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URBAN DESIGN

ARCHITECTURE

INSTALLATION

P O R T F O L I O

ADAM HIRSH K E N T S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y PORTFOLIO 2014


ADAM HIRSH | KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

URBAN DESIGN

City Relink

02

Cultural District

10

Port Terminal & Exhibition Center

16

Aquacorp

24

Biomimicry Facilities

30

Visitors Center

40

Youth Hostel

46

MatR Project

50

Topographic and Water Dynamics

56

ARCHITECTURE

INSTALLATION

GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION


Surrounding Characteristics Study

CITY RELINK 01

Scranton Peninsula Cleveland, Ohio

Using the past to ReMAKE the future 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

The City Relink Project evolved through a redefinition of Cleveland’s Industry for the 21st Century based upon the rugged industrial history of Scranton Peninsula. Emphasizing sustainable industry, the site is intended to house pharmaceutical and biomedical manufacturing facilities as an extension of Cleveland’s Health Tech Corridor. Currently, the Health Tech Corridor is based solely around research and practice, while the Scranton Peninsula intervention will complete the biotech model and establish an autonomous medical hot spot for Cuyahoga County and the greater United States. In addition to the site’s manufacturing facilities, Scranton Peninsula will also support a university, offices, and a collocation center in order to encourage collaboration in favor of the medical industry. Additionally, housing will be built, and a campground will be placed in the north end of the site in order to contrast the skyline’s urban aesthetic, as well as to provide a destination along the Cuyahoga County Towpath. Adding these amenities, in addition to a new method of kayak infrastructure along the Cuyahoga River will provide for a Live Work Play environment and ReMake Cleveland’s industry for the 21st Century. [Graduate Design Studio II] [Prof. David Jurca]

09

[In collaboration with Carolyn Emmer]

Ship Alert Signal Water Taxi Stop

2

Kayak Put-in


3


Analyzing the region at Macro, Meso, and Micro scales allowed for a realization of Cleveland’s connection with industry through the various Great Lakes water ways and ultimately the Cuyahoga River. These analyses revealed gaps between peninsulas along the Cuyahoga River as well as a lack in distribution to the greater United States. In utilizing Cleveland’s current standing as a central hub for the health-tech industry, Scranton Peninsula can restore the connective tissue of Cleveland’s production through the distribution of biomedical products and pharmaceutical drugs.

4


GRADUATE | SPRING 2014 SOLAR ENERGY 2,400,588 watts

51% PERVIOUS SURFACE 503,062 gallons intercepted

Guided Water Flow

MANUFACTURING PARCELS HEAVY INDUSTRY LIGHT INDUSTRY SEMI-INDUSTRY

Impervious Surface OHIO MANUFACTURING

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION

POPULATION

System Overlay INDUSTRY TYPE I

Scranton Peninsula’s former industry previously resided as a site of high impact and hard labor. Through emerging technology, predicted growth in population, and change of site use, the peninsula directs it’s agenda towards a sustainable Live Work Play environment introducing solar PV panels, impervious surfaces, kayak infrastructure, and SUSTAINABLE | LIVE WORK PLAY increased moments of temporality.

REDEFINING INDUSTRY High Impact | Hard Labor HIGH IMPACT | HARD LABOR

Sustainable | Live Work Play

Run-off Interception

5


| Kayak Infrastructure | Ship Alert Safety System | Towpath Extension |

6


GRADUATE | SPRING 2014

| Winter Market |

7


| Live Work Play |

8


GRADUATE | SPRING 2014

| Campground |

9


CULTURAL DISTRICT

Erie Street Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

Reflect and Resurrect A city’s culture is defined by the convergence of arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement. Although culture is present within Cleveland, there is no point of connectivity that establishes an optimum destination for these happenings. Being so, the intended exploration to intervene the Erie Street Cemetery introduces a Gateway and Cultural District in order to revitalize the cemetery and it’s surrounding neighborhood. The site is currently encompassed by under utilized masonry structures which lend no recollection to Cleveland’s past, nor provide insight for Cleveland’s future. Therefore, the site will be transformed through a dissolution of the vernacular and reformed by a vertical extension of the cemetery’s landscape. This extension will contain first floor retail and various housing types on the upper levels, with garden view terraces for the higher quality living spaces. Diversity in living allows for a collective environment and various social classes acting as a representation of Cleveland’s social life. Embed within the forms and among the various gathering spaces, landscape will break way for the existing Gray’s Armory and St. Maron Church allowing for an emphasis on historic cultural components extending from the cemetery and acting as objects within the landscape. As well, for an extension of Playhouse Square and accentuation on the newly established cultural district, the site will house a Cleveland Opera House and cultural center emerging from the landscape in order to contrast the historic elements. These programs will differentiate by form contrasting from the rest of the super block, acting as gateway elements for those arriving in the city along East 9th and East 14th Street.

