   May   17,   several   members   of   the   track   and   field   team   are   already   bound  for  States.   Freshman   Kathryn   Mayo  has  already  qualified   in  the  800  and  1600  meter   races,   as   has   senior   Ryan   Thomas.   Junior   Zach   Gentry   qualified   for   the   1600   and   3200   meter   by   mid-­season.  

The   mens’   4   x   400   relay   team   consisting   of   sophomores   Arun   Turay   and   Khalil   Green,   junior   Kevin   McCarthy   and   Thomas   are   headed   to   Harrisonburg   High   for   States   on   June   6.   Thomas,   Gentry,   senior   Camron   Hatchett   and   sophomore   Ben   Gersbach   will   also   be   competing  at  States.   Other   athletes   looking   forward   to   the   post-­ season   are   pole   vaulters   senior   Krister   Briehl   and   sophomore   Josh   Oliver,  

who   both   qualified   during   the  indoor  season.   The  P ats  a re  a lso  l ooking   towards   the   future   with   freshman   Noah   Smith,   who  ran  the  800  in  1:59  at   the  Dogwood  Track  Classic   on  May  2.   “He’s   got   a   lot   of   potential   in   track,   and   I   can’t   wait   to   see   how   the   season   ends   up   for   him,”   Gentry  said.   Their   next   meet   is   the   conference   tournament   on   May   17   at   the   Albemarle   track.  

Junior  Moses  Boamah  passes  off  the  baton  to  ju-­ nior  Kevin  McCarthy  in  the  4  x  400  relay  race  in   their  meet  on  April  16  against  Charlottesville.  


18 The Revolution

Sports

May 16, 2014

Ch-Ch- *LUOV¡6RFFHU$GMXVWV 7R1HZ'LVWULFW$QG Changes: 1HZ&RDFK Photos By Katie Pajewski

$/(;$+2'*(6 2QOLQH(GLWRU

The  girls  join  together  as  they  await  the  start  of  their  game  against  Orange   County  on  March  27.  The  Patriots  defeated  the  Hornets  with  a  score  of  8-­1. to   the   new   coaching   style.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most   of   my   coaches   have   been  male,  so  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  different  to   have  a  coach  who  can  relate   to  us  a  little  bit  more,â&#x20AC;?  Davi-­ son  said.             Junior   and   outside   back   Madison   Keck-­Wilson   add-­ ed,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach  S  is  more  techni-­ cal  with  us.â&#x20AC;?            Describing  her  approach   to  coaching  the  squad,  Sher-­ rill   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;At   practices   or   games,   I   hope   a   spectator   would   observe   our   squad   working   hard,   paying   atten-­ tion  to  details,  laughing  and   being  successful.â&#x20AC;?          Indeed,  the  team  has  seen   much  success,  having  a  sea-­ son  of  11-­0-­1  so  far.  The  girls   look   to   secure   a   spot   in   the   State   championship.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   something   we   have   never   done   in   my   years   at   Albe-­ marle,â&#x20AC;?   Davison   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   care  so  much  for  each  other   and  the  sport  that  we  are  all   trying   as   hard   as   we   can   to   do  our  best.â&#x20AC;?          In  order  to  achieve  their   â&#x20AC;&#x153;ultimate   goal,â&#x20AC;?   the   girls  

focus   on   their   strengths   to   keep   the   team   motivated.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   team   has   great   chem-­ istry,  which  transcends  onto   WKH ÂżHOG DV ZHOO´ 6KHUULOO

said.            Keck-­Wilson  believed  that   the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  strengths  are  also   IRXQGLQWKHWHDPÂśVPLGÂżHOG and  defensive  style  of  play.  

