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Brand - Kennedy House The History of a Town House 124-128 Constitution Street Lexington, Kentucky Relocated 1983 112-114 Constitution Street Lexington, Kentucky

AUTHOR Angelene J Hoffert

December 2010


The Brand Kennedy House is a two-unit town house built in 1813 by James W Brand and Matthew Kennedy. The duplex is two and one-half stories in height, 4 bays in width and two rooms deep. It is constructed of timber frame with brick in-fill and wooden cladding. The residence is an excellent example of early construction methods from the settlement of the town of Lexington, Kentucky. The town house is currently located at 112 & 114 Constitution Street, having been relocated from 124 & 128 Constitution Street in 1983. The site was a part of 'out-lot #10,' an original out-lot appearing on the plat drawn at the incorporation of Lexington in 1776. Since the founding of Lexington, the house has played an important part in the development of the neighborhood and community of Constitution Street. Built by the owners of out-lot #10, Brand and Kennedy, the house was the first residence built on Constitution Street, a street developed by the same builders. Bounded by Mulberry Street (North Limestone Street) to the north, Walnut Street (North Martin Luther King Boulevard) to the south, Templeman Alley to the east and Noble Street in the west; out-lot #10 consisted of four and one-half acres of land. Residential lots were divided from the out-lot to create a neighborhood for the working middle-class residents of Lexington; the majority of these lots had fifty feet fronting Constitution Street and ran one hundred feet deep to an alley, with which they had service. At the time Lexington was platted, out-lot #10 was located to the northwest of the city’s major commercial center. As Lexington grew, additional commercial and industrial industries developed in close proximity to out-lot #10. At its development in the first quarter of nineteenth century, out-lot #10 was located in close proximity to the commercial center of Lexington. Today, the Brand-Kennedy House is a major contributor to the Constitution Street Historic District which includes out-lot #10 and adjacent out-lots. The majority of residences built on Constitution Street were constructed after the mid-nineteenth century with in-fill dating to the early twentieth century. Architectural styles of the district include Federal, Greek Revival, Italianate, Eastlake, late-Richardsonian and Neo-Classical.1 The town house was home to a variety of individuals throughout its history, many of whom were affluent Lexington citizens: Mrs. M A Holley, wife of Transylvania University president, Dr Horace Holley; Dr David J Ayres, a general practice doctor who resided and kept office in the town house; Henry H Timberlake, son-in-law of James W Brand and a prominent citizen, noted as director of the Lexington Fire and Life Insurance Company and merchant; and Matthew Kennedy, the first architect of Lexington, who lived and kept office in the town house for the early years of his career. After the turn of the nineteenth century the Brand Kennedy House changed from a two-unit town house to a four unit apartment complex becoming home to countless individuals and families. Between the end of the nineteenth century and end of the twentieth, the occupants represented the working class-demographics of Lexington, being merchants, carpenters, carriage makers, craftsmen, butchers, tailors, and a variety of other skilled occupations. After decades as a apartment building the Brand-Kennedy was restored to its original twounit town house configuration between 1983 and 1990. 1

NPS, US Department of Interior Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, National Register for Historic Places Inventory-Nomination Form. Constitution Street Historic District Nomination, Lexington Kentucky. 10 Feb 1982. INTRODUCTION

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Origins Lexington’s settlement began in the early months of 1775. At this time, both the town and the territory, that would later become Kentucky, were located within the Commonwealth of Virginia; Kentucky would not become its own Commonwealth until 1792. The initial founders hailed from the surrounding colonies and created a diverse array of settlers. Settlers gathered tracks of land through military warrants to form the town of Lexington; by 1776, they had accumulated 710 acres. An act by the Virginia Assembly on May 6th of 1779 established the city officially.1 In January of 1780, the settlers signed the 'citizens compact' with the conditions that the town was to be laid off in eighty-seven 'in-lots' of one-half acre each, and sixty-eight 'out-lots' of five acres.2 Lots were awarded by a lottery to every man over the age of twenty, who had been a resident of Lexington for a minimum of 6 months, or had planted a crop of corn in the previous year. Each male resident was entitled to one in-lot and one out-lot, with the condition of the in-lot being cleared of timber by June 1st of the following year.3 Because some lots were not settled within the designated time, the town of Lexington redistributed the lots through an additional drawing. In 1791, the town of Lexington granted out-lot #10 to William Henry on the May 7th. William Henry then conveyed out-lot #10 to John W Hunt on November 29th of 1803 for the sum of two hundred pounds.4 In 1813, March 24th, John W Hunt conveyed out-lot #10 to James W Brand and Matthew Kennedy, both of Lexington, for the sum of $6,000.5 Out-lot #10, a tract of land comprised of 4.5 acres, appears to have been purchased by Brand and Kennedy to divide the land into smaller lots for development and sale, and to retain a portion for each of their personal needs and to build permanent personal residential structures. A Partnership Ensues Matthew Kennedy and James W Brand were business partners, not only in the sale and development of land, but as house-joiners. On March 14th, 1812 Matthew Kennedy placed an advertisement announcing his return to Lexington and his partnership with James W Brand, in the profession of 'House Carpenter & Joiner.'

