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RECENT WORK ALAN HOTCHKISS RECENT WORK ALAN HOTCHKISS


Projects Commercial

XYZ Talent Agency (2010)

Cultural/Civic

ARTIC High-Speed Rail Station (2011) Bosque del Apache Nature Center (2006) MacArthur Park Community Center (2009)

Residential

Private Residence/Observatory (2006) UCSB Equestrian Student Dormitories (2007)

Urban Design/Planning

Shanghai World Expo Redevelopment (2010)

Miscellaneous/Competitions Solar Pavilion (2010) House of Red & White (2010)


XYZ Talent Agency Fall 2010

This eight week project was to design a combination Talent Agency, Health Club and Night Club on Hollywood’s Sunset Strip. My main interest in this project was the surface, and how one single, continuous building skin could become façade, floor, ceiling, and program. Perforations in this skin varied depending on programmatic use. For example, private areas such as talent agency offices, had smaller openings, while the night club had the largest. The skin was also broken into two halves. The northern, which faces Sunset Boulevard, was a high-def digital display, showcasing the latest productions involving talent hired by the agency. This pulsating display weaved into the building on the 13th storey to become the floor and ceiling of the nightclub. On the other side, the southern skin was a space frame and green wall. Seen from the city, this caused the building to “disappear” into the landscape of Hollywood Hills... A type of urban camouflage. This green skin weaved in at the 18th floor, becoming the floor and ceiling for the spa/health club. The building was open to the east and west, allowing drivers and pedestrians on Sunset Boulevard to get an unobstructed glimpse of the inner workings of each of the programs.

Location: Los Angeles California

Site Area:

20 000 ft² / 1860 m²

Building Area:

100 000 ft² / 9300 m²

Program:

Offices, Screening Room, Health Club, Night Club, Retail, Public Space


Unfolded Surface North Elevation


Unfolded Surface South Elevation


View from East Morning


XYZ Talent

Downtown LA

Visibility Study

From the Getty Center

Century City


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Ground Floor/Lobby 1/16“ = 1’ - 0”


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Typical Office Floor 1/16“ = 1’ - 0”

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R O O FL G N BY TI B EE LO M

VE M TI OO CU R E G EX TIN EE M

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Executive Floor 1/16“ = 1’ - 0”

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UP


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Health Club/Spa 1/16“ = 1’ - 0”

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North Elevation 1/32“ = 1’ - 0”


South Elevation 1/32“ = 1’ - 0”


East-West Section 1/32“ = 1’ - 0”


Green Wall/ South Façade

Office/Lobby

Balcony

Wall Section 1/4“ = 1’ - 0”


Western Elevation 1/32“ = 1’ - 0”


North-South Section 1/32“ = 1’ - 0”


Urban Concept Diagram Billboard Study


View from West Evening


ARTIC High-Speed Rail Station Spring 2011

Part of a new transit plan, the Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center (ARTIC) is planned to serve as the southern hub for a new high-speed train, connecting cities throughout California. This project was done in collaboration with Jihoon Kim and Hyunsoo Ha, and aimed to explore the concepts of emergent and non-linear design, along with our professors Roland Snooks and Greg Otto. After studying several space-frame precedents, we started off designing a single component that could aggregate in different ways. This “agent” evolved through many different generations. At the same time, we used a scripting program called Processing as a digital counterpart, allowing us to quickly combine many generations of components, and test the results. After developing a process for aggregating our components, we used it to develop a complete structure for our building. After our site and program analysis, we decided to raise the high-speed platform up above the rest of the station. This way we could place the concourse in between the Amtrak (below) and high-speed (above) platforms, to allow for easy transitions. We also included a monorail to connect the station to Angel Stadium, the Honda Center, and other attractions around Anaheim.

Location: Anaheim California

Site Area:

50 000 ft² / 4650 m²

Building Area:

80 000 ft² / 7430 m²

Program:

High-Speed train platforms, Amtrak platforms, monorail platforms, ticketing, offices, waiting areas


Interior Rendering, on the Concourse


Physical Component Evolution

Joint

Magnet

Generation 01

Generation 02

Generation 03


Metal

Flexible Magnet

Generation 04

Generation 05

Generation 06


Screenshot of running script, in Processing


3D printed physical model of script-generated aggregation


Direct Short Distance

Local Connections

Extend River and Create Urban Park

Direct Short Distance

Long Distance Connections

Regional Connections

Formal Concept

Direct Local Distance

Structural Concept

Urban Concept

Honda Stadium

Long Distance

Short Distance

Pedestrian & Bicycle Approach Local Approach

Existing Station

Pedestrian Approach

Local Approach

Angel Stadium

Local Distance

Site Analysis

Vehicular Circulation

Pedestrian Circulation


Surface

Structure

4th Floor

3rd Floor

2nd floor

Layout Diagram 1st Floor


Generation 01

Generation 02

Generation 03

Primary Structure

Secondary Structure

Skin

Structural Concept

A space frame-like aggregation of different-sized similar components, interlocking to create a skeleton for the concourse, platforms, and skin