Photos By Katie Pajewski

         This  season,  girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  soccer   encountered  several  changes   within   their   organization.   Following   the   previous   sea-­ son,   the   team   joined   a   new   district,   altering   the   list   of   schools   that   the   team   plays.   In   addition   to   the   new   dis-­ trict,   the   team   gained   a   new   head   coach,   as   Coach   Hall   stepped   down   from   his   coaching   position   after   11   years  at  AHS.   %RWKPRGLÂżFDWLRQVZLWKLQ the   squad   have   â&#x20AC;&#x153;changed   Albemarle   soccer   a   lot,â&#x20AC;?   ac-­ cording   to   senior   and   cap-­ tain  Abby  Davison.            Davison,  who  plays  center   defense,   captains   the   team   alongside   fellow   seniors   Anne   Brady   and   Ali   Starr.   Davison   said   on   the   team   switching   to   a   different   dis-­ trict,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since  we  play  different   teams,  we  were  unsure  what   to  expect.â&#x20AC;?            While  the  new  district  has   presented  a  challenge  for  the   team,   the   girls   constantly   strive  to  overcome  whatever   obstacles   come   their   way.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   very   focused   on   goals   and   expectations   this   year,â&#x20AC;?   Coach   Amy   Sherrill   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   want   to   compete   in  the  state  tournament.â&#x20AC;?          Sherrill  serves  as  the  cur-­ rent  head  coach  of  the  team,   after   serving   three   years   as   the   JV   coach   and   two   years   as   the   assistant   coach   to   Hall.  Once  she  became  head   coach,   Sherrill   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   ready   to   hit   to   ground   run-­ ning.â&#x20AC;?            She  found  the  transition   to  be  quite  easy,  mainly  due   to  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;fantastic  groupâ&#x20AC;?  of  re-­ turning  players  and  parents.   Coach  Hall  was  also  respon-­ sible  for  Sherrillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  easy  tran-­ sition.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   always   learn-­ ing   from   Coach   Hall   and   his   guidance   was   extremely   helpful,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.          While  the  team  is  familiar   with  Sherrill,  returning  play-­ ers   still   had   to   get   adjusted  

         Sherrill  praised  her  play-­ ers  for  the  dedication  each  of   them  have  for  the  game  and   their  team.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  are  a  joy  to   work  with,â&#x20AC;?  she  concluded.            Not  too  far  from  the  con-­ ference   tournament,   the   girls   are   working   hard   to   keep   their   goal   of   States   in   sight.  So  far  in  their  season,   the   team   has   been   shutting   down   their   opponents.   Oc-­ casionally,   however,   schools   such   as   Western   Albemarle   and   Mountain   View   require   WKHWHDPWRÂżJKWKDUGHU          The  team  is  also  learning   WRÂżJKWKDUGHULQUHVSRQVHWR missing   players.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   year,   we   have   a   lot   more   to   over-­ come   with   all   the   injuries,â&#x20AC;?   Keck-­Wilson   said.   Injured   players   of   the   team   include   MXQLRUPLGÂżHOGHUV-D]]\/R-­ redo  and  Carmen  Thomas.   5HJDUGOHVV RI WKH GLIÂżFXO-­ ties  that  come  their  way,  the   only   thought   that   crosses   each   playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mind   is   that   of   winning   States.   Davison   ZDV FRQÂżGHQW LQ KHU WHDPÂśV chances   of   making   it.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have  an  amazing  team  and  if   we  all  come  together,  we  can   do  great  things.â&#x20AC;?

Senior  forward  Ali  Starr  is  challenged  by  an  opponent  during  the  same   game  against  Orange  County.  Starr  scored  3  of  the  8  goals  in  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   win  against  the  Hornets.


May 16, 2014

Sports

The Revolution 19

%R\V¡6RFFHU+RSHV7R5HFODLP6WDWHV7LWOH Photos By Katie Pajewski

JUSTIN FISHER Staff Correspondent

Senior  goaltender  Matt  Natale  punts  the  ball  during  a  home  game  against   Western  on  April  10.  The  Patriots  lost  in  a  close  game  of  0-­1  against  the   Warriors. Photos By Katie Pajewski

          Albemarle   is   marching   their   way   to   the   postseason   once  again  this  year,  earning   a  10-­3  record  thus  far.           â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   team   chemistry   is   good   and   we   share   the   ball   ZHOO´MXQLRUPLGÂżHOGHU0DU-­ cel   Berry   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   just   one   person   scoring   all   the   goals   or   doing   everything.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  team  effort.â&#x20AC;?            â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  say  good  team  chem-­ istry   and   talented   players   have  made  us  successful  this   season,â&#x20AC;?   Coach   Scott   Jack-­ son  agreed.          The  Pats  are  still  striving   towards   their   2012   high   of   winning   the   State   Champi-­ onships  and  are  keeping  that   as  their  goal  for  this  season.          â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  just  have  to  stay  fo-­ cused.     Sometimes   we   slack   off  or  do  things  we  shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   doing.     We   have   to   give   100%  effort  in  every  practice   and  every  game,â&#x20AC;?  Berry  said.          Jackson  holds  a  different   viewpoint   on   his   past   suc-­ cess;Íž   insisting   that   this   is   about   a   new   team   and   new   goals.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   trying  to  live  up  to  anything.     Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   a   new   season   with  