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Matthew Kennedy was born in Augusta County of Virginia in 1781. He later moved

to Kentucky in 1796 and became known as the first classical architect of Lexington.7 James W Brand is noted as a son/relative of a prominent family of Lexington.8

Kennedy would spend most of his

professional career in Lexington, building some of the most notable structures in the area. It is unknown how the partnership of Brand and Kennedy was formed, but this announcement makes clear both intended to pursue a profession as 'House Carpenter & Joiner.'

1

Robertson, James R. Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky, page 60. Illustration title, Town Bounds of Lexington, 1791. Refer to section Supplementary Information. 3 Staples, page 9-10. 4 Fayette Circuit Court Deed Book A, page 225. 5 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book G, page 384. 6 Kentucky Gazette. Dated August 18th, 1812, pp 3, col 5. 7 Lancaster, Clay. Antebellum.... pp 117. 8 National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places Inventory. 1982 Constitution Street Historic District Nomination. 2

HISTORY

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Shortly after purchasing the property in 1813, Brand and Kennedy built a frame house on the out-lot, presumably as a temporary structure until their permanent homes were built on the land.1 The frame house, which fronts on Constitution Street, was constructed as a two-unit town house, allowing each family to live separately. It is unknown whether the attached structure, appearing on the 1861 City of Lexington map,2 was built at the same time. The frame double house had a two-story kitchen elle, which was separated from the main block of the house by a covered breezeway or dogtrot. This house is known today as the Brand-Kennedy House and is the focus of this paper. Brand died unexpectedly on February 20th of 1814, just months after the purchase of the out-lot #10 and the construction of the two-unit town house. James Brand left his wife with three infants, the youngest of whom was just months old. Further trauma struck the family when James' wife, Mary, unexpectedly died in May of the same year. The deaths of both James and his wife complicated plans for the development of out-lot #10. The tract was in the process of being developed and divided into lots to be sold at the time. While Kennedy and Brand had received verbal agreements for some of the land, no official division or deeds of conveyance had been made. Ultimately, the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky ruled in 1817 that all matters of the estate were to be governed in the interest of the infant heirs by the administrators, who were given the right to convey, sell and divide until Brand’s heirs came of legal age. The ruling further stated that the divisions of land made by Kennedy and Brand before his death were valid.3 After Brand's death, Kennedy continued his career as a "House Carpenter and Joiner." In 1814, he announced his need for two to three apprentices to learn the carpenter's trade.4 The same year, Kennedy was selected to build the new Kentucky State House in Frankfort. Upon its completion in 1816, Transylvania University, in Lexington, selected Kennedy to design and construct its Main Building. The same year, Kennedy built his permanent residence on the corner of Limestone and Constitution Streets; today, the house is at 216 South Limestone. Kennedy's career continued in Lexington for many years, and he served as the architect for many notable residences and public buildings. Some of these include: The Grand Masonic Hall in 1824; Transylvania University's Medical Hall in 1827 and the residences known as The Samuel Wallace House and The Meadows. Division In 1831, James Brand's only surviving heir, Mary S Brand, came to the age of inheritance. On January 12th, 1831 Mary S Brand and Matthew Kennedy distributed the personal portions of the original out-lot for their individual use. Kennedy received two tracts of land totaling 27,000 square feet including the northeast portion of the frame house (124 Constitution Street) built by Brand and Kennedy; Mary S

1

Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 6, pp 629. Illustration title, City of Lexington Map, 1861. Refer to section Supplementary Information. Act of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1816. pp 94-97 4 Kentucky Gazette. Dated August 8th, 1814, pp 3, col 5. 2 3

