Page 1

Spring 2019

TWO CONTINENTS, ONE MISSION

pg. 12

HELPING HONEY pg. 26

Volume 65 Number 1

SOIL IN THE CITY pg. 44


Know a future Wildcat?

We’d love to meet them. (785) 532-5736 www.ag.ksu.edu @kstateag


KSUAGR .C OM 1919 Pl att St re et Man hatt an, KS 66502

“Making Better Men at K-State”


CONTENTS features

voices

PERSON BEHIND THE BRAND

26

HELPING HONEY

12

TWO CONTINENTS, ONE MISSION

28

CONNECTING COORDINATES

16

’CATS IN CORDUROY

31

MORE THAN METRO

18

MEANINGFUL MENTORSHIP

34

PULLING FOR PURPLE

20

OPENING THE CUPBOARD

36

ABROAD IN IRELAND

7

2

An editorial that captures the experiences of one student’s personal brand.

Agricultural economics student uses love of industry for international development.

Two out-of-state students attribute involvement with the College of Agriculture to their selection as National FFA American Star Award finalists.

Faculty advisers help students reach their full potential.

Students help improve the well-being of their food insecure peers.

How one Kansas State University student’s interest in bees became a career path.

From Saskatchewan to Kansas, an international student learns about livestock judging.

Animal sciences and industry from a whole new perspective.

Shooting is more than a hobby for some students.

Students in the College of Agriculture traveled to Ireland on a faculty-led study abroad trip. KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019


campus

interns

40

DAIRY ON THE GO

52

FROM THE BILL TO THE HILL

42

PEOPLE. PASSION. PIGS.

55

SWEET COMMUNICATION

Food science and industry students create an award-winning dairy snack.

Learning from example, students use their passion to create a new club on campus.

44

SOIL IN THE CITY

46

HITTING HIGH STANDARDS

Horticulture students discover the unique aspects of urban agriculture.

57

Two College of Agriculture students’ internships help shape the future of U.S. agricultural policy.

Student finds a sweet and tasty internship through the career fair.

INTERNSHIP ADVICE

Searching for internships prompts College of Agriculture students to explore potential.

Two College of Agriculture student-athletes manage academics and sports.

ON THE COVER: HELPING HONEY

Read more on page 26. Photo by Hannah Frobose

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019

3


livestock sales

JUNCTION CITY CLAY CENTER

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Cattle sold on Tuesdays in Clay Center and Wednesday in Junction City, Sheep and Goat Sales the first Saturday of each month in Clay Center.

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SERVE WITH

PURPOSE GIVE WITH

PASSION GROW THE

L E GAC Y Consider establishing a giving plan to honor a loved one or simply in celebration to help Kansas FFA members achieve premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. Visit ksffafoundation.org or email beth.gaines@ksffa.org to learn more.

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KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019


From the EDITORS

Leah Giess, Taylor Belle Matheny, Molly Bertz

C

reating a magazine is an involved process that begins with a vision and carries through to storytelling, advertising sales and creation, photography and design. Our goal is to tell the stories of the College of Agriculture in a way that informs readers in a visually appealing format. Leading our efforts this semester was editor and lead designer, Taylor Belle Matheny, who worked diligently to execute our vision. She implemented modern design techniques with bold colors and simplistic fonts. We hope the design probes readers to pick up the magazine and see it as a publication leader for creativity, imagination and modernism. This is a 64-page publication with 24 pages of advertising. We thank Molly Bertz, advertising manager, and her team for their diligence in selling advertising. They also worked with multiple clients to write advertising content and build the perfect advertisements for their businesses. Guiding the editorial content was Leah Giess, associate editor. She helped her staff writers plan story angles and edited their work. The students listened, learned and told fascinating stories about the people and happenings in KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019

the College of Agriculture, which are featured in this issue. Also assisting in the writing process was Sarah Moyer, who took time to edit the student’s stories as a guest editor. The magazine is broken up into five sections: Features, Voices, Imagery, Campus and Interns. Our special section, Voices, takes a look at the people behind the statistics. Stories in this section include an urban student’s journey to the College of Agriculture, an international student and his livestock judging path, and a student with a passion for honeybees. As editors, we are proud of our small but mighty group of students and their hard work, determination and team attitude. They put it all into this magazine. Thanks to Hannah Frobose, Kelli Schrag, Kyler Langvardt, Megan Green, Whitney Whitaker and Zachary Callaghan for their help to make this magazine a success. We would also like the thank Lisa Moser, our adviser. She takes time with each student and helps them be the best storyteller they can be through coaching, constant encouragement and being a source for new ideas. She pushes students to look beyond the basics, to dig deep and discover the full potential in a story.

Thank you, Lisa, for all that you do. For you, the reader, we appreciate you for taking time to look through the magazine. We are honored to share stories from within the College of Agriculture and hope you enjoy our version of the Kansas State Agriculturist. – The Spring 2019 Leadership Team

IN EVERY ISSUE 5

A LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

58

NEWS

62

ADVERTISING INDEX

63 64

AGRICULTURIST STAFF DID YOU MISS?

Colophon: Volume 65, Number 1, of the Kansas State Agriculturist was produced by the Spring 2019 agricultural student magazine class and printed by Jostens. This 64-page magazine, plus covers, was created using Mac computers. Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator were used in layout and design. All images were obtained by the Agriculturist staff unless otherwise noted, and all pages were designed by the staff. Advertisements were designed by the Agriculturist staff or came from original artwork. Pat Hackenberg, of the IGP Institute, provided technical advice and assistance during production. Inquiries about this issue should be addressed to Lisa Moser, Kansas State University, Department of Communications and Agricultural Education, 301Umberger Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506.

5


FUN, FAMILY, COMMUNITY AND FUTURE WITH

WHEAT STATE AGRONOMY CLUB Membership in Wheat State Agronomy Club allows students to be involved with the Department of Agronomy, keep updated on current agricultural events from industry professionals, and to join with students from other universities at national and regional meetings. Meetings are the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month.

WHEAT STATE AGRONOMY CLUB

@ksuwsac ksuwsac


FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

PERSON behind the

BRAND An editorial that captures the experiences of one student’s personal brand. editorial by LEAH GIESS

L

ike many College of Agriculture students, graduation is quickly approaching, and the job search has commenced. I’m checking off the normal items, researching companies and jobs, networking at conferences and updating my resume and LinkedIn profile. But as an agricultural communications and journalism major, a key lesson taught throughout my college education is the importance of developing a personal brand and what it means to have one. Many people might not understand the meaning of a brand. It is a widely used term, but unevenly understood. Today a brand is more than just a name given to a product or service. It’s the qualities, attributes and meaning behind it all. When connecting with people professionally, how do I want to be perceived by them? What fundamental values are observed? What do people think when they hear my name? All of these questions connect back to my personal brand. The idea behind a brand is to be remembered and recognized. My agricultural communications classes taught me the importance of making sure my resume, cover letter, business cards and anything professional carry the same design and layout. This helps employers recognize “me” and “my brand.”

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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Beyond the look of all the application items, a large part of a personal brand comes down to what I stand for and the value I can offer a team. This can help shape the opportunities made available to me. That is why it is important to outline exactly what I am good at and what I want to do, then incorporate those skills into my brand and reputation. There are multiple ways to show potential employers a personal brand and one common way is social media platforms. On all my platforms I make sure to be clear on the image I project and have one cohesive message. Going beyond social platforms, personal branding is more than posts to Facebook or replies on Twitter. It’s finding those personal qualities and recognizing them, then others will recognize them too. Looking to the future, I encourage College of Agriculture students to reflect on the self-awareness gathered through their education and understand their true value. Then launch their personal brand passionately and effectively, and just see where the opportunities lead.

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KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019


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Last semester members completed over 400 hours of community service. Pictured are members painting Manhattan Hill, one of our all house service projects. Five members attend Conclave, FarmHouse International’s biennial gathering to discuss relevant issues facing our fraternity, to receive training on how to become better leaders, and to network with other   FarmHouse members from across the country.

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spring 2019

Contact ksuagriculturist@gmail.com for more information.

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FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

TWO continents

Sara Gammon has traveled to two continents in her mission for international development.

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KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019


FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

ONE mission

Agricultural economics student uses love of industry for international development. story and photo by KYLER LANGVARDT

Y

ou know what, I might as well try.” A motto that Sara Gammon, student in agricultural economics with a secondary major in global food-systems leadership, has truly taken to heart. That motto has taken her to three countries on two continents. These trips are not just sightseeing trips, Gammon says, they are to improve the lives of others through agricultural development.

JUST A FEW PAGES Drexel, Missouri, a rural town might not seem like the launching point for an international career, but to Gammon, it provided the right mixture of family, support and agriculture. “My roots in agriculture started with my town, and even though it’s an hour south of Kansas City, it’s still pretty rural,” Gammon says. “I had a bit of interest in travel because of the trips I took with my family, but I hadn’t traveled out of the country.” That changed when Gammon was offered the opportunity to attend the World Food Prize Missouri Youth Institute. Her agricultural education teacher, Tammy Bartholomew (who Gammon credits as one of her strongest mentors), told her she needed to write a document about an international agricultural topic and present a solution to solve that issue. Before long, she was selected to represent Missouri as a KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019

delegate at the World Food Prize in Des Moines, Iowa in 2016. “Before the Global Youth Institute, I didn’t know how prevalent food insecurity was, even in the U.S.,” she says. “It’s where I found my path and when I decided to work abroad.” With her motto in mind, Gammon decided to apply for a Borlaug-Ruan Internship with the World Food Prize. The Borlaug-Ruan internship provides students an all-expenses-paid, eightweek experience, working around the globe. The chance paid off, Gammon was selected as a summer 2017 intern. Her destination was India.

EMPOWERING OTHERS The MS Swaminathan Research Foundation gave Gammon free-range over topics to choose for her research project. Without prior research experience, and after learning that women are often the head of production on farms in the country, Gammon decided to research the effectiveness of village milk centers for female dairy producers. “Women aren’t seen as equal on the farm in India,” Gammon says. “A man called the milk vendor would milk the cows for the women, then sell the milk on the market. He was supposed to give the women their share but most of the time he would say that it was a lower price at the market, so they were cheated out of money.”

Village milk centers put a woman in charge of selling the community’s milk, teaching other women how to properly milk the cows and paying the women based on the milk-fat percentage, ensuring a fair payment is received. Gammon used traditional surveys to meet with women and discuss how the milking centers had affected them. “I did surveys with women who were and weren’t a part of the center,” Gammon says. She found they were not only benefiting economically but also benefiting socially from the centers.

TAKING SERVICE INTERNATIONAL Returning home from India, Gammon started her official journey as a Kansas State University student. She wasted no time getting involved on campus with classes and organizations. Gammon also applied to be part of an International Service Team through the Staley School of Leadership Studies. “I originally applied because it seemed pretty open, and the place that they were going had a farm,” Gammon says. “I thought I could make a difference with my previous knowledge and experiences.” Gammon spent the summer of 2018 working with the Children and Youth Empowerment Center (CYEC) in Nyeri, Kenya.