new   players   so   we   have   set   new  goals.â&#x20AC;?          Jackson  took  a  break  from   coaching   last   season,   and   brings  renewed  energy  to  the   ÂżHOGÂł,WÂśVJUHDWWREHEDFN, missed  it  a  lot.    I  like  working   with  the  athletes  every  single   day.â&#x20AC;?           â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   coach   Jackson   brings  a  lot  of  energy  to  the   team   and   he   keeps   us   fo-­ cused  a  lot,â&#x20AC;?  Berry  said. While   a   return   of   coaching   staff   makes   things   more   fa-­ miliar,  the  change  to  the  Jef-­ ferson   District   brings   new   faces   to   the   Patsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   competi-­ tion.            Berry  thinks  the  division   switch  has  had  a  positive  im-­ pact  on  the  team  this  year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  it  helped  us  because   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   to   go   so   far   and   we   get   to   play   teams   closer   to   home.     Traveling   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  as  tiring  as  it  would  be   in   the   other   district,â&#x20AC;?   Berry   said.             Coach   Jackson   is   more   concerned   with   keeping   the   team   focused   in   spite   of   the   division  switch,  however.           â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   [the   division   switch]   PDGH LW PRUH GLIÂżFXOW WR keep   [the   players]   motivat-­ ed   because   there   are   some   programs  that  are  not  as  far   along   as   we   are,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   working   on   staying   focused  and  motivated.â&#x20AC;?          Staying  motivated  is  a  big   key  this  year,  as  Coach  Jack-­ son  believes  they  have  plenty   of   talent   and   ability   to   live   up   to   their   own   goals.     The   SOD\HUV KDYH FRQÂżGHQFH LQ themselves  as  a  team  and  are   enthusiastic  about  the  rest  of   the  season,  as  well.           â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   we   have   a   good   chance   of   going   to   States   and  doing  well  this  season.â&#x20AC;?   Berry  said.

LEFT:  Junior  forward   Adonis  Krasniqi    heads   the  ball  away  from  an   opponent  during  the   same  game  against   Western.  


20 The Revolution

Sports

May 16, 2014

%R\V¡7HQQLV%DFNKDQGV&RPSHWLWLRQ &RS\(GLWRU

OLNHÂľZHÂśUHJRLQJWRVODXJKWHU WKHVH JX\V WKH\ GRQÂśW NQRZ how   to   play   tennisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   and   then   after   singles   we   were   WLHG ´ :LWK D ÂżQDO VFRUH of   6-­3,   Albemarle   emerged   champions,   but   Michel   said   the  team  realized  â&#x20AC;&#x153;we  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   this  invincible  team,  we  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   just  breeze  through  wins.â&#x20AC;? For  most  teams  they  have,  

Photos  by  Katie  Pajewski

Photos  by  Katie  Pajewski

A   nearly   undefeated   sea-­ son,   with   just   two   losses,   and   the   boys   varsity   tennis   WHDP LV IHHOLQJ FRQÂżGHQW that   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   ready   for   their   Conference   tournaments   on   May   15,   16   and   19.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   a   pretty  good  team,â&#x20AC;?  junior  Sa-­ hil  Patel  said.

After   the   district   shifts   this   past   year,   the   team   has   been   experiencing   new   tal-­ ent  with  teams  they  have  not   played  in  the  past.  After  a  sig-­ QLÂżFDQW ZLQQLQJ VWUHDN VH-­ nior  and  captain  of  the  team   Joey   Michel   said   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ÂżUVWUHDOLW\FKHFNFDPHZKHQ they   played   Monticello   on   April   22.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   went   in   there  

Above:  Seniors  Jake  Brooks  and  Joey  Michel,  the  captains  of  the  team,  re-­ turn  serves  from  Louisa  on  April  24.  The  match  against  Louisa  resulted  in   a  Patriot  victory  with  a  score  of  9-­0.  Right:  Sophomore  Charlie  Shepherd   vigorously  returns  a  shot  from  the  Louisa  team  

