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PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE

November 11, 2010 Issue 238-14-23

Favorable Weather Speeds Up Harvest; Crop Production Down

Special Features FFA District 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10 FFA District 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-15 FFA District 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-23 Ak-Sar-Ben Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29

Weather Al Dutcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Country Living House Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Quilt Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 35

The Lighter Side Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Markets Grains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Government Report Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Ag Management Farm Service Agency Administrator Urges Farmers & Ranchers to Vote in County Committee Elections. . . . . . 19

Livestock News By Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent Weather has made all the difference this year when it comes to the area crop harvest. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, for the week ending Nov. 7, producers had 94 percent of the state's corn crop in the bins, about three weeks ahead of average. That's a big difference from last

year, when only 28 percent of the corn crop had been harvested. The five-year average for the first week of November, according to the USDA, is 66 percent. Along with corn, the USDA reported that sorghum harvest was also "well above average pace" at 92 percent complete. Soybean harvest has already been completed. Farmers have been able to harvest this year's crop so quickly because of

For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com

above-average temperatures and below-average precipitation this fall. As of Nov. 8, there had been only 0.30 of an inch of rain since Sept. 26. Conditions have been so dry that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has categorized south Central Nebraska as "abnormally dry." Continued on page 16

Livestock and Products, Weekly Average 96.48

98.27

123.51 120.26 110.07 116.00 156.27 161.54 76.64 52.68 * * 88.43 74.23 142.12 149.25 329.95 343.21

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Crop Assistance Program . . . . . . . . 10

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-34

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 10/29/10

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Production News

MARKET GLANCE Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$86.64 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .98.59 Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93.11 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . . .141.15 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52.32 Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . .* Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . . .57.16 Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .91.25 Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239.19

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Heartland Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.95 Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.48 Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.59 Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . .5.64 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .2.49

5.20 4.11 10.05 7.25 3.28

6.02 5.45 11.76 9.23 3.63

* * 75.00 127.50 47.00

170.00 * 75.00 160.00 55.00

Hay (per ton) Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . . . . .* Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . . .82.50 Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . . . .* Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120.00 Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40.00 * No market.

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Page 2

Heartland Express - Weather

November 11, 2010

Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Al Dutcher Report A storm system entering the central U.S. during the 11/1011/12 period resulted in welcome moisture for portions of southern and eastern Nebraska. A variety of conditions were reported with this system as rain, snow, and a wintery mix all made their presence Allen Dutcher know as the storm lifted towards the Great Lakes region. Although the moisture was welcome, substantial precipitation deficits have been noted during the past 30, 60, and 90 days across much of southern and western Nebraska. It will take several more storm systems of the magnitude seen during the 11/1011/12 period during the next few weeks to undo impacts of this extended dry spell. Week One Forecast: 11/13-11/19: Below nor-

Farm and Ranch Publishers - Central Nebraska Publications General Manager - Marc Currie Sales Assistant/Circulation LeAnne Killion

Sales Representatives Eric Keeton • Tim Lingg • Tom Meyer Todd Smith • Lola Cornell •Darlene Overleese Production - Chris Frazer • Dixie Sickels

Web Development - news@agnet.net Important Notice: The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertising herein, and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertisers and not the publishers. The publisher is not liable to any advertiser herein for any misprints in advertising not the fault of the publisher, and in such an event the limit of the publisher’s liability shall be the amount of the publisher’s charge for such advertising. In the event of misprints, the publisher must be informed prior to the printing of the next publication

Published by: Central Nebraska Publications, Inc. 21 W. 21st Street, Ste. 010 • P.O. Box 415 Kearney, NE 68847 • 1-800-658-3191 • Copyright © 2010 Front cover mast head background photo courtesy of OWH, Jeff Beiermann

mal temperature during this period appear certain according to the latest weather models, as a broad upper air trough will dominate the central United States. Only one significant chance for moisture is projected for Nebraska as a surface low pressure moves through the Dakota’s on 11/16 and drives a cold front through the state. Since this system will be originating out of the northern Rockies, moisture will be limited and only scattered light rain and/or snow showers are expected across the state. High temperatures during the period will primarily be in the mid to upper 40's during the 11/1311/15 period, warming to the upper 40's to low 50's on 11/16, before cooling into the low to mid 40's during the 11/17-11/19 period. A couple of weather models are pointing toward a substantial Arctic air intrusion as early as 11/19, with the majority holding off on the cold air until the weekend of 11/20. Week Two Forecast: 11/20-11/26: The majority of weather models point to a significant storm developing across the northern Rockies on 11/19 and sliding southeastward. Behind

Nebraska Weather and Crop Report

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this system, Arctic air appears poised to funnel into the central United States. Current models indicate snow will develop across northwestern Nebraska during the early morning hours of 11/20 and spread east and southward during the day. Snowfall is projected to end across northern Nebraska during the morning hours of 11/21, with the southern half of the state expected to see snow continuing into the late afternoon hours. If the models are correct, this will be the first widespread snow event of the winter season, with moderate to significant accumulations possible across the northern 1/3 of the state. A secondary push of cold air is projected for 11/24, but little more than flurries are expected. High temperatures during the period will range from the mid 30's north to low 40's south on 11/20, cooling into the upper 20's north to low 30's south during the 11/21-11/22 period.. High temperatures on 11/23 are projected to be in the 30's statewide, cooling to the upper 20's to low 30's during the 11/24-11/25 period, before warming into the 30's statewide on 11/26.

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Agricultural Summary: For the week ending November 7, 2010, producers neared completion of fall harvest as warm, dry conditions allowed progress to continue at an above average pace, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Corn harvest reached 94 percent complete, three weeks ahead of average. The last time there was more corn harvested by this date was in the year 2000. Likewise, sorghum harvest was well above average pace at 92 percent complete. Fall field work such as fertilizer application and tillage has slowed somewhat due to dry soils. Most of the western half of the state has recorded less than one inch of precipitation during the last 45 days. Winter wheat conditions continued well below average due to the lack of precipitation. Weather Summary: Temperatures averaged 4 degrees above normal across the state. Unseasonably warm readings reached the low 80’s while lows were more fall-like and fell into the teens. The Southwest District recorded both the coolest and warmest temperatures for the week in Nebraska. Only a trace of rain was recorded in the North Central and Northeast Districts.

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Continued on page 30


November 11, 2010

Heartland Express - Country Living

Tailgate Safely This Football Season Sheryl Fellers, Dawson County Extension Service Football season is back in full swing and every weekend comes alive across the country as football fans prepare for games by tailgating beforehand. Tailgaters should remember some important tips about food safety so their tailgate is a food success instead of a food disaster. Don't leave any food out for more than two hours. Though temperatures during the mid-season of football tend to be on the cool side, anything can happen with the weather. If temperatures reach 90 degrees or above, make sure food isn't out for more than one hour. Try to prepare as much food beforehand as possible. Make sure perishable foods, such as meat, poultry, eggs and salads, are kept in a cooler with ice or freezer packs when heading to the tailgate destination. Keep raw meats separate from cooked foods and foods meant to be eaten raw, like fruits and veggies. Also, pack drinks in a sep-

arate cooler so the food opener isn't being opened frequently. Fill the cooler to its maximum capacity. A full cooler maintains its cold temperatures longer than one partially filled. Typical main tailgate dishes include hamburgers, barbecue items, bratwurst and hot dogs. When cooking meat, don't judge whether it's fully cooked or not by its color. Pack a food thermometer and use it. The safe temperature for hamburgers is 160 degrees. The temperature for bratwurst and poultry is 165 degrees. Hot dogs should be piping hot. Make sure to wash hands before and after handling raw and cooked foods, before eating and after eating. Bring along moist towelettes, hand sanitizer or a jug of water, soap and paper towels to make sure everyone can keep their hands clean. Keep utensils clean, too. Use different utensils and serving plates for raw and cooked foods to prevent contamination.

Holiday Staple is Delicious and Healthy Sheryl Fellers, Dawson County Extension Service During Thanksgiving week, Americans will consume approximately 80 million pounds of cranberries. Along with enjoying a delicious holiday staple, these people will be receiving several health benefits. Cranberries have long been known to prevent urinary tract infections. This was once attributed to the juice's acidity, but recent research shows that certain compounds in cranberry juice prevent infection by not allowing some bacteria to stick to urinary tract walls. Additional research may show that cranberry juice also affects ear and respiratory infections, stomach ulcers and gum disease. Cranberries also contain powerful antioxidants. In 2007, research by the USDA showed cranberries ranked highest in total antioxidant activity compared to 23 other commonly eaten fruits. Oxidation, the process of cell metabolism as oxygen burns, forms "free radicals" that can dam-

age cells and may contribute to aging. Antioxidants like those found in cranberries slow or prevent this process. Eating cranberries and other foods high in antioxidants may help increase immune function and protect against cancer, heart disease and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. The American cranberry is found in sunny areas of moist sphagnum bogs in the wild. It requires well-drained, organic and acidic soil, as well as consistent soil moisture. These factors may make cranberry unsuitable as a landscape plant in Nebraska, but Nebraskans can still enjoy the berry's delicious taste on Thanksgiving. Wisconsin and Massachusetts, the nation's top cranberry-producing states, harvested 400 million and 190 million pounds, respectively, in 2009. Those interested in learning more about cranberries should visit the Wisconsin State Cranberry Growers Association website for a list of cranberry festivals held in September and October.

Tips for Low Cost Holiday Meals Susan Hansen, Extension Educator, Colfax County Holiday meals are a special time for family and friends to get together. For some, it is that one time of year that a special food is made or purchased. For others, it may be a traditional menu that is served each year and rarely, if ever, changed. Whatever the situation, the cost for holiday meals and get-togethers can be surprising. Plan ahead for these and other holiday costs. Better yet, take a look at places to reduce your costs yet still enjoy family and friends this holiday season. Consider making less food. Many holiday meals have lots of food on the table. While it is nice to have the diversity of flavors and food choices, does there need to be three meat choices when one or two will be just as enjoyable? Since meat is usually the most expensive part of the meal, seriously consider reducing the number of meat choices or reduce the amount prepared. Remember, though, to have enough food for everyone. This can be a challenge for some families who really don’t know how many people will be showing up for a meal. I’ve cooked for meals like that and it is a challenge. Check the sale ads for your local grocery store. Turkeys become much cheaper around Thanksgiving and on into December. A whole turkey is less expensive per serving than buying separate pieces of turkey. Healthier alternatives can be less costly. If you are serving pie for dessert, consider serving pumpkin pie or a fruit based pie without a top crust as an alternative to pecan or French silk pie. Not only are pumpkin and fruit based pies usually cheaper, they also add some nutrients with the pumpkin or fruit. Yes, pie can be a part

of the diet – it is one of those once in awhile foods. Make the food yourself. The more work you do, the less the food costs. The more boxes and cans you open, the more expensive the item per serving. However, you do need to consider your time, skills and equipment when making a choice of using convenience foods or making from scratch. Have a plan for leftovers. When a meal is finished, take the time to put the food in containers so they are ready to use for another meal. Put food away promptly after a meal. Perishable food should not sit out for more than two hours. The cost of beverages can add up quickly. The cheapest choice and the best choice for health is tap water. Serve water as the main choice with meals. Other beverages can be offered after the meal. Some beverages are full of empty calories so let your guests fill up on delicious, nutritious foods rather than not so healthy beverages. Do you really need to buy the fancy holiday paper products – napkins, paper towels, cups? If you enjoy using them, that’s great. But if you are needing to cut costs somewhere with holiday entertaining, look at the disposable products you buy. Holiday cloth napkins or glass bowls that can be used from year to year may be a good investment as well as being better for the environment. Plan ahead for next year by purchasing these items after the holiday season when prices are cut in half or lower. Yes, you do have to store the items so consider that in your decision making. Determine what YOUR family wants to do to celebrate this holiday season. There isn’t just one right answer for celebrating the special days. The important thing is to communicate as a family and to consider your family’s wants, needs and resources when making a good decision.

Page 3

Four Bedroom Country

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This breezy yet classic farmhouse perfectly embodies easy living. The open floor plan radiates from the fireplace-warmed great room, with the island kitchen and morning area opening to the rear covered patio, and a formal dining room near the front. In addition to the pair of bedrooms on the left side, two flexible rooms on the right adapt to the needs of your family, whether as an office and a nursery, or another bedroom and a den. Don't miss the master suite with its walk-in closets and luxurious corner tub.

Detailed Specifications Plan - #HMAFAPW1548 Title - Four Bedroom Country House Style - Country, Farmhouse, Greek Revival, NeoClassical, Southern. Bedroom Extras - Private Patio/Deck Access Kitchen Extras - Island - Snack Bar Foundation Type - Crawlspace - Slab Fireplace Key Information - 2,506 Square Feet - Beds: 4 - Baths: 4 ½ - Stories: 1 - Garage Bays: 2 - Width:97' Depth:49' Room Summary - Formal Dining Room - Workshops Special Features - Home Office - Patio / Terrace / Veranda - Split Bedrooms - Walk-In Closet Main Level

A downloadable study plan of this house, including general information on building costs and financing, is available at www.houseoftheweek.com. To receive the study plan for this home, order by phone, online, or by mail. By phone: Call (866) 772-1013. Reference plan #HMAFAPW1548. Online: Go to www.houseoftheweek.com.