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FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

“Once we arrived, I learned we came shortly after a team from Penn State had left, and they were studying the effectiveness of silage for the farms’ dairy cattle, so I decided to continue that research,” Gammon says. “After the silage samples from Penn State had fermented, I was able to check the samples and create more of the best quality silage.” The CYEC farm consists of crops, dairy cattle and napier grass. Farm products are used to feed the children who live and learn there. The center had struggled in the past, according to Gammon, because maize was the only crop planted the previous five years of production, which left the soil in terrible shape. If the napier grass could not produce a high amount of silage, the dairy cattle would have no feed in the dry season, leaving little food for the children of the center.

Gammon noted that farm employees seemed skeptical about why a crop rotation was needed, so she used a soil testing kit to check the soil for nitrogen and pH levels. “I was able to show them how badly their soil was lacking nitrogen,” Gammon says. “Beans are a staple crop for food, so we worked to plant maize during the rainy season and to supplement the beans into their rotation.” Gammon hopes that the work she accomplished in Kenya will continue to make a difference in the lives of children who live at the CYEC.

GAINING PERSPECTIVE Gammon knows that she wants to work in international development one day, but she has not pinpointed a location yet. “Since I want to work in international agriculture and development, I think it’s important to have those experiences

in different places around the world,” Gammon says. “If you’re trying to work with people instead of for people to develop solutions that work for them, it’s important to be there and hear them rather than work in an office in the U.S. and assume that you know what’s best.” By simply giving it a try, she has been able to experience international agriculture and find her mission. She encourages other agricultural students to embrace international experiences. “Even if you’re going back to the farm, the things you grow and sell won’t only stay in the United States,” Gammon says. “In whatever you do, even if you don’t realize it, you’re connected to our global society.”

1: Sara Gammon points toward a chalkboard with information about cash crops. Children living at the CYEC were learning about cash crops grown in Kenya during class. 2: Sara Gammon speaks with women in India who are a part of the village milk center program.

1

3: Sara Gammon weighs milk from dairy cattle in Nyeri, Kenya. Photos courtesy of Sara Gammon

2

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3

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019


The Kansas Department of Agriculture

Growing Kansas Agriculture.

CULTIVATING LEADERS. Agriculture is Kansas’ largest industry and economic driver, employing more than 238,000 people, nearly 13 percent of the Kansas workforce. The Kansas Department of Agriculture is doing our part by offering year-round student internships, part-time jobs and full-time careers. If you are interested in being part of our team, visit www.agriculture.ks.gov/jobs. Agriculture provides nearly

$

64 billion

in total economic contribution to the state

That jumps to over

Kansas exports more than

if you add food retail and ethanol production

in agricultural products

$

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$

3.6 billion

1320 Research Park Drive • Manhattan, Kansas • www.agriculture.ks.gov


’Cats in FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

CORDUROY

Two out-of-state students attribute involvement with the College of Agriculture to their selection as National FFA American Star Award finalists. story and photo by KELLI SCHRAG

E

Gracie Danner and Eric Koehlmoos used their experiences at K-State to be successful in FFA.

16

xperiences in the blue corduroy jacket lead to golden memories – pinnacle moments in one’s FFA career that are fondly looked back on with utmost gratification and satisfaction. For two Kansas State University College of Agriculture students from Iowa, this golden memory is their selection as National FFA American Star Award finalists. The American Star Awards are divided into four categories: agribusiness, agricultural placement, agriscience and farmer. The top four applicants in each category are selected as finalists, signifying they have mastered skills in production, finance, management or research. Eric Koehlmoos, agricultural education student from Granville, Iowa, was selected as a finalist for the American Star in Agriscience award. Agricultural economics student Gracie Danner was chosen as a finalist for the American Star in Agricultural Placement award. Danner is from West Liberty, Iowa. Danner and Koehlmoos proved themselves during the initial selection process and accredit their experience both at home and on campus to their success. KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019


FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

ELABORATE EXPERIENCES Family ties led Danner to her beef placement Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE). “Cattle have had a long history in my family with my grandpa and dad exhibiting across the nation,” Danner says. The family had shifted focus to crops and market hogs until cattle returned to the Danner farm as she started her SAE. She currently manages 30 Maine Anjou, Chianina and crossbred cows. As part of her SAE, Danner also works for a producer who owns and sells mostly crossbred show cattle. “I enjoyed learning about the marketing aspect associated with a larger producer,” Danner says. For her project, Danner focuses on the changes in genetics and the quality of her herd. Most of her personal research has been with genetics and she is certified in artificial insemination. “I’m very interested in the expected progeny differences,” Danner says. “I enjoyed using the Maine Anjou digital beef database to cross compare EPDs to make better breeding decisions.” Danner is responsible for understanding the needs of her cows and making the breeding decisions with the advice of her father. Together, Danner and her father increased the herd from three to 30 cows. “The most rewarding aspect is that it is a family operation that I can go home to,” Danner says. While Danner concentrated on the breeding aspect of cattle, Koehlmoos worked to create a different way to feed them. Koehlmoos’ four-year comparison study for his SAE in agriscience looked at ways to utilize common grasses to feed livestock by increasing ethanol yield and byproduct protein percentage. “I compared switchgrass and prairie cordgrass to corn the first year and to wheat straw the second year,” Koehlmoos says.

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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In the third and fourth years, he studied the effects of calcium hydroxide and sulfur, respectively, on ethanol yield. Koehlmoos had the opportunity to present his research findings to then President Barack Obama on the White House lawn in 2015. He was picked by the National FFA headquarters to represent the organization. “It was cool to say the least,” Koehlmoos says. “As somebody producing ethanol in their basement, it was interesting and weird to be at the White House and see how many security guards there were.”

PATHWAY TO PURPLE Danner credits the mentorship and encouragement of her FFA adviser, Zach Morris, for leading her to K-State. Danner was drawn to the university because of the College of Agriculture. “I loved my visit and have my whole life to go back to Iowa,” Danner says. “This was an opportunity to step outside my comfort zone and meet new people.” Danner says K-State has broadened her scope as to what she can do in agriculture and the beef industry. “My classes sparked my interest in trade and policy and gave me that global interest,” Danner says. Over spring break, she travelled to Ecuador with the agronomy department to study different crops and biomes. At K-State, Danner is involved as a College of Agriculture Ambassador and is in the Sigma Alpha Professional Sorority, where she currently serves as the philanthropy chair. “These two organizations have allowed me to grow professionally and also meet other individuals across the College of Ag that are in many different majors,” Danner says. Koehlmoos was not originally intending to come to K-State, but he decided to stop for a visit on his way to Oklahoma State University.

“I fell in love with K-State,” Koehlmoos says. “It was the right fit, I connected with the advisers and decided that purple looked better than orange anyway.” Koehlmoos has continued to conduct research at K-State, but with a different focus. Working with Gaea Hock, assistant professor in agricultural education, Koehlmoos is analyzing the perceptions of agriscience research to find ways to increase participation in the state agriscience research fair. The duo is looking at what is prohibiting Kansas teachers from conducting research with their students. Koehlmoos’ experiences at K-State contributed to his achievement of being selected as a finalist. His research with Hock has allowed him to present papers at two American Association for Agricultural Education conferences. He was able to coronate the state agriscience fair in May 2018, which added to his resume. His participation on the K-State meat judging team helped improve his communication and writing skills, which assisted in the application writing and interview process.

ENTHUSIASTIC REACTIONS Koehlmoos says he was excited about being selected as a finalist. “It was good to get that phone call and get the answer after waiting three months.” While being selected as a Star award finalist is prestigious in itself, this is not Danner’s first time to be nationally recognized. She was a national finalist in the beef production proficiency award area in 2017. “It was such an honor,” Danner says. “Beef aren’t a typical SAE in Iowa, so having a smaller project and being a national finalist in the beef proficiency area and now this, it’s an honor.” Editor’s Note: During the 2018 National FFA Convention, Koehlmoos was named the American Star in Agriscience.

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FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

Haley Wecker and Chad Paulk work together through undergraduate research.

MEANINGFUL MENTORSHIP Faculty advisers help students reach their full potential. story and photo by KELLI SCHRAG

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KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

E

veryone can think back on life and name someone who made a difference. Whether that mentor is a teacher, coach or friend, that person serves as a source of wisdom, teaching and support. A mentor’s role can also be rewarding as he or she influences the mentee’s life, who in turn influences the lives of others. For some Kansas State University students, their mentor is their academic adviser. Faculty mentors provide personal guidance and advice on academic and professional matters, helping their mentees not only clarify but achieve their career goals. Chad Paulk, assistant professor in feed science and management, and Haley Wecker, student in feed science and management, have formed a close mentorship through feed science research.

A RESEARCH FOCUS Typically, feed science majors accept manufacturing positions in feed mills after graduation; however, Wecker wants to conduct research or work on a product development team. “Being somebody who wants to go a different route than working in a feed mill, Dr. Paulk has helped me get involved and get my name in the industry,” Wecker says. Paulk and Wecker have worked together on research projects for 18 months. “When I arrived at K-State, Haley had previously received a National Pork Board undergraduate research grant with Dr. Cassie Jones,” Paulk says. “At this time, the undergraduate research project was transferred to me. After the project, Haley continued to work with me as an undergraduate research assistant.” To date, Paulk has provided guidance to Wecker on eight research projects varying in subject, but all pertaining to feed efficiency and pellet quality. Wecker has presented research findings at several conferences,

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019

including one on pellet quality at the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Midwestern Section regional meeting in Omaha, Nebraska, in March 2018. She was judged based on her poster and an oral presentation explaining her results. “It was a little scary at first,” Wecker says. “The oral presentation was out of my comfort zone. We practiced for about two months beforehand and Dr. Paulk helped me feel comfortable. We survived.”

“HER ABILITY TO BE A TEAM PLAYER, WHILE ALSO BEING ABLE TO LEAD PROJECTS INDEPENDENTLY ALLOWED ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO GIVE HER MORE RESPONSIBILITY.” – Chad Paulk, Assistant Professor in Feed Science and Management Wecker did more than just survive; she placed first in her category. “Although Haley’s greatest accomplishment is really hard to define because she’s had so many as an undergraduate researcher, I’d say her greatest was winning the ASAS Midwest meeting undergraduate research poster presentation competition,” Paulk says.

A TALENTED TEAM Paulk recognizes Wecker’s work ethic and problem solving abilities and contributes them to her talent as an undergraduate researcher. “Haley has been an integral part of the feed science research program at K-State,” Paulk says. “Her ability to be a team player, while also being able to lead projects independently allowed me the opportunity to give her more responsibility.” Paulk considers his relationship with Wecker as symbiotic; both benefit from each other’s dedication to “push the envelope” in feed science research.

