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Andrew Heathfield Collected Works 2012


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COLLECTED

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WORKS

/ 2012

Andrew Heathfield University of Michigan Master of Architecture 2012


UNDERLAY University of Michigan ARCH 660 / 662 Thesis PP. 01-14

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LIVE WORK University of Michigan ARCH 672 Comprehensive PP. 15-28

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PAVILION University of Michigan ARCH 562 Option PP. 29-46

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REHAB

University of Michigan ARCH 552 Threshold PP. 47-60

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DIMENSIONS

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University of Michigan ARCH 466 Elective PP. 61-70

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08 /

05 /


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CONTAINER

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Miami University ARCH 477 Independent Study PP. 77-82

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OTHER

Miami University ARCH 402 Capstone PP. 71-76

Table of Contents

Varied Varied PP. 83-92

00 / 00

WEESE


UNDERLAY

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Underlay

01 / 02

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2

UnderLAy Los Angeles, CA

University of Michigan ARCH 660 / 662 Thesis Advisor Kathy Velikov

connections. The urban externalities thesis studio will take an interest in these territories, their ecologies, technologies, architectures and societies, tying them and their future into our urban narratives and potentials. The thesis group will operate both individually and as a collaborative think-tank, developing collectively the scope and focus for the year of research efforts. *As

POSITION / UnderLAy focuses on the phenomena of externalities not as distant, partitioned territories discarded by prior activity, but

03 / 04

prefaced by Thesis Advisor Kathy Velikov

Underlay

THESIS OVERVIEW / The continually densifying and expanding cities and urban regions of the contemporary world are supported, and literally brought into being, by vast territories of land dedicated to the production, extraction, processing and transportation of materials and resources, and their associated networks. Often a lacuna to most who reside in cities, these territories produce not only aberrant artificial ecologies (which may often have impacts on a massive scale), but also develop specific subjectivities, social relations, spatial codes, politics (both internal and global) and


Hollywood Sign

CINEMA ECOLOGY_

Pacoima Wash

RIVER ECOLOGY_

Santa Monica Pier

Tujunga Wash

Big Tujunga Creek

Rodeo Drive

N

N

Griffith Observatory Chinatown Biltmore Hotel

Aliso Creek

Bradbury Building Union Station Los Angeles River Queen Mary

Bell Creek Verdugo Wash

Burbank

Burbank

Arroyo Calabasas

Pasedena

Pasedena

Glendale

Glendale

Canoga Park

Santa Anita Creek

34°11’43”N 118°36’08”W

West Hollywood

West Hollywood

Beverly Hills

Beverly Hills

Culver City

Santa Monica

Arroyo Seco

Los Angeles

E. Los Angeles

Culver City

Santa Monica

Los Angeles

E. Los Angeles Rio Hondo

W

W

E

E Inglewood

Inglewood

Lynwood

Lynwood

Pacific Ocean

Downey

Hawthorne

Pacific Ocean

Downey

Hawthorne

Compton

Compton DreamWorks Warner Bros. Universal

Redondo Beach

Redondo Beach

Center Studios Paramount Lakewood

MGM United Artists

Lakewood

Sony Pictures

Lomita

Lomita

Long Beach

Long Beach

Port of Los Angeles / Long Beach

Rancho Palos Verdes

Rancho Palos Verdes

33°45’23”N 118°11’20”W

5 Miles

5 Miles

S

Length: 47.9 Miles

S

Elevation Chage: 794’ - 00” Average Flow: 226 cu. ft/s Max: 129,000 cu. ft/s (14x Hudson River)

1880

1900

1920

1940

Min: 2 cu. ft/s USGS Gage #11103000 Channel Construction: Apprx. 30 yrs. / 3.5 million barrels of concrete

1960

Naturalization: Apprx. 13 of 47.9 Miles left unpaved Governance: 30+ federal, state and local agencies Warner Bros. Studios opens in Hollywood. 1918

Thomas Edison shoots footage on South Spring St. in Los Angeles. 1889

The large Sennett Studio moves to Studio City, marking end of Edendale era. 1928

Fox Film Corporation opens in Hollywood. 1915

Boggs shot and killed by the studios "gentleman janitor" Frank Minematsu. / That same day, Nestor Studios is first to open in “Hollywood”. 1911 William Selig and Francis Boggs open first studio, Selig Polyscope Company in Southern California in Edendale. 1909

Hollywood Walk-of-Fame created. 1958

Radio-Keith-Orpheum Productions founded in Los Angeles. / First Academy Awards brunch ceremony held at the Hollywood Hotel. 1929

Paramount Pictures Corporation and Universal Pictures Company open in Hollywood. 1912

Harvey Wilcox registers his acreage as “Hollywood”, a name his wife Daeida suggests. 1886

Grauman’s Chinese Theater opens on Hollywood Blvd. / Beginning of “Golden Age”. / End of Silent Film era. 1927, 1927-1949

Beginnings of Modern Cinema. Mid-1950’s

All major film studios relinquish ownership of their theaters. 1949

Downtown / River 1887

1750

Eathquake 1974

The Rocketeer 1991

Flooding 1914

6th St. Viaduct 1931

Construction near Pasadena Fwy. 1935

Chaplin 1992

1815

1881

Beverly Hills Cop 1984

Construction 1950’s

1946

Near Completion 1950’s

Body Double 1984

City adopts the River Revitalization Master Plan which details a 32-mile greenway from Canoga Park to Downtown to Vernon. 2007

Floods take 85 lives and cause $23 million in property damage. 1934 - 38

Designated most endangered river in the United States. 1995 Los Angeles Aqueduct completed to import water from the Owens River. 1913

Portola Expedition finds a “good sized, full flowing River,” lined with lush greenery. 1769

Pretty Woman 1990

2012

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers builds concrete channel for River and major tributaries. 1938 - 1959

Los Angeles River sole water source for city. 1781 - 1913

AP: Goldmember 2002

Spanish colonists found El Pueblo de la Reina de los Angeles. Build Zanja Madre to deliver water to the pueblo. 1781