it   seems,   with   scores   of   9-­0   GLIÂżFXOWIRUWKHWHDPWRJHWLQ in   matches   against   Fluvan-­ as  much  playing  time  as  they   ZRXOGOLNHEXW3DWHOLVFRQÂż-­ na,  Louisa  and  Monticello.   Western  Albemarle,  how-­ dent  the  team  has  improved   ever,   state   champions   for   regardless,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;we  ended  up  be-­ 2007,  2008,  2009  and  2012,   ing  good  pretty  fast.â&#x20AC;? Part   of   what   has   con-­ has   been   the   greatest   com-­ petitor  for  the  team.  In  their   tributed   to   their   ability   to   ÂżUVWPDWFKDJDLQVWWKH:DU-­ win   matches   is   the   sense   of   riors,   Albemarle   lost   4-­5,   community   that   has   devel-­ but   their   coach,   Chip   Grob-­ oped   throughout   the   year.   meyer,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;expected   them   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   all   hang   out   and   have   get   blown   out   of   the   waterâ&#x20AC;?   JRRGWLPHV:HMRNHDURXQG with   each   and   the   team   o t h e r , â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;really   came   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  this  invin-­ Patel   said.   through   with   four   wins,â&#x20AC;?   cible  team,  we  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  just   The  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ability   as   Michel  said.   a   whole   Their   sec-­ breeze  through  wins.â&#x20AC;? to   remain   ond   match,   on   May   6th   ~Joey  Michel confident   after  a  loss   was   more   devastating   with   a   loss   of   is   what   Michel   credited   as   2-­7,   but   Patel   says   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;we   one  of  its  greatest  assets.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   it   comes   to   being   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   get   too   down   on   our-­ selves.   Even   if   we   start   los-­ serious,â&#x20AC;?  Michel  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;we  do   ing,   we   continue   to   perse-­ WKHZRUNZHQHHGWRGR´7KH vere  and  play  hard.â&#x20AC;?  And  the   ZRUNWKH\ÂśYHGRQHPLJKWSD\ scores   agree,   with   their   fol-­ off   for   the   Patriots   in   their   tournaments   lowing   victories   over   Pow-­ Conference   hatan,  Monticello  and  Char-­ FRPLQJ XS WKLV ZHHN DQG WKHLU ÂżQJHUV DUH FURVVHG IRU lottesville. Three   matches   and   sev-­ their  success  at  play-­offs  and   eral  practices  were  cancelled   states   in   late   May   and   early   GXH WR ZHDWKHU PDNLQJ LW June. Photos  by  Katie  Pajewski

JULIA HARRISON


May 16, 2014

Sports

The Revolution 21

KIERAN RUNDLE Staff Correspondent The   girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   tennis   team   worked   their   way   through   their   new   opponents   in   the   Jefferson   District,   bringing   home   wins   against   teams   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  never  faced  before  and   a  5-­2  record. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All   our   opponents   save   Orange   are   new,   so   playing   them   there   are   a   lot   of   un-­ knowns   and   anxiety   about   what  talent  they  have,â&#x20AC;?  Coach   Richard   Lindsay   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   we  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  worry  about  that  and   instead  need  to  focus  on  our   side  of  the  net.    The  only  dis-­ tance  that  matters  are  the  six   inches  between  our  ears.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tennis  is  such  a  fun  sport   to   play.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   only   physi-­ cally  challenging  but  also  re-­ quires  a  lot  of  mental  tough-­ ness   and   intensity,â&#x20AC;?   junior   Madeline   Bruggeman   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  team  is  great  and  Coach   Lindsay  and  Coach  Lyons  are   truly  fantastic.â&#x20AC;? Balancing   late   night   and   weekend  practices  along  with   homework   and   other   extra-­ FXUULFXODUVFDQEHFRPHGLIÂż-­ cult,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;but  if  you  stay  on  top  of   it  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  too  too  bad,â&#x20AC;?  junior   Gaby  Balcells  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  biggest  challenge  we   face  is  the  unknowns.  Talent-­ wise   this   team   has   its   work   cut  out  for  it.    In  this  case  we   DUHDVNLQJSOD\HUVWRÂżOOSRVL-­ tions   where   they   are   not   yet   comfortable   and   it   is   a   chal-­ lenge,â&#x20AC;?  Lindsay  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   need   to   grow   up   fast   and   start   playing   to   our   po-­ tential   if   we   are   going   to   achieve   what   we   are   capable   of.     I   tell   them   all   the   time   that   it   is   not   the   wins   and   losses   that   really   matter,   it   is   the   effort   you   put   forth   in   preparing   for   and   pursuing   those  wins.â&#x20AC;? Lindsay  is  very  glad  about   the   switch   into   the   Jefferson   District,   with   closer   teams   they   can   develop   actual   ri-­ valries  with,  and  shorter  bus   rides   so   that   parents   and   friends   can   also   come   and   watch   the   matches.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Long   overdue,  there  is  no  compari-­ son.  This  is  way  better.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Playing   in   the   Jefferson   District  has  been  a  really  big   change.  Instead  of  a  two  and   a  half  hour  bus  ride  to  get  to   away  matches,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  about   30  minutes.  This  means  that   we  have  a  lot  less  time  to  bond   as  a  team,  and  we  get  home  a   lot  earlier  than  we  have  in  the   past,â&#x20AC;?  Bruggeman  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  never  played  most   of  these  teams  before,  so  it  is   a  new  experience.  We  go  into   most   matches   not   knowing   how  good  our  opponent  is,  as   opposed  to  last  year  when  we   had   played   the   same   teams   for  many  years.â&#x20AC;?   A   huge   challenge   that   the   team  has  faced  this  year  is  the   amount  of  injuries. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many  people  on  the  team   are   injured   and   that   causes   problems  with  the  lineup  and   with   who   is   able   to   play   be-­ cause   it   changes   constantly.â&#x20AC;?   Bruggeman  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Six   of   players   are   hurt   and   three   are   unable   to   play   in  matches.  Two  of  those  are   in  our  top  six  ladder  and  an-­ other   would   be   playing   in   that  top  six  with  the  injuries,â&#x20AC;?   Lindsay   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   played   against   Monticello   without   four   of   our   top   seven   play-­ ers.â&#x20AC;?   The  Patriots  lost  the  game,   4   to   5.   Injuries   and   all,   the   girls  have  been  working  hard   WRÂżOOWKHJDSRIODVW\HDUÂśVVH-­ niors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   lost   our   top   three   SOD\HUV VR ZH DUH GHÂżQLWHO\ weaker,â&#x20AC;?   Balcells   said,     â&#x20AC;&#x153;but   we  are  closer  than  we  were  in   past   years   so   that   has   made   up  for  the  loss.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   still   trying   to   get   a   hang   of   the   new   positions.   But,   for   the   most   part,   I   feel   like   we   are   displaying   good   talent  on  the  court  and  show-­ ing  the  other  teams  what  the   Patriots  are  made  of,â&#x20AC;?  senior   Molly  Napolitano  said. Senior   Kaitlyn   Grossman   is   the   top   ranked   player   on   the  team,  followed  by  sopho-­ more   Maddie   Williamson   and  Napolitano. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   the   hardest   part   about   being   a   leader   on   the   team   is   always   making   sure   your  actions  and  words  ben-­