“Haley’s work ethic and abilities far exceed what is expected as an undergraduate researcher. She was always willing to help and work long days in order to complete research projects,” Paulk says. “The dedication that Haley has provided to the Feed Science Research Team and as president of the Feed Science Club has allowed our program to achieve new levels of success. This dedication and hard work mixed with the ability to have fun while working is the key to successful relationships between mentors and mentees.”

A MEANINGFUL MENTOR Just as Wecker recognizes Paulk as a valuable asset to her success, Paulk appreciates his mentors for helping him get to where he is today. Among others, Paulk acknowledges Charles Stark, Jim and Carol Brown associate professor in feed technology, as a mentor in his professional career. “Dr. Stark has been essential in my development as a faculty member,” Paulk says. “The thing I have learned the most from him is how to have positive relationships with students.” Stark currently serves as the faculty coordinator of the O.H. Kruse Feed Technology Innovation Center and Cargill Feed Safety Research Center. He and Paulk have been working together for the last two years to grow the graduate and undergraduate research programs in the Department of Grain Science and Industry. “Dr. Paulk’s best qualities as an undergraduate mentor are his abilities to help students develop protocols, analyze data and present the findings at national meetings,” Stark says. “He takes the time to explain to the students why the research is important and how it will contribute to the scientific community, and then holds them accountable for their research.”

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FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

OPENING the

CUPBOARD Students help improve the well-being of their food insecure peers. story and photos by ZACHARY CALLAGHAN

S

tudents who are hungry cannot focus in classes; can’t focus on a healthy lifestyle; and, ultimately, can’t do what they came to college to do,” says Katheryn Gregerson, food science and industry student. It’s estimated that about 40 percent of financially stressed Kansas State University students are food insecure. Many on campus are intentionally taking action to resolve this issue.

CREATING CHANGE The Cats’ Cupboard, an on-campus student food pantry, opened in 2017. It has received support from some in the College of Agriculture who provide expertise and dedication to this resource. The pantry, located in the basement of Fairchild Hall, is open Sunday through Friday. “I had been pushing for development of a food pantry since I was a freshman at K-State,” says Christine Rock, now a fourth-year student in food science and industry. “I teamed up with other students to write and share petitions and create buy-in for the campus resource.” She also worked with faculty and staff on funding applications that led to the pantry’s establishment. Both Gregerson and Rock serve on the advisory board for the Cats’ Cupboard and committees, also called champion groups. Gregerson chairs the Patron Experience Champion Group, while Rock heads the Partnerships Champion Group. Collectively, these groups ensure the pantry receives support from outside organizations and provides the best experience possible. “I use my position to share a student perspective while tying in my connection to other food-based groups like Food Recovery Network and Food Science Club,” Rock says. “The champion groups seek to collaborate with K-State and 20

Christine Rock and Katheryn Gregerson support the Cats’ Cupboard food pantry by volunteering and serving on its advisory board. community-based efforts related to food justice and food security to further the goals of Cats’ Cupboard.” On the advisory board, they help generate new ideas, organize events and plan the pantry’s future. They work with a team to help achieve the pantry’s goals. “As a student representative, I serve alongside a few other students, faculty, staff and vital community members,” Gregerson says. “We address issues like stigma and ensuring all users have the best experience possible.”

SHATTERING STIGMAS The pantry is open to anyone enrolled at K-State, including nontraditional and international students who are experiencing financial stress. Since its launch last year, Cats’ Cupboard has been used more than 3,000 times. “This resource prioritizes a safe, welcoming and inclusive environment to minimize the stigma associated with seeking help,” Rock says. “Items in the pantry are available to any student, in whatever quantity, and at whatever frequency they deem necessary.” The pantry’s support doesn’t end with food insecurity. Shelves are stocked with hygiene products, school supplies and even cookware. When students visit the Cats’ Cupboard, they also learn about financial, mental and physical health resources. “Cats’ Cupboard has done a great job so far reaching out to affected populations and trying to fill the gap among already existing resources on K-State’s campus,” Gregerson says. Both students believe there’s more work to be done. Some college students may not be aware of their own food insecurity, while others suddenly find themselves in unfortunate situations that reduce their food security.

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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“Many students don’t know the true definition of food insecurity and don’t realize that they themselves could take advantage of the pantry,” Gregerson says. “Food insecurity isn’t a one-sizefits-all sort of description. It can affect anyone at any time,” Rock says. These students want to defeat the stereotype of a hungry college student eating cheap meals out of a box. All students should have access to healthy and affordable food options, and the Cats’ Cupboard could help achieve this. “Food insecurity means buying ramen when you want fresh vegetables and meat. Food insecurity means skipping meals to afford rent. Food insecurity means saying no to hanging out with friends because they want to eat out, and you’re afraid you won’t be able to afford the bill. Food insecurity can look different from person-to-person, but its effects can be devastating to all who experience it,” Rock says. To alleviate stigmas and help students, some believe actions should be taken to create change. The College of Agriculture may have resources and the potential to facilitate that change.

AGRICULTURAL ACTIONS Those studying agriculture may have an upper hand when it comes to understanding matters surrounding food. A few are implementing their knowledge to address the complex issue of food insecurity at the university.

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“As a food science student, I have been able to learn about the nutritional value and makeup of food. This has helped me appreciate the work that goes into ensuring that food available at the pantry is healthy, filling and nutritious,” Gregerson says. “If students are getting free food, but it is only desserts, carb-loaded, boxed pasta and potato chips, the pantry is not fulfilling its goals.” In addition to students, several departments have provided support. “An awesome new resource for the Cats’ Cupboard is our partnership with the animal sciences and industry department to provide vouchers for meat and dairy products in Call Hall,” Gregerson says. “I think it’s a great opportunity for hungry students to get the nutrients their bodies need.” A horticulture and natural resource class donated extra lettuce from a hydroponics experiment. “Other students may have connections via jobs and internships to agricultural companies that could donate some food products to the pantry. Donation drives are great, too,” Rock says.

PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE Cats’ Cupboard is always seeking new donations and support. Pantry staff, who are mostly student volunteers, keep the website updated with current needs. Often, this list includes canned fruit, granola bars, tuna, cereal, pasta and female hygiene products.

Students stock shelves and share the message about food insecurity on campus. “Once every student is aware of what food insecurity is and sees the resources K-State has to offer, this hunger problem will start to diminish,” Rock says. Students in the college provide perspective on food security and can be well-suited to help address the issues faced. “To get involved or volunteer, I’d encourage College of Agriculture students to think in terms of the resources within their departments/ institutes and those that are unique to themselves,” Rock says. The cupboard lists current volunteer opportunities on its website. Volunteering may be rewarding and make a positive difference on campus. Students can see the real-life impact they can make by helping their peers. “Volunteering with Cats’ Cupboard has shown me just how big of an issue food insecurity is on our campus. I have also seen a plethora of students and staff coming together to help their peers and friends,” Gregerson says. “It’s exciting to see how many others are passionately fighting hunger on our campus, and the Cats’ Cupboard is the perfect outlet to make a difference.”

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Expand your career in Food and Agriculture Be a part of feeding the world of the future.

Earn an advanced degree

ONLINE. 1-800-622-2578 global.k-state.edu/ag

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18

Countries represented

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Percent of students come from cities of 50,000 or larger

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College of Agriculture organizations

Minors

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VOICES special section

Voices takes a look at the people behind the statistics of the College of Agriculture at Kansas State University.

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Helping Honey How one Kansas State University student’s interest in bees became a career path.

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story and photo by HANNAH FROBOSE

efore going to college, students often have a vague idea of what career path they are searching for. Generally, their past experiences help them decide what their major will be. However, many incoming students are still unsure of what their ideal career is. Rogan Tokach, a student majoring in agronomy and minoring in entomology, knew exactly what he was going to be before he ever stepped foot on campus.

WHERE THE BUZZ BEGAN

VOICES special section KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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Tokach grew up in Abilene, Kansas, where he was involved in many different activities, including 4-H and FFA. Between his seventh and eighth grade years in high school, Tokach was attending his county fair where he saw a honeybee booth. Interested in the bees, he began asking the booth manager questions about beekeeping. “I kept pestering the guy about it and continued to go back day after day,” Tokach says. Eventually, Tokach shared this interest with his mom. Testing how sincere his curiosity was, his mom bought him “Beekeeping for Dummies,” promising that if he read it, she would consider getting him bees. “She didn’t think I would read it all the way through,” Tokach says. “But I did.” While researching different ways to get involved in beekeeping, Tokach and his mom found a scholarship offered through the Kansas Honey Producers Association (KHPA) that is built to help young individuals learn about beekeeping and honey production through hands-on experience. Tokach and his sister were awarded the scholarship with which they received a hive, bees, two suits and the necessary equipment to start their own beehive as well as a mentor. Becky Tipton, who currently serves as the KHPA’s third vice president and scholarship chair, was Tokach’s mentor. “That initial experience was really great and is what got me started in beekeeping,” Tokach says. “I decided to turn that into 4-H projects from there forward.”

HELPING HONEY During his first year of beekeeping, Tokach gave the honey he produced to family and friends. After his second year, he KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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and his sister were producing so much honey that he realized it could serve a greater purpose. “I decided to start a service project called ‘Honey for Heifer,’ which I am still involved in today,” Tokach says. “I sell every one pound jar of honey for $10 and all of my proceeds go through Heifer International.” Heifer International is an organization based out of Little Rock, Arkansas, that works with communities to end world hunger and poverty. One of Heifer International’s charities involves donating animals to communities in need that can use the animal to sustain themselves. Some animals that Heifer International currently provides are, cows, pigs, chickens and beehives. “One hive through Heifer International is $30, so every three jars I sell is one hive,” Tokach says. “My goal every year is to sell 150 jars so I can buy 50 hives for communities in need.” Tokach has been involved in Honey for Heifer for more than five years now, and both his mom and dad have been able to work through Heifer International directly. “It’s been a very rewarding project to be a part of,” Tokach says. Tokach was also involved in a special interest (SPIN) club in 4-H known as Brown’s Busy Beekeepers. Through this club, Tokach reapplied for the KHPA scholarship in order to receive two more hives and the equipment to start another bee farm at a local retirement home. “I wanted to give people an opportunity to learn about honey production and taking care of honeybees,” Tokach says. “I was able to teach a lot of different people about honeybees and several families even decided to get their own bees through that process which was really rewarding.”

FOR FUTURE COLONIES Tokach had always planned to enroll in K-State at the conclusion of his senior year of high school, and in August 2016, he made the move to Manhattan, Kansas. With the ultimate goal of becoming a honeybee researcher, he hoped to find a degree path that suited his interests. K-State only offers entomology as a minor, therefore, Tokach strategically chose a major that would best compliment that minor while still preparing him for his future.

