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Alcohol 101 If you choose to drink, Alternate alcoholic with non-alcoholic drinks. 56% of UVM students who drink alternate alcoholic with non-alcoholic beverages. This keeps you hydrated and helps prevent being too intoxicated too quickly. Avoid pre-gaming. Pre-gaming often leads to dangerously high blood alcohol concentration (BAC) increasing vulnerability to violence and other problems. Avoid mixing alcohol with other drugs. Mixing even small amounts of alcohol and other drugs can be medically extremely dangerous. Choose not to drink. Most UVM students sometimes or always don’t drink when they go out to a party. If you are feeling highly emotional, physically ill, or just stressed out, drinking can make things worse.

ACUTE ALCOHOL POISONING SYMPTOMS: t Person seems asleep but cannot be awakened t Person is non-responsive to pain t Person has cold, clammy, or bluish skin t Breathing is slow or irregular t Person vomits while passed out

Call for help. If any of the symptoms are present call 802-656-3473 (FIRE) for UVM police and use the Medical Amnesty Program (MAP) to remove or reduce student conduct proceedings. Let a medical professional decide if someone needs medical help. On-campus response to alcohol policy violations: Meet with Center for Student Ethics and Standards or Res Life staff member who determines sanctions, ranging from education to fines to suspension/dismissal based upon severity or frequency.

DRINK DEFINITION:

A standard drink contains .5 ounces of pure alcohol. This means that a standard drink could be 5 oz of wine, 12 oz of beer, or 1.5 oz of 80 proof liquor. Mixed drinks can be anywhere from 1-3 drinks, depending on how they are made.

Laws to know: t Minor in possession/ underage drinking: $150 fine t Open container: $50 fine Police patrols operate throughout the year.


Consent 101 Intimacy does not have to equal intercourse! Consenting to kissing or taking off clothes doesn’t mean that someone wants to have sex. Ask at each step. Consent must be established with each new step and new activity. Never assume that you can touch someone or have sex. Communicate and listen when initiating sexual activity. Silence does NOT equal consent.

Find ways to ask...

t Is this okay? t Do you want to keep going? t Can I touch you here? t Do you want to have sex?

Benefits of consent

t You both feel safe. t You know your partner wants you for you. t You feel good afterwards. t There is an increased chance of a repeat.

Definitions

Consent: An informed, freely and actively given agreement that is mutually understood. Sexual Assault: Any sexual contact forced on another person. Rape: A form of sexual assault involving oral, anal or vaginal penetration.

You can do something! t Ask for and receive consent every time. t Challenge jokes, statements, and media that

Resources:

Counseling and Psychiatry Services (CAPS): 802-656-3340 Victim’s Advocate, UVM Women’s Center: 802-656-7892 advocate@uvm.edu

perpetuate sexual violence. t Attend programs, take courses, and read articles about gender violence. t Get involved! t If a friend confides in you, listen. Believe. Get support.

Women’s Health Clinic: 802-656-0603

There is no consent if the victim/survivor is mentally and/or physically incapacitated or impaired, including conditions due to alcohol or other drug consumption, being asleep, or unconscious. Don’t have sex if you’re not sure. Wait until another time when you are both sober, drug free, and certain.

Police Services: 802-656-3473 or 911 (from a campus phone)

Student Health/Medical Clinic: 802-656-3350

Spiritual and Religioius Life Council: www.uvm.edu/~spirit/>


Alcohol 101

Consent 101

Avoid pre-gaming. Pre-gaming often leads to dangerously high blood alcohol concentration (BAC) increasing vulnerability to violence and other problems.

Never assume that you can touch someone or have sex. Communicate and listen when initiating sexual activity. Silence does NOT equal consent.

Avoid mixing alcohol with other drugs. Mixing even small amounts of alcohol and other drugs can be medically extremely dangerous.

Find ways to ask...

If you choose to drink, Alternate alcoholic with non-alcoholic drinks. 56% of UVM students who drink alternate alcoholic with non-alcoholic beverages. This keeps you hydrated and helps prevent being too intoxicated too quickly.

Choose not to drink. Most UVM students sometimes or always don’t drink when they go out to a party. If you are feeling highly emotional, physically ill, or just stressed out, drinking can make things worse.

Laws to know: t Minor in possession/ underage drinking: $150 fine t Open container: $50 fine Police patrols operate throughout the year.

ACUTE ALCOHOL POISONING SYMPTOMS: t Person seems asleep but cannot be awakened t Person is non-responsive to pain t Person has cold, clammy, or bluish skin t Breathing is slow or irregular t Person vomits while passed out

Call for help. If any of the symptoms are present call 802-656-3473 (FIRE) for UVM police and use the Medical Amnesty Program (MAP) to remove or reduce student conduct proceedings. Let a medical professional decide if someone needs medical help. On-campus response to alcohol policy violations: Meet with Center for Student Ethics and Standards or Res Life staff member who determines sanctions, ranging from education to fines to suspension/dismissal based upon severity or frequency.