Page 4

Heartland Express - The Lighter Side

November 11, 2010

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts •

Auctions, Not Elections

by Lee Pitts

Like just about everything else in our society these days, our political machine is broken and our election process is in need of a complete overhaul. In the 2008 elections 5.3 BILLION dollars was spent on the Presidential and Congressional races alone and look at what we got for our money! Talk about buyer’s remorse! The problem is there are no longer two distinct parties in this country. There is only one: the money party. The politicians only listen to cash, not their constituents. With this in mind I propose that we do away with elections entirely and just sell the Presidency and seats in Congress to the highest bidders at auction. We could get rid of all the middlemen so that all the cash would go directly to the politicians without being laundered through lobbyists. Granted, we’d probably end up with the the same corrupt leaders, but it would be more transparent this way. Perhaps they could even wear the jerseys or uniforms of their benefactors to remind all of us who owns them. If we sold Congressional seats like we sold cattle and had auctions instead of elections your favorite TV shows wouldn’t get canceled because of lame debates and your phone wouldn’t ring off the hook from telemarketers soliciting your vote. Look at all the money we’d save on ethics panels! The sale of the Presidency and every Congressional seat would all be on the same day so that incumbents wouldn’t have

to spend half the time we’re paying them for back home campaigning. They could stay in Washington full time doing their jobs. Okay, so maybe that’s not such a great idea. Some might suggest that selling seats in Congress would be dishonest but isn’t that what we do now? Besides, it’s more of a lease rather than a purchase because alliances could change every four years depending on supply and demand. Money talks and I can hear the auctioneer now... “Welcome to the sale of the Presidency and Congress. Watch your step because, as you can see, we’re holding the sale at a sale barn because they’re used to cleaning up lots of manure. Today we’re proud to offer the most crooked and sleaziest candidates ever sold at public auction. Get out your checkbooks because past leaders have sold for more than anywhere in the world and the sale of the last President brought the highest price ever. “Our first lot is a Senate seat and our first politician is the incumbent who, for the past 36 years, has distinguished herself for her stupidity, arrogance, wealth and ineptness. She is a Democrat who attended Berkley, and obtained her law degree before joining the Peace Corps. Since then she has been a career politician, never having done an honest day’s work in her life. Her many repeat buyers include environmental groups, trade unions and the American Bar

Association. We’re selling a full interest and past buyers agree that she has the highest integrity... once you buy her, she’ll stay bought. “Facing off against her is a blue blooded Republican with many career politicians in his pedigree. He started off poor, with only $150 million, graduated from Harvard and goofed off on Wall Street before joining the family law firm. The family quickly saw his lack of potential and suggested he run for public office where he might help the family business instead of harming it. We’re selling a full interest and a guarantee that the winning bidder will receive favorable legislation, kickbacks, government contracts, Presidential pardons and a willing servant who will tirelessly promote your agenda. “Let’s start the bidding at two million. Do I hear five? Yes, GM/Ford/Chrysler you are in, who’ll give $10 million? Thank you Archer/Exxon/Monsanto. Might I remind the big bankers in attendance today, you aren’t going to acquire your very own lackey by sitting on your hands like you usually do. General Electric are you bidding or do you have an itch? You’d better be careful or you could scratch your nose and end up with a Congressman in your pocket.”

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Features In Upcoming Issues:

Nebraska’s Statewide Ag News Publication

Featured Sections In Every Issue: • Ag Management • Classified Advertising • Country News

• • • •

The Lighter Side Livestock News Production News Schedule of Events

• Weather • Weekly Ag-Market Breakdown

Every Issue Features Available News From These Sources: • AccuWeather Forecasting • Ak-Sar-Ben • Associated Press • Commodities

• Department of Ag • Institute on Agriculture & Natural Resources • Nebraska 4-H

• News from All Heartland Coverage Areas • UNL Cooperative Extension • USDA The Only Publication That Features Statewide FFA Chapter News on a Regular Basis!

myfarmandranch.com

• FFA Dist. 1 & 2 • Soybeans/Sorghum • Parts & Service • Farm Power Show • FFA Dist. 7 & 8 • Corn Results • Tax Prep • Home Shows • FFA Dist. 4 & 11 • Buildings & Home • Norfolk Farm Show • Fair Managers • Columbus Farm Show

Farm & Ranch . . . Where Agriculture Is Always A Business 44140


November 11, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 5

“A Terrific Turkey” CUTTING DIRECTIONS: Background: Cut one 8 1/2” square Inner Border: Cut two strips 1" by 8 1/2" and two strips 1" by 9 1/2” Outer Border: Cut two strips 2" by 6 1/2" and two strips 2" by 8" Outer Border Detail: Cut a total of ten 2 3/4" squares Binding: Cut 2" strips to total 60" in length Trace all your Turkey parts onto fusible adhesive. (We used Stream-A-Seam 2). Cut your fusible adhesive apart leaving at least 1/8th inch around line. For the bigger pieces I cut out the middle to lessen bulk. Press your parts onto fabric, checking picture for color (Find color picture at www.myfarmandranch.com). Cut pieces on line. Peel off paper. You will need a fat 16th (9 X 10 1/2) of background fabric. Do your appliqué and then trim to 8 1/2 X 8 1/2. We used scrap fabric for all the other pieces. We used some of the same fabric from the feathers to make the half-square triangles in the border. Lay your background fabric on the feather placement guide (you can put this on a light box or window to help you see through the fabric) put the feather base on the background fabric and position the feathers. You can trim feathers to fit and again lessen the bulk under the body. Carefully move to pressing pad and press in place. Finish edges as you wish. (We used a machine blanket stitch.) Place body and finish edges. Layer remaining parts finishing edges as you go. Using black embroidery floss add feet, hat buckle and eyes. Trim block to 8 1/2 X 8 1/2 and finish as directed under construction. CONSTRUCTION: 1) Sew the two 1" by 8 1/2” inner border strips to the left and right side of the background square. Press toward the border. Add the two 1" by 9 1/2" strips to the top and bottom of the background. Press toward the border. 2) Take the ten 2 3/4" squares and divide them into five pairs. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one square from each pair. Place each pair, right sides together and sew 1/4" away from both sides of the drawn line. Cut on the line and press open. Square up the resulting half square triangles to 2". 3) Layout the half square triangles and the outer border strips as shown. Turn the half squares any direction you choose. 4) Sew the half square triangles marked A and B together. Add them to the right end of a 2" by 6 1/2” outer border strip. Sew this strip to the left side of the background square. Sew the half square triangles marked C and D together. Add them to the right end of a 2" by 6 1/2" outer border strip. Sew this strip to the right side of the inner border surrounding the background square. Press toward the center. 5) Sew the half square

triangles marked E, F, and G together. Add them to the left end of a 2" by 8" outer border strip. Sew this strip to the bottom of the background square with the inner border attached. Sew the half square triangles marked H, I, and J together. Add them to the right end of a 2" by 8" outer border strip. Sew this strip to the top of the background square with the inner border attached. Press toward the center.

6) Use your favorite applique method. If using fusible web, remember that the design will be reversed. 7) Quilt as desired. Bind with 2" strips. Continued on page 35


Page 6

Heartland Express - Government

November 11, 2010

The Value of Research and Development by Congressman Adrian Smith Grand Island Office 1811 West Second Street, Suite 105 Grand Island, NE68803 Phone: (308) 384-3900 Fax: (308) 384-3902

Scottsbluff Office 416 Valley View Drive, Suite 600 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Phone: (308) 633-6333 Fax: (308) 633-6335

Throughout our nation’s history innovators and entrepreneurs have played an integral role in creating American jobs, increasing productivity, and moving our economy forward. They have done so by pursuing new ideas and technologies. As a member of the House Science and Technology Committee, I have seen just how valuable research and development can be to our nation, and I’m committed to helping the private sector realize its full potential in exploring new frontiers. In 1981 – as a way to help pull our economy out of the Carter recession – Congress enacted a tax credit designed to spur critical U.S.-based innovation and economic growth. This research and development tax credit has incentivized companies, large and small, to perform technological research by allowing greater deductions for the costs of researchers, wages, and supplies needed to make job-creating innovations, as long as all the work is performed in the United States. Thirty years later, our economy is again struggling to right itself and the research and development tax credit once again can be a valuable arrow in our quiver. It has fostered private sector investment by American companies of all sizes, helping to bring new, improved products and services to market. All manner of industries – from agriculture-based

sectors such as food and wood products to the more traditional software and pharmaceutical sectors – have benefited. More importantly, it has helped entrepreneurs encourage American innovation and ingenuity. The research and development tax credits can significantly boost cash flow, especially for emerging and startup companies which lack the financial infrastructure of large companies. Research and development involves experimentation which does not always result in a successful product. The incentive provided by the tax credit helps mitigate some of the risk and encourage companies to innovate. Unfortunately, availability of this tax credit has been far from certain. Since its inception nearly 30 years ago, the tax credit has expired on 14 occasions, and has been extended 13 times, often retroactively. Most recently, the credit expired on December 31, 2009. Since then companies have been coping with uncertainty – a situation which stifles private sector innovation and job growth. Much like the uncertainty and anxiety surrounding the looming tax hikes slated to take effect on January 1, 2011, has forced our nation’s small businesses into a holding pattern; so too has the constant lack of clarity and commitment to the R&D tax credit had a negative effect on America's job creators. A long-term, permanent bipartisan

Washington Office 503 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6435 Fax: (202) 225-0207

extension of the credit would enhance its incentive value because the private sector could rely on it for their multiyear research and development projects. In order to compete in the ever changing global marketplace, America must be competitive. Every day we are losing ground to other nations, and we must find a way to reverse this trend. The R&D tax credit creates high-wage, American jobs and encourages investment in research and development which contributes to the revitalization of the American economy After nearly a year since the tax credit expired, we should be on the cutting edge instead of in the waiting room. Every day the R&D credit remains expired, the future of U.S. jobs, innovation, and economic growth is in jeopardy. Ideas become reality when America's innovators are able to tap into the entrepreneurial spirit which has strengthened our economy for generations. In just a few days, Congress is slated to reconvene for what is referred to as a “lame duck” session. With these few days remaining in the second session of the 111th Congress, I am hopeful we will take up a bipartisan extension of the research and development tax credit to strengthen our economy and empower America's job creators.

Global Dry Bean Promotions Help Nebraska Farmers By Governor Dave Heineman Lincoln Office/State Capitol P.O. Box 94848 Lincoln, NE 68509-4848 Phone: 402-471-2244 Fax: 402-471-6031

Nebraska businesses operate in a global marketplace. In 2009 Nebraska companies exported $4.8 billion in products, with businesses in Canada, Mexico, Japan and China our leading customers. When I traveled to Asia in 2007, I was amazed by the opportunities for our state's businesses. I came away convinced that with targeted outreach and collaboration, Nebraska could continue to increase its share of the global marketplace. Since that time, there have been numerous activities associated with trade development in our state. I want to focus on an example that occurred just this week. A small team of representatives from the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA), the Nebraska Dry Bean Commission and the University of NebraskaLincoln spent four days in Beijing, China, in discussions designed to grow the market for Nebraska dry edible beans. Nebraska is one of the leading states for dry edible bean production, with much of the production and processing located in the Panhandle. The Nebraska Dry Bean Commission recently has set its focus on broadening its global market share, in an effort to provide some price stability.

Western Office 4500 Avenue I • P.O. Box 1500 Scottsbluff, NE 69363-1500 Phone: 308-632-1370 Fax: 308-632-1313

China was targeted for action by the Dry Bean Commission because it is both a competitor in dry bean production, as well as a growth market for consumption. The focus of the visit was on educating key government officials and business representatives about the nutritional value of dry edible beans and opportunities to expand their usage in the Chinese diet. The decision to move ahead with this visit was made after detailed discussions with a number of partners, including the United States Department of Agriculture, about the best opportunities for growing dry edible bean markets. While in China this week, the group met with representatives of the Food Science and Technology Institute, which is a government organization that has some responsibility for looking at new ways of processing agricultural products, like dry edible beans. They also met with the Chinese Nutrition Institute, an organization that is working toward improving the diets of China's citizens. Another appointment was with officials at Masterkong, the largest manufacturer of popular instant noodle cups. The goal was to educate the company on the value of incorporating dry edible

beans into their products. This would increase the nutritional value while opening a new marketing outlet for the beans. The group also met with influential agencies within the Chinese Central Government that have direct authority over dry bean supply management. The Nebraska team was lead by Agriculture Director Greg Ibach. Others included Dr. Linda Boeckner, who is the Director of UNL's Panhandle Research Center and a registered dietitian; Leo Hoehn, who is a dry bean processor and member of the Dry Bean Commission; Stan Garbacz, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture international trade representative and Lynn Reuter, executive secretary of the Dry Bean Commission. The group was small. Each participant contributed significantly to the overall base of knowledge needed for discussions. I am highlighting this trade visit because it represents the collaborative, targeted effort that is important for Nebraska to maintain its competitiveness in an ever-growing, global marketplace. We must expand our outreach and look at our trade partners in new ways if we want to continue to grow our economy.