“I’m able to take more plant-based courses with an agronomy major,” Tokach says. “Having that background might give me a different perspective than other researchers because not many have direct ties to agronomy.” During his time at K-State, Tokach has worked as a graduate research assistant for Brian McCornack and his PhD student Stephen Losey. He attributes the majority of his knowledge of general research to his time spent working in their lab. “Rogan is the ideal undergraduate lab worker,” Losey says. “He’s on time and does the work we’ve asked, but he is also very detail oriented and has curiosity for the experiments we ask him to help with. Rogan has a genuine interest in beekeeping and already owns several of his own hives. This may seem like a small fact by many, but try robbing over 150,000 bees each year of their hard earned honey and you’ll realize that an attention to detail is a great ally to have.” This past summer, Tokach worked for the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in North Dakota, where he helped assess how land-use change was affecting honeybee health. “We were able to see what type of floral resources the bees were utilizing in relation to what was available,” Tokach says. After graduating from K-State, Tokach hopes to attain graduate degrees from universities with beekeeping programs. “The end goal would be to hopefully work for a university where I could work in the field doing research trials of my own with honeybees,” Tokach says. “That’s what really interests me is actually being able to do research, look at the data and make inferences from that in order to help honeybee production as a whole.” Tokach believes he can someday make an impact in the industry by researching some of the main issues in honeybee production such as pests and the impact that insecticides and pesticides have on honeybees. Tokach says, “Learning how to make agronomical practices safer for beekeepers would be a goal for me.”

Rogan Tokach checks the bees on one of his hives on a farm. Photo courtesy of Rogan Tokach KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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VOICES special section KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

CONNECTING COORDINATES From Saskatchewan to Kansas, an international student learns about livestock judging. story and photo by WHITNEY WHITAKER

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hile known for ice hockey, the maple leaf and the occasional “Eh?” phrase, Canada is also home to several international students within the College of Agriculture at Kansas State University. Cody Ray Lafrentz, student in animal sciences and industry from Beinfait, Saskatchewan, which is just north of the U.S. border, is part of that international statistic. Lafrentz left the cold northern tundra to travel south for an education and livestock judging at K-State.

SUNFLOWER STATE For Lafrentz, coming to the U.S. meant leaving his parents, brother and family-run Simmental operation all behind, while he pursued an education. With Wheatland Cattle Company 28

in mind, learning production agriculture and participating on livestock judging teams justified leaving home. “Back home the livestock judging programs don’t have the same competition level in the United States,” he says. “I’ve always loved being part of the agriculture industry and making new friends that share the same interests, which is a big reason why I jumped the border.” With a lot of faith and support from his family, Lafrentz first went to Hutchinson Community College to be a part of the livestock judging team. Attending community college was the first stop for Lafrentz because earning a bachelor’s degree wasn’t his original plan. His appreciation for Kansas and the Hutchinson judging coach, Ben Williams, gave Lafrentz the courage to start a new chapter far from home. KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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FROM THE BEGINNING

LESSONS LEARNED

Before starting school, Lafrentz had to complete a few extra steps. As an international student, applying to school isn’t difficult; however, getting a visa is an important step. “The visa is stapled in my passport, which allows me to cross back and forth without questioning why I’ve been in the states so long,” Lafrentz says. “After that you need to have your paperwork dated and signed by the border workers and my international adviser.” While the university application process may not differ from U.S. citizens, tuition and travel can be more expensive. Chris Mullinix, K-State livestock judging coach, says dealing with the financial portion of being an international student is probably the most challenging part. “Like most students who pay their way through school or have a bigger tuition bill, they often appreciate the opportunities even more,” Mullinix says. “They tend to really focus and take advantage of the opportunities they are being given.” After two years at Hutchinson Community College, Lafrentz wanted to continue learning and enjoying what he calls the “college lifestyle.” His friends were continuing on to K-State, so Lafrentz decided to stay in the U.S. for two more years. His older brother, Riley Lafrentz, graduated from K-State and loved the animal science program and livestock judging team. Lafrentz knew it would be a good decision. Aside from the few hurdles Lafrentz faces being an international student, he has taken advantage of what the College of Agriculture offers. He was part of the National Champion Meat Animal Evaluation Team in spring 2018, and he finished his collegiate livestock judging career in fall 2018 being named Reserve National Champions. Being on these competitive teams allowed Lafrentz to learn more about livestock evaluation and continue to network and make lifelong friends.

“I have seen other producers from back home come down to the states for school, and they loved the programs each school offered,” Lafrentz says. “They always told me that the people you meet and connections you make will last a lifetime.” Mullinix believes in what the international students have been doing for themselves by attending a university in the U.S. “Classroom theory is wonderful, but getting to know producers who make their living in the industry that Cody loves will take on far lasting relevance,” Mullinix says. “Collegiate judging has helped him develop a skill set that simply wasn’t available at home. He’s learned decision-making and communication skills in a competitive environment.” As Lafrentz thinks toward the future, he isn’t sure what his time in the U.S. will look like, but his long-term goal is to end up back at his family’s operation in Canada. All-in-all, Lafrentz is happy with his decisions throughout the past four years. Being a student at K-State has been valuable to Lafrentz, but Mullinix also points out that Lafrentz has also offered a lot to the university and the students he interacts with in class and on the judging team. When asked about Lafrentz, teammates are quick to share the laughs they exchanged and the memories made with their international friend. “Having Cody at K-State has enriched the experience of every person on our team,” Mullinix says. “He’s quiet by nature, but it’s safe to say his teammates have opened him up. Bottom line, Cody’s experience at K-State has benefited us all and he is ready to make his mark in the livestock industry.”

Cody Ray Lafrentz (back row, second from left) was a member of the 2018 livestock judging team, coached by Chris Mullinix (back row, left). KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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Summer is a great time to continue your studies and stay on track toward graduation from Kansas State University. Take courses on campus, online or study abroad. Mix and match with summer jobs, internships and experiences to create your custom K-State summer!

k-state.edu/summer

What’s your graduation date? Talk with your advisor about using evening college, intersession and summer courses in your long-range plan to graduate on time. Expand your scheduling options by fitting an online class into your schedule, available in both eight- and 16-week formats.

Evening College

Online

Intersession

UFM credit

Fit more into your schedule with eight-week or 16-week classes on campus between 5:30 and 10:30 p.m. evening.k-state.edu

Stay on track to finish your degree with online classes in eight-week and 16-week schedules. distance.k-state.edu

Get ahead with short on-campus or online classes between standard university semesters. intersession.k-state.edu

Take recreation, dance and fitness classes for university credit through UFM Community Learning Center. tryufm.org/credit-courses


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MORE than METRO

Animal sciences and industry from a whole new perspective. story and photos by HANNAH FROBOSE

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orting cattle, shearing sheep or feeding pigs are all familiar tasks for most Kansas State University animal sciences and industry students. In fact, many of the College of Agriculture students are accustomed to a lifestyle that entails pitching manure or making livestock breeding decisions because it represents a part of their family’s livelihood. Yet, for the 24 percent of College of Agriculture students who come from cities of 50,000 or larger, a production agriculture background may be more difficult to come by. Dariyan Springfield, an animal science pre-veterinary major from metropolitan Kansas City, Kansas, found his passion for animal science a little bit differently.

LIFE IN THE CITY Springfield grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, where the majority of the non-companion animals he was exposed to were behind a television screen. Despite his lack of contact with wildlife, he was always determined to learn more about animals. “While most kids watched cartoons, I would rather have been watching shows like ‘Animal Planet,’” Springfield says. He constantly insisted that his mother take him to visit their local zoo where he took an interest in the creatures behind the gates and glass. He took every possible opportunity to learn more about different species of wildlife. “I wanted to be like Steve Irwin or Jeff Corwin,” Springfield says. “They had jobs that actually revolved around working with exotic animals.” At just 4 years old, he was able to list interesting facts about many different species from around the world. This love for animals soon evolved into a career goal, and Springfield hoped to one day become a zookeeper. Like most childhood dreams, however, the fascination with becoming a zookeeper faded when he realized that they were only paid roughly $12 per hour. His dream resurfaced during his senior year of high school when a teacher noticed Springfield’s interest in exotic animals and encouraged him to consider becoming a veterinarian. In particular, a zoo veterinarian. Just one year later, Springfield was determined to go to veterinary school. As Springfield worked to choose a university that fit his goals, he focused on what each school’s veterinary program had to offer. Unlike many, K-State’s College of Veterinary Medicine offers an exotic and zoo animal program. This program ultimately sold him on what would be his next eight years in Manhattan, Kansas. There, he would join the 45 percent of animal science students who plan to apply to veterinary school. Little did he know, just his first few days as an animal science student would not turn out as planned.

CHANGING PERSPECTIVES “I didn’t realize that an animal science degree was so livestock focused,” Springfield says. “I didn’t have the background that most other students had and I began having 32

second thoughts, but I’m glad I stuck with it. The College of Agriculture has a homey feel that I’m glad to be a part of.” With time, Springfield embraced the agriculture lifestyle and took many opportunities to learn more about livestock. Currently, he is a part of the Sheep and Meat Goat Science class that he claims are his two favorite domestic species. He appreciates that, along with meat, sheep and goats provide other byproducts like wool or cashmere, which he believes is a statement of how widespread and unique the sheep and goat industries truly are. “People don’t talk about them as often or even realize how much they provide on a global scale,” Springfield says. Beyond enrolling in about every animal science course K-State has to offer, Springfield also took a job as an animal science research assistant for professor Barry Bradford and assistant professor Laman Mamedova. As a research assistant, he’s had opportunities to run tests in labs, collect data at the dairy unit and make strong connections with animal science department faculty. “DJ has been a great member of our research team,” Bradford says. “Despite juggling many different activities in his weekly schedule, he is a reliable and professional assistant in the lab, often taking on monotonous and repetitive tasks with a smile on his face.” These experiences quickly showed Springfield that the skills he was gaining working with and learning about livestock could be applied to his passion for exotic animals as well. “Due to my experience working in a zoo and with livestock, I have been able to compare and contrast the struggles and achievements within both industries and see how far both have come to get to where they are now,” Springfield says.

