Page 1

Volume 1    

In this  Edi1on:    

u  What is  skep1cism                                                      2   u  Teaching  kids  about  skep1cism          10   u  Special  interview                                                            13   u  Games                                                                                                14  


What is  skep1cism?   is  the  constant  ques1oning     Skep1cism   of  your  beliefs  and  conclusions.  It  is  the  

A video  link  is  provided  below  for   furthermore  elucida1ng  about  skep1cism:   www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtCsstLXL9M&feature=player_detailpage  

process of  applying  reasons  and  cri1cal   thinking  to  determine  validity.  It  is  the   process  of  trying  to  find  a  supported   conclusion  to  your  conclusions  and   beliefs.       Skep1cism  is,  or  should  be,  an   extraordinarily  powerful  and  posi1ve   influence  on  the  world.  Skep1cism  is  not   simply  about  "debunking"  as  is   commonly  charged.  Skep1cism  is  about   redirec1ng  aNen1on,  influence,  and   funding  away  from  worthless   supers11ons  and  toward  projects  and   ideas  that  are  evidenced  to  be  beneficial   to  humanity  and  to  the  world.  (Dr.   Shermer)                                                                                                                               link added and Written by Ahmed Yousry Article edited by Shahd Abdelkader


Some very  basic  fun  facts  about  skep1cism     • 

skep1cism is  the  same  thing  as   cri1cal  thinking  :  

The wik1onary  gives  a  defini1on  of   skep1cism  as  “  a  methodology  that  starts   from  doubt  and  aims  to  acquire   certainty”  This  is  a  form  of  cri1cal   thinking    

• 

Extraordinary claims  requires   Extraordinary  Evidence  :  

This famous  quote  was  popularized  by   Carl  Sagan  and  is  a  paraphrase  of  a  quote   by  Marcello  Truzzi    

•  • 

In order  for  an  idea  to  be  considered  science  it  must  be  testable  and  falsifiable:  

The most  important  thing  about  science  is  tes1ng  hypotheses.  

the belief  in  something  in  spite  of  lack  of  evidence  in  it,  or  even  with  the  presence  of  strong   evidence  against  it  is  called  faith  :   Skep1cs  try  to  avoid  taking  things  on  faith    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Written

by Ahmed Yousry Page edited by Ahmed Yousry


Some of  the  popular  misconcep1ons   about  skep1cism  and  skep1cs    

• 

Skep%cism is  a  belief  system.     It’s  not;  it's  a  methodology.  In  fact  it  is  quite  the  opposite  of  a  belief   system.  Of  course  skep1cs,  people  who  use  the  skep1cal  method,   oden  have  opinions  that  are  at  odds  with  many  people's  beliefs;   however,  that  does  not  make  skep1cism  merely  an  alterna1ve   belief  system.    

• 

Skep%cism is  the  posi%on  of  non-­‐belief.     It  is  very  common  for  people  to  refer  to  themselves  or  others  as   'skep1cs'  when  they  don't  accept  or  believe  something:  'global-­‐ warming  skep1cs',  for  example.  This  is  not  the  correct  usage  of  the   word  regarding  scien1fic  skep1cism  however.  As  explained  above,   skep1cism  is  a  methodology  and  as  such,  claims  that  are  supported   will  be  accepted  by  skep1cs.      

• 

Skep%cs are  closed-­‐minded.  

This  cri1cism  is  normally  made  by  those  who  believe  in  things  that   have  been  disproved  or  are  unproven.  Concluding  that  a  claim  is   false  when  it  fails  to  stand  up  to  scru1ny  is  not  being  closed-­‐minded   -­‐  quite  the  opposite,  in  fact;  and  assuming  or  holding  the  provisional   posi1on  that  a  claim  is  false  un1l  proven  otherwise  is  also  the   correct  approach  to  take  (see  Burden  of  Proof  above).  Forming   conclusions  based  upon  the  best  available  evidence  does  not  make   one  closed-­‐minded  simply  because  this  logically-­‐sound  posi1on   disagrees  with  someone's  belief  or  desire  that  their  belief  were  real.  


• 

Skep%cs do  not  believe  in  anything.     This  misconcep1on  probably  comes  from  philosophical  skep1cism;  a   branch  of  philosophy  that  ques1ons  whether  absolute  knowledge   and  certainty  are  possible.  Modern  skep1cism  is  ra2onal  or  scien2fic   skep2cism;  the  method  of  doubt  and  inquiry  explained  above.     Many  people  also  make  a  fallacy  of  equivoca1on  and  confuse  the   word  skep2cal  (to  be  doubgul)  with  skep2cism  (the  methodology)   and  assume  that  skep1cs  are  simply  doubters  or  disbelievers.    