Photos  by  Katie  Pajewski

Girls Varsity Tennis Is Kicking Ace

Sophomore  Maddie  Williamson  prepares  to  swing  in  a  match  against   Louisa. HÂżW WKH WHDP´ *URVVPDQ said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   always   being   watched  by  the  younger  girls,   and  it  is  important  to  always   be   setting   a   good   example.   I   try  to  focus  on  always  bring-­ ing  positive  energy  and  hard   work  to  each  and  every  prac-­ WLFHDQGPDWFKIRUWKHEHQHÂżW of  the  team.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   a   great   group   of   ninth   and   tenth   graders.     They  are  following  the  leader-­ ship   of   our   upperclassmen,â&#x20AC;?   Lindsay  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;  We  could  not   ask  much  more  from  our  se-­ niors   in   terms   of   how   they   go   about   things.     They   know   what   is   expected   and   set   a   good  example.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   love   my   teammates.   It   always   takes   a   little   bit   of   time   in   the   beginning   of   the   year   to   integrate   all   of   the   new   team   members   and   come  together  into  a  cohesive   unit,   but   I   think   we   are   on   our   way   to   become   a   united   team,â&#x20AC;?  Bruggeman  said. To  anyone  thinking  about   trying  out  for  tennis  in  future   years,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pick  up  a  racquet  now   and  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  stop  swinging  it  un-­ WLOWU\RXWVDQGPRVWGHÂżQLWH-­ ly   try   out!   [Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the]   best   de-­ cision   ever!â&#x20AC;?     senior   Ann   Yu   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coachman   rocks   and   so   do   the   girls   on   the   team!  

Sophomore  Leah  Lord  makes  an  overhand  swing   during  a  match  against  Louisa  on  April  24.  Lord   is  number  5  on  the  team.


22 The Revolution

Sports

May 16, 2014

Baseball Closes in on the Upcoming Postseason Staff Reporter   The   Patriots   started   off   the   season   with   a   shaky   4-­4   start   but   have   turned   it   around   by   winning   the   last   ÂżYHRIVL[JDPHV   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   struggled   with  

VHQLRUV  'XH WR WKH UHFHQW FKDQJH RI GLVWULFWV $OEHPDUOH KDV IDFHG ELJJHU DQG VWURQJHU JX\VWKDWKDYHQÂśWEHHQIDFHG EHIRUH DFFRUGLQJ WR VHQLRU 'UHZ6KLIĂ&#x20AC;HW  $PKHUVW KDV WKH EHVW SLWFKLQJ DORQJVLGH D VWURQJ EDWWLQJ FRUH DFFRUGLQJ WR