Outline Curves

Control Curves

Aggregation

Aggregated Skin

Smooth Membrane

Skin Concept

Contrasting skins, including opaque (tensile membrane), filtered (dense aggregations of small components) and transparent (glass walls providing selective views)


Site Model Looking South 1:3000 Scale


Site Model Plan View 1:3000 Scale


Site Model Looking West 1:1000 Scale


Vehicular Drop-Off

Parking

Amtrak/Local Rail Platforms

Ground Floor - Amtrak Platform Scale: 1:2000


Monorail Platform

Main Waiting Area

Main Concourse

Highway Drop-Off

Second Floor - Main Concourse Scale: 1:2000


(Open to Below)

High Speed Platform

Third Floor - High-Speed Platform Scale: 1:2000


Offices (Open to Below)

Fourth Floor - Offices Scale: 1:2000


Section Detail Rendering Aggregation Side


Section Detail Rendering Membrane Side


3D Printed Detail Model


Component Light Fixture Detail Rendering

Slab Edge Detail Rendering


Night Rendering Looking North


Bosque del Apache Nature Center Spring 2007

A nature conservation area located in central New Mexico, Bosque del Apache is an important area for many species of migratory birds. This project focused on creating a visitor center for the area, which would include a small bookstore, ranger station, and viewing platforms. A vertical orientation was chosen for the building, in order to give visitors multiple vantage points for viewing birds across the shallow lake, both up close and distant. Two concrete slabs provided the main vertical structure, with cables supporting the entrance bridge and the viewing bridge. Recycled wood cladding was used for the façade to help it blend into the natural environment from the vantage point of the lake, while the concrete slabs gave it a more solid appearance from the road. With its footprint concentrated to the concrete slabs, it seems to float over the lake.

Location: Socorro New Mexico

Site Area:

22 000 ft² / 2050 m²

Building Area:

2000 ft² / 185 m²

Program:

Ranger station, visitor center, bookstore, viewing area


Southern View


Northeastern View


Eastern Elevation 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


Southern Elevation 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


MacArthur Park Community Center Fall 2009

After an intensive study or Wilshire Boulevard and the various neighborhoods along it, MacArthur Park was chosen as the site for a community center and city councilor offices. The program also included a station incorporating Los Angeles Metro’s BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) Line 720. The primary goal was to create a center for the community to use to the fullest. With this in mind, a large community room was designed (including a kitchenette) that could be used for neighborhood meetings, as well as rented out for other functions such as wedding receptions, birthdays, and quiceañeras. Following those design considerations, I choose a large bus station located below the assembly room, in order to accommodate the large number of people using line 720, the busiest line in Los Angeles. A large ramp takes visitors from the lobby, past the offices, and up to the auditorium. This gives a sense of ritual and importance, as well as a view of the councilors’ office, creating a sense of responsibility and accountability to those working there.

Location: Los Angeles California

Site Area:

10 000 ft² / 930 m²

Building Area:

7000 ft² / 650 m²

Program:

Community Meeting/ Multi-purpose Room, Offices, Bus Shelter


Southwestern View


Parti

Circulation

East/West Structure

Ramp Structure


Upper Floor Plan 1/16” = 1’-0”


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ling

Bur Ground Floor Plan 1/16” = 1’-0”

Wil shir eB lvd .


Photovoltaic Panels Weather Membrane Concrete Slab Metal Deck I-Beam

Ceiling Frame HVAC Ductwork Acoustic Panel Cor-Ten Panel C-Channel Weather Membrane Rigid Insulation Backing Plate Column Gypsum Board/ Interior Finish

Concrete Slab Metal Deck I-Beam Flashing Cor-Ten Panel Column

Wall Section 1/4“ = 1’ - 0”


East Elevation

(from Parking Entrance)

South Elevation

(from Wilshire Boulevard)


Transverse Section (through Main Lobby)

Longitudinal Section

(through Kitchenette, Auditorium, Main Lobby)


Transverse Section

(through Ramp, Courtyard, Balcony)

Longitudinal Section

(through Kitchenette, Auditorium Lobby, Ramp, Main Lobby)


Transverse Section

(through Auditorium Lobby, Auditorium)

Longitudinal Section

(through Auditorium, Courtyard, Offices, Main Lobby, Restrooms)


Private Residence/Observatory Fall 2006

This project from my first semester of Undergraduate study was to design a private residence for an eccentric astronomer. The site was set in the mountains of New Mexico, far from light pollution, and was strictly constrained to a 30’ x 30’ x 60’ envelope, with two extensions of 5’ x 15’.