HISTORY

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Brand received two tracts of land totaling 17,000 square feet including the southwest adjoining portion of the same house, 128 Constitution Street. From this point forward, the two-unit town house on Constitution Street, today known as 124 & 128 Constitution Street, would be divided between two owners. Mary S Brand and Matthew Kennedy would convey the lands as they saw fit; the town house will not be owned by the same parties again until the beginning of the twentieth century. Until such time, each house will be discussed separately. The Northwest Side (124 Constitution Street) Kennedy lived in the northwest portion of the town house from the time it was built until 1816, when he designed and built his house on the corner of Limestone and Constitution Streets. He and his family remained in the Limestone house until 1843, when they move to Louisville, Kentucky.1 Kennedy rented the northwest portion of the town house after his new house was constructed. One prominent citizen of Lexington who rented the northwest portion of the town house was Mrs. M A Holley, wife of the well respected Transylvania University president, Dr. Horace Holley.2 Though Kennedy moved to Louisville in 1843, he continued to own, and rent, the northwest portion of the town house until 1845 when he conveyed the property to Charlotte Hill and Elizabeth Walker, sisters.3 The sisters purchased the house for seven hundred dollars on July 30th of that year. The northwest portion of the town house is noted to have been damaged by fire in the previous year, which appears to have been repaired by Kennedy before the sale. The 1850 US Federal Census listed the residents of the town house as: Miss Hill, 30; Mrs. Walker, 40; their sister Mary Ann Mann, 35, her husband James, 38, a upholster, and sons Shelby and Romily, 5 and 4; another sister Jane Grimes, 38, and her son George, 11; and Mrs. Walker's son, Charles, 21, a blacksmith.4 Elizabeth Walker died on June 14th of 1870 leaving a will for the dispersal of all her real and personal property.5 The will, written January 31st of the same year, bequeaths her share of the northwest portion of the town house to her sister, Mary Ann Mann. Mrs. Walker's will ensured the house would remain in the family so long as her sister and equal owner, Charlotte, was alive and chooses to continue owning it. The 1870 US Federal Census enumerated the following residents of the house: Mary Ann Mann, 53; her sons Shelly and Romily, now 26 and 24, both printers; Charlotte Hill, 50; their nephew George Grimes, 30, a house painter; and 4 black servants of various ages.6 In August of 1882, Charlotte Hill and Mary Ann Mann conveyed the house to Romily Mann, Mary Ann’s son and Charlotte's nephew, for the sum of $1.00 and “the further consideration of love and affection, the parties of the first part.”

7

Though Romily now officially owned the property, Charlotte and

1

Lancaster, Vestiges... pp 39-42. Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 13 pp 315. Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 24 pp 117. 4 1850 US Federal Census, Census Place: District 2, Fayette, Kentucky. 5 Fayette County Clerks Office: Will Book 6 pp 554. 6 1870 US Federal Census, Census Place: Lexington, Ward 3, Fayette, Kentucky. 7 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 66 pp 22. 2 3

HISTORY

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Mary Ann continued to reside there.1 Charlotte Hill passed way in 1885; it is unknown when Mary Ann passed away. Fifteen years later Romily Mann passed away, leaving all his real and personal property to his cousin, George Grimes.2 The transfer of the deed for the northwest portion of the town house was completed on October 27th, 1897.3 It is unknown whether George Grimes continued to live at the property after 1897. The City Directory of 1898 does not included an entry for 24 (124) Constitution Street. The 1900 US Federal Census shows that Katie Payne, a 47 year old widow, and her daughter Ellen, 7, lived at the residence; the Census indicates that George Grimes lived at 161 East Main Street in Lexington.4 In 1902, J. Frank Croghan, a grocer, and his wife, Julia, lived at the residence with their sons J Frank Jr. and John W, both blacksmiths.5 This suggests that at some time during this decade the northwest portion of the town house was rental property and had been converted to apartments. George Grimes passed away in 1904. His will, recorded June 13th 1904,6 left directions for his burial and for the remainder of his personal and real property to be left to Miss Annie Coughlin. No relationship has been found between Miss Annie Coughlin and any of the Grimes, Mann, Hill, or Walker family at this time. Annie Coughlin, a single woman, conveyed the northwest portion of the town house on September 24th of 1904 to William H Wood and his wife, Ada L, for the sum of $1,600.7 The 1906 City Directory confirmed the Wood family lived in the northwest portion of the town house, and also revealed that John had the occupation of "agent."