WHAT IT TAKES Springfield knows all too well that experience means just as much on a veterinary school application as an academic record. That in mind, he’s gotten involved in many programs and activities both on and off campus. Aside from his jobs as both a research assistant and a desk manager for Moore Hall, Springfield is a member of K-State’s Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) chapter. “It’s a great organization for networking,” Springfield says. “It helps connect you with people in the agriculture industry and it’s also helped me make a lot of friends.” Springfield also serves as the president of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African-American men. Since becoming a member in 2016, Springfield has held many executive roles in the chapter and gained major role models. Outside of coursework and campus life, Springfield has prioritized internship experience as well. He interned at the Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo as a zookeeper, which helped him gain hands-on skills working with exotic animals. During his time there he had opportunities to work in every department

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Percent of students from cities of 50,000 or larger

VOICES special section KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

Above: Dariyan Springfield has integrated himself into other aspects of animal agriculture during his education at K-State. Right: Dariyan Springfield interned at the Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo where he worked on projects with bears. Right photo courtesy of Dariyan Springfield including carnivores, primates, hoof stock and avian wildlife as well as working in the feed house and the zoo’s program leadership department. His project during the internship was to design and build a bed for Boodah, one of the zoo’s bears. He created the bed out of fire hoses, and the zoo continues to use Springfield’s project today. “It was a great experience that solidified that I want to work with zoo animals,” Springfield says. For the upcoming summer, Springfield has been accepted into the McNair Scholars program. This program aims to prepare students that represent minority segments of society for doctoral studies through research and other scholarly activities. Springfield hopes to work with an adviser from the College of Veterinary Medicine to develop an undergraduate research project that would ultimately prepare him for a graduate program. He plans to apply to the College of Veterinary Medicine in the summer of 2019.

PERSEVERANCE No matter the dream, goal or ambition, Springfield believes that it’s important to stay true to oneself. Like most preveterinary students, Springfield was approached numerous

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times with warnings of how difficult and expensive his academic and career paths would be. “At times, I was intimidated by the cost and difficulty of vet school and people reminded me of that constantly,” Springfield says. “I had to work to not let those things deter me from my dreams.” Despite lacking a production agriculture background, Springfield has persevered by getting involved in and out of the College of Agriculture in order to pursue his goals. “If you have a passion for something, follow your dreams and just go for it,” Springfield says. “Never let anything deter you from accomplishing what’s important to you.”

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PULLING

for Purple

Shooting is more than a hobby for some students. story and photos by MEGAN GREEN

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ressed in a Kansas State University polo with a shotgun in hand, wildlife and outdoor enterprise management students take their position, shouting “pull,” aim and fire.

THE TEAM Rounds are shot and the scoring begins. Marty Shanks, a student majoring in wildlife and outdoor enterprise management (WOEM) explains, “We go to a shoot and usually a round is made up of 100 shots at 100 clays. So, our score is how many we hit out of 100. In a weekend, we shoot anywhere from 300 to 600 shots depending on the competition. Each round is usually a different event. We shoot trap, skeet and sporting clays.” Every year, Kansas State University’s shotgun shooting sports team members attend the ACUI Collegiate Clay Target Championships, a week-long national competition. More than 800 people participate, with 200 rounds each day. In 2018, the K-State team placed fourth out of 25 teams. K-State WOEM student James Norin leads the team as president and hosts practices throughout the year. They attend local and regional shoots to practice for the national competition. They work together to raise money by hosting 34

shoots for other schools to attend. They also have a few meetings to coordinate when and what shoots they will be attending as well as informational safety meetings. During each competition, the individual scores are added up to reach an overall team score. K-State’s team attends multiple competitions over the semester with different placings. Shanks participated in about four each semester and attended the national competition. Shanks has been shooting for 16 years and competitive shooting for 13. “I started practicing with my dad and then went on to shoot in 4-H and the National Sporting Clays Association (NSCA),” Shanks says.

SHOOTING TO LEARN As the saying goes, “practice makes perfect” and these students work hard before every competition to do the best that they can. Alex Hartman is a student in WOEM who also attends multiple shooting competitions a year. With the encouragement of a few friends, Hartman decided to join the shotgun sports team at K-State. He has always enjoyed hunting and fishing, so joining the team seemed fitting.

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Organizations

Above: Marty Shanks practices shooting sporting clays. Right: Marty Shanks (left), Drake Dieker, Nathan Peleska, Alex Hartman are members of the Shotgun Shooting Sports team.

“It’s another way to learn. I’d like to manage a shooting range one day and possibly own one. So I am getting around and seeing different operations and also getting ideas for the future,” Hartman says. Being on the team can be a learning experience for students. “I have learned a lot from our president, fellow members as well as my coach,” Hartman says. For some students, the shooting sports team gives job opportunities as well. “I have a year-long internship set up at a big shooting and hunting course in New Jersey I’m planning on going to after I graduate in May. They knew I’m on the team, which I believed helped me get it,” Shanks says. “I’ve also met many good friends while at college shoots that I keep in touch with still.” Attending shoots also allows students to become better hunters. “Practicing for competition allows me to be more of an instinctive shooter while out hunting,” Shanks says. “I don’t have to think about how far I need to lead a bird. It’s just natural because of how much I shoot.”

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SHOOTING DEFINED Trap shooting: Varying from skeet and sporting clays, the field is set in five different stations in a slight semi-circle around the trap house, also known as “the bunker.” The clays are thrown in different directions and up to 42 miles per hour. There are single rounds shot until all shooters have shot five targets at their station. They then rotate stations until a total of 25 rounds have been shot. Skeet shooting: This differs from trap shooting in that instead of one trap house, there are two called a high house and low house. There are also eight stations. Seven are located in the semi-circle and one is by itself in the middle. The two different houses are thrown at different angles, and the shooters take turns shooting a mix of singles and true pairs. Sporting clay: Also known as “shotgun golf,” it is the most accurate for simulating bird hunting. The targets in sporting clays are thrown at different speeds, angles and distances.

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ABROAD

in Ireland

Students in the College of Agriculture traveled to Ireland in a Department of Communications and Agricultural Education faculty-led study abroad trip. The 15 students experienced everything the Emerald Isle has to offer, partaking in educational tours about cheese, wool, beef and dairy production. Students saw the country views, stopping by the famous Cliffs of Moher and visiting castles. During their time in the city, students tasted Irish cuisine and mingled with the locals. Through numerous cups of tea and plenty of scones, students appreciated the hospitality of those they met. The College of Agriculture offers multiple faculty-led trips every year to offer students the opportunity to experience another culture.

1 Photographers 1. Taylor Belle Matheny, agricultural communications and journalism 2. Kyler Langvardt, agricultural communications and journalism 3. Taylor Belle Matheny, agricultural communications and journalism 4. Taylor Belle Matheny, agricultural communications and journalism 5. Cara Wolverton, agricultural education 6. Kyler Langvardt, agricultural communications and journalism 36

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EXTENSION

RESEARCH

TEACHING

785-532-6533 • 232 Weber Hall • asi.k-state.edu


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on the go

Food science and industry students create an award-winning dairy snack. story by HANNAH FROBOSE

Photos courtesy of Kansas State University Food Science Graduate Students

I

magine having a nutritious, dairy-based snack in the palm of your hands. Something quick and easy to consume, maybe even while driving a car. Products that come to mind might be drinkable yogurt or string cheese. However, a new creation from Kansas State University food science and industry students may have

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consumers rethinking their next to-go dairy snack.

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Every year, Kansas State University food science professors and students work together to compete in various new product competitions. For the past six years, Kelly Getty and Jay

Amamcharla, associate professors of food science, have led these teams to several championships. In 2018, the theme of the National Dairy Council’s new product competition was to develop a highprotein, dairy-based snack. Three K-State food science students, Priyamvada Thorakkattu, Karthik KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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Sajith Babu and Yuda Ou accepted this challenge to develop a product that fit this theme. Ou had tasted a german-style cheese known as quark, a soft unripened cheese with a smooth creamy texture, while traveling in European countries. “That’s how we came up with the idea,” Thorakkattu says. From there, the team worked together to manipulate the product into a convenient, high-protein snack that consumers would find intriguing. After accepting quark as their base ingredient, the team developed a list of flavors that would make the product more ideal to consumers. However, this process can be lengthy. “It is very hard to press both a new product and new flavor together, and still achieve consumer acceptability,” Thorakkattu says. In order to pinpoint what flavors would be acceptable to consumers, the team conducted multiple consumer taste panels to find flavors that worked best for their product. “We had many different flavors in mind like pumpkin spice and seasonal flavors,” Babu says. “Since our product itself was new, we needed exemplary flavors to offset that.” The consumer panels revealed the highest likability toward two flavors, blueberry acai and piña colada. The next step in the development process was to create a package that fit the “snack” aspect of the competition’s theme. They prioritized convenience, hoping that a consumer could eat the product while on the way to class or even while driving a car. “Our packaging was a bit extraordinary,” Thorakkattu says. “We used a small pouch that you can squeeze and eat like a smoothie.” “It’s like a drinkable quark,” Babu says. “It’s different from a yogurt drink because it is more viscous and is easier to eat.” The quick, on-the-go style of the product ultimately helped them choose the name of their product: Quick Quark. KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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Not only does the consistency of Quick Quark differentiate it from yogurt, but it provides added nutritional benefits as well. “Our serving size is about 150 grams with 14 grams of protein,” Thorrakkatu says. “That’s double the amount of protein of most yogurt drinks on the market.” The team was able to mask the slight chalk-like taste of the extra protein with the flavors that they had chosen, and the end result was more than satisfactory to the judges that evaluated their product. “All of the judges finished their entire sample, which was very exciting for us,” Babu says.

PUTTING IT ON THE SHELF Though the success in the competition meant a lot to the team, they spent little time dwelling on the win before evaluating what was next. Often, teams don’t usually get to keep ownership of their product. “Companies and organizations that sponsor these competitions will

generally buy the product and market it as their own,” Getty says. That didn’t stop the team members from exploring other avenues for Quick Quark. Though they have been approached by several companies interested in buying their product, the team sees possibilities of keeping it in Manhattan, Kansas. “If we could get a fermenter and the right kind of packaging machine, it’d be easy to make the product here, but we haven’t finalized any of these plans yet,” Babu says. Beyond the product, the team members are also excited about what this win means for their futures in the food industry. “When you’re graduating in food science, this competition can help with attaining jobs,” Amamcharla says. “Employers often question where students have applied the things they’ve learned in class to real life. This competition and these student’s success is an example of that.”

From left: Karthik Sajith Babu, Priyamvada Thorakkattu and Yuda Ou. The group shares the poster illustrating their product.

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PEOPLE. PASSION. PIGS. Learning from example, students use their passion to create a new club on campus. story and photos by WHITNEY WHITAKER

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ansas State University has many programs to offer students, especially in the College of Agriculture. There are currently 36 student clubs and organizations for students in the college in all areas of interest. With the level of student involvement in clubs and organizations, clubs have certainly played an integral role in K-State’s history. Some clubs in the department of animal sciences and industry have even been around since 1914 such as Block and Bridle. However, even with the traditional clubs on campus, there are also new clubs being introduced including the Undergraduate Swine Club.

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FINDING THE NEED Creating a new club on campus is not the easiest task to accomplish, but Cassandra Jones, animal sciences and industry associate professor and Undergraduate Swine Club adviser, says the students are the ones who need to have the passion and desire to create a sustainable club worth starting. “We had an interested set of student leaders approach us and they had the fortitude to follow.” It only took one idea from a student to put it into action. Gage Nichols, feed science master’s student and current adviser for the Undergraduate Swine Club, went to Jones in the fall of 2017 with a group of students interested in forming a club that would only focus on the swine industry. “While we have such great swine specialists here at K-State, the opportunities for undergraduates to get involved in the swine industry are lacking,” Nichols says. Creating a club focused on only one species allows students the opportunity to learn more within that field and connect with that faculty. Once a key group was established with students ranging from freshman to seniors, the group started planning. During their time planning the team used resources from K-State’s Center for Student Involvement to help. The CSI has certain guidelines that the club had to follow to meet the requirements of starting a new club.