[Graduate Design Studio I] [Prof. Jonathan Kurtz]

10

Erie Street Cemetery Office Tower Opera House Arboretum Cultural Center Restaurants and Shopping District Sports, Arts, and Performance District Gray’s Armory St. Maron’s Church

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


4 8 3 2 7

1

6 9

5

11


ADAM HIRSH

ERIE VIEW CEMETERY:

3/4 AERIAL An early study for the Erie Street Cemertery involved a proposal which neglected surrounding conditions, and instead was driven through personal aspirations. This initial form was intended to act as a catalyst for the design to grow upon, and was the inspiration for the extension of the cemetery landscape. Fledged by this scheme, the urban fabric could reflect upon the historic cemetery, enabling optimal daylighting and views from private terraces, and provoking reutilization of this inner-city graveyard.

12

Existing Conditions

Preserve Historic Elements

Block Overlay

Increase Program | Preserve Daylight


GRADUATE | FALL 2013

Pervious Green Roof

Skylight

Typical Apartment Layout

Shared- 2 Apartment Balcony

Guided by a study on Cleveland’s topographic and water dynamics (see page 42), the forms will counteract the impervious hardscape of of urban infrastructure, aiding in the reduction of stormwater run-off and urban heat island effect. The landscape will run alongside private balconies enabling a connection between man and nature, lessing the negative psychological affects associated with city living.

Streets From Surrounding Context

Gateway Elements at City Edge

Increase Gateway Visibility

Interior Sunlight

13


| Sports, Arts, and Performance District | Baseball Plaza | Office Tower |

14


GRADUATE | FALL 2013

| Apartment Balcony | Solar Powered ‘Star Path’ | Performance Space |

15


PORT TERMINAL

B A C K G R O U N D

AND EXHIBITION CENTER

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

North Coast Harbor, Cleveland In an effort to connect with the multiple cities and amenities located within the Great Lakes region, the Cleveland Port Terminal and Exhibition Center will introduce a gateway between Cleveland and many destinations from Chicago to Montreal. Hosting a small cruise line, ferries, and water taxi docks, the terminal caters to multiple demographics from travelers to business persons, or even young adults and children who can explore the in-house exhibition center while roaming around Cleveland’s Museum Campus. The site’s location has a prime positioning along the Erie lakefront as it introduces visitors from other cities directly into the Cleveland Museum Campus; The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Science Center, Maritime Museum, and others alike. Even more so, the path through the Museum Campus leads visitors across the 2020 pedestrian bridge and into Cleveland’s Heart: Public Square. Housing a terminal and exhibition space introduces two very opposing means of circulation throughout the building. Passengers taking the ships are eager to move through the space while visitors viewing the exhibition move at a more leisurely pace. Poetically, the building embraces these two very different pieces of program through an abstraction of a break wall; the dynamic terminal is representative of water, and the exhibition space as rocks. Futhermore in a windeswept pattern, the terminal acts as a lighthouse becoming more porous in areas that provide views towards downtown. [Graduate Design Studio III] [Prof. Charles Graves]

MACKINAC MONTREAL

DETROIT

NIAGARA

CHICAGO CLEVELAND

David currently lives in Cleveland and works as an accountant in London, Canada. He catches the ferry into Port Stanley on weekdays reducing his travel time from 5 hours to a little over an hour had he driven by car. Without the ferry, David would not be able to live at home with his family while maintaining a job he loves north of Lake Erie.

5 HRS 1.75 HRS

PORT STANLEY 3 HRS 2 HRS

DETROIT

CLEVELAND

VOINOVICH PARK

WHISKEY ISLAND EAST BANK FLATS CASINO

NAUTICA SCRANTON PENINSULA

16

The Great Lakes Cruise Line is a getaway excursion providing opportunities for families and individuals to explore the various environments along the Great Lakes. The cruise extends from the highly urban city of Chicago, up through Mackinac Island, and all the way up to Montreal. The Smiths and the Hendersons take the cruise every few years as it is an affordable, nearby means of exploring the Northern United States and Canada with amenities tuned for people of all ages.