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On November 9th of 1906, the Woods sold the northwest portion of the town house to the sisters Mrs. Virginia Scandland and Miss Nannie B Kiser for the sum of $1.00 and "other valuable consideration equal to receipt as cash." 9 The deed does not detail these "considerations." It appears that Nannie B and Virginia purchased the property as a rental property, because at this time the two lived at 32 (132) Constitution,10 a property adjacent to the town house. There is no evidence that Nannie B or Virginia ever lived on the property. Nannie B Kiser and Virginia Scandland continued to own the property until 1969, when it was gifted to Sayre College. This will be discussed further in the paper as the southeast portion of the town house also came to be owned by the two sisters in 1903. The Southeast Side (128 Constitution Street) As previously explained, James Brand's daughter, Mary S Brand, inherited the southeast portion of the town house on January 12th of 1831, after she came of legal age. On October 25th, 1832, she married 1

1880 US Federal Census, Census Place: Lexington, Fayette, Kentucky. Fayette County Clearks Office: Will Book 8 pp 357. 3 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 111 pp 448. 4 1900 US Federal Census, Census Place: Lexington Ward 3, Fayette, Kentucky. 5 1902 Polk's City of Lexington, Kentucky Directory. 6 Fayette County Clerks Office: Will Book 9 pp 535. 7 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 136 pp 629. 8 1906 Polk's City of Lexington, Kentucky Directory. 9 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 147 pp 378. 10 1906 Polk's City of Lexington, Kentucky Directory. 2

HISTORY

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Henry H Timberlake.1 Henry, or H.H., was the son of a prominent resident of Bourbon County, Henry Timberlake. During H.H.'s professional career, he was Director for the Lexington Fire and Life Insurance Co for many years.2 Other professionals in of the insurance company included John W Hunt, Matthew Kennedy, and A.O. Newton. A.O. Newton would later play a role in H.H. Timberlake's business ventures. The City of Lexington Directory indicates H.H. was also a merchant.3 In 1837, H.H. used the Constitution Street property as collateral in business transactions. In April of that year, H.H. and Mary S conveyed the southeast portion of the town house and land to A.O. Newton for the sum of $3,000.4 After a few months, the property was then conveyed back to H.H. and Mary S for the same amount.5 A notation in the deed stated that the Timberlakes resided in the house during the time of the transfers. It is unknown if the Timberlake's lived in the townhouse after 1837. In 1847, H.H. and Mary S conveyed the house to H.H.’s mother, Mary Ann Timberlake, of Bourbon County.6 This conveyance was completed in trust with Charles L Timberlake, H.H.’s brother, for Mary Ann’s sole and separate use, as if she were an unmarried woman. The conveyance was completed the sum of $2,000, paid in hand, and with further considerations, on the date of September 9th. The 1850 US Federal Census indicated that Mary and H.H. Timberlake lived in Louisville, Kentucky with their children Thomas, 5, Henry D, 3, Mary R, 12, Amelia J, 10, and Clara B, 2.7 Since the 1860 US Federal Census does not list Mary S, it appears that she died between 1850 and 1860. H.H. continued to live in Louisville with his children Amelia, 20, Thomas C, 15, Henry D, 13, Clara B, 11, and John B, 9.8 In December of 1847, Mary Ann and Charles L Timberlake conveyed the southeast portion of the town house to John M McCann of Bourbon County for the price of $1,500, paid in hand.9 This deed mentioned the addition of a coal grate and is the only deed to state an improvement or change to the southwest portion of the town house through its history. Between 1847 and 1850, John M McCann passed away unmarried, his father James H McCann his only heir. On June 19th of 1950, James H McCann conveyed the property and all personal effects of his son to James P Turner for the total of $431, paid over the next two years.10 James P Turner was James H McCann’s brother-in-law, being John’s wife, Jane L McCann’s brother.11 On November 2nd of the same year, the southeast portion of the Constitution house and lot was conveyed by the Sheriff of Fayette County to William M O Smith. The deed included information which suggests that the sale involved settlement of John M McCann’s estate and debt. The tract was sold for

1

Dodd, Jordan. Kentucky Marriage Index, 1802-1850. [Online database] Kentucky Gazette, dated May 17th 1938. 1839 Lexington City Directory. 4 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 13 pp 315. 5 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 14 pp 86. 6 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 24 pp 604. 7 1850 US Federal Census, Census Place: Louisville, District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky. 8 1860 US Federal Census, Census Place: Louisville, District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky. 9 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 25 pp 105. 10 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 26 pp 518. 11 Bourbon News, dated Dec 19, 1899. 2 3