Location:

The program included a living area, dining area and kitchen, sleeping area, and observatory areas. The main design strategy was to use the two extensions entirely for the stairs, and completely free up the rest of the space. This allowed maximum use of the first floor for the living area, followed by the dining area, bedroom, and the open observatory on the roof.

11 000 ft² / 1020 m²

The exterior was clad in lightweight concrete panels, blocking most light except for several small apertures, arrayed as constellations.

Building Area:

Jemez Mountains New Mexico

Site Area:

3000 ft² / 275 m²

Program:

Residence, observatory


North Elevation 1/16” = 1’ - 0”

Second & Third Floor Plans 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


Entrance View with Topography


Southwest View

Northeast View


Night View from Southeast


UCSB Equestrian Student Dormitories Spring 2008

For the “Leading Edge“ competition, Daniel Gonzales and I collaborated to design a dormitory complex to house the UCSB equestrian team. The building was to be completely off the grid, and use passive heating and cooling techniques. The layout was based on two conceptual ideas. First, that of a earthquake, that could shape an otherwise orthagonal building. Secondly, the power of a horse, closely related to the unbridled power of a earthquake. Three curved mass walls based on these principles acted as wind scoops to provide passive cooling, as well as vertical louvers facing the west to provide shade. Each dormitory was also provided with a balcony overlooking the ocean, both to provide a view and take advantage of Santa Barbara’s excellent climate.

Location: Santa Barbara California

Site Area:

1500 ft² / 140 m²

Building Area:

5000 ft² / 465 m²

Program:

Dormitories, Common areas, Horse Tackrooms


Site

Site Plan - USCB Equestrian Grounds 1/64” = 1’ - 0”


Ground Floor 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


Second Floor 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


Third Floor 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


Fourth Floor 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


Devereaux Lagoon

Plaza

Transverse Section 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


Longitudinal Section 1/16” = 1’ - 0”


Fragmented Urbanism - Shanghai World Expo Summer 2010

Each summer, the University of Southern California and Tongji University host the American Academy in China (AAC), a six-week-long studio aimed at providing students with first hand contact with China’s culture and history. The topic of the 2010 studio was to create a master plan for the site of the 2010 World Expo held in Shanghai. The studio included weekly site visits and daily workshops at MADA s.p.a.m. offices, with the purpose of creating an algorithmic tool for master planning the site. The cross-university team for this project consisted of Jared Shier (USC), Shi Bingjie (Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing), Johnny Wang (University of Edinburgh), Song Xiaoyu (Tongji University), and myself. Over the course of four weeks, we created a set of algorithms used to determine parcel value, land use, and Floor-toArea ratio (FAR). The non-linear process we developed could instantly respond to changes and needs on both a local and global system level. This process was then applied to the entire 25 km² Expo site to develop a master plan proposal and presented to the Shanghai Urban Development Agency at the final review.

Location: Shanghai China

Site Area:

~10 miles² / 2600 hectares

Program:

Housing, Commercial Zones, Green Space, Cultural Centers, Mixed -use neighborhoods, Infill Programming


Planning Algorithms Phase 1

1.1 Existing block structure

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1.3 Minor Lines Offset

1.4 Line Mediation

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1.5 Major and Minor Lines

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Phase 2 1

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1

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1

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2.1 One Node at Intersection

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2.2 Developed and Open Space Values

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Nodes for Entire Site

2.3 Node Value from Adjacent Spaces

2.4 Node Value in Larger Context

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Phase 3 2.4 2.4

Parcel Value < (# Nodes) x (8) = Residential Parcel Value ≥ (# Nodes) x (8) = Mixed-use Parcel Next to Elevated Walkway = Commercial

2.3

31% 15% 21% 33% 100%

0

22

3.3

4.3

4.4 3.8

3.8 3.9

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2.9

4.5

(FAR min )( Asite) # Bldgs = ( Abldg)