John and his friends are students at Cleveland State University. They frequently spend time along the waterfront exploring Cleveland’s Museum Campus during the day, and partying in the Flats at night. The Cuyahoga River Water Taxi quickly transports John and his friends back and forth between the two creating a seamless connection between Cleveland’s waterfronts.


GRADUATE | SPRING 2014

LARGE FIELD FOR PUBLIC VENUES

SMALLER SPACES DEDICATED TO LEISURELY PARK ACTIVITIES

SCULPTURE PARK TO TIE INTO CITY MUSEUM CAMPUS

PROGRAM RELATIONS

PUBLIC SPACE DEPARTURE/ ARRIVAL ROUTES STAFF/ OFFICE SUPPORT AMENITIES BACK OF HOUSE

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U R B A N

EXTEND E. 9TH STREET PIER

F O R C E S

TYPICAL BUILDING FORM

T H E O R Y INTERWEAVING PROGRAMS

TERMINAL

EMBRACE SKYLINE VIEWS

&

18

WALL

AP

PR

OA

CH

I N S P I R A T I O N STATIC VS. DYNAMIC

WATER

BREAK

IP

ADJUST SURFACE AREA PER SHIP TYPE

BREAK WALL

EXHIBITION

SH

EXHIBITION | TERMINAL

“WINDSWEPT” LIGHTHOUSE PATTERN


GRADUATE | SPRING 2014

S E Q U E N T I A L 1

ENTRY

2

P R O G R E S S I O N

DEPARTING FROM CLEVELAND 3 DEPARTURES SECURITY TICKETS & CHECK-IN

4

TO SHIP/FERRY

ARRIVING TO CLEVELAND ARRIVALS SECURITY 6 BAGGAGE CLAIM

5

4

14 7

15 9 16

1 4

19

17 18

8

23

5

20

2

11 10 2 12

5

21 3 1 4 6

13 6

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N

N

LEVEL 1 | PARKING & BAGGAGE CLAIM

LEVEL 2 | MAIN CONCOURSE

1.Staff Parking 2.Mechanical Room 3.ATM and Transportation Services 4.Baggage Claim 5.Baggage Claim Office 6.Baggage Handling and Back of out Services

7.Terminal Administration 8.Arrivals Security 9.INS Offices 10.Tickets and Check-In 11.Ticketing Office 12.Baggage Conveyor System 13. Exhibition Space 1 | Promotional Displays

N

LEVEL 3 | DEPARTURES 14.Departures Lounge 15.Departures Security 16.Interrogation Room 17.Secondary Inspection Room 18.INS Offices 19.Form Filing 20.Exhibition Space 4 21.Exhibition Space 3 22.Exhibition Space 2

N

LEVEL 4 | AMENITIES

23.Private Lounge & Duty Free

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[Main Concourse]

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GRADUATE | SPRING 2014

[Exhibition Gallery Space]

CLOSED FACADE | INTERIOR AESTHETIC POROUS FACADE | FRAMED VIEWS

FACADE TESSELLATION

21


[Lighthouse]

Like many buildings in Cleveland’s museum campus, the building stands alone and takes on a sculptural form. This form allows the building to establish itself as an autonomous entity and glow at night symbolic of a lake shore lighthouse identifying a port, and homing ship back to shore. Additionally, a sculpture garden has been introduced greater enforcing Cleveland Culture.

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GRADUATE | SPRING 2014

[Sculpture Garden]

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W COMPETITION FINALIST

*Logo designed by _Adam Hirsh

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

Aquacorp is an international Freshwater Preservation Corporation guided towards the sustainability of freshwater. Adjacent to the world’s largest collection of freshwater, The Great Lakes, the corporation aims to utilize the building INTEGRATED DESIGN COMPETITION as a celebration of life through a freshwater INTEGRATED DESIGN COMPETITION aquarium paired withSTATE hydroponic gardens, a KENT UNIVERSITY KENT STATE UNIVERSITY system call “aquaponics. ” | ARCH SPRING 2013 40102 001