DRINK DEFINITION:

A standard drink contains .5 ounces of pure alcohol. This means that a standard drink could be 5 oz of wine, 12 oz of beer, or 1.5 oz of 80 proof liquor. Mixed drinks can be anywhere from 1-3 drinks, depending on how they are made.

Intimacy does not have to equal intercourse! Consenting to kissing or taking off clothes doesn’t mean that someone wants to have sex. Ask at each step. Consent must be established with each new step and new activity.

t Is this okay? t Do you want to keep going? t Can I touch you here? t Do you want to have sex?

Benefits of consent

t You both feel safe. t You know your partner wants you for you. t You feel good afterwards. t There is an increased chance of a repeat.

Definitions

Consent: An informed, freely and actively given agreement that is mutually understood. Sexual Assault: Any sexual contact forced on another person. Rape: A form of sexual assault involving oral, anal or vaginal penetration.

Resources:

You can do something! t Ask for and receive consent every time. t Challenge jokes, statements, and media that

Victim’s Advocate, UVM Women’s Center: 802-656-7892 advocate@uvm.edu

perpetuate sexual violence. t Attend programs, take courses, and read articles about gender violence. t Get involved! t If a friend confides in you, listen. Believe. Get support.

There is no consent if the victim/survivor is mentally and/or physically incapacitated or impaired, including conditions due to alcohol or other drug consumption, being asleep, or unconscious. Don’t have sex if you’re not sure. Wait until another time when you are both sober, drug free, and certain.

Counseling and Psychiatry Services (CAPS): 802-656-3340

Women’s Health Clinic: 802-656-0603 Student Health/Medical Clinic: 802-656-3350 Police Services: 802-656-3473 or 911 (from a campus phone) Spiritual and Religioius Life Council: www.uvm.edu/~spirit/>


Party Going

Check out these tips and advice on how to have a fun, safe time at parties. Most UVM students sometimes or always don’t drink when they go to a party. You can go to a party and drink soda or water and will be in good company. If you are feeling highly emotional, physically ill, or just stressed out, drinking can make things worse. Sound travels far and fast; talk quietly when walking around downtown. If you are at a party and things are going badly, call or text 802.363. TIPS (8477) to leave anonymous information with the Chittenden County Sheriff. If you see someone acting sketchy, you can do something. Ask the person/people to stop, distract them with random information, tell other people, call the police.

If you choose to drink at a party:

Alternate alcoholic with non-alcoholic drinks: This helps prevent being too intoxicated too quickly (a.k.a. getting the most out of drinking) Eat before and during drinking: This can slow the absorption of food and help you stay within your limits. Avoid pre-gaming, doing shots, and drinking games: All of these often lead to dangerously high blood alcohol concentration, increasing vulnerability to violence, and other problems. Avoid mixing alcohol with other drugs: Mixing even small amounts of alcohol and other drugs can be medically extremely dangerous.


Party Hosting Check out these tips and advice on how to throw a fun, safe party.

Talk to your neighbors: Talking to your neighbors before and after your party can make everyone happier. They can call you and not the police if people are being too loud. Provide food: Eating before, during, and after drinking can help keep people from drinking too much and not having fun. Provide non-alcoholic drinks: By providing non-alcoholic drinks, you welcome all your friends to the party. Alternating alcoholic with non-alcoholic drinks also helps keep people from drinking too much so they can have fun. Keep your party legal: Find a way to mark people who are of age to drink, turn people away who are drunk, and don’t serve people who are under 21. You are legally responsible for people during and after your party, so protect yourself. Bouncer, Bartender, Sober host: A bouncer can regulate the party for who gets in, how noisy things get, and help people leave safely. A bartender can regulate the alcohol. A sober host can keep non-alcoholic beverages stocked, and talk to neighbors and police if needed. Clean up: Pick up any trash on your lawn, and check-in with your neighbors.

Laws and Fines

Serving and/or selling alcohol to minors: $500-$2000 Minor in Possession: $150 Public urination/defecation: $50-$500 Open container: $50 Misrepresenting age: Diversion or $300 Burlington Noise Ordinance: $500 for lease holders, and 3rd offense is criminal. Police patrols occur throughout the year. Burlington Police Department reports municipal and arrest violations to UVM, so off-campus violations may have on-campus conduct effects.


THINK about the impact of your words, actions or silence. CARE about your community members. ACT to end incidents of harm or injustice.

THINK about the impact of your words, actions or silence. CARE about your community members. ACT to end incidents of harm or injustice.

THINK about the impact of your words, actions or silence. CARE about your community members. ACT to end incidents of harm or injustice.

THINK about the impact of your words, actions or silence. CARE about your community members. ACT to end incidents of harm or injustice.


Health Promotions 2011-2012  

various work for health promotions, 2011-2012

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