Shampoo 1975

Reinforcement 1950’s

Columbia Pictures Corporation opens in Hollywood. MGM founded after merger of Metro Pictures and Goldwyn Pictures Corporation. 1924

Mayor Tom Bradley creates River Revitalization Task force. 1991

Clean Water Act Amendments pass. 1972

Night Tide 1961

The Sting 1973

Fletch 1985

Falling Down 1993

The Phantom Empire 1935

Rebel Without a Cause 1955

Dragnet 1951-59

The Spy with My Face 1964

Forrest Gump 1994

Terminator 1984

Bowfinger 1999

Bell Creek / Arroyo Calabasas Confluence: Canoga Park

Rush Hour 1998

Columbo 1968-78

Chinatown 1974

Ghostbusters 1984

In the Line of Fire 1993

ER 1994-06

The West Wing 1999-06

China Girl 1942

I, The Jury 1952

Good Neighbor Sam 1964

Chinatown 1974

Blade Runner 1982

The Artist 2011

Blade Runner 1982

Speed 1994

Can’t Hardly Wait 1998

Collateral 2004

Start: Canoga Park

Blow 2001

Entourage 2004-11

One of Three Naturalized Sections: Sepulveda Dam

As We Know It: 6th St. Viaduct

Bike Traffic: Near Long Beach

End: Long Beach

Mad Men 2007-12

Varied 54’-00”

20’-00”

Primal Fear 1994

19’-00” 1’-00”

Chinatown 1974

River Mouth: Pacific Ocean

12’-00”

Varied

120’-00”

28’-00” 178’-06”

18’-00”

17’-00” 1’-00”

75’-03”

38’-03”

River Sections 1/32”

255’-00”

_250 + Bird Species (More than anywhere else in country) Them! 1954

Point Blank 1967

Chinatown 1974

Grease 1978

Repo Man 1984

To Live and Die in L.A. 1985

Stand and Deliver 1988

Point Break 1991

Southland 2009-12

Drive 2011

_4,426 Vascualar Plant Species / 2,125 (48 percent) unique to region _Many species of Fish / Reptiles / Amphibians & Mammals still exist _Once a prime habitat for grizzly bears

Dangerous Crossing 1953

No Way to Treat a Lady 1968

The Poseidon Adventure 1972

The Love Boat 1977-86

The Natural 1994

L.A. Confidential 1997

Adaptation 2002

Snowy Egret

Great Blue Heron

Black-necked Stilt

Steelhead

Green Sunfish

Largemouth Bass

Tilapia

Mountain Lion

Coyote

Grey Fox

Arroyo Toad

Buckeye Butterfly

Friends of Los Angeles River / The River Project

Arrested Development 2003-06

Ecosystem

Top Ten Most Used Los Angeles Filming Locations

UnderLAy: RIVER ECOLOGY / CINEMA ECOLOGY

UnderLAy: RIVER ECOLOGY / CINEMA ECOLOGY Los Angeles River

Shooting Location

River Tributaries

Studio

Municipality

Los Angeles River

Shooting Location

River Tributaries

Studio

Municipality

“This is the city; Los Angeles, California. They make movies here.”

“The Los Angeles River is the single most powerful space in Southern California: Our Golden Gate Bridge, our Yosemite.”

Thom Andersen Los Angeles Plays Itself

Kazys Varnelis The Infrastructural City: Networked Ecologies in Los Angeles


Hollywood Sign

Pacoima Wash

COMPOUNDED DESCRIPTORS _

Santa Monica Pier

Tujunga Wash

Big Tujunga Creek

Rodeo Drive

N

Griffith Observatory Chinatown Biltmore Hotel

Aliso Creek

Bradbury Building Union Station Los Angeles River Queen Mary

Bell Creek Verdugo Wash

Burbank Arroyo Calabasas

Pasedena Glendale

Canoga Park

Santa Anita Creek

34°11’43”N 118°36’08”W

West Hollywood

Arroyo Seco

Beverly Hills

Culver City

Santa Monica

Los Angeles

E. Los Angeles Rio Hondo

W

E Inglewood Lynwood

Pacific Ocean

Downey

Hawthorne

Compton DreamWorks Warner Bros. Universal

Redondo Beach

Center Studios Paramount MGM United Artists

Lakewood Lomita

Sony Pictures Long Beach

Port of Los Angeles / Long Beach

Rancho Palos Verdes

33°45’23”N 118°11’20”W

5 Miles

S

Reyner Banham

Martha Rosler

Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies Published 1971

The Bowery in Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems Completed 1974-75

1. Surfurbia 2. Foothills 3. Plains of Id 4. Autopia

_45 gelatin-silver prints of text and images. _Poetic interrogation of urban blight in Manhattan. _What is excluded is in fact the subject.

East to Downtown from 1st St. Bridge

Rail South of 1st St. Bridge

South to 4th and 6th St.

INTERVENTION / Ultimately, the research of both cinematic and infrastructural elements UnderLAyed across the city informs an ephemeral architecture of cloth projection surfaces, able to deploy across pathways of previously recorded filmic history, as well as rail-anchored, protracting elements for viewing the video projections. Also, an observation tower along a specific portion of the Los Angeles River deliberately highlights the physical infrastructure of the river as cinematic backdrop.

North to 6th St. Viaduct

*

Approx. 1 mi. river section between 1st St. and 7th St. Bridges.