Ready To Be Your Advocate by Senator Mike Johanns Kearney Office: 4111 Fourth Avenue, Suite 26 Kearney, NE 68845 Tel: (308) 236-7602 Fax: (308) 236-7473

Lincoln Office: 294 Federal Building 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Tel: (402) 476-1400 Fax: (402) 476-0605

As you know, the Federal Government can sometimes be inefficient and paralyzed by bureaucratic red tape. It can be incredibly frustrating, as citizens, when we hit a brick wall with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) or get no response to repeated questions posed to various federal agencies about Medicare coverage, student loans, veteran benefits, Social Security and many other topics. Part of my job as your Senator is to help with these situations. I want you to know that you can call any of my offices at anytime and we will do all we can to assist you. The very safety and well-being of Nebraskans is sometimes at stake. My office was contacted by a woman desperate to get out of dilapidated housing with no hot water or functioning restroom, a broken refrigerator and mold on the walls. She had been awarded Social Security back pay and needed it quickly to afford a move, but she didn't know how to make that happen. My staff helped her connect with the Social Security Administration (SSA) and provide details of the unacceptable living conditions. The funds were released and this

Scottsbluff Office: 115 Railway Street, Suite C102 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Tel: (308) 632-6032 Fax: (308) 632-6295

Nebraskan was able to move to a safe home. For another Nebraskan, the financial uncertainties of retirement were amplified when the IRS refused to allow an important tax exemption that was clearly owed to him in his retirement plan. My staff took up his case and the agency eventually conceded. The exemption was applied in short order. Another Nebraska family was experiencing trouble while trying to adopt two children from Ethiopia. Due to a miscommunication between two federal agencies, the proper paperwork had not been transferred, and with one of the children about to reach the age limit for eligibility, the entire adoption was in jeopardy. My office was able to connect the dots and the adoption is now progressing without issue. Sometimes my staff can help to resolve problems beyond the immediate jurisdiction of Federal agencies. A Nebraska couple had worked hard to put their finances in order so they could assist their son with a student loan as he took the big step toward college. When they applied for the

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loan, they were stunned to be denied due to a tax lien that had been resolved years prior, but still incorrectly appeared on their credit report. My staff provided the credit bureaus with a record of the lien release and the couple’s ability to access credit was restored. Our casework also goes beyond helping individuals and families. The Elkhorn Rural Public Power District spent three years trying to access Federal disaster dollars promised to the district due to heavy storm losses. Their claim appeared lost within the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) bureaucracy. Elkhorn officials called my office for help. I'm very pleased we were able to push FEMA to release the $800,000 promised to Elkhorn. That might not seem like a lot of money to a massive Federal agency, but it is to a local power district. My point in sharing these stories is to let you know that my dedicated staff is standing by to help you. The casework we do is confidential and we'll always be respectful. Please don’t hesitate to call.


November 11, 2010

Heartland Express - FFA District 5

Page 7

North Bend FFA Stays Busy in October

DISTRICT 5 David City Howells-Clarkson Humphrey Lakeview Leigh Newman Grove North Bend Osceola Schuyler

Hot Eats Cool Treats! On October 5th, nine students traveled to Northeast Community College in Norfolk to attend the Nebraska FFA IMPACT leadership workshop. While attending the workshops, Nebraska State officers taught students about individual leadership, team building skills, and current issues facing agriculture. On October 6th, 25 North Bend students traveled to Pender, to participate in the Northeast Area Land Judging Contest. 15 out of the 25 participants received ribbons. There were 300 participants overall. Those receiving red ribbons were: Austin Stone, 44; Taylor Walla, 47; Hunter Cave, 66; Holile Maca, 75; and Chandler McCurdy, 86. Individuals receiving white ribbons were: Taylor Ruzicka, Jordan Kremlacek, Neil Hansen, Chance Marr, Jared Kreikemeier, Blane Zeleny, Broc Vyhlidal, Zach Swanson, and Rachel Neisius. North Bend also had four of six teams receive team ribbons. Those teams were: Red, 21, Ashley Dvorak, Chandler McCurdy, Hunter Cave, and Taylor Ruzicka. Red, 25, Taylor Walla, Kaitlyn Blackmon, Rachel Neisius, and Hollie Maca. White, 29, Justin Bang, Zach Swanson, Jared Kreikemeier, and Astin Stone, White, 35, Broc Vyhlidal, Blane Zeleny, Jordan Kremlacek, and Tate Emanuel. On October 20th, five FFA members and advisor DJ Mottl arrived in Indianapolis, Indiana to attend the 83rd National FFA Convention. Those

attending the convention were Meliss Nordboe, Rachel Neisius, Katie Timm, Hollie Maca, and Taylor Ruzicka. At the convention they attended the Career Fair that included more than 250 exhibitors. They participated in local tours, and leadership sessions featuring Josh Shippe, and Judson Laiepley, the creator of Evolution of Dance. On Saturday morning they attended the American Degree Ceremony. The American Degree is the highest possible degree that an FFA member can receive. April Bunn, daughter of Bernard and Lori Bunn, was among those receiving this degree. On November 4th, the Ag. Leadership class and members of the FFA chapter hosted the first career fair at North Bend Central. Twenty exhibitors were present at the event. The organizers felt that the career fair went well for its first year. Around fifty students and community members attended this event. Recently, the North Bend FFA kicked off their annual fruit sales. Proceeds from fruit sales assist the chapter in sending members to leadership workshops, national and state conventions, funding community service projects, and many other events throughout the busy year. Sales began on November 4th, and will end on November 22nd. Contact any FFA member if you are interested in helping support the North Bend FFA!

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Page 8

Heartland Express - FFA District 5

Leigh FFA Holds Elementary Safety Day

November 11, 2010

Howells/Clarkson Schuyler FFA Member Named FFA Chapter The Howells/Clarkson FFA Chapter has been very busy during the summer and fall months. Membership of the chapter is 53 members for the 2010-2011 school year. The chapter has done many volunteer projects and competed in competitions. The first volunteer work they did was the traveling barnyard that took place during June. During the traveling barnyard, the FFA chapter members take farm animals and travel to three different sites. The places they visit are the Dodge and Clarkson nursing homes and the Norfolk Veterans Home. Members of the chapter that showed at the Colfax County Fair in July were: Amber Burenheide, Adam Burenheide, Garrett Ruskamp, Eric Coufal, Paige Indra, and Julie Hegemann. Also, at the county fair, members helped serve a free breakfast to Colfax County residents on Saturday morning with other chapters from the county. The week before school started, the chapter had a grill-out and swim party. Many of the chapter members were there and had a great time at the party. In the middle of November the chapter has its annual fruit sales. The fruit sales are a very successful project for the chapter. The money raised from fruit sales is used to send members to contest and other leadership building activities throughout the year. Members of the Howells/Clarkson FFA Chapter will be competing at the District Leadership Skills Events held on November 24th at David City. The chapter is working hard on preparing themselves for these contests which are state qualifying.

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Jordan Brabec of Schuyler, Neb., is one of 10 students from across the country who received a National Agri-Entrepreneurship Award and $1,000 during a ceremony at the 83rd National FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 23. The award program recognizes young people who start or are planning to start their own businesses. Jordan Brabec understands that money doesn’t grow on trees…but it was a tree that sparked the idea for his profitable business venture. Brabec wanted to take a traditional lawn

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On Oct. 27, members of the Leigh FFA Chapter presented a farm and harvest safety program to the members of the Leigh Elementary school. A total of 28 members presented 6 different sessions to 70 elementary students. The presentations were held to cover areas of pesticide, flowing grain, and animal safety and PTO, lawn mower and ATV safety. At harvest times with many different activities occurring at the same time on a farmstead it was felt that safety items needed to be brought before the young students so they could stay out of harms way. In addition, students living in town may well be served as they may encounter these risks as by-standers around the home.

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November 11, 2010

Heartland Express - FFA District 5

Page 9

Newman Grove FFA Chapter Last summer the Newman Grove FFA Chapter sent five individuals on a thirty-two hour train ride to Washington, D.C. During the week of July 11th-20th, FFA members Christina King, Kendra Nelson, Demi Edgell, and Joan O’Brian, along with advisor Mrs. Sweeter, attended the Washington Leadership Conference. While attending WLC they were able to visit several monuments, a few of those included the Lincoln Memorial, WWII Memorial, Capitol Building, Arlington National Cemetery, White House, and the Roosevelt Memorial. The students enjoyed developing their leadership skills, taking part in a community service activity, and meeting people from all over the United States. We started the year off quickly with a few chapter events including our annual family and FFA member BBQ on August 23rd. We enjoyed great food, held our first officer meeting, and welcomed new FFA members and their families. Our chapter also made the trip to Grand Island on September 15th, to experience Husker Harvest Days. A total of twenty-nine FFA members attended Nebraska’s largest farm show. On October 14th, seven students ventured out to Ord to take part in the North Central Region Land Judging Contest. Students that participated in

land judging included, Scott Boettcher, Brock Donelson, Demi Edgell, Jason Kaufman, Billy O’Brian, Mark O’Brian, and Sage Robak. Students earning ribbons included Mark O’Brian, Jason Kaufman, and Demi Edgell. While we did not have any individuals finish at the top, we learned a lot about the competition, and look forward to improving our scores at next year’s competition. Our FFA chapter recently hosted the annual Jr. High FFA Lock-In on October 29th. The lock-in is used as a recruitment tool for our chapter. All Newman Grove Jr. High students were invited to spend a night with the FFA. “The Lock-In is a great way to create relationships with our Jr. High students and show them that FFA is fun and enjoyable�, freshman FFA members, Brooke Pieke and Megan Nelson described. This year our lock-in had a Halloween theme, and we enjoyed lots of food, games, dancing, a costume contest, and leadership development activities. A big thank you to the following members for helping with the 2010 Jr. High Lock-In, Christina King, Kendra Nelson, Demi Edgell, Alisha Dunlap, Megan Nelson, Brooke Pieke, Brock

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Continued on page 10

Members of the Newman Grove Jr. High and FFA members enjoy the 2010 Halloween Lock-In

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Page 10

Heartland Express - FFA District 5

November 11, 2010

SCHUYLER FFA MEMBER NAMED... Continued from page 8 mowing business to the next level. In planning, Brabec asked himself the question, “What if I could plan a business that would trim and prune trees and put the useable residue through a wood chipper to make a satisfactory product to ring the same tree with to prevent damage from the lawn mower?” And so Clip’n’Chip was created and has been growing ever since. Brabec wanted to be successful, but he also wanted to make a positive difference. “Through my school, community and work experience, I have gained so much knowledge and lessons of life that have served me well as I continue to grow and make my mark on the world,” Brabec said. Brabec knows that to successfully operate a business, you must maintain a high moral standard. “I have found that being a good per-

son with good values may not be the easiest road in life, but it is certainly important to success,” he said. His main goal is to increase awareness of the importance of his service and to deliver that service in a timely, customerconvenient manner at a fair and reasonable price. “This is a unique business with a unique owner that offers a unique product,” Brabec said. It is that individuality that has set him apart from competitors and allowed him to be successful. Brabec is currently a junior at Schuyler High School. He is very active in the FFA, participating in leadership development events and competitions. He is also an active member of Saint Mary’s Church. USDA Rural Development sponsors the National Agri-Entrepreneurship Award Program as a special project of the National FFA Foundation, Inc.