STEPS TO SUCCESS Nichols and his team also visited clubs both inside and outside of K-State allowing them to see different ideas and learn what other established clubs do. They visited with K-State’s Block and Bridle and Collegiate Cattlemen’s clubs, as well as South Dakota State University and Iowa State University’s swine interest clubs. “For future clubs, I would look for similar clubs at other universities as

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From left: Gage Nichols, Cara Comstock, Payton Dahmer, Jenna Chance, Jake Pettigrew and Olivia Harrison are members of the Undergraduate Swine Club leadership team.

they have already gone through growing pains, and they can help you get past some simple hurdles,” Nichols says. After visiting with other clubs to create a set of by-laws the students agreed on, the group then petitioned to be an official club within OrgSync, an online platform that allows students in clubs to connect. To finish up the required steps, the club decided to be a Departmental Student Organization, which means they reached out to faculty for advisers. Jones and other faculty in the Swine Nutrition Team would serve as advisers for the club. Finally, they had to receive approval from the animal science and industry department. When the club was deemed official, the group needed to actually plan for the upcoming year and incorporate ideas that were part of the by-laws. A big part of building the club was creating an officer team. “We had a core set of students from the beginning who needed to move into an officer setting, so the students could know their roles and responsibilities, so we held a meeting with those students and talked through who would be interested in various positions,” Jones says. Setting up the structure of the club was a challenging and tedious process

for the team because they wanted it to be easy and flexible for students to attend meetings and get involved. Jones says she wanted to make sure the club worked with other activities and organizations that way the club wouldn’t detract from membership within other clubs. She wanted to work with them instead of against them. “Extracurricular activities are important, but I’m also sensitive to the student time commitment,” Jones says. As an adviser, Jones encourages other people interested in starting a club to make sure that the students interested have a plan that will be successful, but also be sustainable after the group of students graduate. In order to create a sustainable club for years to come Jones and Nichols advice can be applied. Jones says, “This is one of the most important parts of the club, because students are typically involved for two to four years, and we need a succession plan to make sure the club continues after those students who created the club graduate and move on to their careers.”

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SOIL

in the city Horticulture students discover the unique aspects of urban agriculture. story by ZACHARY CALLAGHAN photos courtesy of CARY RIVARD

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magine walking down the bustling streets of St. Louis. Cars zip by and people crowd the sidewalks. The only signs of nature are small patches of grass. The area seems void of food production and yet St. Louis and other large cities have their own local agricultural system. Students enrolled in Horticulture 795, Urban Agriculture Study Tour, have taken it upon themselves to discover the hidden food system in this large city.

SEEING NEW Students in the class travel to a different city each fall to explore urban agriculture. As students travel to different cities, they are exposed to a unique learning experience that is open to students from all majors. “Each year we try to pick sites that represent all different parts of an urban food system, and students have the opportunity to see real-life examples in the city we are visiting,” says Eleni Pliakoni, course instructor and associate professor in horticulture and natural resources. This is the fourth semester this class has been offered. Previous classes have traveled to Chicago, Seattle and Honolulu. The course is limited to 10 students, allowing for an optimal learning environment. The goal of this class is to “enrich our understanding of various production systems and approaches within the realm of urban agriculture, 44

while inspiring students to find their interest and ultimately contribute to urban agriculture in the future,” says Joseph Rundquist, graduate student in horticulture and natural resources, and graduate teaching assistant for the course. This course is different from others because it allows students to learn by placing them in the environment they are studying about. “The trip allowed me to see the diverse professions that exist in the field of urban agriculture. It was valuable to see how the various commercial farms, non-profits, markets and social enterprises around urban agriculture all work in tandem to support the local food system in a city,” says Tricia Jenkins, student in the course, and graduate student in horticulture and natural resources.

PROBLEM SOLVERS Many are aware of issues surrounding food in urban areas. When people move from rural communities to urban cities, a current global trend, it leads to rising food insecurity and malnutrition in those more populated areas. While on the trip, students in the class evaluate each site they visit. One thing they examine is a site’s ability to increase food access and food security within the urban core. In addition to that, students evaluate each site’s contributions to education and research surrounding food in their community.

Rundquist hopes students will take initiative to make positive strides on the challenges facing urban food systems and food insecurity after they take this class. “One of the things we hope to gain from this is to create a spark in students to see something they are interested in and then go on to do it themselves,” Rundquist says.

ONCE IN A LIFETIME It’s not often that one gets a chance to jump right in and explore something as complex and large as a local food system firsthand. Some students who participated in the trip believe it provided surprising and remarkable moments that allowed them to grow personally and professionally. “I found it surprising how many people we met from various organizations and farms that do not have formal education in agriculture but were still quite successful. It shows that dedication and passion can go a long way,” Jenkins says. The tour included several noteworthy sites, some of which may be surprising and not typically considered when thinking about urban agriculture. Those were the sites Rundquist believed were most intriguing. “The sites that are doing something unique are always interesting. One was a goat creamery that makes award-winning goat cheese. We got a free tasting as part of our group tour. KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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Another unique site was a company that produces large quantities of highgrade mushrooms,” Rundquist says. Other stops on the trip included a visit to a beekeeper, a commercial composting facility, a farm that raises pigs and sites that produce fresh vegetables, herbs and other edible plants. On the trip, students evaluate the city’s food system. This assignment asks students to identify how each site contributes to the system and the ways they are addressing the challenges to food security in the urban area. Students evaluate the ability of each place they visit to produce or process food.

“The group works to identify how each site contributes to food security and the ways they are addressing the challenges in the urban area of St. Louis through production, marketing, distribution, social-economic, laws and policies, education and communication,” Pliakoni says. They rate the location on a scale ranging from one to 10, with 10 being the highest ability to produce. “If they receive a five they probably produce a fair amount of food, say enough to feed a community, but not a whole city,” Rundquist says.

This evaluation system allows students to analyze how different parts of a food system work together and inspires participants of the tour to dig deeper into urban food systems. These real-life examples drive curiosity and produce a willingness to enhance the lives of others through agriculture. “Just to see examples of what other people are doing in other cities I think is sometimes motivation,” Rundquist says. “To know what is possible and see something that inspires you is one of the outcomes of this trip.”

Above: Horticulture 795 students visiting Good Life Growing, an urban horticulture producer in St. Louis, Missouri. Below: Students visiting the Food Roof Farm on top of an urban building in St. Louis, Missouri.

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Hitting High STANDARDS

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alancing academics, extracurricular activities and a social life is a challenge for any college student. Add in playing a sport for an NCAA Division I school and the equation gets even more difficult to maintain. However, two dedicated Kansas State University College of Agriculture students have mastered their skills on the field and court, and in the classroom. As members of the 2017-2018 First Team Academic All-Big 12, Macy

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Flowers, animal sciences and industry student and middle blocker on the volleyball team, and Adam Holtorf, agribusiness student and center for the football team, have demonstrated success in the classroom. The Academic All-Big 12 team recognizes student-athletes from Big 12 universities who have excelled in both academics and athletics. To qualify for the academic team, student-athletes must maintain a 3.00 or better grade point average either cumulative or from

Two College of Agriculture student-athletes manage academics and sports. story and photos by KELLI SCHRAG

the two previous semesters and must have participated in 20 percent of their team’s scheduled contests. First team members are those who maintained a GPA of 3.20 or better, and the second team are those with a GPA from 3.00 to 3.19.

A BALANCING ACT As upperclassmen, Flowers and Holtorf have had years of practice prioritizing time between school and athletics. KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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“I dedicate about 25 to 30 hours to football a week,” Holtorf says. The football team lifts weights for an hour each morning and is at the complex from 2:00 to 7:30 p.m. every night. “The hardest part of being a student athlete is time management,” Holtorf says. “The biggest thing that has helped me is keeping a planner to stay up-todate on deadlines and tests.” Holtorf says when others find out that he is an athlete, they typically question him about the team or Coach Snyder. “The questions can be anything from what the outlook for the game that week is, what workouts are like, or what it’s like playing for Coach Snyder,” Holtorf says. As a member of the volleyball team, Flowers finds time outside of workouts, meetings, team activities, games and film to go to class, study and do homework. “I always take classes in the morning since practice is in the afternoon,” Flowers says. “I study after practice, but typically Sundays are dedicated to studying and schoolwork.” Flowers takes fewer classes in the fall during season to accommodate her busy schedule. “Online classes help a lot during the season,” Flowers says. “I have to be on top of things, but I’m lucky to have teachers who work with me.” The volleyball team typically misses two days of classes each time they travel to play. About 50 percent of their games are hosted by the opposition, meaning lots of time is spent traveling. During Big 12 play, the team has a game nearly every three days. However, Flowers has found ways to utilize travel time to study. “When we’re sitting on an airplane I have notes and books to study,” Flowers says. She says her 6-foot-3 height usually gives it away that she plays some sort of sport. “It always starts with questions like ‘do you play basketball?’ or ‘how tall are you?’” Flowers says. “Since I am tall they usually don’t act too surprised when I tell them I’m an athlete.”

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WITH THE ASSIST Flowers and Holtorf recognize mentors and advisers that have assisted them with their academics. Flowers took ASI 400, Farm Animal Reproduction, online. She has always wanted to follow in her mother’s footsteps and be a veterinarian, and the farm animal reproduction class solidified Flowers’ choice to pursue her passion. “I was always set on the pre-vet option, but I was concerned about not liking it,” Flowers says. “Through classes and specializing in reproduction it helps solidify that is what I want to do.” As Flowers is in the process of applying for veterinary school, she credits her volleyball coaches for supporting her decision.

“I THINK IT’S A PRETTY GREAT ACCOMPLISHMENT, ESPECIALLY IN-SEASON TRYING TO KEEP GRADES UP WHILE COMPETING.” – Macy Flowers Animal Sciences and Industry Student “Suzie Fritz, Trent Sorensen ad Jeff Grove really care about us as people,” Flowers says. “They were references for me for my vet school application.” Flowers will know if she is accepted to veterinary school in January 2019. Holtorf credits the athletic department academic staff for helping him balance school and sports. “The academic counselors within athletics do a great job of giving us the tools,” Holtorf says. “They give us daily and weekly planners, and encourage us to write out where we’re allocating our time and make sure we’re leaving time for school.” Holtorf also values the mentorship of a past teammate with the same major. “Matt Seiwert was also in ag business and on the football team,” Holtorf says. “He was a few years older but I got a

chance to get recommendations for classes and teachers from him.” Following graduation in December 2018, Holtorf will work toward a master of business administration degree at K-State.