Distance to 6th St. Viaduct (Order of Proximity) 2 Miles

_Los Angeles Center Studios: 2.2 Miles _Chinatown: 1.9 Miles _Biltmore Hotel: 1.7 Miles _Bradbury Building: 1.4 Miles _Union Station: 1.3 Miles

Plays Itself

Selected Films Within Section

Point Blank 1967

Chinatown 1974

Grease 1978

Repo Man 1984

To Live and Die in L.A. 1985

Kazys Varnelis The Infrastructural City: Net-

UnderLAy: RIVER ECOLOGY / CINEMA ECOLOGY Los Angeles River

Shooting Location

River Tributaries

Studio

Municipality

“And what are films likely to discover? ... things normally unseen; phenomena overwhelming consciousness ... ‘special modes of reality’. ” Siegfried Kracauer Theory of Film: The Redemption of Physical Reality

Ecological Convergence

RIVER ECOLOGY / “The Los Angeles River is the single most powerful space in Southern California: our Golden Gate Bridge, our Yosemite.” worked Ecologies in Los Angeles At Left / Cinema, River and Overlay Intro Research Boards

05 / 06

Them! 1954

CINEMA ECOLOGY / “This is the city; Los Angeles, California. They make movies here.” Thom Andersen Los Angeles

Underlay

North from 1st St. Bridge

The Bowery Los Angeles County

rather an internalized urban condition described through infrastructural and human ecologies. It examines these ecologies not only as a product and producer of the city, but in many ways, also it’s foundational elements. These systems of urban description and narration are ultimately leveraged to synthesize current and historical perceptions of place. Located in Los Angeles, California, this work evaluates the capability of film and video to house explicit perspectives of place. Cinema, the city’s iconic representational medium is used to represent one small portion of the greater whole. The thesis negotiates cinematic techniques and spatial indexing to integrate a broader range of filmic representation aside from the more notable works that already exist. In doing so, a range of societal groups may then coalesce for the purpose of event, spectacle, memory and public space.


DESCRIPTOR EXPLANATION / Previous attempts to negotiate this region’s sprawling characteristics, specifically Reyner Banham’s 1971 “Four Ecologies”, attempted to develop a descriptive framework that group urban elements into the ecological models of Surfurbia, Foothills, Plains, and Autopia. While this quasi-scientific approach attempted to create analytical categories as a way of understanding the sprawl; a differing methodology of combining two partial, yet specific descriptive systems appears more practical and productive. Taking cues from Martha Rosler’s “The Bowery in Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems”, a photographic and poetic documentation of the Bowery district in Manhattan, one

tion of the ecologies is highlighted underneath the Sixth St. Viaduct. It is at this location a number of cinematic endeavors have been pursued. Being so, three of these films, spread across genre and era, Point Blank 1967, Grease 1978 and Repo Man 1984 were selected to showcase the methodology by which the architectural intervention would construct itself. Tracking both character pathways through the site, via foot and vehicle, as well as camera angles, the information gathered prescribes the location of a permanent steel pole infrastructure used to support deployable cloth projection surfaces. This assembly does not reflect discernible moving images, however constructs a heightened atmospheric and experiential

comes to understand that what is excluded, is in fact the subject, rather than what is included. In many ways, this thesis is interested in the recasting of Los Angeles through the descriptive technique of film (both in terms of the history of film in the city, and film as an active agent which, like Banham, continually produces new identities for the city) as well as in the technique of film itself - framing, cropping, perspective, etc. In this case, what is left out - quite literally refers to the spaces of infrastructure, marginalized populations, and the space beyond the frame or behind the cameraman. Moving from the initial research of both film and river, a concentra-

Skid Row / Wholesale District

13

16

14 21

Carter Walker

19

20

11 Stegman 9 Otto

Bud

17

15

18

1 1

2

6 16 21 23

11

30

4

Rodriguez Brother

27 6 1 2

6 3 4 5

12

10 8 32 7

7

29

9

3

31

12 13

Danny

Shot 15

10

5

3

24 2

27

0.7 Miles

8

5

28

16 15 14

Rodriguez Brother

4 26 15

8 9 7 10 Sniper 22

Leo

33

11 37 36

19 20 34

17

14 18 25

35

13 Sandy

Shot 12

UnderLAy: LOS ANGELES RIVER (E. CESAR CHAVEZ to SEVENTH)

Shot 27

Integral Character

Tower Footprint

Perceived Car Path

Co-Opted Rail Line

East Los Angeles

Perceived Foot Path Camera Position / Shot

7TH ST. BRIDGE

6TH ST. VIADUCT

4TH ST. BRIDGE


2020 _

Tower Projects Film Film Projects Tower

12 13

The City is the Cinema The River is the Cinema

1614

15

1 5 4

11

11

2 8 10 6 7 9 3

2010 _

REPO MAN

Concentrations 2000 _ Single Film Shot Overlap

Projection Surface Infrastructure

Cross-Film Shot Overlap

Seating / Congregation 26

24 25

21 22

17

19

23 24

20

18

2827 29 31 1 631289710 2 45 1137

30

151416

32

3334 36

35 13

1990 _ GREASE

The rules are . . . there ain’t no rules!

Shot 15

1980 _

9 1 5

3 16 21 22411 23 12 13 4 26 27 810 6 7 15 22 14 18 25

1917 20

Shot 12

1970 _

POINT BLANK

UnderLAy: LOS ANGELES RIVER (E. CESAR CHA Integral Character

Tower Footprint

Perceived Car Path

Co-Opted Rail Line

Perceived Foot Path

Shot 27

Camera Position / Shot

400’ - 00”

1960 _

7TH ST. BRIDGE

Above / Film Tracking to Built Form Below / Site Plan

N

Downtown Los Angeles

12 24 26

25

11 22

23 24

E. CESAR CHAVEZ BRIDGE

100’ - 00”

07 / 08

SANTA ANA FWY.