HISTORY

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the sum of $878.60, the total accumulated debt of John M McCann's estate and payment of property taxes, to William M O Smith, attorney for James H McCann.1 Smith retained the property until May of 1853 when he conveyed the property to David J Ayres for the sum of $665 paid within six months and an annual payment of $135 with 6% per annum for the dower right of Jane L McCann, wife of John H McCann.2 Dr. David J Ayres resided and held his general medical practice in the southeast portion of the town house between 1853 and 1869.3 In August of 1869, the tract of land containing the southeast portion of the town house was conveyed to Dr Samuel Ayres, Dr David J Ayres' son, by John H McCann and his wife, Jane L. David J Ayres passed away in the summer of 1869. The purchase price listed in the deed of $76.25 was for the completion of the dower payments by David J Ayres to the McCann's.4 The heirs of David J Ayres sold the property to Josephine Kiser, wife of John G Kiser, for the sum of $2,935, paid over 18 months.5 Josephine Kiser held the property for two years; there is no proof the Kisers lived in the southeast portion of the town house. Evidence has shown the Kisers lived at 52 (130-132) Constitution Street from 1877 to 1969.6 On May 3rd, 1871, Josephine Kiser conveyed the property to Elizabeth Cromwell for the sum of $1,647.83, paid in hand, and a further sum of $1.352.17 in twelve months.7 Elizabeth Cromwell soon married and became Elizabeth Metcalfe. Elizabeth Metcalfe lived in the southeast portion of the town house until her death in 1890. According to the 1880 US Federal Census, she lived on the property with two sisters and their families, whom included: Elizabeth Metcalfe, 71; her nephew, William McConnell, 36, a harness maker; her sister Sarah Aubrey, 55, and Richard, 60, and their two children John T, 20, a bookkeeper and Margaret, 16; and another sister Margaret Weldon, 51.8 The 1880 US Federal Census documents two separate families living at the southeast portion of the town house, suggesting this portion of the town house was converted to apartments. Analysis of the 1901 Sanborn insurance maps of Lexington, Kentucky and 1980 photographic evidence of the town house as a two-unit apartment provides confirmatory information for this suggestion.9 When Elizabeth Metcalfe died in June of 1890, she left a will bequeathing all her personal and real property to her sister Sarah Aubrey, with the condition if Sarah were to die the property was to be divided equally between Elizabeth's sister, Margaret Weldon, and two nephews, William H McConnell and John T Aubrey, with right to convey as seen fit.10

1

Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 27 pp 427. Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 29 pp 203. 1858-59 City of Lexington Directory. 4 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 47 pp 188. 5 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 48 pp 46. 6 Kentucky Historic Resources Inventory. 130-132 Constitution Street #FA-LN-CS-15 and 1898 - 1969 City of Lexington Directories, various publishers. 7 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 49 pp 349. 8 1880 US Federal Census, Census Place: Lexington, Fayette, Kentucky. 9 Photo A, 124-128 Constitution Street showing front facade and west side, looking northwest. 10 1901 Sanborn Map, refer to sections Architectural Description and Supplementary Information. 2 3

HISTORY

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Sarah Aubrey died before she took possession of the property. The ensuing deeds of conveyance suggest the southeast portion of the town house became possession of Margaret Weldon, John T Aubrey and William McConnell. In 1896, John T Aubrey and wife, Ruby May, conveyed their share of the town house to J W McConnell, brother of William McConnell, for $300 paid in hand.1 In 1897, J W Weldon, Margaret Weldon's son, and his wife, convey Margaret's share of the town house to William McConnell and J W McConnell for the sum of $400 paid in hand.2 The 1893 City Directory indicated that Kate Spears resided at 28 (128) Constitution Street. This suggests the continued rental of the southeast portion of the town house.3 The 1898 City Directory confirms rental status denotes D S Bradley resided at 28 (128) Constitution Street.4 The 1900 US Federal Census indicated Mary Martin and family inhabited the southeast portion of the town house. 5 December 4th of 1903, William McConnell, a single man, and J W McConnell, and wife, conveyed the southeast portion of the town house to Nannie B Kiser and Virginia Scandland, sisters, for $1,600 paid over twenty-four months.6 For the first time in the history of the town house built by Brand and Kennedy, the two-unit town house was owned by one family. Nannie B and Virginia, daughters of Josephine and John G Kiser, resided at 52 (130-132) Constitution Street while they rented the apartments of 24-28 (124-128) Constitution Street until 1969 when the entire town-house was gifted to Sayre College. A Rental Property (124 & 128 Constitution Street) Between the late 1880's and 1983 the two-unit town house, owned by Nannie B Kiser and Virginia Scandland, became residence to many citizens of Lexington. The four apartment units contained within the town house were numbered 24 and 24-1/2 (124 and 124-1/2) Constitution Street and 28 and 28-1/2 (128 and 128-1/2) Constitution Street. The City of Lexington Directories confirmed various residences with a range of working class occupations to reside at the town house for various lengths of time. 7 In 1949, Virginia Scandland died, leaving a will for the settlement of her estate. All her real and personal property were bequeathed to her sisters, Nannie B Kiser and Elizabeth C Kiser. Elizabeth C Kiser died after the will was written in 1913; no codicil was recorded, all property was passed to Nannie B for her sole use. 8 In 1969, Nannie B Kiser conveyed the town house, 124 & 128 Constitution Street to Sayre College for the sum of $1.00 and notable exceptions.9 Exceptions included directions for the continued use of the