IDC

SPRING 2013 | ARCH 40102 001 PROFESSOR JACK HAWK, AIA

PROFESSOR JACK HAWK, AIA The aquaponic system allows the building to be self-sustaining and even provide food, water, and energy back into the system itself, along with the Cleveland Community. The key component behind this self sustaining system is its paring with an anaerobic digester, a machine with OWNER: OWNER: allows microorganisms to break down waste AQUACORP INTERNATIONAL AQUACORP INTERNATIONAL material without the need of oxygen. When waste material gathered from the building’s DESIGN TEAM: market, TEAM: ADAM HIRSH aquarium, restaurant,DESIGN or plumbing is input into ADAM HIRSH BRITTANY the digester, it begins to breakBALLISH down insoluble BRITTANY BALLISH organic materials. When these materials have STRUCTURAL ENGINEER: been burned within the digester, they produce STRUCTURAL ENGINEER: KABAK, P.E. methane and carbonJOHN dioxide. From this point, JOHN KABAK, P.E. the resulting effluent will contain a substantial MECHANICAL ENGINEER: amount of nutrients yet still possess pathogens. In MECHANICAL ENGINEER: TADHG O’CROWLEY , P.E., within LEED AP order to prepare and reuse this water the TADHG O’CROWLEY, P.E., LEED AP building, the effluent will be processed through ELECTRICAL ENGINEER: a UV radiation zone to throughly disinfect the ELECTRICAL ENGINEER: JAMES STADELMAN water from the pathogens. This water is now JAMES STADELMAN capable of being stored within the building’s grey CONSULTANT: water cisterns andDESIGN supply grey water to fixtures DESIGN CONSULTANT: JACK HAWK such as toilets. Furthermore, energy from the JACK HAWK anaerobic digester comes from the resulting methane discharged from the organic material. With the use of a turbine generator, the methane can be converted into energy and used within the building. [Fourth Year Design Studio II] [Prof. Jack Hawk] [In association with Brittany Ballish]

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AQUARIUM The aquarium acts as an interactive attraction along the waterfront, extending Cleveland’s Lakefront Museum Campus along the city’s newly proposed promenade and conveying Aquacorp’s vision for clean water to the public.

HYDROPONICS

SYSTEMS DIAGRAM

Waste from the fish within the water provides the plants with nutrients, which are absorbed creating a fresh water supply that can be recirculated back into the tanks.

HIGH VEHICULAR CIRCULATION

LOW VEHICULAR CIRCULATION

PEDESTRIAN PROMENADE

MARKET The market will be greatly supplied by the hydroponic gardens located within the building. During the warmer months, the market will spill out onto the lake front promenade further connecting the idea of urban farming within an urban setting

25


AINABILITY / LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE

TED DESIGN COMPETITION

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1. DAYLIGHTING

2. WATER RECLAMATION

WATER RECLAMATION

Natural Ven

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UNDERGRADUATE | SPRING 2012 2

ODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY

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4

ABILITY / LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE

3

D DESIGN COMPETITION S U S T A I N A B I L I T Y

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4. AQUAPONICS

Sustainability is an important aspect to design, especially in a world which increasingly acknowledges the need for green initiatives. The decision for which sustainable techniques to approach is first gained from the detailed site and climate analysis. As such, the building aims to utilize the site’s climatic elements in order to enhance the building’s overall performance. The southern facade is curved in order to maximize surface are for southern exposure. Furthermore, this same curved facade will also help to deflect winter winds coming from the south towards the lake. In addition, the northern facade will embrace a radial view towards the lakefront while acting as a wind fin, with a double facade to maximize natural ventilation.

27


WAITING

Active Systems BIM

RECEPTION/SECRETARY WORK/COPY ROOM

ASSOCIATE OFFICE EXECUTIVE RESTROOM MECHANICAL

59

4K O F F I C E S P A C E CONFERENCE

KITCHEN

TEAM CONFERENCE VICE PRESIDENT

OPEN OFFICE

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY PRESIDENT

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The detailed 4k office layout is specifically design around the idea that there is not a single space that does not receive natural daylight or natural ventilation. The office space is located along the south facade for maximum southern exposure as well as lies along two atrium within the building. Transoms are used within the offices located along the core to allow for natural ventilation and daylight to reach the space through the atrium. As well, for aesthetic purposes, the main lobby and conference room overlook the aquarium and hydroponic gardens creating an increased level of interaction amongst the building’s various programmatic elements.