Underlay

1ST ST. BRIDGE


quality. Other projection surfaces within the system maintain a more functional role for cinematic viewing during community screenings or Hollywood premieres. A series of rail lines running along the western edge of the site provide further infrastructure for other deployable assets including seating, additional media and vendors. Simultaneously, levels of the observation tower, located on the east bank of the river, chronologically record films shot in the area. Within the darkened tower interior, apertures in the facade denote the specific areas of character movement within a particular scene of a particular film. The river is no longer abstracted, but rather portrayed in a physical, tangible light, while still correlat-

TOWER AS_ TOWER AS_

ing to the film it frames. The tower is also meant to be used as storage for retracted cloth, as well as a continuously operating hub of live social media gathered from outlets across the city and internet. CONCLUSION / In conclusion, UnderLAy works to assist in the re-thinking of our assumptions of externalized space given by way of an overlay of infrastructure, cinema and public event. By physically intervening on the space, it creates a new mode of interaction, an instant feedback loop. The tower now becomes another background element in films to come, and the tower then expands to document these. UnderLAy capitalizes on the city’s known representational

DOCUMENTARIAN DOCUMENTARIAN

FILMIC SWITCHBOARD / PLATFORM FILMIC SWITCHBOARD / PLATFORM

FEEDBACK LOOP FEEDBACK LOOP

OBSERVER OBSERVER

MARKER MARKER

medium to provoke human infiltration of the normally overlooked Los Angeles river canal, as well as help re-frame it’s filmed historical perspectives. While Los Angeles may never be fully described through its Hollywood films, the integration of a broader social cinema will indeed promote a perspectival realignment of interaction within the seemingly well-known, yet unknown “externality” of the Los Angeles River.


Above / Presentation Images Below / Site Section

_ Projection Output

_ Media Intake

_ Film to Physical *See /

Point Blank 1967 Grease 1978 Repo Man 1984

_ Physical to Film

E/W River Section_ 1/16� Facing North at the 6th St. Viaduct

Underlay

09 / 10

_ Gather


_ Protract / Retract

_ Projection / Passage


Carter (0:21:38 - 0:23:38) 2:00

2

4

0:21:42

8/9

0:22:03

10

0:22:40

11

0:22:42

Walker

14

12

0:22:47

0:22:49

0:23:03

11 Bud

Otto

15

1 2 8

5 6

4

Stegman

10 9

7

9

3

Rodriguez Brother Rodriguez Brother

1

(1:30:54 - 1:37:52) 6:58

9

12

1:34:03

18

1:34:08

23

1:34:38

26

1:34:55

36

34

1:35:08

1:35:45

5 3

1:36:00

_ Invisible / Museum 28

27

29

24 2

11

16 21 23 12

30 31

16 15 14

Danny 32 1 2

6 3 4 5

12

8 9 7 10

13

Leo

34

33

11 37 36

35

13 Sandy

27 6

10 8 7

4 26 15

(1:01:25 - 1:05:15) 3:50

6

10

1:02:21

20

1:02:56

1:03:35

21

1:03:37

23

27

1:03:37

1:05:07

27

1:05:10

Carter Walker

Above / Repo Man Tracking (Light Box) Grease Tracking (Light Box) Point Blank Tracking (Light Box)

9

1

5 3

11

12 13

27 6

16 21 23

10 8 7

4 26

Point Blank Tracking Detail

15

20

19

17

Sniper 22

20

19

17

14 18 25

Opposing Page / River Perspective

11 / 12

24 2

Following Page / Tower Perspective

Convergence at 4th St. Facing West

Underlay

Stegman


On the Viaduct Facing East


LIVE WORK

11 /


Live Work

15 / 16

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Live Work Ann Arbor, MI University of Michigan ARCH 672 Comprehensive Professor Doug Kelbaugh

STUDIO OVERVIEW / As the primary building block of cities and the basic integer of urbanism, housing makes up around three-quarters of the building stock in cities the world over. Nonetheless, it typically plays a background role to the foreground buildings that punctuate the urban fabric – the more sculptural and sometimes spectacular, audacious public and institutional architecture. Unlike these more monumental buildings, housing may be an inspired design but it’s not about inspiration or spectacle per se ; it is quietly, modestly there to provide its occupants comfort, indepen-

dence and private sanctuary from the rigors and stimulation present in the rest of their lives. However, its shared and semi-public spaces can be exceptional, and its understated morphology and details can be rich. Live / work housing– whether an office, studio, workshop, retail shop or café – may need to interface with public or private clientele. All urban housing - whether public, market-rate, non-profit, cooperative, institutional, communal, multi-family or single family – needs to front and connect to the public realm, as well as provide privacy. Housing provides a deep insight and


Live Work

17 / 18


N

Green-way Level 1/16” = 1’-0”

Third Level 1/16” = 1’-0”

Roof Level 1/16” = 1’-0”

Above / Elevated Street Plan Roof Deck Plan Opposing Page / Selected Tower Plans


Penthouse Level 1/16” = 1’-0”

index of a society and its community values. Compact, affordable, multi-family housing offering urban walkability, bikeability, vitality, proximity and anonymity may be the next American Dream, replacing the private, suburban McMansion. The residential sector consumes a great deal of energy and other resources; accordingly, sustainability and resilience are critical issues, including their environmental, economic, social and aesthetic dimensions. Both offensive and defensive, active and passive energy systems are needed to improve performance and comfort. *As prefaced by Studio Professor Doug Kelbaugh

Tower (Top) 1/16” = 1’-0”

Tower (Bottom) 1/16” = 1’-0”

Live Work

19 / 20

Tower (Mid) 1/16” = 1’-0”

POSITION / Located on the Library Lot in downtown Ann Arbor (one of three proposed Ann Arbor studio sites) between South Fifth and Division, our project utilizes a connection between the existing Liberty Plaza at the corner of Division and Liberty and the proposed plaza at Williams and South Fifth. This connection is accentuated by way of an elevated green-way, running diagonally from Northeast to Southwest, splitting the lower mass of the structure. The second level entry from the north is made possible due to a gently sloping green-scape moving up from ground level. The green-ways southern end terminates at a projecting balcony, overtop of the plaza. Opening out, on to the elevated walk are both live / work units as well as a number of social spaces, including a music venue, destination restaurant, gym and music school. Moving vertically through this lower mass (consisting of four levels), more privatized roof decks and community garden spaces emerge. From here, the tower elevates another fourteen stories to include a skip-corridor assembly of one, two, three bedroom and penthouse market rate units.