• 

Skep%cism is  about  opposing  claims.       Skep1cism  is  about  examining  claims,  not  opposing  them.  As   Written by Ahmed Yousry explained,  skep1cs  will  doubt  claims  un1l  they  can  be  scru1nized;   this,  however,  is  the  correct  way  to  deal  with  new  claims.  There's  no     Article Edited by Shahd Abdelkader logical  reason  to  accept  or  reject  a  claim  before  it  has  been  examined     -­‐  hence  the  suspension  of  judgments.   Page Edited by Ahmed Yousry      Of  course  skep1cs  do  oppose  many  claims,  such  as  many  involving  the  paranormal  and  pseudoscience;   this  is  not  simply  an  automa1c    opposi1on  to  such  claims  however,  it's  because  such  claims  have  been  examined  and  the  suppor1ng   evidence  does  not  stand  up  to     scru1ny.   Skep%cs  are  debunkers.     Bunk  is  another  word  for  nonsense  and  means  the  opposite  of  something  that  is  true  or  factual.  To  debunk  something  means  to  remove   the  nonsense  from  it  and  reveal  what  is  true.  Skep1cism  is  not  about  debunking  per  se,  but  debunking  is  a  consequence  of  cri1cal  inquiry.   In  fact,  contrary  to  popular  understanding,  the  best  way  of  showing  that  something  is  true  is  that  it  can  resist  a:empts  to  prove  it  false:   aNemp1ng  to  prove  something  false  is  a  robust  way  of  tes1ng  its  validity.     The  misconcep1on  here  is  not  that  skep1cs  some1mes  end  up  debunking  claims;  but  that  the  word  'debunker'  is  oden  used  as  a  pejora1ve   term.  Debunking  nonsense  ideas,  scams,  hoaxes  and  misleading  claims  is  of  posi1ve,  not  nega1ve,  value.     It  should  be  made  clear,  however,  that  skep1cs  do  not  set  out  with  the  purpose  of  debunking  claims  (i.e.  holding  a  preconceived  and   unjus1fied  posi1on  of  a  claim's  falsity).  Some  claims  will  simply  end  up  being  debunked  as  a  consequence  of  skep1cal  inquiry.  That's  an   important  dis1nc1on  to  understand.  

• 


CHECK IT  BEFORE  !    

•  •  • 

The situa%on:  someone  posted  on  Facebook  that  "yesterday,  I  was  watching  TV   show  and  they  brought  a  person  who  can  bleed  from  his  eyes.  Then  someone   came  to  analyze  that  person  is  possessed  by  ghost.       Applying  skep%cism:     Read  Carefully     Decide  if  the  issue  is  worth  genera%ng  skep%cism  

• 

Ask.

• 

–  Does it  affect  your  life?   –  Does  it  worth  to  spend  1me  searching  for  it.   –  Will  it  nega1vely  affect  others?   –  When,  Where,  in  what  context?   –  "Ask  for  the  source".    

• 

Check the  source.  

• 

Don't like  it  or  share  it,  if  it  isn't  reliable.  

–  Collect some  informa1on  about  the  author     –  Is  it  from  a  well  known  newspaper  or  channel  which  always  has  a  reliable  news.   –  Wikipedia  isn't  a  good  source.  

Written by Eman Khreba  Page edited by Ahmed yousry


Believe the  media  (They  say)       Television  is  one  of  the  most  credible  sources  of  informa1on,  they  say.   News  presented  in  media  in  all  forms  is  credible  and  they  have  very  well  known  sources,  they  say.   The  official  government  newspaper  never  published  any  faulty  informa1on,  they  say.       You  are  probably  wondering  why  am  I  using  this  tone  in  my  wri1ng?  Well,  as  a  person  grows  up,  he/she   is  taught  that  media  in  its  many  forms  is  the  most  credible  source  of  informa1on;  because  informa1on   being  published  has  gone  through  series  of  inspec1on  and  falsifica1on  and  they  are  published  because   they  are  believed  to  be  true.         This  is  a  common  mistake  we  as  a  popula1on  make.  We  tend  to  seek  informa1on  and  once  we  stumble   across  a  source,  no  maNer  how  reliable  it  is,  we  claim  that  the  informa1on  presented  is  a  fact,  or  most   of  us  do.  We  need  to  ques1on  the  informa1on  presented,  we  need  to  be  “skep1cal”  about  what  we   hear  and  see.         How  reliable  is  the  informa1on  presented  is  called  ethos.  Readers,  viewers  and  even  interviewers  need   to  skep1c  about  the  ethos  of  the  informa1on  presented.  Before  we  go  on  and  pass  informa1on  to  the   public  we  need  to  make  sure  that  it  is  not  faulty,  this  simple  statement  is  actually  what  skep1cism  is  all   about.  It  is  about  not  believing  everything  right  away  and  making  sure  the  informa1on  is  correct  by   many  means.    