1

Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 108 pp 282. Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 110 pp 450. 3 1893 City of Lexington, Kentucky Directory. 4 1898 City of Lexington, Kentucky Directory. 5 1900 US Federal Census, Census Place: Lexington, Ward 3, Fayette, Kentucky. 6 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 133 pp 136. 7 City of Lexington Directories, 1900-1976. 8 Fayette County Clerks Office: Will Book 27 pp 24. 9 Fayette County Clerks Office: Deed Book 975 pp 26. 2

HISTORY

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property by Nannie B Kiser and her designated heir, Etta Bryan, during their lifetimes. Further conditions of maintenance and continued receipt of rental payments for the property were granted in the deed. From 1969 until her death on March 10th, 1971, Nannie B Kiser continued to reside at 132 Constitution and maintain the rental and rights of use of 124-128 Constitution Street town house. Etta Bryan, Nannie B's designated heir, died in September of the same year.1 The relationship between Etta Bryan and Nannie B Kiser is unknown; the only information available at this time is the City Directory listing Etta, a widow, as a resident of 132 Constitution Street.2 A Rebirth Sayre College continued to rent the four apartments of 124-128 Constitution Street until 1983 when they gifted the house and a lot of land, 112-114 Constitution Street, to the Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation of Lexington, Kentucky for the relocation and restoration of the town house. A 1980 survey of historic properties in Lexington, by the Kentucky Heritage Division and Lexington-Fayette County Historic Commission, led to interest in restoration and preservation of the property. The town house became known as the Brand Kennedy House and placed under local preservation initiatives by the city and the Blue Grass Trust. The original out-lot #10 and surrounding out-lots were zoned as the "Constitution Street Historic District" by Lexington and was nominated to the National Register in October 1980 with the Brand Kennedy House playing a significant role in its development and need for preservation efforts. Between the years of 1983 and 1984 the Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation moved to restore the property, selecting local restorationist Robert H Hillenmeyer Jr and Martin H and Sue L Ginocchio as proprietors of the property. The house was relocated to 112-114 Constitution Street, approximately 100 feet to the northwest of the original tract. At this time, the two-story kitchen ell and adjoining breezeway was demolished; these components where not reconstructed. In 1985, Robert H Hillenmeyer Jr and Martin H and wife, Sue L, Ginocchio formed a partnership for the restoration of the Brand Kennedy House. A deed of conveyance by the Bluegrass Trust to Hillenmeyer-Ginocchio dated July 22nd, 1985 denoted the terms of restoration, preservation, and ownership of the Brand Kennedy House. The restoration of the town house was completed in 1990; a deed of conveyance severed the partnership of Hillenmeyer and Ginocchio on January 2nd, 1991. The dissolution of partnership portioned the house between the two parties, Hillenmeyer to own and reside in 114 (128) Constitution Street and the Ginocchios to own and reside at 112 (124) Constitution Street. In 1997, Hillenmeyer conveyed the 114 (128) Constitution Street property to Martin H and Sue L Ginocchio for the sum of $78,000. Sue Ginocchio died in 2006, Martin Ginocchio continues to own and reside in the town house. Martin lives at 112 Constitution Street; 114 Constitution Street is a rented.

1 2

Commonwealth of Kentucky Death Index, 1911-present. City of Lexington, Kentucky Directories, various years through 1900s.

HISTORY

10


Staples, C.R. The History of Pioneer Lexington, 1779-1806. Lexington, Kentucky: 1939, reprinted by Lexington-Fayette County Historic Commission, 1973.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

11


1861 Lexington Kentucky Map.

Enlargement Constitution Street. 1861 Lexington Kentucky Map.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

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LOT LOCATIONS AND SIZES

Figure A: Kennedy 27,000 SF Lot including northwest portion (124 Constitution Street).

Figure B: Brand 17,000 SF Lot including southwest portion (128 Constitution Street).

Figure C: Northeast portion, 42 FT wide by 100 FT deep lot. (124 Constitution Street).

Figure D: Southwest portion, 75 FT wide by 100 FT deep lot.. (128 Constitution Street).

Figure E: Southwest portion, 40 FT wide by 100 FT deep lot. (128 Constitution Street).