Perspective from Library Lane


Live Work

21 / 22

At Left / Plaza Perspective


Perspective from Elevated Street

Above / Elevated Street Perspective Opposing Page / North-South Section & North Elevation


North / South Section 1/16” = 1’-0”

Live Work

23 / 24

North Elevation 1/16” = 1’-0”


One Bedroom Unit 1/4” = 1’-0”

Above (From Left) / One Bedroom Unit Plan Two Bedroom Unit Plan Three Bedroom Unit Plan 1 Three Bedroom Unit Plan 2 Three Bedroom Unit Plan 3

Two Bedroom Unit 1/4” = 1’-0”

Three Bedroom Unit (I) 1/4” = 1’-0”

Three Bedro


TOWER UNITS:

25 / 26

Three Bedroom Penthouse Unit 1/4” = 1’-0”

Live Work

room Unit (II) 1/4” = 1’-0”


Above / Liberty Plaza Perspective


27 / 28 Live Work

Perspective from Liberty Plaza


PAVILION

10 /


Pavilion

29 / 30

/ 11


2

Pavilion Ann Arbor, MI

The 15-Minute Architecture studio will devote the term to an interrogation of the pop-up phenomenon.

We will intentionally incite the messy collision of branding, marketing, advertising, popular culture and space-making with the aim of strategically crafting a new kind of 15-minute architecture. The studio will operate like a branding and advertising firm where each student is a brand strategist. For the first half of the term, each student will have to create a new brand identity for an existing product. In the second half, each student will craft a product launch for their “clients” re-invented brand in the form of a pop-up architecture.*As prefaced by

Studio Professor Teman Evans

Pavilion

STUDIO OVERVIEW / Today architecture has a built in expiration date. It is disposable, meant to be consumed now and instantly obsolete - not unlike milk or a Happy Meal. Architecture is no longer meant to endure 25, 50 or 100 years as an anachronism that tells a story of “permanence”. Rather, today’s architecture is a short-lived one of event and spectacle that follows the fickle pulse of commerce. ‘Here today, gone tomorrow...’

31 / 32

University of Michigan ARCH 562 Option Professor Teman Evans


INITIAL.

GRAPHIC/AD. cool whip

Cool Whip

CW

cool whip

CW

cool whip cool whip

CW

CW

CW CW CW

CW

cool whip

a dollop for today. ready for today. a dollop for today. ready for today. a dollop for today. ready for today.

a dollop for today. ready for tomorrow.

cool whip CW cool whip Cool Whip dollop for today ready for tomorrow

cool whip

cool whip

cool whip cw CW

cool whip CW cool whip cool whip cool whip cool whip

CW CW CW

dollop for today. ready for tomorrow.

cool whip cool whip cool whip

cool whip cool whip

cool whip

CW

cool whip cool whip

cool whip dollop for today. ready for tomorrow. dollop for today. ready for tomorrow. dollop for today. ready for tomorrow.

packag


At Left / ABS Plastic 3D Print

Pavilion

33 / 34

Opposing Page / Initial Form & Branding


A

PAVILION

N TRADITION

EAT

DRINK

/PIE-IN-FACE /CW SCULPTING

EXPLORE

/FAMILY-STYLE DINNERS /BAKED GOODS

GIOVANETTI PAVILION

FAMILY

WATCH

/CW AND COFFEE /CW AND HOT COCOA /CW AND MILKSHAKES /CW AND SMOOTHIES

ERNESTO NETO

POSITION / With regards to the long and respected tradition of the Cool Whip brand, The 2012 Winter Ann Arbor Restaurant Week Cool Whip Pavilion intends to accentuate these familial assets. With activities ranging from guest chef vs. amateur bake-offs and cooking instruction / container re-use tips, to dinner events and Cool Whip sculpting, SITE PLAN NTS the focus consistently centers on PRECEDENT

DOCUMENTATION

FUN

READ

LISTEN / LEARN

/ELASTIC STRUCTURE /EMBEDDED CW CULTURE & HISTORY

/RW DEMONSTRATIONS /CW COMMERCIALS /CW PRINT ADS /BAKE-OFFS

IM KOPF EXHIBIT

/BAKING COOKBOOKS /BAKING CULTURE /CW RECIPES /FAMILY RESOURCES

IMAGINATION PLAYGROUND

the interaction of family through brand. All events contained within the space include and promote the participation of both adults and children alike. Open Thursday January 12th through the following Saturday, the accentuation of nostalgia, exploration and education aims to make the pop-up a successful addition to the culture of Ann Arbor culinary celebration.

/RW DEMONSTRATIONS /CONTAINER RE-USE /GUEST DJ - MUSICIANS

Above / Brand to Form

HILTON PATAYA

Below / Liberty Loft Documentation Opposing Page / Liberty Loft Site Plan Brand Brief


N

A

A

BRIEF. VALUE. TASTE. NOSTALGIA. DEPENDABILITY. SITE PLAN NTS

WOMEN OVER THE AGE OF FORTY. FRESH LONGER. RECYCLABLE. CONTAINER.

SAME FRESH PRODUCT. NEW, RECYCLABLE CONTAINER.

A DOLLOP FOR TODAY. READY FOR TOMORROW.

CW

KRAFT FOODS. CONS UMER.

COOL WHIP ORIG INAL. REDDIWIP. OTHER. DREAM WHIP.

‘67 UNIQUE. TRADITION. MAJORITY MARKET.