Photos courtesy of The Peer

ALEX LESLIE

Âł7KHUHLVDORWRIVNLOORQWKHWHDP EXWZHKDGQÂśWUHDOO\ZRUNHGDVD VLQJOHXQLWXQWLORXUODVWWZRJDPHV´ a-XQLRU.HYLQ%URPEHUJHU EHLQJ D WHDP´ MXQLRU .HYLQ %URPEHUJHUVDLGÂł7KHUHLVD ORW RI VNLOO RQ WKH WHDP EXW we  hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  worked  as  a   single  unit  until  our  last  two   JDPHV´  7KLV \HDUÂśV WHDP IHD-­ WXUHV PXOWLSOH VRSKR-­ PRUHV LQ SLWFKHU 1LF 3DU-­ VRQV ÂżUVW EDVHPDQ -DFRE 1DVK DQG RXWÂżHOGHU 4XLQQ *LEVRQ7KH\RXQJWHDPKDV UHERXQGHG TXLFNO\ DQG DUH FXUUHQWO\IRFXVHGRQWKHXS-­ FRPLQJSRVWVHDVRQ  7KH\RXQJWHDPVWUXJJOHG in   the   beginning   but   have   found   their   stride   with   the   KHOSRIWKHPRUHH[SHULHQFHG

1DVK   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   hard   to   tell   at   this   SRLQW´ %URPEHUJHU VDLG Âł%XW ,I ZH VWDUW DFWLQJ DQG SOD\LQJ OLNH D IDPLO\ ZH KDYH D FKDQFH WR ZLQ VRPH SRVWVHDVRQJDPHV´   The   Pats   have   three   JDPHV UHPDLQLQJ WKLV VHD-­ VRQDWKRPHDJDLQVW)OXYDQ-­ na   and   Harrisonburg   and   WKHQ WKH\ ÂżQLVK WKH UHJXODU VHDVRQDZD\WR/RXLVD  Âł:H MXVW QHHG WR WDNH LW RQH JDPH DW D WLPH´ 1DVK VDLG   Playoffs   begin   with   the   &RQIHUHQFH7RXUQDPHQWEH-­ JLQQLQJ0D\

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BY THE NUMBERS

51- total runs scored this year 3.6- runs per game 43- runs scored in last six games 20- runs allowed in last six games

Stats as of May 13

&RDFK&DWK\&RIIPDQDQGWKHPHQVÂśTXDGURZLQJ WHDPPDGHXSRIVHQLRUV0DWWKHZ'HDQ*DHOHQ 5LFNDUG0DVRQ/DQGRQ6PLWKDQG*DEH*LD FDORQHFHOHEUDWHWKHLUZLQRQ0D\

Where in the school? Photo  by  Bailey  Bush

Photo by Humphrey Liu

Rowing Repeats State Win

%HWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSHUVRQ to come to room 207 with the DQVZHUWRZLQD prize!