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

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Photo A 124-128 Constitution Street showing front facade and west side, looking southeast. Kerr, Bettie Lee. Historic Commission. Photo 6 of 17. September 1980.

Photo B Front and End Gable Perspective Brand-Kennedy House, 112-114 Constitution Street. 2010.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

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Photo C Gable End Elevation, Brand-Kennedy House, 112-114 Constitution Street. 2010.

Photo D Rear Elevation, Brand-Kennedy House, 112-114 Constitution Street. 2010.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

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1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place:

District 2, Fayette, Kentucky;

Roll: M432_199; Page: 216A; Image: 209. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Louisville, District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky; Roll: M432_206; Page: 178B; Image: 361. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place:

Lexington, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll:

M653_365; Page: 590; Image: 590. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Louisville, District 2, Jefferson, Kentucky; Roll: M432_206; Page: 178B; Image: 361. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Lexington, Ward 3, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll: M593_490; Page: 266B & 267A; Image: 542-3; Family History Library Film: 545959. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place:

Lexington, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll:

413; Page: 331C; Image: 103; Family History Library Film: 1254413; Enumeration District: 66. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Lexington Ward 3, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll: T623_ 519; Page: 3B, 13A; Enumeration District: 20. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Lexington Ward 4, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll: T624_474; Page: 19B & 30B; Enumeration District: 27. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Lexington Ward 4, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll: T625_569; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 63. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Lexington, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll: 743; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 41. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Ayres, David J heirs to Josephine Kiser deed, conveyed 1 Sept 1869. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 48, page 46. Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation to Hillenmeyer-Ginocchio Partnership deed, conveyed 22 July 1985. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 1376, page 479.

Bourbon News. Dated Dec 19, 1899. Page 3, Col 1. Brand Administrators to Mathew Kennedy Deed, conveyed 12 January 1931. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 6, page 629. Brand, James W Estate Inventory, recorded 11 May 1915. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book C, page 516. Commonwealth of Kentucky, Health Data Branch, Division of Epidemiology and Health Planning. Kentucky Death

Index, 1911-present. Frankfort, KY, USA: Kentucky Department of Information Systems. Coughlin, Annie to William Wood deed, conveyed 22 September 1904. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 136, page 73. Dodd, Jordan. Kentucky Marriages, 1802-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1997. Original data: Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Kentucky. Dunn, C. Frank. Old Houses of Lexington, Kentucky. Unpublished manuscript, Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort, 1930-1950. Emerson and Dark’s Lexington City Directory of 1898. Grimes, George will, written 2 November 1907, proven and recorded 13 June 1904. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 9, page 535. SOURCES

INDEX


Henry, William to John W Hunt deed, conveyed 29 November 1803. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Circuit Court Deed Book A, page 225. Hill, Charlotte will, written 13 May 1875, proven and recorded Oct Term 1885. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 6, page 383. Hillenmeyer-Ginocchio Partnership to George Gregory, trustee deed, conveyed 2 Jan 1991. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 1572, page 417. Hillenmeyer, Robert H to Martin and Sue Ginocchio deed, conveyed 25 Sept 1997. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 1937, page 342. Hunt, John W to Mathew Kennedy and James W Brand Deed, convey 14 March 1813. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book G, page 383. Hunt, John W to Mathew Kennedy and James W Brand, and wives deed of mortgage, conveyed 14 March 1813. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book G, page 385. Kennedy, Matthew to Mary S Brand deed, conveyed 12 January 1813. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 6, page 627. Kennedy, Matthew to Walker-Hill deed, conveyed 30 July 1845. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 24, page 117. Kentucky Acts: passed at first session of the 25th general Assembly, for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Frankfort, KY: Gerard and Kendall, 1817.

Kentucky Gazette. Dated August 8, 1814. Page 3, col. 1. Kentucky Gazette. Dated May 7, 1838. Page 3, col. 1. Kerr, Betty Lee. Kentucky Historic Resources Inventory for Matthew Kennedy and James W Brand House, 124-128