Written by Abdulrahman El-sobki Page edited by Ahmed yousry


When do  children  develop  Skep1cism?    

         Children  have  different  quali1es  in  them,  but   the  most  adorable  is  their  credulity.    Children   they  seem  to  believe  everything  that  has  been   told  to  them,  from  Santa  Claus  to  the  Tooth   fairy.  But  if  one  stops  to  think  about  it,  children’s   enthusiasm  to  believe  even  more  ordinary  facts   conveyed  through  language  is  preNy  amazing.   Why  should  children  take  your  word  for  it  that   they  live  in  place  called  “Egypt,”  or  that  the  a  tall   necked  animal  that  eats  trees  is  called  a   “giraffe.”                        Studies  showed  that  a  three  year  old  is  more  likely  to  believe  what  they  have  been  told  then  the   same  informa1on  that  is  given  to  them  but  told  in  a  different  way.  There  has  been  a  study  that   explains  this  theory,  there  were  some  kids  who  heard  an  adult  say  that  a  some  sort  of  s1cker  was  in   one  cup  when  the  truth  was  it  was  actually  in  another;  the  rest  of  the  kids  saw  the  adult  put  an  arrow   on  the  cup  without  the  s1cker  in  it.    The  first  trial,  all  the  children  looked  in  the  cup  that  was   indicated  by  the  adult.  This  reflects  a  general  and  appropriate  expecta1on  that  shows  that  adults  are   normally  helpful  in  these  types  of  situa1ons.  In  a  later  trial,  the  kids  who  saw  the  adult  who  used  an   arrow  to  mark  the  empty  cup  quickly  switched  to  searching  in  the  opposite  cup.  But  the  rest  of  the   kids  who  heard  the  adult  say  that  the  s1cker  was  in  the  empty  cup  con1nued  to  look  there.  Some   children  did  this  about  eight  1mes  un1l  they  figured  it  wasn’t  in  the  empty  cup.  This  shows  that  when   kids  hear  something  they  believe  what  has  been  told  to  them  rather  then  using  their  minds.   Researcher’s  argued  that  in  addi1on  to  whatever  trust  a  3  year  old  has  the  others  will  behave  in   helpful  ways,  and  shows  that  they  have  developed  a  specific  bias  to  trust  what  they  have  been  told.    


Some children  did  this  about  eight  1mes  un1l  they  figured  it  wasn’t  in  the  empty  cup.  This  shows   that  when  kids  hear  something  they  believe  what  has  been  told  to  them  rather  then  using  their  minds.   Researcher’s  argued  that  in  addi1on  to  whatever  trust  a  3  year  old  has  the  others  will  behave  in   helpful  ways,  and  shows  that  they  have  developed  a  specific  bias  to  trust  what  they  have  been  told.                      This  is  actually  good.  Adults  usually  try  their  best  to  tell  children  the  truth  (or  what  they  believe  is   the  truth),  so  a  default  bias  of  this  type  is  adap1ve:  If  children  can  just  believe  what  they  are  told,  they   don’t  have  to  go  through  the  process  of  finding  evidence  to  compare  with  argument,  they  don’t  have   to  go  through  the  1me  consuming  process  of  evalua1ng  and  veracity  of  everything  that  has  been  told   to  them.  Researchers  have  pointed  out  that  without  this  kind  of  bias,  communica1on  would  break   down  for  adults,  too.  We  would  have  never  been  able  to  learn  about  things  outside  of  our  own   experience,  for  an  example.  Dan  Gilber  a  graduate  form  Harvard  University  suggested  that  adults  do   originally  accept  as  true  informa1on  they  are  presented,  but  not  like  children  they  can  later  go  back   and  “unaccept”  the  informa1on  that  has  been  given  to  them.                    The  ques1on  is,  when  do  children  develop  the  skill  skep1cism,  or  the  ability  to  not  believe   everything  that  is  told  to  them?    It’s  quit  complicated,  but  could  be  explained.  Lets  go  back  to  the   s1cker  experiment,  instead  of  three  year  olds,  the  researchers  got  as  well  4  years  old,  they  have  liNle   difficulty  ignoring  or  doing  the  opposite  of  that  they  are  told  in  this  kind  of  situa1on.  But  of  course,   there  is  a  huge  amount  of  variability  in  how  gullible  children  and  adults  can  get.  A  few  of  the  3  year   olds  in  the  study  have  stopped  believing  what  the  adults  have  told  them  ader  being  misled.  In  fact,   using  other  techniques,  Melissa  Koenig  of  the  University  of  Minnesota  and  Cathy  Echols  of  The   University  of  Texas  at  Aus1n  have  iden1fied  what  might  be  considered  skep1cism  in  some  infants  as   young  as  16  months.  In  that  work,  an  adult  referred  to  a  dog  as  a  “ball,”  for  example,  and  some  infants   objected  in  various  ways  (e.g.,  shaking  their  heads,  looking  quizzically  at  their  mothers,  saying  “no”).   Written by Shahd     Article edited by Ahmed yousry  