ACCEPTING THE HONOR Playing for K-State has taught Flowers and Holtorf the meaning of teamwork and accountability. “The best part of being a student athlete has to be the friendships I have made with my teammates,” Holtorf says. “The bond formed among teammates is extremely strong because of the countless hours we spend with each other practicing and training, along with the ups and downs of a season. I know I can always count on them.” Likewise, Flowers enjoys the support system associated with the volleyball team. Flowers says her favorite part of being on the volleyball team is the team aspect of representing K-State and having a strong support system within the whole athletics department. Flowers’ and Holtorf ’s selection to the Academic All-Big 12 first team recognizes their hard work and dedication to athletics and academics. “I think it’s a pretty great accomplishment, especially inseason trying to keep grades up while competing,” Flowers says. In addition to the Academic All-Big 12 Team, Holtorf was selected to the 2017 CoSIDA First Team Academic All-District 7 and the 2017 CoSIDA Second Team Academic All-American. “To be recognized for the AllAmerican honor is something that means a great deal to me,” Holtorf says. “I put a lot of hours into both academics and athletics, which is a balancing act to be able to get all that done in a day. The award is a culmination of academics and athletics and one of the highest honors and recognitions of what I’ve been able to accomplish.”

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From the BILL to the HILL

Hannah Taylor (front row, second from left) and Clara Wicoff (front row, third from left) met U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Sonny Perdue, during their internship.

Two College of Agriculture students’ internships help shape the future of U.S. agricultural policy. story by KYLER LANGVARDT photo courtesy of U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

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tudents are encouraged to pursue internships throughout their time at Kansas State University. By working in the industry, students are able to meet with influencers in their field of choice. Two Kansas State College of Agriculture students were able to work alongside many influencers this past summer through internships with the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry majority office in Washington, D.C. With ideas of internships in the U.S. capital, Clara Wicoff and Hannah Taylor, both students in agricultural economics, found a path to the internship through the Kansas Food and Agricultural Policy Fellowship.

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“As someone who is passionate about agriculture and food security, I knew that I wanted to intern in Washington, D.C. to learn more about the development of agricultural policy,” Wicoff says. “Fellows complete two internship experiences in this program — one at the state level and one at the federal level. As a part of this fellowship program, I applied for an internship with the senate committee.” Though unsure of where she wanted to land in Washington, D.C., Taylor knew she was going to be in the city as early as February of 2017. Through fellowship program, she was matched with a coordinator who helped her find an internship to fit her future career goals. Interning in the Capitol helped Taylor decide what she wanted to do after graduation. “Working there redirected my career path. I now want to work in agricultural policy in the future,” Taylor says.

BIG CITY, BIG NAMES As of the last census, Manhattan, Kansas, had a population of over 53,000. The city of Washington D.C. has just under 700,000 residents. The two interns had to make a few adjustments to live in the capital. “Out of everything that is different between D.C. and Manhattan, the thing that took the most time getting used to was the transportation,” Wicoff says. “Whether it was figuring out the Metro, using a ride-sharing app, or walking around D.C., figuring out how to get from point A to point B took me more time in D.C. than in Manhattan.” Once on the job, Taylor and Wicoff both performed everyday intern tasks, but with an twist: those tasks included names that have had a role in changing American policy. Taylor particularly enjoyed working alongside her boss, Senate committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry chair, Pat Roberts. “Senator Roberts is a huge figure in

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agriculture policy, having served on both the Senate and House agriculture committees,” Taylor says. “He was also just an incredible boss to work for. He took the time to get to know his entire staff and show his true appreciation to us.” Both interns attended a variety of lectures hosted for congressional interns, but Wicoff said she most enjoyed meeting with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who described her relationship with former Justice Antonin Scalia.

“WORKING THERE REDIRECTED MY CAREER PATH. I NOW WANT TO WORK IN AGRICULTURAL POLICY IN THE FUTURE.”

– Hannah Taylor Agricultural Economics Student

“Even though they often stood on different sides of the argument, they were friends,” Wicoff said. “She told us they would give each other drafts of their arguments and use them to make their arguments stronger. In a world that is becoming more and more partisan, her stories about Justice Scalia were refreshing.”

A HISTORIC BILL With the 2014 Farm Bill set to expire on September, 30 2018, the office of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry kept busy getting the Senate version of the bill for a vote. Taylor and Wicoff both helped with the bill through their work in the office. “Summer 2018 was the perfect time to complete an internship with the Senate Ag Committee, because this was when the farm bill was going through the committee,” Wicoff says. “I enjoyed being able to actually be in the room during the farm bill markup, and it was just as exciting to sit in the gallery and

watch as it passed in the Senate.” Taylor enjoyed the behind-the-scenes access the internship provided during the passage of the bill in the Senate. “Having an official ID badge that allowed me access to “Authorized Personnel Only” areas in the Capitol was pretty cool,” Taylor says. “It was great to be a part of events that others may never get to see, like the markup or the passage of the bill with the most for votes ever.” The 2014 final version of the Farm Bill was more than 140,000 words. Wicoff thinks that when the newest version passes, it will be just as lengthy. “Even though I knew that the bill would be large because it covers such a wide variety of agricultural issues, seeing the size of the printed version of the Farm Bill was still surprising.” Wicoff says. Though both enjoyed seeing the Senate version of the farm bill pass, by the time Taylor and Wicoff left D.C., the Senate and House of Representatives had yet to come together to create a cohesive bill that could pass both bodies before being presented to the president. “The Senate and House agriculture committees wrote their own completely different versions of the bill,” Taylor says. “After the House passed their version, the Senate proposed an amendment to the House bill striking almost the entire bill and inserting what Chairman Roberts, Ranking Member Debbie Stabenow from Michigan, and their staffs had written.” Neither Taylor and Wicoff are sure if Washington D.C is where they want be in the future, but expressed appreciation for the people they met, what they learned about the ins-andouts of agricultural policy and the opportunity to make a difference on a piece of legislation that affects not only Kansans but all Americans.

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Agribusiness Options Agribusiness Food Industry International Agribusiness

Among 162 majors, agricultural economics has the lowest unemployment rate at

Agricultural Economics Options Specialty Farm Management Natural Resources Pre-Vet Pre-Law Quantitative

this year according to USA Today.

Contact Us Cherie Hodgson, Undergraduate Academic Programing Coordinator 343 Waters Hall I 785-532-4559 I chodgson@ksu.edu www.ageconomics.k-state.edu

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SWEET

Communication Student finds a sweet and tasty internship through the career fair.

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story by MEGAN GREEN photo courtesy of DANIELLE COMSTOCK

very year, Kansas State University hosts a career fair that attracts students looking to find their dream job. The career center is where Danielle Comstock, student in agricultural communications and journalism started to find her internship in the chocolate world. For Comstock, the career fair led to an experience where chocolate eating was a must. “I think the Career Center does a great job of making opportunities accessible for students. The website shows companies and opportunities that will be at the fair,” Comstock says. Comstock went to the career fair to find an internship and she succeeded. There was an interview process for the companies she had researched in advance, but she was most interested in the communications internship with Cargill located in Wayzata, Minnesota.

LEARNING AND CHOCOLATE Comstock traveled miles to learn about chocolate and gain experiences of a lifetime about communications to further her personal career. “The first week, all we did was learn about chocolate. You may think that there’s not much to it, but you’re wrong. It is such a unique sector of food and agriculture,” Comstock says. It can only be grown 20 degrees North and South of the Equator, she explains. “It also happens to be grown in some of the least developed areas of the world.” Comstock and another intern worked on three main projects during KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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the summer. The biggest one was to create a searchable database of all 1,200 products in the Cargill cocoa and chocolate standard portfolio. “The information was almost impossible to get, so we had to put on our food scientist hats sometimes and do some calculations,” Comstock says. In addition to other tasks, Comstock did a competitive analysis of other companies from business-to-business. “It was really fun to explore how the business we worked in stood out and where we could improve. We also created a marketing communications playbook,” Comstock says. A playbook is a marketing and communications tool used to outline opportunities for businesses.

SAVORING THE KNOWLEDGE The chocolate process is different than row crop food production. It’s also much more dangerous.

“Cargill works to help protect farmers’ livelihoods and prevent child labor in these chocolate-producing countries. Because we were in marketing, we needed to be able to explain why it was important to buy our chocolate,” Comstock says. Comstock did several tastings to learn about superior chocolate qualities and uses for each product. “Something really fun that we got to do was a chocolate photo shoot for the new Peter’s brand website. It was just so much fun to go to work every day expecting to either learn or do something new. I learned so much about chocolate and I don’t think I even scratched the surface,” Comstock says. She had a full summer learning about chocolate and communications at the same time. “It was a fantastic experience. It was some of the most challenging work I have ever done, but the fun and dedicated team I was on, along with the Cargill culture, made it exciting to go to work every day,” Comstock says. Expanding her knowledge led to new skills she can carry with her into future jobs. “I learned a lot of project management skills and tools. I will definitely be much more prepared to manage a project in my next job,” Comstock says. “I also learned how to persevere and think critically to solve problems. That developed me and will help me in more than the workplace environment.”

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ON CAMPUS PROVIDING PATHWAYS TO FIND YOUR PLACE IN THE INDUSTRY Online Careeer Profiles with Tips and Advice Learn about career paths of industry professionals through our online career profiles and find tips about interviews and resumes at kscorn.com/corn-oncampus/ Kansas Corn Collegiate Academy Build your skills as a professional while learning about market development, policy and consumer trends through our Collegiate Academy Program Learn more about the program online at kscorn.com/collegiate-academy

“The importance of trade was not only discussed in our many visits but we got to see first-hand the importance this summer with trade negotiations and tariff wars. The agriculture industry is global, this is evident in a small-town co-op all the way to a billiondollar agribusiness. No matter where in the industry I end up, this will be evident and important to understand and work with.� -Gracie Danner, Class 1 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE GRADUATING MEMBERS OF COLLEGIATE ACADEMY CLASS ONE:

Avery Aust

Tyler Cloud

Gracie Danner Keren Duerksen

Trent Frye

Tarra Rotstein

Jaylie Weseloh

For more information visit KSCorn.com/Collegiate or follow us on social media.


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INTERNSHIP Advice

Students and faculty break down the steps to getting an internship, and bring students closer to securing the right opportunity. “Give the application and interview process your full effort; try hard, even if it’s not your dream internship. You won’t know the possibilities if you don’t give it your all.”