Constitution Street. Source # Fa-LN-CS-12. Documented: Oct 1980. Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government; Historic Preservation Department. Kerr, Betty Lee. Kentucky Historic Resources Inventory for 130-132 Constitution Street. Source # Fa-LN-CS-15. Documented: Oct 1980. Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government; Historic Preservation Department. Kiser, Josephine to William Bruce mortgage, conveyed 25 Oct 1875. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Mortgage Book 36, page 177. Kiser, Josephine and John G to Elizabeth Cromwell deed, conveyed 3 May 1871. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 49, page 349. Kiser, Nannie B to Sayre College deed, conveyed 20 Oct 1969. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 975, page 26. Kiser, Nannie B will, proven and recorded 12 Mar 1971. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 61, page 15. Lancaster, Clay. Antebellum Architecture of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky: University of Kentucky Press, 1961. Lancaster, Clay. Vestiges of the Venerable City: A Chronicle of Lexington, Kentucky. Cincinnati, Ohio: CJ Kirchbiel Co, 1978. Lexington City Directory, published years 1924, 1928, 1930, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 19752, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983,

and 1985. Lexington, Kentucky:

Publishers Varies. McCann, James to Dr. Samuel Ayres deed, conveyed 28 Aug 1869. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 47, page 188.

SOURCES

INDEX


McCann, James to John P Turner deed, conveyed 19 June 1850. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 26, page 518. McCann, James by Sheriff of Fayette to William O Smith deed, conveyed 2 November 1850. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 27, page 427. McConnell-McConnell to Kiser-Scandland deed, conveyed 8 June 1897. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 133, page 136. Mann, Mary Ann and Charlotte Hill to Romily Mann deed, conveyed 28 August 1882. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 66, page 22. Mann, Romily will, written 8 June 1892, proven and recorded 12 October 1897. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 8, page 357. Mastin, Bettye Lee. "A Moving Story." Lexington Herald-Leader. Oct. 1 1989. Section J, page 1. Metcalfe, Elizabeth will, written 13 Nov 1889, proven and recorded 12 June 1890. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 7, page 260. Metcalfe, Elizabeth codicil, written 28 Nov 1889, proven and recorded 12 June 1890. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 7, page 260. Metcalfe, Elizabeth codicil, written 19 Feb 1890, proven and recorded 12 June 1890. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 7, page 261. NPS, US Department of Interior Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, National Register for Historic Places Inventory-Nomination Form. Constitution Street Historic District Nomination, Lexington Kentucky. 10 Feb 1982. Newton, A.O. to Henry H. Timberlake deed, conveyed 31 August 1837. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 14, page 86. Polk’s Lexington (Kentucky) City Directory, published years of 1919, 1925, 1927, 1933, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1942, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, & 1971. Columbus, Ohio: R.L. Polk & Co, respectively. Ranck, George W. History of Lexington, Kentucky: It's early annals and recent progress. Cincinnati, Ohio: Robert Clarke & Co, 1872. Robertson, James Rood Ph.D. Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky, to the General Assembly of Virginia,

1769-1792. Louisville, Kentucky: John P Morton & Co, 1914. Sayre College to Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation deed, conveyed 20 June 1983. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 1319, page 769. Scandland, Virginia Will, written June 6, 1913, proven and recorded November 7, 1949. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 27, page 44. Security Trust & Safety Vault Co, trustee to George Grimes Deed, conveyed 27 October 1897. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 111, page 448. Smith, William O to David J Ayres deed, conveyed 14 May 1853. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed book 29, page 203. Staples, C.R. The History of Pioneer Lexington, 1779-1806. Lexington, Kentucky: 1939, reprinted by LexingtonFayette County Historic Commission, 1973. Timberlake, C.L. trustee for Mary S. Timberlake to John M McCann deed, conveyed 25 December 1847. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 25, page 105. Timberlake, Henry H. to A.O. Newton deed, conveyed 14 April 1837. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 13, page 315. SOURCES

INDEX


Timberlake, Henry H. to C.L. Timberlake, trustee for Mary Ann Timberlake deed, conveyed 29 September 1847. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 24, page 604.

U.S. City Directories [database on-line]. Emerson and Dark's Lexington Directory 1898-9. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S. City Directories [database on-line]. Lexington City Directory 1873-4 and 1931. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S. City Directories [database on-line]. Maydell's Lexington City Directory 1867. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S. City Directories [database on-line]. Prather's Lexington City Directory 1875-6. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S. City Directories [database on-line]. R.C Hillrigle and Co's Lexington City Directory 1877-8. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

U.S. City Directories [database on-line]. Williams Lexington City Directory 1864-5 & 1881-2. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Walker, Elizabeth will, written 31 Jan 1870, proven and recorded 14 June 1870. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Will Book 6, page 554. Weldon, J W to McConnell-McConnell deed, conveyed 8 June 1897. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 110, page 450. Wood, William to Scandland-Kiser Deed, conveyed 9 November 1906. Lexington, Kentucky: Fayette County Clerks Office Deed Book 147, page 378.

SOURCES

INDEX


Brand-Kennedy Property History