DOCUMENTATION

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N

* WITH REGARDS TO THE LONG AND RESPECTED TRADITION OF THE COOL WHIP BRAND, THE 2012 WINTER RESTAURANT WEEK COOL WHIP PAVILION INTENDS TO ACCENTUATE THESE FAMILIAL ASSETS. WITH ACTIVITIES RANGING FROM GUEST CHEF BAKE-OFFS AND COOKING/ CONTAINER RE-USE INSTRUCTION, TO DINNER EVENTS AND COOL WHIP SCULPTING, THE FOCUS CONSISTENTLY CENTERS ON THE INTERACTION OF FAMILY THROUGH BRAND. ALL EVENTS CONTAINED WITHIN THE SPACE INCLUDE AND PROMOTE THE PARTICIPATION OF BOTH ADULTS AND CHILDREN ALIKE. OPEN THURSDAY JANUARY 12TH THROUGH THE FOLLOWING SATURDAY, THE ACCENTUATION OF NOSTALGIA, EXPLORATION, AND EDUCATION AIMS TO MAKE THE POP-UP A SUCCESSFUL ADDITION TO THE CULTURE OF ANN ARBOR CULINARY CELEBRATION.

* WITH COOL W PAVILIO ACTIVIT CONTAI SCULPT OF FAM SPACE AND CH FOLLOW TION, A DITION

Pavilion

A

A


POP UP_ HERE IT IS. Above / Pavilion Entrance Perspective


Pavilion

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Above / East-West Section Opposing Page / North-South Section


Pavilion

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EAST / WEST SECTION


MATERIALS

KITCHEN/ DEMONSTRATION

RESTROOMS

ELASTIC ENTRY 3

MIXED USE RELAXATION/ READING

S. FIRST ST.

OVERHEAD PERSPECTIVE


ELASTIC ENTRY 1 MAIN ENTRY

T. TY S IBER W. L

ELASTIC ENTRY 2

At Left / Aerial Perspective Below / East Elevation

STORAGE

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FLOORPLAN 1/16

Pavilion

COFFEE SHOP/ BOOKSTORE


Above / Interior Perspective One Opposite Page / Pavilion Plan


Pavilion

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ELASTIC ENTRY 3

S. FIRST ST.

MIXED USE

KITCHEN/ DEMONSTRATION

RELAXATION/ READING

MEDIA CIRCLE

ELASTIC ENTRY 2

COFFEE SHOP/ BOOKSTORE

STORAGE

ELASTIC ENTRY 1 MAIN ENTRY

A

RESTROOMS

STORAGE

N

ERT

IB W. L . Y ST

SOUTH FACING PERSPECTIVE

FLOORPL


At Right / Interior Perspective Two


Pavilion

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REHAB

10 /


Rehab

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/ 11


Rehab Detroit, MI University of Michigan ARCH 552 Threshold Professor Steven Mankouche

STUDIO OVERVIEW / Professing a “kit of parts� approach, the initial research distilled as a catalogue of actors, programmatic types and building typologies maintained within the Detroit area. From here, individual trajectories were fabricated through a somewhat random combinatory selection of these variables, all working as acupunctural yet cohesive architectural leverage for the Mexican Town area of Detroit. POSITION / REHAB on REHAB utilizes an abandoned factory space once used as a distribution hub for

the Detroit News. Located south of the Ambassador Bridge entering Windsor, Ontario, the property accounts for nearly 20,000 SQ. FT. of the project. In total, this area as well as 10,000 SQ. FT. of new construction will formulate the basis for a rehabilitation center focused on the theme of self-improvement through cloistral meditation and labor, specifically agricultural labor. Avoiding most connotations of the once accepted Kirkbride asylum plan employed throughout the early 20th century, REHAB on REHAB attempts to cite the more versatile Cottage Plan for mental, as well


Rehab

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REHAB ON

SUMMARY /

REHAB on REHAB utilizes an abandoned factory sp for the Detroit News. Located south of the Ambas the property accounts for nearly 20,000 SQ. FT. o well as 10,000 SQ. FT. of new construction will fo rehabilitation center focused on the theme of self meditation and labor, specifically agricultural labor

REHAB

Avoiding most connotations of the once accepted throughout the early 20th century, REHAB on REHA Cottage Plan for mental, as well as physical rehabi parallel the river’’s edge, patients begin their recov secluded, wrapped space; as shown through the d the buildings. From this initial point of stabilization, ahead, through the various stages of the healing p normalcy, more or less level ground, the program m within the main administration building as well as t through these theoretical and physical stages that themselves. The orange which wraps the structures nature of energy, balance, and warmth.

Offering space for medical treatment, drug and ca meditation/reading space, as well as long term car idea of modern style, monastic cloistering for the but community.

MAIN ENTRY

MICHIGAN ADDICTION / Treatment Programs Served/

73,334 Persons

Gender/

Male Female

64.7 % 35.3 %

Age/

12 - 17 18 - 35 36 - 54 55 and older (Median age is 32)

5.4 % 50.8 % 38.5 % 5.2 %


Opposing Page / Facility Entry Perspective

SITE DOCUMENTATION

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as well as the warehouse garden area. It is through these theoretical and physical stages that the patients are expected to regain themselves. The orange which wraps the structure is intended to imply the color’s nature of energy, balance, and warmth. Offering space for medical treatment, drug and career counseling, overnight shelter, meditation/reading space as well as long term care, REHAB on REHAB fully inhabits the idea of updated, monastic cloistering for the betterment of not only self, but community.

Rehab

as physical rehabilitation. Using linear bands that parallel the river’s edge, patients begin their recovery pace once used as a distribution hub ssador Bridge entering Windsor, OT, process in more intensely secluded, of the project. In total, this area as ormulate the basis for a f-improvement through cloistralwrapped space; as shown through r. the double skin covering the back Kirkbride asylum plan employed AB attempts to cite the more versatile half of the structure. From this ilitation. Using linear bands that very process in more intensely initial point of stabilization, indidouble skin covering the back half of , individuals then progress up and then progress up and ahead, process. Through this quest forviduals health, makes use of various ““levels”” both the various stages of the the warehouse garden area. It through is t the patients are expected to regain s is intended to imply the color’’ s healing process. Through this quest for health, normalcy - more or less areer couseling, overnight shelter, re, REHAB on REHAB fully inhabits the level ground, the program makes betterment of not only self, use of various “levels” both within the main administration building