– Katherine Burke, agricultural communications and journalism instructor

“Employers often use behavioral interview questions to determine if a candidate has previous evidence of key skill sets. To prepare, be sure that you review the job description in depth, highlight key skills and requirements and be ready to talk about times when you have demonstrated relevant skills in your past experience.” – Mary Ellen Barkley, assistant director for the Career Center

“Know the time and place to do so, but ask as many questions as possible and to as many people as you can. Although you may think you know the answer, people might come back with a different perspective or different helpful tips that could take you a long way. This also gives you the opportunity to network and start other conversations.” – Kristy Gordon, milling science and bakery science student

“I would recommend all students do an internship sometime during their college career, because an internship will give a student the hands-on experience to be successful in the future.” – Cade Ames, agricultural technology management student

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NEWS

College of Agriculture Big Time Bake Sale story by HANNAH FROBOSE photos courtesy of EMILY STANGEL

Bakery Science club members stand with Gina Reardon (left), organizer of the No Kid Hungry campaign.

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his past September, 16 members of the Kansas State University Bakery Science Club traveled to Kansas City, Missouri, to participate in the World’s Biggest Bake Sale. The bake sale serves as an opportunity for the community to give back by allowing bakers from surrounding areas to contribute their own baked goods to sell and then ultimately donate the proceeds to a campaign called No Kid Hungry. “As a non-profit organization, their goal is to work to solve problems of hunger and poverty in the United States,” says Emily Stangel, Bakery Science Club president. “As their name suggests, they focus mainly on reducing childhood hunger in the U.S.” Ingredients for the products sold in the bake sale were donated by the American Society of Baking, allowing several dozen culinary professionals to bake and sell cupcakes, cakes, cookies and many other baked goods to help the cause.

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“This was our first year participating in the event,” Stangel says. “It ended up being a really worthwhile experience.” Club members donated a wide variety of baked goods to add to the medley of products donated by other bakers in the area and volunteered their time to run multiple sales throughout the day. “Having our club help out with this experience was beneficial for all parties involved,” Stangel says. “No Kid Hungry got some extra hands to keep their operation moving and our club members got to spend a Saturday promoting our Bakery Science program and knowing that their time was being utilized to a spectacular cause.”

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Students Travel to Present Research story by KELLI SCHRAG photos courtesy of ZACHARY CALLAGHAN

Caitlin Dreher (left) and Zachary Callaghan (right) stand in front of their research posters with research mentor Gaea Hock at the North Central Region AAAE Conference in North Dakota.

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ndergraduate research in agricultural education gave students the opportunity to interact closely with a faculty member, develop skills for work in the classroom and network with professionals at national and international conferences. Zachary Callaghan and Caitlin Dreher, agricultural education students, presented their research findings at the North Central Region American Association

for Agricultural Educators Conference hosted at North Dakota State University in Fargo, North Dakota. The duo traveled with Gaea Hock, research mentor and assistant professor in agricultural education. Dreher presented her project, “The Awareness and Implementation of the SAE for All Framework in Kansas.” Dreher and Hock have been conducting research for this project together since August 2017. “This trip served as an excellent way to educate myself on other research projects being done in agricultural education and gave me more ideas on what to do in my classroom someday,” Dreher says. Callaghan presented data from three research projects he conducted with Hock. Callaghan and Hock also travelled to the International Conference on Educational Innovation in Agrarian Topics held at the National Agrarian University in Lima, Peru. In Peru, Callaghan presented a research poster on the knowledge students gained about sustainability from the Kansas Youth Water Advocates Conference. Callaghan says, “My favorite part was being able to share the research I’ve been able to do at K-State with people around the country and around the world.”

Three Feed the Future Innovation Labs Renewed story by ZACHARY CALLAGHAN

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ansas State University is currently home to four United States Agency for International Development Feed the Future Innovation Labs, the second most of any university in the country. In August, the Sorghum and Millet, Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss and Wheat Genomics labs were renewed, which granted K-State nearly $22 million for research. The fourth, the Innovation Lab for Sustainable Intensification, is up for renewal next year. “Each of the labs have specific targets and work in developing countries that have issues in agriculture, nutrition, and overall food availability,” says Carlos Campabadal, research scientist in the Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss Innovation Lab.

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With more than 800 million people across the world going to bed hungry each night, some believe that ending hunger may be one of the greatest challenges faced in the coming years. Campabadal says, “These labs are very important to K-State since they show how the university is committed to reducing global hunger and are able to collaborate with the government on its quest to improve the livelihood of small-scale farmers in developing countries.”

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FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

NEWS

College of Agriculture Secretary of Agriculture Delivers Landon Lecture story by KYLER LANGVARDT photos courtesy of COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING, KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY

Senator Moran (left) and Secretary Perdue (right) visit with students in a question and answer session. Secretary Perdue answered questions regarding cotton, cost of schooling and the farm bill.

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.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue visited Kansas State University on November 2 to give the 179th Landon Lecture, followed by a small session with student leaders. Perdue’s speech, titled “Leave It Better Than You Found It: Lessons in Public Service I Learned on the Farm,” focused on how growing up on a family farm in Georgia impacted his public service career. During the lecture, Secretary Perdue spoke to guests in McCain auditorium about his service as Georgia Governor, his travels as Secretary of Agriculture and the efficiency of the federal government. “Persistence is rooted in faith, and covered in the topsoil of optimism,” Perdue says. “When a farmer plants a seed, the farmer has faith that it will grow, but there’s also an expectation that it will grow. That’s optimism.” Secretary Perdue was then accompanied by Kansas Senator Jerry Moran for a question and answer session with student

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leaders from across campus. First year food science student, Scuyler Zenger, enjoyed listening to Secretary Perdue’s and Senator Moran’s perspectives on current agricultural issues. “The student session with Secretary Perdue was a great opportunity for my generation to ask questions,” Zenger says. “We are concerned, and it was nice to get advice from someone who has been in the game for awhile and is so people-oriented.” K-State has hosted every sitting U.S. Secretary of Agriculture since the inception of the department. “You need to understand this right now,’” Perdue says. “We’re all stewards, we’re going to leave this life all the same way and whether we own it, or whether we rent it, we’re going to leave it better than we found it.”

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

spring 2019


FEATURES | VOICES | IMAGERY | CAMPUS | INTERNS | NEWS

Dairy Leaders of the Future Head to Western Kansas story by WHITNEY WHITAKER photos courtesy of ALEXANDRE SCANAVEZ

K-State students and advisers pictured in front of Más-Cow Dairy in Moscow, Kansas.

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he Dairy Leaders of the Future allows students to gain more insight and knowledge about the dairy industry. This program was recently formed by Kansas State University to help expose, prepare and connect students in animal sciences and industry to the growing dairy industry in Kansas. The team heading up the program includes Luis Mendonca, associate professor; Alexandre Scanaves, doctoral student; and Cai Gamarra, graduate student. These advisers mentor 12 students who have a passion for the dairy industry. In October 2018, 10 students were selected to travel to western Kansas for a tour of three dairies (Ag Oasis, J-7 and Royal Dairy Farms). During the visits, students learned

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURIST

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more about each participating herd while interacting with the professionals who run the operations. At the end of the tour, two to five students were selected for internships at the participating dairies. For students who may or may not have grown up on a dairy, going on these tours allowed them to gain more knowledge, helping them figure out if they wanted to pursue an internship at any of those dairies. Scanavez says, “Because the dairies we visited are so well managed and take such good care of their animals, we knew visiting these herds would catch the interest of students.”

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THANK YOU SPONSORS

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, KANSAS 4–H FOUNDATION, KANSAS FARM BUREAU

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IGP Institute................................................................48 Junction City and Clay Center Livestock Sales........4 Kansas 4-H Foundation................Inside Back Cover Kansas Corn...............................................................56 Kansas Department of Agriculture..........................15 Kansas Farm Bureau..................................Back Cover Kansas FFA Foundation..............................................4 Kansas State University Global Campus............22,30 Mai Family Show Pigs.................................................8 Melissa Photography....................................................4 Pacheco Cattle Co......................................................51 Prill Show Pigs............................................................50 R.C. McGraws Bar and Grill.....................................10 University Printing.....................................................11 Wheat State Agronomy Club......................................6

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STAFF EDITORIAL

HANNAH FROBOSE Pemberville, OH

MEGAN GREEN

KELLI SCHRAG

Leavenworth, KS

Hutchinson, KS

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ZACHARY CALLAGHAN Tonganoxie, KS

LEADERSHIP TEAM

Chapman, KS

WHITNEY WHITAKER Paso Robles, CA

Not pictured: Sarah Moyer, Guest Editor, Emporia, KS

TAYLOR BELLE MATHENY Mays Lick, KY Editor

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KYLER LANGVARDT

spring 2019

LEAH GIESS

Pierz, MN Associate Editor

MOLLY BERTZ Mayview, MO Advertising Manager 63


DID YOU MISS?

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OPENING THE CUPBOARD

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MORE THAN METRO

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HITTING HIGH STANDARDS

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FROM THE BILL TO THE HILL

Students dedicate their time to develop Cat’s Cupboard by serving on an advisory council. The cupboard is open to anyone on campus and helps food insecure students at K-State.

24 percent of students come from cities 50,000 or larger. A Kansas City local found his way to the College of Agriculture for a career in zoology.

Student athletes share their experiences on how to succeed in both academics and sports and provide a sneak peak on what it is like to be an athlete at K-State.

Students make an impact on Capital Hill and get to see history being made firsthand with the U.S. farm bill.

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Inspire Kids To Do In 4-H, kids roll up their sleeves and do with their hands. Through these experiences they grow the responsibility they need for their life and career.

Spark Doing. Give today. kansas4hfoundation.org/give


Scholarships Help Young People Making Their Way in Agriculture

Scholarships are a visible, tangible way to express support for young people pursuing post-secondary education and you can directly impact a student’s life.

Provide a major gift to establish an endowed fund or offer a smaller donation to support KFB’s ongoing scholarship efforts.

Join Farm Bureau’s efforts today. We have decades of success awarding scholarships to young people pursuing higher education, and you can join us.

No matter what you give, you’ll ensure the future generation of ag leaders is well equipped.

“ I am passionate about agriculture and strongly believe in what Farm Bureau does. Because of these scholarships, we can become stronger communicators and one day help Farm Bureau carry out its mission as advocates for those in agriculture.”

Mary Marsh

Major: Ag Communications & Journalism Year: Sophomore Hometown: Arbuckle, CA

“People should contribute to a fund like this because it encourages students to strive to achieve their academic goals, represent the College of Agriculture and helps them attain their personal and professional goals for their careers in the agricultural industry.”

Samantha Albers

You Can Help Make a Difference Your $25,000 gift can establish an endowed fund to honor the memory of others. Gifts up to $25,000 support KFB’s ongoing efforts and increase per-scholarship amounts.

Major: Ag Communications & Journalism Year: Senior Hometown: Bendena, KS R

KANSAS FARM BUREAU Foundation for Agriculture

To donate today, call 785-587-6106 or visit www.kfb.org/foundationforagriculture.

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Profile for Lisa Moser

Kansas State Agriculturist Spring 2019  

Kansas State Agriculturist Spring 2019  

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