UNDERGRADUATE | SPRING 2012

L SECTIONS / 4K

EGRATED DESIGN COMPETITION M E P S As part of an Integrated Design Studio, the 220,000 square foot office building was designed to be a fully functional composition including complete and accurate calculations and implementation of the building’s Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, and Structural systems. Additionally, the building has been analyzed to assure all components adhere the to regulations set forth in the Ohio Building Code. [Fully detailed drawings and calculations are available within the project’s complete drawing set, available upon request.]

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COMPETITION WINNER Pavilion: Implementation of Sustainable Design

BIOMIMICRY FACILITIES Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

En[LIGHT]ening Sustainability In conjunction with Kent State’s College of Technology and Sustainability, and the Department of Biology, the University will develop a private/public joint-venture in establishing a biomimicry driven academic park alongside the Main Campus wetlands. Biomimicry is a design criteria following the methods in which nature has solved problems that society struggles with today. The study includes the definition of a problem, observing a plant, animal, or other element of nature, and attempting to emulate the model in developing a strategy adaptable for humans. The predominant stimulus of the academic park is the Biomimicry Institute including spaces for public education and research laboratories, while the satellite research pavilion allows for greater interaction and experimentation between the researchers, and the man-made University Everglade. Both facilities are driven by The Living Building Challenge, a series of design guidelines direct towards a vision for lasting sustainability. The guidelines are meant to inspire a designer to find a solution through restorative principles, as well as to inspire others to reduce environmental impact by increasing awareness through design.

08 09

30

[Fourth Year Design Studio I] [Prof. Alexander Kolbe]


BIOMIMICRY INSTITUTE

RESEARCH PAVILION


X-Factor: Bioluminescence When a living organism produces and emits light, this process is called bioluminescence. It is a naturally occurring form of chemiluminescence where a chemical reaction releases energy in the form of light. The Biomimicry Institute embraces this element of nature developing sustainable strategies adaptable to the facility. Research shows that the most common use for bioluminescence in animals is to be used as a source for both attraction, and navigation. The idea is implemented by extending the atrium through the core of the institute allowing light to flood between the two major gathering points; the lobby and the cafe. The extensive amount of light entering the space signal a means of navigation between the two points, connecting the program in between, and sustainibly lighting interior units which would require artificial lighting otherwise.

Atrium Bioluminescence Exhibition Museum Cafe Auditorium Laboratory Office Conference Room

A B C D E F G H

H

G

G

F

F

G

G

G

H

H

H

H G

G

G G G

LEVEL 3

G

E

G

G

G

F

G

F

Driven by the Institute’s sponsor, General Electric, a Bioluminescence Exhibition will provide guests the opportunity to walk through a glowing forest of bioluminescent vegetation, interact with thousand of unconstrained fireflys, and observe aquariums of bioluminescent deep sea aquatic life forms.

C

LEVEL 2

E

G

G

G

F

G F

A D

B

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C

LEVEL 1


UNDERGRADUATE | FALL 2012

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As an extension to the idea of bioluminescence, the concept was taken a step farther towards adapting light sources produce by vegetation. French biochemist Pierre Calleja studied the way algae can be used to produce energy. Through Calleja’s findings, he created a “micro-algae lamp” that is powered by the consumption of CO2 Inspired by Calleja’s lamp, the Biomimicry Insitute will feature a series of steel columns wrapped in a glass tube finish filled with micro-algae. The building’s HVAC system will exhaust into these columns wherein the algae will absorb CO2 and produce energy contained in a battery. The battery will then distribute the energy into a low energy bulb running alongside the column, allowing it to produce light. Depending on how much CO2 the building is exhausting will determine the intensity to how much the lamp will glow. This visual aesthetic will provide an interaction between the building and its occupants giving the sense that the institute truly is a “living building.”

The lamps will greatly reduce the building’s carbon footprint as each lamp will absorb 1 ton of CO2 each year, which is equal to the amount a tree can absorb in its entire life.

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UNDERGRADUATE | FALL 2012

Lofted above 50 parking spaces adjacent to the institute are two large spans of photovoltaic panels. The panels will absorb solar radiation from the southern sun, store the energy, and distribute it to the building as necessary. Photovolatics act as a renewable energy source, as well as provide a form of shelter for the visitors and their cars from rain or snow. Additionally, the panels serve as another indicator for the institute’s theme on light and will educate the public on the University’s commitment to sustainability.