Osceola FFA This year, the Osceola FFA Chapter will be celebrating the 10th anniversary of the School Board’s decision to bring FFA back to our school. Some of our grandparents were in FFA but when the last ag teacher retired no replacement could be found so the school moved to Industrial Tech. In 1999,after our shop teacher, Charlie Hayes, resigned Steve Schmit was hired to cover shop classes. He also introduced ag courses and explored the idea of bringing FFA back. Interest was so strong that the state issued us a “chapter number” so we could begin participating that year. Students competed at range and land judging and visited other ag departments. In the spring Mr. Schmit and several seniors attended State FFA Convention in Lincoln. Mrs. Sonja (Plugge) Glup was the advisor for the charter year 2000-2001. She began her teaching career by helping to get the FFA chapter up and running. The re-organized Osceola FFA chapter began to hold meetings, have fundraisers, and participate in the local and district contests. In April of 2001 students received a chapter banner and officer emblems at the State FFA Convention. In 2004, Mr. Schmit returned and is currently the advisor for Osceola. This school year will be his 8th year with OHS. The past ten years have been very eventful for us. With livestock judging, range judging, land judging, speaking contests, State FFA, National FFA, and many numerous other contests and fundraisers, the Osceola FFA has had many experiences and has taught many kids about the agricultural aspect of our state and country. Since 2000 we have had fourteen State Degrees and three American Degrees. An Alumni and a Middle School Chapter have been started. We have received two silver Chapter ratings and one NIFA grant up to this point. Stories from this year so far: JUNE - Officers held two summer retreats and Mr. Schmit visited us at home. JULY - Mr. Schmit’s family was recognized for farming 100 years in the same location. Members participated in the Butler and Polk County Fairs. Cierra Fisher and Rachel Wiseman became the first from Osceola to attend PEAK. AUGUST - Four Osceola FFA members joined thirty-three others from Humphrey, Schuyler, and David City to learn about possible careers with exotic animals at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. Attending from Osceola: Camille Marak, Taylor Meysenburg, Stephanie Steele, and Tori Meysenburg. On August 14, 2010 ten Osceola FFA students and their sponsor, Mr. Schmit, attended a back-toschool escapade. The day started at 7:00 A.M. when the bus departed for our trip to Harlan County. We toured the dam and Osceola FFA Alumni members, Dan and Lisa Oquist, graciously supplied lunch for the group at their family cabin. The main attraction of the afternoon was a Huck Finn type adventure of tubing down the Republican River. Our tubing experience lasted about four hours and we covered close to 4.5 miles. The members who attended the tubing trip were Eli Green, Rachel Wieseman, Austin Gabriel, Zach Oquist, Aaron Neujhar, Colton Kuhnel, Aaron Oquist, Stephanie Steele, Erik Oquist, and Clyde Ericson. Osceola FFA Members participated in the 2010 Nebraska State Fair at Grand Island, Nebraska. Beef; Jordan Zahm got 1st in class with her 4-H

The National FFA Organization, formerly known as Future Farmers of America, is a national youth organization of 523,309 student members as part of 7,487 local FFA chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. The National FFA Organization operates under a Federal Charter granted by the 81st United States Congress, and it is an integral part of public instruction in agriculture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction for FFA as a service to state and local agricultural education programs. For more information visit www.ffa.org, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and FFA Nation.

NEWMAN GROVE FFA CHAPTER Continued from page 9 Market Steer. Jake Zahm won Grand Champion Sophomore FFA Beef Showman and received 2nd place in class with his FFA Market Heifer. Taylor Meysenburg got 4th place in her class of 4H Shorthorn Breeding Heifers. Tori Meysenburg received 1st in her class of 4-H Market Heifers. Swine; Aaron Neujahr received a purple and blue with his FFA Market Swine. FFA Crops and Range Boards; Bartley Nelson, Karen Bonilla, and Nikko William exhibited a Range Board and received a red. Zach Oquist, Montana Gable, and Tyler Finley exhibited a Crop/Range board and received a blue ribbon. Madison Euse, Taylor Meysenburg, April Giesbrecht, and Alex Fehringer exhibited a Crop/Range board and received a blue ribbon. Horticultural Floral Arrangements; Camille Marak exhibited a Dried Floral Arrangement and received a blue ribbon. Montana Gable exhibited a Dried Floral Arrangement and received a red ribbon. Madison Euse exhibited a Dried Floral Arrangement and received a blue ribbon. Kristi Cerny exhibited a Dried Floral Arrangement and received a red ribbon. SEPTEMBER - On September 16, 2010 the Osceola FFA attended Area 6 Range Judging contest in Fairbury at Rock Creek Station. Ten FFA members attended. There were two senior teams, which are the 11th and 12th graders, and one junior team, which are 9th and 10th graders. Attendee’s were Camille Marak, Zach Oquist, Montana Gable, Stephanie Steele, Austin Gabriel, Kristi Cerny, Bartley Nelson, Ashlynn Klein, Dallas Talbot and Madison Euse. A total of 117 students participated. The top half of students receive a ribbon. Stephanie Steele, Dallas Talbot, and Zach Oquist were the only three from Osceola to ribbon. The rest of the Osceola placings are as follows: Kristi Cerny, Camille Marak, Austin Gabriel, Montana Gable, Ashlynn Klein, Bartley Nelson, and Madison Euse. OCTOBER - The Osceola FFA chapter held a Children’s Barn Yard for the Osceola elementary students. There were a variety of animals such as cats/kittens, dogs, hamsters, rabbits, a guinea pig, a 3-day-old calf, and a horse. The young kids gained many facts about each animal after hearing a speech about each one from the FFA members that presented it. Stephanie Steele was selected to the National FFA Chorus again this year and spent a week in Indianapolis. 2009 Osceola High School graduate, Shelby Sterup, became the first from our school to walk across the National FFA Convention stage when she received her American FFA Degree. The American Degree is the highest FFA level that a student can achieve. The Degree requires you to have a record of outstanding leadership, have 50 hours of community services in 3 different projects, and you must have a “C” average or better. Profits or investments in an Agriculture-relatContinued on page 30

Donelson, Scott Boettcher, Nikki Penfield, Sage Robak, Joan O’Brian, Ashley Potmesil, Nick Flamme, Alex Wiese, Jacob Haase, Billy O’Brian, Mark O’Brian, and Jason Kaufman. On Halloween FFA members dressed in their best costumes and took part in the Trick-Or-Treat for the Food Pantry. FFA members teamed up with the FCCLA, FBLA, and National Honor Society, and went from door to door asking for food items to help support our local pantry. Many students agreed that the Food Pantry Trick-Or-Treat is a deed that makes them feel good about themselves, and gives them the opportunity to help others in our community. We are currently preparing for our LSE district contest in David City, November 24th. Several of our members are looking forward to competing in demonstrations and speeches. So far the Newman Grove FFA Chapter has had an extremely busy start to the school year, and we look forward to all the events coming our way soon!

DAVID CITY FFA FALL FESTIVITIES Continued from page 9

David City FFA members along with the Nebraska State FFA Officers held a junior high fun night to recruit new FFA members as well as expose them to opportunities in FFA, the Ag classroom and SAE.

David City FFA members said “thanks” by handing out breakfast to farmers and employees during harvest at five local cooperatives.

FFA officers proudly display a check in the amount of $2500 awarded by Monsanto. Monies will be used for various projects in the community.


November 11, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 11

By David M. Fiala

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

County Grain Prices as of 11/09/10 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Scottsbluff Sidney St. Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon

New Corn

Beans

$5.24 $5.08 $5.21 $5.09 $5.21 $5.22 $5.31 $5.29 $4.81 $5.24 $5.10 $5.29 $5.03 $5.20 $5.06 $5.20 $5.13 $5.20 $5.16 $5.08 $5.01 $5.11 $5.38 $5.30 $5.15 $5.11 $5.31 $5.22

New Wheat

$12.29 $12.69 $12.22 $12.04 $12.11 $12.65 $12.49 $12.34 $12.46 $12.44

$12.64 $12.29 $12.37 $12.39

$6.18

$6.52

$6.49

$6.79 $7.37 $6.84 $6.42

$6.18 $6.67 $6.34 $6.51 $6.18

$6.52 $6.97

$6.18 $6.37

$6.52 $6.97

$6.40 $6.18 $6.28

$6.69 $6.52 $6.73

$6.40 $6.03 $6.51 $6.51

$6.69 $6.37 $6.82 $6.82

$6.20

$6.52

$6.32 $6.88

$7.22

Pinto $20.00 Oil Flowers (new) $15.05 Spring Wheat(new) $4

$6.82 $6.52

$4.96

Crop Basis Charts from Reporting Locations as of 11/09/10

$4.96

Corn Basis

Soybean Basis

Wheat Basis

Sorghum Basis

$5.16 $4.88

$4.56 $4.70 $4.70

N/A

Soybeans

Wheat

Dec. 10 539 619

Dec. 10 535 573

December 2010 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart

The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

$5.31 $5.06

Navy

Corn trade has been lower this week due to profit taking by market longs. The weekly net change is 17 lower on both the December and March contracts. The focus this week has been on Tuesday’s USDA Supply and Demand report. The USDA November 2010 corn yield was pegged at 154.3, .1 lower than expected. The production number was 5 million lower than expected at 12.54 billion bushels. The US carryover was at 827 million versus the 845 million average trade guess. Total usage was down slightly, the export number was lowered by 50 million, ethanol usage increased by 100 million and feed lowered by 100 million; these balance sheet usage changes made sense. The world carryover came down by 2.2 million metric tons down to 129.16 million tons. Chinese corn production went up by 2 million to 168 million tons. Despite the friendly report, the market appears to have priced-in the lower yield. Profit taking by market longs along with the higher dollar created selling interest following the report. The trade posted a key reversal down off of both the $6 area and new highs which led to follow-through chart selling through midweek. Nearby support is down at $5.43 which is the October low and the 40-day moving average. The longterm trend is still higher and the fundamental trend still indicates additional upside, but the market could go through a long liquidation phase if demand items fail to remain supportive. The dollar index is oversold and China also tightened banking regulations this week; the combination of the two could create a bounce in the dollar which could limit Chinese import activity near-term. The Monday afternoon progress report listed the corn harvest at 96% complete versus the 73% 5-year average and only 35% last year. The weekly export sales will be delayed until Friday due to Thursday’s Veterans Day holiday. Hedgers call with questions.

Open . . .5.700 High . . .5.726 Low . . . .5.650 Close . . .5.666 Change .-0.094

New Milo

customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options.

$7.24

Corn

Support: Resistance

Milo $5.36

$6.49 $6.11

$12.36 $11.99 $12.44

$25.00 $19.90 $7.15

Wheat $6.57

$12.44 $11.99 $12.57

$5.06 $5.19 $5.40 $5.14 $5.17 $4.99

671 Northern Above Oil Flowers Above Spring Wheat 30.

New Beans

$12.47 $12.28 $12.32 $11.99 $12.34 $12.39 $12.76 $12.53

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience to provide

Wheat trade has been lower this week due to the higher dollar and spillover pressure from corn. The weekly net change 18 lower on the December Chicago contract, KC is down 14, and Minneapolis was down 15. Moisture is forecast across the southern plains for late this week, which will help to alleviate drought concerns for winter wheat producers. This has limited upside this week following the mostly neutral USDA Supply and Demand report. The US carryover was 5 million bushels less than the October number; this compared to expectations for a slight rise in carryover. The carryover is at 848 million bushels which is still comfortable. Adjustments on the domestic balance sheets should be supportive for KC and Minneapolis versus Chicago, but those spreads have trended that way the past few months. The world carryover was reduced to 172.5 million tons which is down 2 million tons from the October report. The Australian wheat production number was up 1 million tons to 25 million tons and Argentine production was up 1.5 million tons. Both these countries are important wheat exporters, so it is important that these countries avoid production shortfalls. The weekly export sales will be seen on Friday; supportive demand numbers are likely needed in order to continue upward. The progress report listed 95% of the winter wheat planted versus the 92% 5-year average. Emergence was at 82% which is 3% ahead of the average number. Winter wheat ratings declined another percent to 45% good to excellent versus 63% a year ago. Hedgers call with questions.

Support: Resistance

Chicago 653 789

K City 710 852

Minneapolis 726 856

December 2010 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .7.160 High . . . .7.160 Low . . . .7.040 Close . . .7.100 Change .-0.116

Soybean trade has been higher this week due to the supportive USDA Supply and Demand report. The weekly net change is 46 higher on November beans. December meal is up $7.40 and oil is 173 points higher. The UDSA report on Tuesday held a bullish surprise for beans; the 2010 soybean yield was listed at 43.9 bushels per acre versus the average trade guess at 44.6. The production number was then 51 million bushels below expectations at 3.375 billion bushels. Usage was increased by 50 million due to a bump in exports. There were a few other small changes, but the bottom line was an 80 million bushel drop in the carryover which was toward the low side of expectations at 185 million bushels. The world carryover was steady at 61.4 million tons due to a 2.5 million ton combined increase in Brazilian and Argentine production. It makes sense that production would rise ahead of their planting season following the recent $3 increase in the futures market. The fundamental changes on the report provide additional incentive to further test the upside, but a move to and above $14 may be hard to make and sustain without further global weather problems. Beans are technically overbought, but corrections should be kept at a minimum unless demand suddenly slows due to price rationing. It will be important to watch the dollar index and the affect the Chinese banking restriction will have on it in the following weeks. Support on the January chart is down at $12.75 which is the 10-day moving average. The weekly progress report did not even list bean harvest which implies that it is completed. The weekly export sales will be delayed this week until Friday due to Veteran’s Day on Thursday. Hedgers call with questions.