Page edited by Ahmed yousry


Teaching kids  about  Skep1cism     Those  who  are  raising  their  children  without  any  religion  or  believing  in  God,  they  should  teach  them   how  to  be  skep1cal,  how  to  employ  in  cri1cal  thinking,  and  how  to  apply  the  standards  of  skep1cism   to  religious  and  paranormal  claims  that  they  may  encounter.  They  should  be  able  to  do  so,  but  with   respec1ng  others  and  not  aNacking  those  who  hold  these  beliefs.  Some1mes  in  life  there  will  be   those  who  should  be  cri1cized  personally,  but  it  should  not  be  the  first  tac1c,  they  must  listen  to   others  and  be  able  to  take  in  their  argument.     The  reason  why  children  need  to  learn  to  be  skep1cal  is  because  in  their  life  1me  they  will  encounter   a  large  number  of  claims,  ideas,  and  opinions  that  they  can’t  assume  that  they  are  all  true.  On  the   opposing,  most  are  probably  false  or  at  least  somewhat  false.  It  would  be  wrong  to  accept  all  the   claims  a  face  value,  and  a  reliable,  reasoned,  “skep1cism  is  a  good  way  to  separate  the  wheat  from   the  chaff.”  The  best  way  for  inves1ga1ng  claims  is  going  through  the  scien1fic  checklist  (also  known   as  the  scien1fic  method)  this  is  to  be  used  to  inden1fy  if  a  claim  is  true  or  not.     Teaching  children  to  become  skep1cal  isn’t  as  easy  as  teaching  them  how  to  do  math  or  learning   about  history.  There  aren’t  any  lists  to  memorize  or  following  any  types  of  procedures  that  can  be   repeated  the  same  way.  On  the  other  hand  skep1cism  can  be  more  about  the  astude  and  peoples   perspec1ve  rather  than  knowledge.  Children  need  to  learn  cri1cal,  skep1cal,  and  scien1fic  habits,  it’s   a  way  of  look  at  claims  and  being  able  to  reason  through  the  ideas  they  hear.  These  kind  of  habits   have  to  be  developed  over  1me  and  taken  in  small  steps  for  it  to  grow  gradually.    