At Left / Interior Perspective Two


N

N

Garden T1

Employee Parking/ Loading Zone

Garden T2

S3 Garden T3

SITE PLAN NTS

Utility Admin. Patient Drive

Medical

Main Entry

Assembly

Flood Plain

Residential

10’ 20’

Above / Site Plan Ground Floor Plan Second Floor Plan

4


N

N

Garden T1

S2

Employee Parking/ Loading Zone

Garden T2

Garden T3

Garden T4

Patient Drive

Garden T5

MultiUse

Landing

Assembly

Flood Plain

S1

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1/32”

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 10’ 20’

40’

1/32”

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40’

Public Walk

Rehab

Public Walk


SECTION 1 5’ 10’

20’

1/16”

5’ 10’

20’

1/16”

5’ 10’

20’

SECTION 2

SECTION 3

Above / Model & Presentation Documentation North-South Section Diagonal Section East-West Section Opposing Page / Model Detail

1/16”


Rehab

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GARDEN PEDESTRIAN RAMP

GARDEN PEDESTRIAN RAMP THE TWELVE STEP RECOVERY PROGRAM / 1/ 2/ 3/ 4/ 5/ 6/ 7/ 8/ 9/

We admitted that we were powerless over our addiction, that our lives had become unmanageable. We came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity. We made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him. We made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves. We admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs. We were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character. We humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings. We made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all. We made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others. 10/ We continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it. THE TWELVE STEP PROGRAM 11 / RECOVERY We sought through prayer and meditation to/ improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out. 1/ We admitted that we were12powerless over that our lives become unmanageable. / Having hadoura addiction, spiritual awakening as ahad result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to 2/ We came to believe that a Power addicts, greater than ourselves us toin sanity. and to practicecould theserestore principles all our affairs. 3/ We made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him. 4/ We made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves. 5/ We admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs. 6/ We were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character. TRANSTHEORETICAL MODEL / 7/ We humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings. 8/ We made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all. Developed in 1977 at the University of Rhode Island by Dr. James O. Prochaska. Otherwise known as 9/ We made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would Prochaska and DiClemente’’s Stages of Change Model. injure them or others. 10/ We continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it. Precontemplation/ People are not intending to take action in the foreseeable future, usually measured 11 / We sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we as the next 6 months. understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out. Contemplation/ People are intending to change in the next 6 months. 12 / Having had a spiritual awakening as a result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to Preparation/ People are intending to take action in the immediate future, usually measured as the addicts, and to practice these principles in all our affairs. next month. Action / People have made specific overt modifications in their lifestyles within the past 6 months. Maintenance/ People are working to prevent relapse. This stage is estimated to last anywhere TRANSTHEORETICAL MODEL from / 6 months to about 5 years. Termination/ Individuals have zero temptation and 100% self-efficacy. They are sure they will not Developed in 1977 at the University of Rhode Island by Dr.return James Prochaska. Otherwise as of coping. to O. their old unhealthy habitknown as a way Prochaska and DiClemente’’s Stages of Change Model. Precontemplation/ Contemplation/ Preparation/ Action / Maintenance/ Termination/

People are not intending to take action in the foreseeable future, usually measured as the next 6 months. People are intending to change in the next 6 months. People are intending to take action in the immediate future, usually measured as the next month. People have made specific overt modifications in their lifestyles within the past 6 months. People are working to prevent relapse. This stage is estimated to last anywhere from 6 months to about 5 years. Individuals have zero temptation and 100% self-efficacy. They are sure they will not return to their old unhealthy habit as a way of coping.

GARDEN AT T1

GARDEN AT T1

MAIN ENTRY

ASSEMBLY

MICHIGAN ADDICTION / Treatment Programs Served/

73,334 Persons

Gender/

Male Female

64.7 % 35.3 %


Below / Tiered Garden Perspective

Rehab

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Opposing Page / Garden Walk Perspective Facility Main Stair Perspective


At Left / Exterior Residential Perspective

Rehab

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RESIDENTIAL ENTRANCE


DIMENSIONS

10 /


Dimensions

61 / 62

/ 11


2

Dimensions Ann Arbor, MI

University of Michigan ARCH 466 Elective Professor Christian Unverzagt

page of the Taubman College website located at http://www.tcaup.umich.edu/architecture/ publications/dimensions/

63 / 64

Dimensions solicits work each fall for inclusion in the upcoming volume, which is designed and produced during the academic year with the guidance of a faculty advisor in Arch 466. Advance copies of the printed journal are given to ar-

chitecture graduates each spring at Commencement, with a public unveiling to the school the following September. *As stated by the Dimensions

Dimensions

PUBLICATION OVERVIEW / Dimensions is the annual, student-produced journal of architecture at the University of Michigan. It seeks to contribute to the critical discourse of architectural education by documenting the most compelling work produced by its students, faculty, fellows, and visiting lecturers.


At Left / TCAUP Release Event Fall 2011

Dimensions

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Opposing Page / Letter from the Editors


Above / Index Opposing Page / Section Intro Spread Project Intro Spread


Dimensions

67 / 68


Above / TCAUP Dimensions Webpage Opposing Page / Cover Detail


08 /


Container

71 / 72

/ 09 CONTAINER


Container Covington, KY Miami University ARCH 402 Capstone Professor John Becker

STUDIO OVERVIEW / Positioned as a three part studio, the initial two design inquiries were a bike rack design for the Queen City Art Racks Competition and a single-family residential project in Northside, Ohio. The final project continues the residential trajectory with a multiunit residential project. The site is positioned on a steeply graded lot east of Devou Park in Covington, Kentucky between Western and Crescent Ave. POSITION / While the demands of market rate housing call for a particular degree of luxury, there

remains no opposition to ingenuity and re-use. This particular realization of contemporary condominium living centers on the re-application of shipping containers for compact, efficient habitation. These containers, used in stacked groupings of one to three-bedroom units throughout the site, constitute the bulk of the building’s structural framework. While the overall development plan continues to preference the automobile, a close proximity to the Mainstrasse area of Covington suggests other, more sustainable patterns of mobility.