Support: Resistance

Jan 1195 1406

Dec Meal 326 380

Dec Oil 4835 5701

January 2011 Soybeans (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .13.210 High . . .13.300 Low . . .13.150 Close . .13.194 Change .-0.094


Page 12

Heartland Express - FFA District 9

Broken Bow FFA

DISTRICT 9 Ansley Broken Bow Burwell Elba Greeley Wolbach Loup City Loup County North Loup-Scotia Ord St. Paul Sandhills Sargent SEM Wheeler Central

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The FFA members planted their soybean test plot on May 26, 2010 and they harvested the plot on October 18th. There were 25 members that gained experience in the agronomy field because they helped with the planting, scouting and harvesting. The FFA members would also like to thank all of the others that helped them with either the planting and/or harvesting of their soybean field. Art Anderson provided the equipment; Trotter Fertilizer provided the herbicide; and Fontanelle, Pioneer, Asgrow and Northrup King provided the seed. On October 19th through 23rd the following members went to the National FFA Convention; (Freshmen) Breanna Wilkie, Gage Pollard, (Juniors) Jonaya Doggett, Logann Harris, and (Senior) Hadley Storms. They attended many The soybean harvesting crew with a 40 foot head sessions and also went to the career expo. One that was used to combine the soybeans. The memmember, Hadley Storms, competed in a, just for bers had the chance to ride in the combine as well fun, welding competition at the career expo. He as do all the weighing and testing of the soybeans. came out as 2nd overall and Hadley won a $250 welding helmet. The FFA members also got to be interviewed for a radio talk show that was aired in Broken Bow. It was estimated that over 55,000 FFA members went to the National FFA Convention. Those who went said they had an amazing time and they highly recommend others to go if they get the chance to. Members have had a busy summer with projects ranging from making a path with river rock at the Interpretive Scenic Highway 2 Museum, Adams Land & Cattle Company Picnic, Officer Retreat, Member Retreat, and Pool Party. This fall we have helped lay landscaping block and rock at North Park. We are now busy preparing for our district leadership skills events.

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November 11, 2010

Heartland Express - FFA District 9

Page 13

Ord FFA Chapter Taylor Hornickel The State Range Judging contest was held Wednesday, September 29th in Red Cloud, Nebraska. The Ord FFA range judgers headed down Tuesday afternoon for a practice day and stayed overnight in Blue Hill. The contest was held about a mile from the Kansas border on the Willa Cather Memorial Prairie. Following the contest contestants and coaches ate lunch, listened to guest speakers and presentations, and anxiously awaited awards. Ribbons were awarded to the top 25 percent in both the junior and senior divisions. Those that received ribbons in the junior division included: Cody Drudik- 45th, Cody Krikac- 27th, Dusty Staab- 24th, Dylan Miller-

13th, and Taylor Hornickel- 7th. The team of Cody Krikac, Dusty Staab, Dylan Miller, and Taylor Hornickel placed 3rd. Also competing in the junior division was Cole Svoboda. Receiving ribbons in the senior division were: Tom Krcilek- 45th, Christie Schauer4th, Kris Hornickel- 2nd, and Johnny Ference1st. This team of Tom, Christie, Kris, and Johnny won 1st place senior team. Also competing in this division were: Austin Ries, Amanda Shepperd, Geoff Foth, and Grady Gydesen. The 3rd place junior team and the 1st place senior team will compete in the National Range Judging Contest in Oklahoma City this May. The teams were coached by Dave Ference.

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Page 14

Heartland Express - FFA District 9

November 11, 2010

S.E.M. FFA Members Compete, Succeed at National Convention During the National FFA Convention 9 members of the Chapter attended this year’s events in Indianapolis, Indiana. Among the members that attended 4 of them competed in events and 5 went on the trip to learn more about the FFA, support the competitors and make connections with businesses and FFA members across the Nation. As members of the Livestock Evaluation team, Alec Ibach, Evan Ibach, Lauren Ibach, and Travis Line brought home a gold rating and the 12th place Plaque. The competitors put in time preparing for this event which included several parts: a team cull/keep activity, evaluation, reasons, and knowledge test. Travis Line was the 3rd high individual in the sheep category and the team was 5th overall in the Beef area. In individual rankings, Alec received a silver award while Evan, Lauren and Travis received gold. The team members were happy to have represented Nebraska and have done so well. Evan Ibach’s convention didn’t get any easier as after his livestock evaluating he was rushed to downtown Indianapolis for a series of interviews based on his records and skills learned and earned in the Beef industry as part of his S.A.E. Evan

was competing in the Beef Proficiency – Placement event. Judges evaluated Evan’s application based on his records detailing hours worked, money earned, skills developed and his general knowledge of the beef industry based on what he has learned over the course of the past four years as an FFA member. Evan competed against students from Georgia, New York and Kansas. Evan was one of only three Nebraskans out of 47 to win their respective area this year. In addition to the competitors, several FFA members attended the convention to enjoy the festivities. Amongst the members were freshman; Aaron Simmons and Rachel Ibach, sophomores, Chase Erwin, Calvin Frerichs, and Brookelyn Trampe. Members attended motivation speakers including Josh Shipp and Judson Laipply, the creator of the Evolution of Dance. Members also attended workshops on new careers in the corn seed industry as well and leadership. These mem-

bers were also able to take in the NCAA hall of champions that is located in Indianapolis. Finally members attended the career fair along with some of the 50,000 other FFA members from across the nation in an attempt to learn more about a particular branch of the agriculture industry that interested them, visit with prospective colleges or to meet other young FFA members. Jackie Trampe of rural Sumner attended the trip as a sponsor along with Mr. Bowder, advisor.

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November 11, 2010

Heartland Express - FFA District 9

The St. Paul FFA Chapter

Page 15

NE Pork Producers Announce Scholarship

The St. Paul FFA Chapter is alive and well this year with many activities already under our belt. In September we pitched in at Husker Harvest Days by cleaning up Tuesday night and Saturday morning, helping put on wristbands, and the kids brought canned food items for United Way. We also got to have fun at Husker Harvest Days on Tuesday. In mid-September, we held a Junior High Fun Night that consisted of games, games, and more games! We played volleyball, Frisbee, soccer, and hide and seek. It definitely helped recruit some of the younger kids we now have in our organization. On September 25, we held our annual Pancake Feed and Hired Hand Auction. It was a good turnout this year and it helped get quite a few kids involved. In October, we attended our local Impact workshop in Hastings and developed our leadership skills. Of course near the end of the month, National Convention rolled around and we sent 12 lucky kids to Indianapolis to have fun and get motivated about FFA. On Halloween, our school holds a safe trick or treat and we set up a table to hand out candy to the youngsters in our community. Since it’s the start of November, we are kicking off our Fruit and PartyTime sales to help our members raise money for State and National Conventions. We are also preparing for District LSEs which are right around the corner.

St. Paul FFA students who went to Impact at Hastings Community College. Left to right Nickolas Jerabek, Zach Rasmussen, Jared Rasmussen, Cole Scheer, Jefferson Keller, Spencer Kulwicki, Michael Duester, Kelsey Scheer, Chris Svobada, Jacob Lange, Jordan Kosmicki, CaLee Thomsen, Dalton Placke.

The Nebraska Pork Producers Association is pleased to sponsor four $500 scholarships to recognize outstanding college-aged students involved in the pork and agriculture industry. Scholarships will be awarded to students who intend to pursue a career in the pork or related industry. “The Nebraska Pork Producers Association is committed to improving, encouraging and enabling the development of youth in Nebraska and one way to do that is through these scholarships,” said Kyla Wize, youth leadership and events specialist of the association. The Nebraska Pork Producers Association established these scholarships to encourage college students to pursue pork related careers. By supporting and encouraging young people to work within the pork industry, NPPA is helping one person at a time improve their college experience and career potential. To be eligible, scholarship applicants must follow the Scholarship Criteria listed below: · Be an undergraduate student, enrolled in a swine program or college of agriculture at a twoor four-year academic institution in Nebraska. · Submit a brief letter explaining a role they see themselves having in the pork industry after

Sorghum Producers Association Offers Scholarship The Nebraska Grain Sorghum Producers Association announces their annual scholarship to a graduating high school senior or to a student currently enrolled in post-high school education. This year’s scholarship totals $475 as it includes a $75 memorial contribution in honor of NeGSPA Board Member Duane Henrichson of Ceresco. To qualify, the student must plan to pursue a course of study in preparation for a career in agriculture or an ag-related field. If the applicant is currently enrolled in college, his/her studies must be ag-oriented. The applicant's parents or guardian must be a member of the Nebraska Grain Sorghum Producers Association. The screening and selection of the scholarship recipient will be done by a special committee appointed by the Nebraska Grain Sorghum Producers Association. The committee will identify one winner and one alternate. Notification will be made by May 1, 2011 in time for spring commencement ceremonies, if appropriate. The proceeds of the scholarship may be applied to the winning candidate's tuition or other educational expenses.

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The application deadline is February 1, 2011. Application forms are currently available and can be obtained by contacting the NeGSPA office at P.O. Box 94982, Lincoln, Nebraska 68509; 402/471-3552. Email: sorghum.board@nebraska.gov.

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graduation. Submit an essay of 2,000 words or less that responds to one of the following issues affecting the pork industry. The essay will explain what the issue means, how it could positively and/or negatively affect the pork industry, and share potential solutions to the issue. The “Trends to Watch” article from the January 2010 issue of the Pork Business Journal inspired the following issues and is a great resource and starting point for the writing. Respond to one of the following issues: working retired, commuters, stay at home workers, pet parents, vegetarian kids and obesity. The article is available at www.nepork.org. To download the complete scholarship criteria information and the “Trends to Watch” article, visit www.nepork.org. Applications are due December 20, 2010. The Nebraska Pork Producers Association will administer the program, read the essays and select the winners. Essays will be judged on the basis of clarity, persuasiveness, originality and relevance of topic. Winners will be notified via mail. Scholarships will be applied directly to the winners’ school accounts. NPPA reserves the right to publish any or parts of the essays submitted.

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Page 16

Heartland Express

November 11, 2010

Tri-Basin Focus on Water Projects to Benefit Platte By Lori Potter, The Kearney Hub Projects and programs designed to enhance Platte River flows to benefit threatened and endangered species were the focus at Tuesday's Tri-Basin Natural Resources District Board meeting in Holdrege. Platte River Recovery Implementation Program Executive Director Jerry Kenny of Kearney described a proposed water re-regulation reservoir in northwest Phelps County. The idea is to deliver water through the Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District's Phelps Canal to a small reservoir at times when extra water is available and hold it for later releases to the river. Tri-Basin General Manager John Thorburn said Kenny also discussed a pilot project in the same neighborhood north of Loomis to test groundwater recharge that can improve river flows. The pilot project will use a one-acre pond. Kenny said that if a recharge project is developed, it could include one or more 80-acre ponds. "We'll watch this project closely," Thorburn said, because it may help Tri-Basin meet its responsibilities to offset river depletions. Also, the NRD is implementing its own groundwater

recharge project in the Sand Creek area in the Little Blue Basin within Kearney County. Also Tuesday, the board approved $20,000 as Tri-Basin's share of administrative costs for CNPPID to file a request with the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources to transfer some surface water rights to the NRD. Thorburn said the plan is to leave about 2,500 acre-feet of water in the river as TriBasin credits. Tri-Basin will pay Central for the water rights. In a related issue, the Tri-Basin board approved a map prepared by Thorburn that highlights priority areas near the Platte River in northwest Phelps and northern Gosper counties to promote an incentive program to retire land from irrigation. He said a targeted mailing describing the payment opportunities will go to landowners in those areas. Money is available from the federal Agricultural Water Enhancement Program for temporary retirement of irrigated acres. Thorburn said his board approved $100,000 two months ago to enhance the one-time payment to have the acres permanently retired from irrigation. "The board wants to do this on a bid basis," he said, with landowners making offers on what

they would accept to retire irrigation. The board approved a request for proposals on a project to enhance North Dry Creek flows into the Platte River in northern Kearney County and set a bid deadline of Dec. 12. Thorburn said the bids will be considered at the Dec. 14 board meeting. The board discussed Tuesday the limited opportunities to get interest on money in savings for pending water offset projects. Thorburn said it was decided to use some of the money to pay off the $111,000 balance of a loan to purchase and remodel the NRD's new building on North Highway 183 in Holdrege, which will save more on loan interest than could be gained with a certificate of deposit. Approval of an interlocal agreement for the Republican River Coalition, which also includes the Middle Republican and Upper Republican NRDs, was tabled as negotiations continue on Tri-Basin's share of the budget costs for fiscal year 2011. Thorburn said the coalition's fiscal year began July 1, but Tri-Basin was not a member during the first quarter. So, the goal is to negotiate a pro-rated three-quarters payment for this year's budget.