Luckily for  atheist  parents,  their  kids  are  naturally  skep1cs  and  always  asking  ques1ons.  Their   fondness  for  asking  ques1ons  about  everything  has  driven  more  than  one  parent  to  distrac1on.  It   may  get  annoying  but  a  child’s  desire  to  ask  ques1ons  should  be  encouraged  rather  than   discouraged.  Parents  love  to  appear  to  know  everything,  but  they  should  know  its  important  for   them  to  be  able  to  say  “I  don’t  know”  to  some  of  the  ques1ons.     Saying  “I  don’t  know”  allows  each  parent  to  teach  their  own  children  that  no  one  knows   everything  and  it  isn’t  always  necessary  to  know  all  the  answers.  This  gives  the  parents  the   chance  of  teaching  their  children  how  to  use  different  kinds  of  resources  such  as  the   encyclopedias  and  dic1onaries  to  research  ques1ons  in  order  to  arrive  at  their  own  answers.  It   teaches  them  how  to  become  skep1cal  and  to  become  independent.     This  is  one  of  the  most  important  lessons  for  parents  teaching  their  own  children  to  be  skep1cal   in  their  approach  to  life.  People  must  know  that  its  okay  not  to  know  everything,  but  its  not  okay   to  pretend  you  know  something  or  making  up  an  answer  simply  because  it  fits  in  with  your   preconcep1ons.  It’s  all  right  to  ask  ques1ons  and  wan1ng  to  know  more,  but  it  isn’t  ok  to  assume   you  know  enough  and  having  nothing  new  to  learn  or  understand  about  the  world.  This  is  the   type  of  astude  one  must  have  to  be  able  to  exercising  skep1cism  and  cri1cal  thinking,  or   applying  the  scien1fic  methods  to  learning  about  the  world.     Simply  teaching  kids  about  how  to  research  ques1ons  and  learn  their  own  answers,  weather   through  the  Internet  of  in  books  or  their  own  experiments,  you  will  also  be  teaching  them  many   accepts  of  skep1cism,  cri1cal  thinking,  and  science.  To  become  skep1cal  and  cri1cal,  it  means   taking  responsibility  for  what  you  believe  and  being  ac1ve  in  life.  Teaching  children  to  become   independent  and  taking  responsibility  for  researching  the  answers  to  their  own  ques1ons  means,   it  teaches  them  not  to  simply  rely  on  what  authority  figures  tell  them.  You’ll  be  teaching  them  to   become  more  independent.     Written by Shahd      Article edited by Ahmed yousry  Page edited by Ahmed yousry    


Visual Skep1cism    

These photos  are  a  funny  and  very  natural  way  to  explain  what  skep1cism  is.       Since  words  are  a  bit  boring  for  some  people,  I  have  made  a  video  that  would  basically   show  what  is  the  concept  of  skep1cism  in  less  than  a  minute.         Video  Link:   www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ZYvKVTSREBw  

Video made and posted by Abdulrahman El-sobki Written by Abdulrahman El-sobki Page edited by Ahmed yousry


Special Interview     We  had  the  chance  to  meet  with  Dr.  Aziza  el  Lozi,  she  Agreed  to  answer  some  of   our  ques1ons  about  skep1cism  and  many  of  it’s  related  subjects.     Dr.  Aziza  is  a  professor  at  the  American  University  in  Cairo.           Link  to  the  video  :   www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUaoXn0yF5s&feature=player_detailpage      


Games sec1on     Words  Puzzle    

I E U X F N S K E P T I C S P

A  D  J  Q  O  O  C  R  P  F  X  J  S  M  Z

U  P  E  F  E  I  Y  C  U  X  S  N  F  S  H

M  T  A  A  N  T  J  Z  B  J  E  C  B  I  E

F  X  W  C  C  U  R  V  V  I  E  E  J  C  I

S  A  E  S  U  L  V  F  L  P  L  E  S  I  D

O  E  L  J  Z  O  G  A  X  K  F  K  A  T  A

D  V  S  S  N  V  L  S  D  I  J  T  O  P  R

I  K  E  E  I  E  W  X  L  G  K  S  F  E  D

P  K  I  L  H  F  E  N  U  S  U  T  E  K  E

Puzzle solu1on  :  

G  E  N  E  S  T  I  G  R  X  M  A  R  S  Q

D  A  R  W  I  N  O  A  I  N  P  R  O  V  T

K  E  J  F  V  P  O  P  B  M  P  S  P  M  H

E  C  N  E  D  I  V  E  Y  L  T  H  N  V  Y

E  L  B  A  T  S  E  T  V  H  E  Y  W  C  X

                                                         

ALIENS DARWIN  EVIDENCE  EVOLUTION  FALSIFIABLE  GENES     HYPOTHESES  IDEA  LIFE  SKEPTICISM  SKEPTICS  STARS  SUN  TESTABLE


Phrase Puzzle    

Phrase solu1on  :  

Extraordinary claims  requires  Extraordinary  Evidence        

Maze  

Games added by Ahmed Yousry Page edited by Ahmed yousry


Editors:

Ø  Ahmed yousry         Ø  Shahd  Abdelkader  

Ø  Eman  Khrieba    

Ø  Abdulrahman El  sobki    

Magazine design  and  Edi1ng:   Ø  Ahmed  Yousry    

Skepticism  

about Skepticism

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you