Container

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Above (From Top, Left) / East Site Elevation West Site Elevation Studio Unit Plan One Bedroom Unit Plan Selected Stacked Unit Elevations


Container

75 / 76


08 /


Weese

77 / 78

/ 09

WEESE


2

Weese Columbus, IN

PAMPHLET INTRODUCTION / Harry Mohr Weese was born on June 30th, 1915 in Evanston, Illinois. He completed undergraduate work at both MIT and Yale University between 1933 and 1936, ultimately receiving his architectural degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1936. During his

time at MIT, Weese studied under the famed Finnish architect, Alvar Aalto. Following graduation, Weese was awarded a fellowship to Cranbrook Academy of Art in Detroit, Michigan where he studied city planning alongside both Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen. In 1939, Weese joined the Chicago firm Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill. After just two years however, he joined the military as an engineering officer, returning to the firm in 1946. A year later, in 1947 he opened his own firm, Harry Weese Associates. Throughout his career, Weese amassed an incredible portfolio of

Weese

OVERVIEW / Undertaken as a inquiry into the architect responsible for a number of buildings in Columbus, Indiana. The research eventually concluded with the design of a short pamphlet, documenting these notable works of Harry Weese.

79 / 80

Miami University ARCH 477 Independent Study Professor John Humphries


This Page / Pamphlet Cover Opposing Page / Columbus Map Spread First Baptist Church Spread


preservation and will certainly be remembered as the architect who “shaped Chicago’s skyline and the way the city thought about everything from the lakefront to its treasure-trove of historical buildings.” Weese died on October 29th, 1998 in Manteno, Illinois.

81 / 82

judging entries for the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, Board of Governors, Metropolitan Housing and Planning Council of Chicago, President Johnson’s Citizens’ Advisor Committee on Recreation and Natural Beauty, and 1978’s Chicagoan of the Year. Weese is noted for his firm’s enthusiasm for historic

Weese

work. Aside from those projects showcased in the following pages, other notable works include the Washington D.C. metro rail system, the Chicago Seventeenth Church of Christ, Scientist, and the renovation of Louis Sullivan’s Auditorium building in Chicago. Other accomplishments include his role in


05 /


83 / 84

OTHER

Other

/ 12


Other Various Locations Varied Varied Varied

OVERVIEW / Following no particular chronology or theme of production, the following pages include a small portion of the other work created both within and apart from academia. This output includes first, the culmination of creative work and documentation produced after a six-week summer studio to China in 2007. The installation, dubbed, “China’s New Experience” detailed our photography, small urban intervention projects in the Nanshan district of Shenzhen and our participation with the firm Urbanus for their “Building Asia Brick by Brick” competition submis-

sion. The second spread includes a portion of compensated, as well as recreational graphic design / screen printing projects. The highlighted Saarinen piece was commissioned by the Columbus Indiana Visitors Center for sale in the gift shop. The third spread contains an illustration previewing as part of the Final Friday event from May 25th to June 30th 2012 at MOTR in Cincinnati, as well as selected photographic works. Further graphic, photographic and filmic samples can be viewed at spudthemud.com.


Other

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At Left / “China’s New Experience” Exhibition at Alumni Hall, Miami University Fall 2007

China

87 / 88

Opposing Page / Urbanus’ “Building Asia Brick by Brick” Competition Entry


Above / Screen Print of Saarinen’s First Christian Church Opposing Page / Selected Graphic Work


MIDPOINT INDIE SUMMER SERIES

THE PASS

F R I DAY J U LY 1 5 FO U N TA I N S Q U A R E

The First Annual

JOAN & BRUCE r u n / W a l k 5 k . T h e L a k e f r o n t T r a i l . C h i c a g o , I L . J u ly 1 0 t h , 2 0 1 1

89 / 90

EAT SUGAR

80

Graphic

STARFOX


91 / 92

Opposing Page / “The Sounds Around” 2011

Illustration & Photo

At Right / Girl. Cairo. 2010 Truck. Dubai. 2009 Column. Detroit. 2010


EDUCATION.

University of Michigan. Ann Arbor, MI / Master of Architecture with Distinction / May 2012

Miami University. Oxford, OH / Bachelor of Arts in Architecture / December 2009

Miami University Studio Abroad. China / ARCH 302 Studio / Summer 2007

University of Notre Dame. South Bend, IN / Architecture Discovery Program / Summer 2005

EXPERIENCE.

Libre. Cincinnati, OH Summer 2011 Designer / Administrative Assistant NORTH. Portland, OR Spring 2011 Intern Columbus Area Arts Council. Columbus, IN Summer 2010 Intern InVism Media Productions. West Hollywood, CA Summer 2009 Intern / Production Assistant Morgante-Wilson Architects. Chicago, IL Summer 2008 Intern Ono Brothers. Columbus, IN Summer 2006 Laborer

SKILLS.

Digital: CAD. Rhino. Revit. VRay. SketchUp. Adobe CS5. Final Cut X. Analog: Write. Draw. Paint. Model.

AWARDS / EXTRACURRICULAR.

TCAUP Student Show. 2012 / ARC 672 Live Work Project / AIA, At-Large Award Winner

TCAUP Student Show. 2012 / ARC 672 Live Work Project / Alumni Advisory Board, Second Place

&. Flex and Frame Issue. 2011 / Annual Publication of Taubman College / Contributor

Dimensions. Installment 24. 2010 - 2011 / Annual Publication of Taubman College / Editor

Effusions Art Journal. Spring Issue 2009 / Biannual Publication of Miami University SFA / Contributor

WMSR Student Radio. “Lab Partners”, “Reviews in Technicolor” August 2008 - December 2009 / Co-Host


spudthemud.com andrew.heathfield@gmail.com 812.343.5210

Resume

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Š Andrew Heathfield 2012


h

a


a

h

A. Heathfield Portfolio 2012  

Collected Works / University of Michigan & Miami University

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