FAVORABLE WEATHER SPEEDS UP HARVEST; CROP PRODUCTION DOWN Continued from page 1 Those dry conditions, including low humidity and gusty winds, have caused the National Weather Service to issues numerous fire warnings for the area over the past several months, and rural fire departments have been busy putting out grass fires on nearly a daily basis. Up until September, it had been a wet year. The National Weather Service in Hastings reported that precipitation for the year is at 28.61 inches, more than 4 inches above normal for this time of year. At this time last year, Grand Island had recorded only 23.65 inches of precipitation, which was slightly below the normal average. During October, Grand Island's 0.30 of an inch of precipitation was 1.21 inches below the October average. Temperature-wise, the daily average temperature during October for Grand Island was 3.8 degrees above normal. In October 2009, precipitation was 1.88 inches above normal (including 4.5 inches of snow) and the daily average temperature was 7.4 degrees below normal. November has started out nearly 7 degrees warmer than seasonal daily average temperatures, and with no precipitation. But the National Weather Service in Hastings is forecasting a change from the warmer, dry conditions, with cooler temperatures starting today with highs near 50 and a 50 percent chance of showers on Thursday that could produce as much as one-quarter of an inch of precipitation. With the colder temperatures, NWS in Hastings said there's a possibility of a rain/snow mix Thursday night as the night's low will dip to 28 degrees. And the dry conditions aren't just in south Central Nebraska, as the USDA reported that most of the western half of the state had recorded less than one inch of precipitation during the last 45 days, causing below normal conditions for winter wheat that was seeded this fall. Only 44 percent of the winter wheat was rated either good or excellent. While the weather has been favorable for a quick and timely harvest this year compared to

2009, weather has also been a factor in lower production this year, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Based on Nov. 1 conditions, the USDA reported Tuesday that the state's corn crop is forecast at 1.48 billion bushels, down 2 percent from last month's prediction and 6 percent below last year's record high. Yield is forecast at 166 bushels per acre, down four bushels from last month's forecast and 12 bushels per acre below last year, but equal to the second highest of record. Area to be harvested for grain at 8.9 million acres is 1 percent above a year ago. Hall County farmer Mike Dobesh said this year's crop season was a roller coaster ride, especially with lower yields in some fields compared to last year. Dobesh said he completed harvest about a month ago, while last year he finished harvesting in December, several days before a blizzard. This year, the dry weather caused the corn to dry down under 15 percent moisture, causing farmers both a loss of yield and a lesser price for their corn because of the lower test weights. Last year, Dobesh had to replant corn because of excessive moisture problems and when he harvested his corn in December, moisture levels were above 40 percent,. Nationwide, the USDA reported that corn production is forecast at 12.5 billion bushels, down 1 percent from the October forecast and down 4 percent from last year's record production of 13.1 billion bushels. As of Nov. 1, yields are expected to average 154.3 bushels per acre, down 1.5 bushels from the previous month and 10.4 bushels below last year's record of 164.7 bushels. According to the USDA on Tuesday, corn use for ethanol has increased by 100 million bushels, with record October ethanol production indicated by weekly Energy Information Administration data and favorable ethanol producer margins. The USDA reported that ethanol prices continue to track higher with corn prices, supporting returns for ethanol producers. "Although

small relative to domestic usage, higher ethanol exports and lower imports are also expected to add to corn use for ethanol with high sugar prices limiting the availability of ethanol from Brazil," according to the USDA. In Nebraska, corn demand for ethanol production has helped increase cash receipts from higher corn prices, according to the USDA, by nearly $3 billion between 2005 and 2010. With a tighter corn supply, corn prices will continue to increase, especially as ethanol production increases. According to the Nebraska Corn Board, in Nebraska, last year the state's ethanol industry produced 1.45 billion gallons of ethanol using 518 million bushels of corn. With a shorter corn supply this year in the state, ethanol production is projected to increase to about 2 billion gallons of ethanol using 675 million bushels of corn. With soybean harvest completed, production is forecast at a record-high 270 million bushels, down 4 percent from last month but 4 percent above last year. Yield is forecast at 53 bushels per acre, down two bushels from last month and 1.5 bushels below the record high set in 2009. Nationwide, the USDA reported Tuesday that soybean production is forecast at a record-high 3.38 billion bushels, down 1 percent from the October forecast but up slightly from last year. Based on Nov. 1 conditions, USDA said yields are expected to average 43.9 bushels per acre, down 0.5 bushel from last month and down 0.1 bushel from last year's record-high yield. Statewide, sorghum production is forecast at 6.83 million bushels, down 3 percent from last month's prediction, 48 percent below a year ago and the smallest production since 1953. Yield is forecast at 91 bushels per acre, down three bushels from the previous month's forecast and down two bushels from last year. Both Nebraska sugarbeet and potato production are down 17 percent and 14 percent, respectively, compared to a year ago.


November 11, 2010

Heartland Express

Poll Shows Rural Nebraskans More Positive About Lives Rural Nebraskans are much more positive about their lives than they were just a year ago, according to the Nebraska Rural Poll. It may be a sign that uncertainty over the looming recession in 2009 has given way to a realization that the region's economy didn't dip as low as some feared it would, say poll organizers. The 14-page survey, conducted by the University of NebraskaLincoln, was sent to 6,500 households in 84 non-metropolitan counties last March and April. Results are based on 2,797 responses. Fifty percent of poll respondents said they believed they were better off this year than they were five years ago. That's up from 43 percent a year ago and is second only to the 53 percent who answered similarly in 2008. The poll also reflected a steep drop in the percentage of rural Nebraskans who believe they are worse off than they were five years ago " going from 28 percent last year, tying for the all-time high, to 21 percent in 2010. Poll organizers said the improvement in rural Nebraskans' mood from 2009 to 2010 might reflect perceptions of the economic outlook. In spring 2009, there was "all this sky-is-falling talk" about the recession, said Randy Cantrell, rural sociologist with the Nebraska Rural Initiative. A year later, media reports are focused on an economic turnaround, and many rural Nebraskans may feel the worst hasn't been so bad in this part of the country, they said. "Uncertainty is the thing that really breeds unhappiness," Cantrell said. On the other hand, once people understand what they have to deal with, they tend to come to terms with it and don't worry as much, he added. Nebraska has fared better in this recession than many states. "A lot of satisfaction is a relative thing," said Bruce Johnson, UNL agricultural economist. The poll also found that 42 percent of respondents said they expected to be better off in 10 years than they are today, while 23 percent said they expected to be worse off. Those numbers have remained fairly steady from year to year. Cantrell, Johnson and Brad Lubben, UNL public policy specialist, noted that the 2010 poll drives home a point that previous polls have made, too: No matter what the economic outlook is, rural Nebraskans who seek higher education are more satisfied with their lives, more confident about the future and less likely to feel powerless than those who do not go to college.

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Cantrell refers to this as the poll's "annual stay-in-school message." This year, for example, 47 percent of respondents with a high school diploma or less education agreed that people are powerless to control their own lives. Only 22 percent of those with a four-year college degree shared that opinion. Fifty-three percent of respondents with at least a four-year degree said they believed they'd be better off 10 years from now than they are today, while only 26 percent of respondents with less than a high school education shared this optimism. "If you don't pursue education, the odds are very good you will be unhappy," Cantrell said. "It's true when times are good, it's true when times are bad." Johnson said investing in education usually helps people to "have more resiliency. You may fall, but you're more likely to land on your feet." Other findings of the 2010 Nebraska Rural Poll:Twenty-nine percent of rural Nebraskans live two miles or less from their nearest parents, 75 percent live within 60 miles of a parent and 2 percent live with their parents or their spouse's parents.Ten percent of respondents provide daily, voluntary assistance to relatives who are aging, ill or have special needs. Fifteen percent do so weekly and another 13 percent monthly.Three percent of rural Nebraskans provide daily, voluntary assistance to neighbors who are aging, ill or have special needs. Eight percent do so weekly and 13 percent monthly.As in previous years, rural Nebraskans are most satisfied with their marriages, families, friends, religion/spirituality and the outdoors. They are less satisfied with job opportunities, current income levels and financial security during retirement. Another reflection of an improved perception of the economy: 42 percent said they were satisfied with job opportunities this year, up from 32 percent in 2009. Also, satisfaction with job security increased from 59 percent last year to 66 percent this year. The Rural Poll is the largest annual poll of rural Nebraskans' perceptions on quality of life and policy issues. This year's response rate was about 43 percent. The margin of error is plus or minus 2 percent. Complete results are available online at http://cari.unl.edu/rural poll/report10.shtml. The university's Center for Applied Rural Innovation conducts the poll in cooperation with the Nebraska Rural Initiative with funding from UNL Extension and the Agricultural Research Division in the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

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ers to invest checkoff dollars in their best interests.” Gregg Fujan recently served as the Chairman of the Nebraska Soybean Board and as the NSB District Three Director for nine years, he looks forward to taking that leadership to the national board. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack recently announced the appointment of 34 farmer-leaders to the USB and soybean checkoff. All appointees will serve three-year terms beginning immediately and represent the interests of all U.S. soybean farmers.

HUGE 2 DAY AUCTION COMPLETE TRUSS, WALL & CONSTRUCTION FACILITIES, SPECIALTY WALL AND TRUSS EQUIPMENT COMPONENTS DISPERSAL AUCTION Day 1: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • 10:00 AM Day 2: Thursday, November 18, 2010 • 10:00 AM ADVANCED BUILDING & COMPONENTS, INC. • MEAD, NEBRASKA GO TO www.delpeterson.com for details, on-line bidding and photos! Sale Site: Advanced Building & Components, Inc. Located at 1541 County Rd 11, Mead, Nebraska 68041. Watch For Signs!

DAY 1: Parcel 1: Approx. 760' x 875' piece of property, Parcel 2: Approx. 285' East & West x 210' North & South. Parcel 3: This parcel will be the balance of 68 acres more or less that is not included in Parcels 1 & 2. It is farm ground that lies to the west of parcel 1. Numerous shop equipment, Inventory, Truss Joints and Lumber. DAY 2: (12) TRUCKS: ’07-’95 Various Makes and Models. (10) TELEHANDLERS, CRAWLER LOADER, (2) PAYLOADERS, (9) SKID STEERS & FORKLIFTS, ATV, (7) TRUSS TRAILERS: ’06-’96 JDH. (8) TRAILERS: ’01-’84 Various Makes and Models. (2) ENCLOSED TRAILERS & NUMEROUS COMPONENT EQUIPMENT: ASI B500 5 blade manual component saw, Apollo saw, (2) Koskovich Auto Omni Robotic component saw, Cleary 4 blade web component saw, Klaisler 4' Roll lumber splicer, Klaisler GR2640 floor truss roller press, Klaisler GR14-24 14' x 100', Jager truss gantry, PCS miter 2 axis sheating saw, PCS/Mitek Automated Interior Wall Line, PCS/Mitek Automated Exterior Wall Line, PCS/Mitek Just-In Time Delivery System, PCS XY saw, other carts, tables, many more related items. Paige Peterson Broker. There are too many items at this auction to mention. Go to www.delpeterson.com to view complete salebill. Call for details! Advanced Building & Components, Inc. is discontinuing their operation in Mead, Nebraska. They have an excellent line of late model Truss & Wall manufacturing equipment along with support equipment. For more information, contact Del Peterson & Assoc, 419 West Judy Drive Fremont NE, 68025, 800-492-9090 or 402-721-4388, Fax: 402-721-4583, E-mail: auction@delpeterson.com, Web Site: www.delpeterson.com

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Page 18

Heartland Express

November 11, 2010

Nebraska Students to Tour Taiwan New Grain Next week, three Nebraska students will travel over 7,000 miles to Taiwan where they will experience the country’s agricultural education system, agricultural industry, and learn more about the role Nebraska agriculture plays in Taiwan. This is the seventh year for the student exchange program between the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) and the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Kansas City. Each year, three students from Taiwan visit Nebraska to attend the annual Nebraska Agricultural Youth Institute (NAYI), a week-long summer program coordinated by NDA. In return, NDA chooses three NAYI delegates to travel to Taiwan in the fall. NDA Director Greg Ibach hopes the exchange program will continue, as it benefits agriculture in both countries. “Agriculture is a global industry, and it’s important that our students are educated and understand the important role our trading partners, such as Taiwan, play in our state’s agricultural industry.” The trip is sponsored by the Nebraska Farm Bureau and the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Kansas City and is coordinated by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA). The students will leave for Taiwan on November 18 and will return to Nebraska on November 23. While in Taiwan, the students will be staying at the Taichung Senior High School of

Agriculture and Technology. Their visit will include tours of the campus, interaction with Taiwanese students, participation in presentations, visits to local farms, and observations of several agricultural research institutes. They will also have the opportunity to do a little sightseeing and visit the Council of Agriculture: Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The students will return to the 2011 NAYI where they will share their experiences with the delegates. The three students selected by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture are: · Mr. Brennan Costello from Gothenburg. Brennan is a senior at Gothenburg Public School and is involved in FFA, 4-H, Student Council, National Forensics League, and Youth Community Improvement Program. His parents are Steve and Becky Costello. · Mr. Judson Hoffschneider from Arlington. As a senior at Logan View High School, Judson is involved in FFA, 4-H, National Honor Society and the Nebraska Jr. Angus Association. His parents are Scott and Jennifer Hoffschneider. · Mr. Hoyt Kraeger from Avoca. Hoyt is a senior at Weeping Water Public Schools and is involved in 4-H, National Honor Society, the Nebraska High School Rodeo Association and the American Versatile Hunting Dog Association. His parents are Mark and Leesa Kraeger.