May 16, 2014

Sports

The Revolution 23

MELANIE ARTHUR

Photos  by  Katie  Pajewski

Softball Meets Adversity with Teamwork head  coach  with  an  intent  to   HVWDEOLVKDPRUHXQLÂżHGDQG positive   softball   team.   By   On   April   21,   the   Varsity   implementing  his  sports  phi-­ Softball  team  was  up  4-­2  go-­ losophies,  Scott  has  strongly   ing   into   the   bottom   half   of   HPSKDVL]HGDWHDPÂżUVWDWWL-­ the  seventh  inning  in  a  game   tude  for  all  players. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  individuals.   against   Monticello.   Then,   the   team   made   three   mis-­ I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   want   groups.   This   is   a   team   sport,   so   we   need   to   takes  in  a  row. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   what   cost   us   the   play   as   a   team   and   act   as   a   game,   because   we   had   op-­ team,â&#x20AC;?   Scott   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   portunities   to   help   push   us   about   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best   for   you,   forward   a   little   more.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  about  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  best  for  Al-­ just   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   what   you   always   bemarle  softball.â&#x20AC;? Senior   pitcher   Em-­ remember:  those  last  inning   things.  You  never  remember   ily   McAllister   mentions   that   ZKDWKDSSHQHGLQWKHÂżUVWRU there  is  a  stronger  focus  and   second  inning,â&#x20AC;?  varsity  head   concentration   on   character   this   season.   Through   a   pro-­ coach  Charlie  Scott  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   big   saying   now   is   gram   called   Character   Cur-­ Senior  pitcher  Emily  McAllister  trots  home  for  one  of  Albemarleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  14  runs   riculum  that  Varsity  Softball   in  a  blowout  win  over  Western  Albemarle  14-­4  on  April  11. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;move  on.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? With   a   record   of   5-­9   at   Assistant   Coach,   Sue   Vida-­ press   time,   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   soft-­ no,  brought  to  the  team  this   program]   makes   them   stop   around  a  little  bit,  [so  that]  it   learn   what   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   be   ball   team   has   faced   an   up   season,   each   player   keeps   and   think   about   more   than   ÂżWVRXUQHHGVDVDWHDPPRUH like,   and   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   trying   to   give   and   down   season   against   a   a   binder   with   motivational   just   softball,   and   more   than   so   than   what   they   would   them   a   small   taste   of   that,â&#x20AC;?   variety   of   competition   lev-­ articles   and   sayings   to   in-­ just  being  a  talented  softball   prefer,â&#x20AC;?   Scott   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   know   Scott  said.     Overall,   Scott   is   proud   of   els  throughout  the  Jefferson   spire   them.   The   team   also   player.â&#x20AC;?   there   are   some   athletes   on   conducts   group   discussions   the   individual   commitment   District. of   each   player   and   the   sup-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   reversed   roles   on   traits   such   as   energy,   at-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  individuals,  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want   port   they   have   for   one   an-­ since   last   year,â&#x20AC;?   Scott   said.   titude,  and  effort.   JURXSV7KLVLVDWHDPVSRUWVRZH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   word   we   focus   other.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  only  as  strong   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last   year   our   bread   and   as   our   weakest   link.   I   know   butter   was   defense.   We   on   each   week,â&#x20AC;?   McAllister   need  to  play  as  a  team  and  act  as  a   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   an   old   clichĂŠ,   but   our   played  solid  defense  all  year   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then   at   the   end   of   team.â&#x20AC;? team   is   only   going   to   be   as   ORQJ7KLV\HDULWÂśVVRUWRIĂ&#x20AC;LS each   week,   the   coaches   se-­ as   our   weakest   play-­ Ă&#x20AC;RSSHG :HÂśUH VFRULQJ ORWV lect  a  person  who  best  dem-­ ~  Head  Coach  Charlie  Scott strong   er,   and   if   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   help   her   of  runs,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  hitting  the  ball   onstrated   the   trait   of   that   to  build  her  skills,  and  if  the   very   well,   our   batting   aver-­ week  and  they  get  a  charac-­ age  right  now  is  up  110  or  115   ter  award.â&#x20AC;? Other  changes  this  season   the   team   who   would   rather   best   player   we   have   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   The   program   is   not   only   include   new   practice   uni-­ be   in   other   places,   but   they   continue   to   build   her   skills,   points  from  last  year,  but  our   GHIHQVLYH ÂżHOGLQJ SHUFHQW-­ meant   to   teach   athletes   a   forms,   more   dedicated   lift-­ ÂżW WKH PROG RI $OEHPDUOH and   nobody   pushes   her,   good   lesson,   but   get   them   ing  time  in  the  weight  room   softball   better   with   where   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   fall   down   to   age  is  way  down.â&#x20AC;? After   four   seasons   of   as-­ thinking   about   life.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;High   and   a   different   team   struc-­ they  are  right  now,  and  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   the   middle.   Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   got   sistant   coaching   the   Varsity   school  kids  get  caught  up  in   ture.   working  on  the   understand-­ to   push   everybody   no   mat-­ ter   if   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   the   best   or   the   team,  Scott  has  moved  up  to   so  much,â&#x20AC;?  Vidano  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  moved  some  players   ing  of  that.â&#x20AC;? McAllister   recognizes,   worst,â&#x20AC;?  Scott  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone   is   encourag-­ and  loves,  the  challenges  she   comes   across   in   softball.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   ing  but  also  honest  with  each   think   a   lot   of   people   under-­ other   and   I   think   we   really   estimate   how   hard   it   is   to   try   to   help   each   other   out.   play   softball   because   they   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   also   had   some   huge   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   understand   how   tech-­ hits   and   incredible   plays   nical   the   game   is   and   how   that  make  me  proud  to  play   much   thinking   is   involved,â&#x20AC;?   on   the   Albemarle   softball   team,â&#x20AC;?  McAllister  said.   McAllister  said.   As   far   as   the   rest   of   the   Scott   sees   his   methods   of   coaching   and   the   charac-­ season,   the   team   aims   to   ter   program   to   expose   play-­ continue   their   positive   ers   to   softball   at   the   college   streak   into   the   Conference   level.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   is   not   a   college   Tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every   winâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   great   win,   program   by   any   stretch   of   the  imagination.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  try-­ no  matter  if  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  15-­nothing   ing   to   make   it   be   like   one.   or   a   1-­nothing.   You   had   to   -XQLRUÂżUVWEDVHPDQ3DLJH6KHOHUVWUHWFKHVWRVQDJDEDOOLQWKHUXQ But   if   they   want   to   play   at   do  something  right  to  get  to   route  of  the  Warriors the   next   level   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   to   that  point,â&#x20AC;?  Scott  said.