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The Biomimicry Institute’s satellite Research Pavilion is a laboratory and classroom intended to provide students and researchers with further opportunities to analyze the wetlands. In order to achieve a method of modular design, the pavilion is organized upon eight foot increments of similar building conditions, that allow for prefabrication of the structure before assembling it on site. This will reduce the impact of construction on the wetlands natural environment, as well as increase the rate of assembly, preventing any weather induced harm to the facility itself. Additionally, the pavilion will educate its occupants through the use of sustainable technology and visibly expose such elements as water reclamation pipes, living machine segments, and photovolatic panels. The structure becomes more than a facility guided towards wetland research, but also a place of sustainability education.

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Classroom Laboratory Bathroom Storage Mechanical

A B C D E

D

C

E

A

D

B


UNDERGRADUATE | FALL 2012

Clear Rainwater Collection Tubes

Living Machine Wetlands

Living Machine Storage Tanks

Photovoltaic Guardrails

The concept of exposing sustainability is further emphasized through the repurvposing of recycled pallets. Organizing the wooden frames in a variety of stacked positions allows the pavilion’s furniture to becomes modular as well, enabling a shift in spaces based upon the pavilions current needs.


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UNDERGRADUATE | FALL 2012

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COMPETITION WINNER USA Firenze Competition- Published in AND Magazine

VISITORS CENTER Piazza Annigoni, Florence, Italy

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

40

“For a knowledge of intimacy, localization in the spaces of our intimacy is more urgent than determination of dates.” -Gaston Bachelard The Poetics of Space Driven by the city’s historic values, Florence, Italy has become a central destination for travelers across Europe. Being so, the city is in need of a visitors center for those traveling to the city. Piazza Annigoni is at the cross-roads between the historic city and the new city, providing a gateway to the Renaissance monuments and culture. The intent of the Florence Visitors Center is to create a facility introducing the history and culture of the City of Florence to those visiting from other cities, and furthermore, other countries. The program contains four main themed areas such as ‘Architecture and Gardens,’ ‘Food and Wine,’ ‘Arts and Crafts,’ and ‘Fashion and Design.’ All spaces contain galleries and work stations to provide a visitor with the experience to gain an understanding of life in Florence. In addition, the Visitors Center features a large 10 foot by 30 foot tri-dimensional model of Florence allowing visitors to analyze the city’s extents from the historic cathedral, to the gardens beyond the River Arno.

[Third Year Design Studio II] [Prof. Andrea Ponsi]


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C2

F

C1

Studies of visitor centers around the world reveal a common agenda in distinctly representing the locations in which they reside. Although this concept may be conceived as cliché, it is truly the best way to introduce the vales of a given location to a traveler from abroad. The Florence Visitors Center focuses on the idea of allowing the traveler to ‘explore the city’ by encountering three main destinations any visitor would experience if walking through the streets of Florence. The masses of the center symbolize the monuments, the city streets, and the cafes adjoined with piazzas by uniquely combining the program which best represents each individual scenario.

C3

C4

C Themed Areas 1 Architecture and Gardens 2 Food and Wine 3 Arts and Crafts 4 Fashion and Design F Roof Gardens

B

E

C2

C3

A

D

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C1

C4

A Lobby | Public Performance Space B Auditorium C Themed Areas 1 Architecture and Gardens 2 Food and Wine 3 Arts and Crafts 4 Fashion and Design D Cafe E Tri-Dimensional Model of Florence

[The Monuments] of Florence are buildings unique from the rest, typically fronted by steps often utilized as seating for people in the streets. The building’s auditorium represents the monuments as it is a grand piece of program for visitors to approach upon entering the center. [The Narrow City Streets] are represented through the four themed areas. As visitors navigate through the tight city block, they are pushed into themed areas to explore within, or guided through the streets eventually terminating into one of the center’s ‘piazzas.’ [The Cafes and Piazzas] are inspired by Piazza della Republica, the location of a steel model of Florence which is further represented by the tri-dimensional model placed next to the center’s cafe.