Bin Goes Up Farmers Union Co-op is hoping to put some much-needed new storage to use soon. Farmers Union Co-op Manager Randall Schwartz said work is nearing completion on a 400,000-bushel grain bin in Cedar Bluffs. The bin was scheduled for completion the first of October, but rain delays this spring and summer pushed back the work. Schwartz said the dirt work and ground compaction under the bin was especially held up due to the wet conditions earlier this year. But crews were able to put the final two rings of the 28-ringed bin in place on Saturday. The new structure stands about 125 feet tall. There is some electrical wiring that must be done now before the bin can be used. Schwartz said the goal is to have that completed in the next couple of weeks. He added the co-op has some corn on the ground now they are hoping to get into the bin as soon as possible. "It will help keep the grain off the ground," he stated.

Servicing Lawnmowers for Winter David Lott, Horticulture Extension Educator, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension, North Platte The killing frost finally arrived to remind us that Fall is coming to a close. Previous news columns have addressed tasks around the garden and landscape to complete before the cold winter arrives for good. Now is the time to think about servicing the lawnmower before it is stored for the winter. Here are some simple tips to consider and follow so the lawnmower is ready to go next spring when it is time to mow the lawn again. · Drain the gas out of the tank or add a gasoline stabilizer to keep the gas from becoming thick and gummy. · After the spark plug is removed, squirt a

Upcoming Special Sections November 25 ........................FFA Dist. 1 & 2, Soybeans/Sorghum, Parts & Service, Farm Power Show December 9 ....................................FFA Dist. 7 & 8, Corn Results, Tax Prep, Home Shows December 23 ..........................FFA Dist. 4 & 11, Buildings & Home, Norfolk Farm Show January 7 ............................Fair Managers, Columbus Farm Show

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couple drops of oil in the spark plug hole to help lubricate the cylinder. Replace the sparkplug with a new one after the oil has added. · Clean battery terminals if the mower is equipped with a battery to help avoid corrosion. Remove the battery, and connect it to a battery monitor that will keep it charged during the winter. · If the battery is removed and not connected to a battery monitor, store it in a protected location. Cool basements and crawlspaces are good locations to use. · Sharpen the blades so the mower is ready to make clean cuts on the grass the next spring. Otherwise, a newly cut lawn will have a ragged appearance due to dull blades. · Many small engine shops and people specializing in small engine repair can sharpen the blades for a reasonable fee if a homeowner does not have the time, tools or expertise to correctly remove and sharpen the blades on their own. · If other parts or functions of the mower are not working correctly, this is a good time to send the mower in to have it checked by someone who works with small engines, and can correctly repair it. By completing some of these small steps, the lawnmower can be serviced and ready to go for Spring with minimal extra work. If you have any questions about servicing lawnmowers for the winter, please contact me at dlott2@unl.edu, by calling (308) 532-2683, or by contact your local University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Office. Have a great week!

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November 11, 2010

Heartland Express

Farm Service Agency Administrator Urges Farmers & Ranchers to Vote in County Committee Elections Farm Service Agency (FSA) Administrator Jonathan Coppess announced today that the 2010 FSA county committee elections began Nov. 5, with USDA mailing ballots to eligible voters. The deadline to return the ballots to local FSA offices is Dec. 6, 2010. "All eligible farmers and ranchers can make a difference by voting in this year's county committee elections," said Coppess. "County committee members will provide input and make important decisions on the local administration of new disaster and conservation programs under the 2008 Farm Bill. I particularly encourage minority and women producers to get involved so that county committees fairly represent the producers of a county or multi-county jurisdiction." County committee members are an important component of the operations of FSA and provide a link between the agricultural community and the Department of Agriculture (USDA). Farmers and ranchers elected to county committees help deliver FSA programs at the local level, applying their knowledge and judgment to make decisions on commodity price support loans and payments; conservation programs; incentive indemnity and disaster payments for some commodities; emergency programs and payment eligibility. FSA committees operate within

Page 19

13 Year Old Wins 50th Anniversary Logo Contest for Nebraska Pork Producers

official regulations designed to carry out federal laws. To be an eligible voter, farmers and ranchers must participate or cooperate in an FSA program. A person who is not of legal voting age, but supervises and conducts the farming operations of an entire farm also may be eligible to vote. Agricultural producers in each county submitted candidate nominations during the nomination period, which ended on Aug. 2. Eligible voters who do not receive ballots in the coming week can obtain ballots from their local USDA Service Center. Dec. 6, 2010, is the last day for voters to submit ballots in person to local USDA Service Centers. Ballots returned by mail must also be postmarked no later than Dec. 6. Newly elected committee members and their alternates will take office Jan. 1, 2011. Close to 7,900 FSA county committee members serve in the 2,244 FSA offices nationwide. Each committee consists of three to 11 members who serve three-year terms. Approximately one-third of county committee seats are up for election each year. More information on county committees, such as the new 2010 fact sheet and brochures, can be found on the FSA website at http://www.fsa .usda.gov/elections or at a local USDA Service Center.

A logo design submitted by Taven Zelnio, an eighth-grader from Lincoln, was voted the winner of a contest sponsored by the Nebraska Pork Producers Association. The winning design is now being used as the logo for the association’s 50th anniversary celebration in 2011 and other related promotional materials. “We were looking for the ultimate logo for our year-long 50th anniversary celebration in 2011 and I think we’ve found it in Taven’s design,” said Dee Petersen, NPPA producer information director. The 50th Anniversary Logo Contest closed September 1, 2010 and the 13-member Board of Directors judged and voted at the September meeting. Zelnio received $50 as his prize, which he plans to save for college.

Zelnio, 13, entered the contest after searching the web for local contests and knew that he had what it takes to compete in the 50th Anniversary Logo Contest. “My father leads a small publishing company and has taught me some of the ‘tricks of the trade’ in designing,” Zelnio said. The logo incorporates the current Nebraska Pork Producers Association logo while highlighting the 50 years of service the association has provided the pork producers and the industry. “This experience was good practice for if I ever decide to follow in my father’s footsteps, and work for a publishing company,” said Zelnio. “I’ll use my winnings to save up for college so that I can achieve whichever career I pursue.”

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Page 20

Heartland Express - FFA District 12

November 11, 2010

The Beginning of Another Successful Year for Scottsbluff FFA

DISTRICT 12

By Hayley Clark, Scottsbluff FFA reporter

Alliance Banner County Bayard Cody-Kilgore Creek Valley Garden County Gordon-Rushville Hemingford Hyannis Kimball McPherson County Morrill Mullen Scottsbluff Sioux County South Platte

The Scottsbluff FFA chapter has started off to a great year, In May the new officers were elected and the new team set off to Aurora, Nebraska to attend the annual COLT conference. COLT provided many opportunities for the new officer team. At the workshop the team got to know each other and their specific office a lot better. The team also worked on bettering their leadership skills and how to improve the chapter. The officers along with the advisors worked on setting goals for the upcoming year. Overall COLT gave the new team many new skills and opportunities to take home to share with the chapter. Scottsbluff FFA also had five members attend state fair this year: Brayden Auer, Jessica and Isabell Wolf, Sara Aschenbrenner, and Keelyn Hubbard. Brayden Auer took home Division three champion steer. In August, at the start of the school year, Scottsbluff FFA set to work on the many activities for the year. We had several students compete in our first contest of the year, range judging. Scottsbluff had three teams compete this year; two senior teams and one junior team. All three teams did very well at the district contest. The first senior team consisting of Austin Groskopf, Kyra Baldwin, Ashley Pike, and Hayley Clark took first in the senior division. Scottsbluff ’s second senior team consisting of Jessica Wolf, Hallie Anderson, and Chris

Hartsuiker placed fourth. The junior team placed first in the junior division as well, that team consisted of Tevyn Baldwin, Zach Perlinger, and Katey Meyers. Individually Austin Groskopf placed first overall in the senior division, and Tevyn Baldwin placed first overall in the junior division. The first place senior team and the junior team attended state two weeks later. The teams did well and had three people place. Scottsbluff ’s second contest they attended this year was district land judging. The chapter had one team compete consisting of Austin Groskopf, Ashley Pike, Amanda Fletcher, and Seth Huffman. Austin Groskopf received a white ribbon. This year our chapter qualified for the NIFA award. The chapter received a $1000 grant which we will be using to buy water quality testing equipment. The chapter will use this equipment for our “test your well water station” at the KNEB farm and ranch expo. Scottsbluff sent five members to the National FFA convention this year; Paige Steinle, Kyra Baldwin, Tevyn Baldwin, Cody Pedulla, and Hayley Clark. Cody Pedulla received his American degree.The members went to the sessions and attended workshops. They also attended the career show. Overall the members agreed nationals was a great experience. Scottsbluff hopes to continue with a great year, and gain many more opportunities and experiences.

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November 11, 2010

Heartland Express - FFA District 12

Page 21

Creek Valley High School FFA Creek Valley High School FFA members attended the Eighty-Third FFA National Convention held in Indianapolis from Oct. 2023. CVHS Members started the trip by traveling to North Platte from Chappell. Members boarded an Arrow bus. Other Nebraska FFA chapters boarded the Arrow bus after several stops before heading to Indiana. The bus trip took 18 hours. Members watched movies, listened to music and slept. The bus traveled through different states arriving in Indiana on Wednesday, Oct. 20 in the afternoon. The majority of Nebraska FFA members stayed at the Sheridan Hotel. Members attended the first opening session at Conseco Field House. The session introduced the theme "Infinite Potential." National Officers opened the session with opening ceremonies. Levy Randolph, National FFA President, welcomed the many FFA members. The national FFA Band and Choir were introduced. This session had two main speakers who were Dr. Larry Case, National FFA advisor, and Josh Shipp was the keynote speaker. Dr. Case has been the National Advisor for 26

years. He started his career when he was an Ag teacher in a high school and from there he kept advancing. This year he will retire on Jan. 1, 2011. Josh Shipp is the host of “Jump Shipp” and the author of “The Teen’s Guide to World Domination.” He talked about infinite potential in his own way. Thursday, Oct. 21, CVHS members visited the Bluespring Caverns in Bedford. The tour was of an underground cave, where the members traveled on boat a quarter of mile. While in the cave members saw white crawdads and fish. They experienced what it would be like if it was pitch black. The tour guide turned the flashlight off and the students sat in complete dark. Thursday night’s session was about “Empowering [FFA members] Our Potential.” The laser show was shown and then the officers opened session. The welcoming speech was said by Chase Rose. In the program, many different people were recognized by excellence they achieved. These people were Star finalists and Foundation board members. The speaker was Angela Mayfield. At the hotel, FFA members danced the night away. On Friday, Oct. 22, CVHS members toured

the Indianapolis Speedway. There they rode on the track in a bus, kissed the bricks, and took a tour of the different buildings around the track. The night session was about "Engaging [FFA members] our Potential." The night started out with the retiring of the National FFA Board of Directors members. Bethany Bohenblust, National FFA Secretary, gave her retiring speech, named "Stars and Sushi." The keynote speaker was Judson Laipply, comedian. He created the "The Evolution of Dance." He showed his skills in seven minutes dancing different ageless dance moves. Members at the Sheridan hotel danced it up at the dance that night. Saturday, Oct. 23, started early at 7:45 eastern time. This session was where many members in the collegiate FFA received there American Degree. This is the highest degree a person can achieve in the FFA. Autumn Longo, CVHS graduate, received her American degree. CVHS members who attended: JJ Bond, Luke Cavalli, Ann Ford, Clarice Ford, Sheana Hendrickson, Forrest Hendrickson, Justin Huff, Jackie Kimbrough, Cody Meyer and Shelby Selby. Sponsors were Mr. Danny Whiting and Mrs. Sarah Whiting.