Managing Editor


The Revolution 24

Features

May 16, 2014

SoundLQJ&RQÀGHQW Musical Shows Rewards of Hard Work Photo  by  Terri  Marsh

E. EDWARDS Staff Reporter “There   won’t   be   a   single   dry   eye   in   the   house,”   ju-­ nior  Joey  Wharton  predicted   about   the   May   1-­4   perfor-­ mances   of   “The   Sound   of   Music.”   Based   on   a   true   story,   “The   Sound   of   Music”   tells   the  story  of  young  nun,  Ma-­ ria,   who   goes   to   work   for   Captain  Von  Trapp  as  a  gov-­ erness  to  his  seven  children.   Maria   teaches   the   children   to   sing   while   romance   blos-­ soms   between   she   and   the   Captain;;   meanwhile,   the   Nazis   are   beginning   to   seize   control   of   Austria   and   wish   to  enlist  Captain  Von  Trapp.   The   musical   highlights   love,   patriotism  and  bravery. While   students   rejoiced   in  snow  days  this  winter,    the   cast   and   crew   had   less   time   to  rehearse  for  the  musical. “We’ve   had   about   three   weeks  of  lost  time,”  director   Fay  Cunningham  said,  “Two   weeks   from   snow   days   and  

Captain  Von  Trapp  (junior  Aaron  Hoffman)   sings  “The  Sound  of  Music”  with  Maria  (junior   Olivia  Whicheloe)  after  he  returns  from  his  trip.   one  from  SETC.  (South  East   Theater  Conference).”   While   these   days   may   KDYH FUHDWHG VRPH GLI¿FXOW\ towards   play   production,   those   putting   on   the   show   DUH VWLOO FRQ¿GHQW LQ SHUIRU-­ mance.   “I’ve   tinkered   and   toyed   with   doing   this   musical   for   about   25   years,”   Cunning-­ ham  said. One   challenge   with   put-­ ting   on   the   show   is   that   the  

casting   calls   for   children   who   look   young   enough   to   play  5,  7,  and  9  year  olds.   “It   was   different.   It   was   very   odd   to   adjusting   to   having   little   children   run-­ ning   around,”   junior   Olivia   Whichelo   said.   “We   had   to   have  a  babysitter  for  them.” “I   was   really   impressed   with   the   focus   the   kids   brought,   though.   They   did   a   fantastic   job,”   Whicheloe   said.

While   the   director’s   en-­ thusiasm   is   key,   excitement   from   the   players   is   equally   as   important.   The   actors   are  determined  to  make  this   performance  a  good  one. “We   do   a   lot   of   things   to   prepare   ourselves,   like   we’ll   watch   the   movie   adaptation   to  get  an  idea,  and  we’ll  just   sit  and  get  in  the  mindset  of   our   characters,”   Wharton   explained. Besides   creating   a   char-­ acter,   students   participating   in   the   show   have   to   learn   to   balance   their   homework   with  many  hours  of  rehersal   time. “You   just   have   to   set   time  aside  to  do  your  work,”   Whicheloe  said.  “Late  nights   are  part  of  schedule—you  get   into  a  routine.  Your  body  be-­ comes  immune  to  staying  up   until  1.” “It   can   only   really   affect   your   education   if   you   allow   it   to,   though,”   junior   Aaron   Hoffman  added.  “It’s  a  little   more  work,  you  just  have  to   be  smart  about  it.”

BY THE

NUMBERS

177

costumes

132

cast, crew, and pit members

52

parent volunteers

135 minimum total hours of rehearsal time per cast member

Photo  courtesy  of  Katie  Pajewski

Junior  Olivia  Whiche-­ loe,  playing  Maria   Rainer,  sings  “Do-­ Re-­Mi”  with  the  von   Trapp  children,  played   by  (L-­R)  Anya  Roth-­ man,  sophormore  Sara   Madison  Gildersleeve-­ Price,  Sarah  Beiter,   freshman  Doug  Ku-­ low,  junior  Stephanie   Owen,  Landon  Duval   and  freshman  An-­ nalise  Livingston.  “I   like  ‘Do-­Rei-­Mi.’  It’s   KHU¿UVWUHDOPRPHQW alone  with  the  kids,”   Whicheloe  said.  “It’s   her  way  of  saying  ‘hi’   and  ‘this  is  who  I  am’   and  I’m  not  going  to   change  who  I  am.  I   want  to  see  what  I  can   do  to  change  you  to   make  you  happier.”


Revolution 5/16/14