Mixed-Use

Residential Commercial

1.5

4

5.3 5.5

4

4.5 2.3

3.8 4.3

2.6

4.3

3.6

3

4.3 4

3.5

6.6

3.3

2.9

2.8

4.3

3.2

4.6

3.8 4.3 4.6 2.7 2.2

2.4

3.4

3.3

3 3.4

2.7 3.5

4

3.4

6.6 4.6

3.3

3.8 4.1

4.1

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3 3.5

4.3

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4.1 2.8

4.2

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2.8

3.3 FAR Calculation for Site

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2.8 3.4

2.4 3.3

4.5

4.6

3.9

FAR (Floor to Area) Equations

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3.6

(H floor )( FAR min )( Asite) height = (# Bldgs)( A floor)

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3.2 Program Use, Based on Space Values

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4.9

Mixed-Use

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4.8 3.8

4.4

4.6 3.3

Residential Commercial

3.1 Density Map for Site

5.1

3.3 2.8 4.9 3.2 1.3

3.9

39

5

2.5

5.4

4.9

2.8 4.3

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5.9 7.1 3.3

4.5 4.1

FAR = Area / (8 x # Parcels) 10

2.7

2.3

# Parcels Percentage 108 53 74 117 353

4 4.9

4.6

2.6

Residential Commercial Mixed-Use Open Space/Monument Total

4.4

3.2

2.8

Total

2.9 2.1

v FAR = q ´ (# Parcels )

NODE VALUE = 8

3.4

3.8

4.1

3.8

2.8


1.6 Elevated Walkway

1.7 Walkway as Major Line

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1.8 Final Lines

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Lines on the Entire Site

Developed space, open space, and landmarks

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Node Values for Entire Site

Parcel Values for Entire Site

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Resulting FAR Diagrams

Site Density Diagram

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0 19 20 0 0 0 21 26 0 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 39 27 26 0 33 32 0 0 0 0 0 28 27 36 0 0 34 32 36 0 0 0 33260 2624 30 0 053 0 52 0 0 37 0 22 18 30 0 43 0 0 0 0 0 34 62 0 0 30 0 55 37 0 24 36 38 0 32 34 22 18 22 0 30 25 0 14 21 28 0 32 32 0 33 34 30 0 12 27 24 0 30 0 0 34 26 26 0 20 22 27 0 32 24 21 24 0 0 0 33 0 22 24 16 0 30 0 24 0 0 30 28 20 0 0 33 0 36 36 14 14 27 0 19 24 26 6 6 0 4 22 21 6 0 18 6 30 4 0 25 22 34

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2.4 Node Values from Surrounding Spaces

6 6 6

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8 8

8

8

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6 8 6

5 6

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Parcel Value = 1 x ( 4 + 6 + 9 + 9 )

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9

8

6

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Rendering Overall Expo Site


Proposal for Post-Expo Use


Site During the World Expo


Solar Pavilion 2010

The intent of this short, two-week study was to design a pavilion, for an undefined purpose, which would be reactive to the sun, either statically or dynamically. Thinking that a static structure could be more challenging, I chose to do this. After researching the sun patterns and climate of Los Angeles, I first varied the perforations in the sides and top of the pavilion to give maximum shade during the summer and maximum sunlight during the winter. Rather than changing the number of holes to increase or decrease density, I changed the size of the perforations. This allowed some of them to run into each other, creating an interesting space frame out of the wall. I then put lenses into each aperture, which would simultaneously filter the sunlight and create different refracted light patterns inside the pavilion depending on the time of year.

Location: Los Angeles California

Site Area: 800 ft² / 75 m²

Building Area:

800 ft² / 75 m²

Program:

Pavilion


South Elevation

Southwestern View


Shadow Studies

Vernal Equinox

Summer Solstice

Fall Equinox

Winter Solstice


House of Red & White

Competition (Finalist)

2010

The House of Red and White was a competition done in conjunction with Fenty Muliadi and Lance Hirai. The program was a memorial in Poland to commemorate a massacre in the Katyn Forest during World War II. Our team was a finalist in the competition. With a sloping site terrain, the memorial becomes partially concealed within the landscape. This allows the structure to be slowly uncovered, just as the victims of the massacre. The undulating wooden surfaces symbolically express the chaos of the massacre. However, order is established through the introduction of the viewing platforms, which provides stability within interior. Confining this balance between chaos and order is the pure geometry of the cube. The materials chosen for the monument represent the element of time. The exterior steel shell will rust over time, and the wood pieces will eventually rot away, but the plastic pieces with the names of the victims will remain forever, as a monument to their memory.

Location: Katyn Forest Poland

Site Area: Undefined

Building Area:

900 ft² / 85 m²

Program:

Memorial


Interior View with Name Stones


B

A

A

B

Plan


Longitudinal Section


Latitudinal Section



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