UNDERGRADUATE | SPRING 2012

[Cafes and Piazzas]

[Narrow City Streets]

[Monuments]

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UNDERGRADUATE | SPRING 2012

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YOUTH HOSTEL Ohio City, Cleveland, Ohio

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

46

“The determination of its boundary depends on how far afield these networks, and their influences reach” -Andrea Kahn The Ohio City Youth Hostel is inpired by the writings of Andrea Kahn from Defining Urban Sites. Gestures of the hostel are designed to physically, visually, and programatically extend the boundary of the building’s extents, providing a dynamic shift in spaces from Ohio City to Cleveland, the urban fabric to a natural aesthetic, and a connection between occupants inside the hostel to those passing by. Ohio City is a historic district located directly outside of the Cleveland metropolitan landscape. Home to over 150 artisan shops and a thriving nightlife, the historic district is a lead attraction for those visiting the Cleveland area. The Ohio City Youth Hostel is to attract and house younger crowds whom intend on exploring the Cleveland metropolitan area, as well as providing a destination within Ohio City to invoke interaction between those living in the Cleveland region, and those visiting from abroad. [Third Year Design Studio I] [Prof. Diane Davis-Sikora]


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Extension between a built and a natural environment

The Ohio City Youth Hostel provides a convergece of the multitude of program making up the Ohio City region. In addition spaces for Living, the hostel will also house a restaurant serving food from the local Westside Market, Bar and Nightclub extending neighborhood nightlife along West 25th street, and an inner green space accommodating functions such as festivals and concerts wherein guests can view and participate in the attractions among the many tiered levels throughout the hostel.

Extension of visual access between Ohio City and Downtown Cleveland

Extension of sidewalk through hostel

Extension of visual access between hostel interior and exterior


PROGRAM Laundry 2- Person Bedroom Hostel Kitchen & Outdoor Seating 6- Person Bedroom Sky Bar Full Kitchen Restaurant & Night Club

Lower Level

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

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MATR PROJECT

Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

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Generating a physical manifestation of the creative thought process The Matr Project is a study to support the conceptualization and actualization of innovative and experimental material research. The project is designed to demonstrate some of the current digital design methodologies for form generation and digital fabrication. As such the resulting structure explores the translation of a complex three-dimensional object into a nonstandard component system through algorithmic and parametric means. Kent State University is nationally recognized as a ‘Tree Campus’ so it is only natural to exploit such a title and bring awareness to the multitude of campus trees to visitors, students, and faculty alike. The form encircles a front campus tree contorting its height in accordance to the branches above the surface. The embracing of the tree and jagged texture emphasizes Kent State’s commitment to maintaining a ‘Tree Campus,’ and to defend the living organism from any harm. [In collaboration with Matter Design] [In collaboration with Bosheng Liu, Cathleen Matuzak, Shawn Michael, Alexander Smith, Jessica Stuck]


SHALLOW CONE

DEEP CONE

The shell is made up of 40 sections containing cells for both an inside and an outside surface. Each cell is unrolled and the resulting space in between determines the depth of the cone for each cell.

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ZIP TIE CONNECTION

In order to attach the cells to one another, zip ties will be used for their durability and strength resistance in addition to providing a means of easy assembly.

SEAM BETWEEN UNITS ANDand FOUNDATION Seam between units foundation PROFILE cut CUT PLYWOOD Profile plywood SOIL ANCHORS Soil anchors

The nature of pattern allows the form to be self supporting, however the weight of the structure causes the cells to bow outward at the ground condition. Plywood cut to the profile of the form’s bottom edge will help support the structure and firmly anchor it to the ground plane.

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TOPOGRAPHIC & WATER DYNAMICS Cleveland, Ohio

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As an early study for the Erie Street Cemetery intervention (see page 10) the objective was to analyze topographic and water dynamics ranging from Downtown Cleveland to University Circle (an alternative site for the given project). In one cohesive image, the study predominantly examines major Rivers and Streams in the area, waterflows, permeable surfaces, topography, and watersheds at regional and neighborhood scales. One of the greatest indicators of the study was the extensive land coverage of impermeable surfaces. Typical to most urban environments, most land resides impermeable and causes issues with stormwater runoff and heat island effect. Given this information, topography and water dynamics acted as a major catalyst in driving the Cultural District at Erie Street Cemetery.

River/Stream low waterflow medium waterflow high waterflow Permeable/ impermeable topography watersheds

[Graduate Design Studio I]

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[Prof. Jonathan Kurtz]


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ADAM HIRSH K E N T S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y PORTFOLIO 2014


Portfolio 2014 | Adam Hirsh | Kent State University