FFA Creed I believe in the future of agriculture with a faith born not of words but of deeds--achievements won by the present and past generations of agriculturists; in the promise of better days through better ways, even as the better things we now enjoy have come to us from the struggles of former years. I believe that to live and work on a good farm, or to be engaged in other agricultural pursuits, is pleasant as well as challenging; for I know the joys and discomforts of agricultural life and hold an inborn fondness for those associations which, even in hours of discouragement, I cannot deny. I believe in leadership from ourselves and respect from others. I believe in my own ability to work efficiently and think clearly, with such knowledge and skill as I can secure, and in

the ability of progressive agriculturists to serve our own and public interest in producing and marketing the product of our toil. I believe in less dependence on begging and more power in bargaining; in the life abundant and enough honest wealth to help make it so--for others as well as myself; in less need for charity and more of it when needed; in being happy myself and playing square with those whose happiness depends on me. I believe that American agriculture can and will hold true to the best traditions of our national life and that I can exert an influence in my home and community which will stand solid for my part in that inspiring task.

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Page 22

Heartland Express - FFA District 12

November 11, 2010

Alliance FFA Chapter Alliance FFA officers travel to National FFA convention. This year the group chose to travel upon one of the Nebraska Shuttle buses to get to Indianapolis. Many hours were spent getting to know others. Alliance FFA officers include. Brittany Andersen - President, Alyssa Dye - Vice president, Ashtyn Shrewsbury - Treasurer, Nikki Dunovsky - Secretary, Shelby Andersen - Reporter,

and Bret Schwaderer - Sentinel. Other activities the chapter has participated in this fall include: land and range judging, Homecoming parade, Homecoming games and burning of the A. FFA members held a new members picnic at the beginning of the year and showed at the Box Butte County fair and state fair also.

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November 11, 2010

Heartland Express - FFA District 12

The Bayard FFA Chapter

National FFA Convention Results

By Ashlee Willey

American Degree One-hundred eighty-seven (187) Nebraska FFA members received the American Degree. Based on a student's SAE, leadership development, and agricultural coursework, each year less than onehalf of one percent of FFA members receive this degree. Last Name First Name Chapter Name Aden Grant Syracuse Aden Jared Eustis-Farnam Albright Josh Ravenna Anderson Jordan Burwell Anderson Kara Creighton Arkfeld Emily Lourdes Central Cath Atwater Lance Blue Hill Bader Thomas Centennial Bartak Brent Ainsworth Bechtel Logan Heartland Beecham Quinn Palmyra Birt Hannah York Bland Cody Blue Hill Blume Robert Southwest Bolte Preston McCool Junction Bromm Natalie Oakland-Craig Brozek Kyle Creighton Bryant Samantha Cody-Kilgore Buettner Karen Northwest Buller Gregory Heartland Bunn April North Bend Burg Austin Conestoga Campbell Colt Ashland-Greenwood Casto Hallie Northwest Chrisman Chase McCool Junction Clausen Ryan Twin River Condreay Christina Lakeview Crocker Adam Southwest Culver Joe Southern Valley Czarnick Zachariah Twin River Daffer Jennifer Southwest Dam Derek Logan View Dather Alicia Bloomfield Dather Allyson Bloomfield Dendinger Katelyn Hartington Deterding Jesse Southwest Docter Amanda Norris Doerr Alissa Creighton Doerr Mickey Bloomfield Domogalla Richard Stanton Drudik Matthew Sutton Easterday Jaimee Eustis-Farnam Ehlers Angela York Engstrom Tyler Lakeview Epp William Heartland Essink Brandon Syracuse Fadschild Hannah Lakeview Frauen Amber Northwest Frenzen Katie Fullerton Friesen Grant High Plains Gadeken Tanya Johnson Co. Central Goeden Danny Hartington Goertzen Cody Heartland Goff Matthew Falls City Grabowski Lisa Ravenna Griess Gary Sutton Guenther Joseph Pender

The Bayard FFA is off to a great school year. We have already won our district land judging and went to state where we didn’t do to bad. The Bayard FFA had their annual FFA Labor Auction where we set a record high of the most money raised since the program was started. We have also had a few barbeques for FFA members to attend. This year’s officers are: President- Mikah Schmall, Vice President- Amanda Dechant, Secretary- Aimee Stricker, Treasurer- Ainsley Ridgeway, SentinelNathanial Rice, Parliamentarian- Kayellyn Hall, Reporter- Ashlee Willey, and Historian- Ashley Schuler. The officers are going up to Denver, Colorado, November 14, to watch the Denver Broncos take on the Kansas City Chiefs. Coming up soon, the Bayard FFA will compete in more leadership contests in Gordon, Scottsbluff, Kimball, and more. We are also ordering FFA t-shirts in the next week!

The Morrill FFA Chapter Scottsbluff County is now home to a new FFA chapter. The Morrill FFA Chapter is starting from the ground up with 45 members and first year ag teacher and advisor Rebecca Cox. This year’s officer team is composed of Cassie Lara, President; Branden Hessler, Vice President; Raina Younkin, Secretary; Kyle Patterson, Treasurer; Morgan Nortness, Reporter; Hannah Patterson, Sentinel; and Taylor Cooper, Parliamentarian. Mrs. Cox is very optimistic for the future of this chapter, saying it is “being led by a very strong group of students. They will be essential in the development and longevity of this chapter.” Morrill FFA plans to compete in several career development event (CDE) teams, such as Equine Judging, Livestock Judging, Ag Mechanics, and many others. “With hard work and determination I feel that this group is going to go far in our first year,” says Cassie Lara.

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Page 23

Last Name Guilkey Haag Haag Hall Hanefeldt Hansen Heikes Hennessy Hilger Himmelberg Hipke Hoffman Jager Jarecki Johnson Johnson Johnston Jordan Judge Kai Kai Katz Kent Kerchal Klawonn Klute Knabe Kneifl Knobbe Korinek Kreifels Krueger Kumm Lammers Lammers Lammers Lammers Lemkau Long Longo Maurer McAfee Meints Meirose Metheny Meusch Millage Millard Miller Musil Musi Neibauer Nelson Nerud

First Name Chapter Name Craig Superior Alan Southwest Denton Southwest Dalen McCool Junction Garrett Creighton Sam Tekamah-Herman Josh Hartington Shane Waverly Trevor Blair Megan Blue Hill Logan Stuart Aliese Red Cloud Gavin Ravenna Andrew Twin River Natalie Oakland-Craig Phillip Central City Cory Johnson Co. Central Timothy Loup County Tad West Holt Blake Pender Brenn Pender Calvin Fairbury Daniel Pender Tanner Wauneta-Palisade Janet Hampton Kelsey Hampton Dustin Conestoga Holly Hartington Jacqueline West Point Hillary Wilber-Clatonia Brandon Lourdes Central Adam Plainview Kelsey Bloomfield Emma Hartington Megan Hartington Ryan Red Cloud Tucker Hartington Jason Sutton Candace Ravenna Autumn Creek Valley Josh Lakeview Boone Leigh-Clarkson Ashton Tri County Tyler Hartington Miles Hartington James Stuart Cady Hartington Sterling Milford Ryan Plainview Kelsie Wilber-Clatonia Seth Ravenna Brittany Stuart Alan Sutton Rachel Bayard Continued on page 30

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Page 24

Heartland Express

November 11, 2010

Supreme Court Rejects CNPPID Re-hearing Request By Sandra Hansen, The Scottsbluff Star-Herald The latest action by the Nebraska Supreme Court in the on-going litigation brought by Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District, could set a precedent that could be used to settle the remaining cases CNPPID has pending against the North Platte Natural Resources District. In a decision announced late last week, the court found in favor of the NPNRD by denying a motion for a rehearing in a case regarding the Pumpkin Creek basin-wide 12-inch allocation. The Scotts Bluff County District Court and the Nebraska Supreme Court earlier found that CNPPID was not a "person aggrieved" in the case, so therefore could not bring suit. Central had claimed that wells in the Pumpkin Creek basin were depriving Lake McConaughy recreationists, power generators and irrigators of the full benefit due them from the western Nebraska creek that is estimated to have provid-

ed 23,000 acre feet to the North Platte River prior to well development and the recent drought. Steve Smith, attorney for the NPNRD, said the supreme court's latest ruling is final, and there can be no further appeals on that basis. "It solidi-

"With this ruling, efforts that have focused on costly litigation can be re-directed to ongoing effective resources management." fies the Pumpkin Creek decision, that can be used as precedent for the remaining cases before the court," Smith said. "The NRD has spent a lot of time and effort in litigating these cases, but now they can get back to managing water, which is

Secretary Vilsack Announces Conservation Program Payments to be issued Soon Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Friday that USDA will begin issuing Conservation Stewardship and Conservation Security Program payments this month to thousands of farmers and ranchers in all fifty states to help maintain and improve natural resources on their land. The yearly contract payments totaling $500 million are authorized under the 2002 and 2008 Farm Bills. USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) administers both programs and provides technical assistance to landowners. A total of $320 million in payments is associated with 20,500 new Conservation Stewardship Program contracts initiated in fiscal year 2010. In addition to the Stewardship program payments, a total of $180 million in payments will also be issued to honor the 15,000 older Conservation Security Program contracts for payments due in fiscal year 2011. The majority of farmers and ranchers will receive their payments by mid-December. According to John Mayberger, NRCS program manager, the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) has been a very successful program for Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers. “During fiscal year 2010, Nebraska had 1,106 CSP contracts covering over 1.8 million

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what they are meant to do." Smith said CNPPID has two other cases pending in district court regarding NPNRD's Integrated Management Plan and the Basin-wide plan, both required by state statute, and already approved by the state of Nebraska. CNPPID has also filed cases against four other NRDs -- South Platte, Twin Platte, Central Platte and Tri-Basin -- regarding the Basin-wide plan. Ron Cacek, general manager of the NPNRD, said, "With this ruling, efforts that have focused on costly litigation can be re-directed to ongoing effective resources management." He said the local district continues working with the other North Platte River NRDs and the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources to implement the strategies laid out in the local Integrated Management Plan and Basin-wide plan to manage and protect ground and surface water resources in the upper Platte River Basin.

Crop Assistance Program Certain Nebraska soybean producers may be eligible for program benefits available under the 2009 Crop Assistance Program (CAP). Signup for the 2009 Crop Assistance Program begins October 25th and ends December 9th, according to Dan Steinkruger, State Executive Director of the Nebraska Farm Service Agency. To be eligible, soybean acreage must be physically located in a county which received a Secretarial disaster declaration due to excessive moisture or a related condition in 2009. In Nebraska, this includes the following eleven counties: • Banner • Box Butte • Buffalo • Cheyenne • Deuel • Hayes • Kimball • Morrill • Perkins • Platte • Valley Producers with eligible soybean acreage must certify to FSA that they suffered a 5 percent or greater loss in quantity or quality of the 2009 crop. This loss must be due to excessive moisture or related conditions. Acreage that is physically located outside of the above designated counties will not be eligible for benefits under this program. Producers should apply in the FSA county office that administers the applicable farm records. The Crop Assistance Program is established with Section 32 funding to help restore purchasing power that was diminished by these 2009 losses. It does not reimburse producers for their level of crop loss. Eligible producers may receive as much $15.62/acre. Payments will initially be disbursed at 75% of this rate. Additional final payments will be determined and issued once signup is complete to ensure the available funding of $550 million nationwide is not exceeded. A $100,000 payment limitation applies. Producers with questions regarding the 2009 Crop Assistance Program should contact their local Farm Service Agency office prior to the December 9, 2010 deadline.


November 11, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 25

Farm and Ranch’s

HEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Dedicated to the Livestock Industry

Torrington Beef Production Convention Early cow pregnancy detection benefits is just one of the topics at a beef production conference for producers this November in Torrington. The Southeast Wyoming Western Nebraska Beef Production Convention is 9:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 23, at the Rendezvous Center. The conference will feature information on improving ranch profitability and important issues facing the beef industry. "I'm excited to see so many ranchers on the program this year talking about their experiences," said Dallas Mount, a University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service (UW CES) educator in Platte County. "University experts and producers who have on-the-ground experience with the topics will be making presentations." A flyer with details is available at http://HPRanchPracticum.com. UW CES and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) Extension are event sponsors.

"Much of this year's program is focused on seeing the ranch business as a whole and making management decisions in light of the big picture," said Aaron Berger, UNL Extension educator for the southwest Nebraska Panhandle. "This kind of information is foundational for long-term success as ranchers evaluate and plan for the direction of their businesses." Workshop subjects include: Evaluating and using technology on a ranch; Lessons learned from ranch financial analysis; Tools to mitigate risks in marketing cattle; Current cattle market prices and where headed; Haying versus grazing meadows; Costs versus returns in developing replacement heifers; Early pregnancy detection as a management tool; Developing a grazing and monitoring plan for a ranch. Preregistration is requested for a meal count. Registration is $15 and can be completed online at http://HPRanchPracticum.com or by calling the Platte County extension office at 307-322-3667.

UNL Beef Short-Courses Give Cow-Calf Producers Valuable Information The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's 2010-2011 Beef Short-Course program, "Staying Competitive in an Ever-Changing Beef Cow-Calf Industry", will be broadcast on NET 2 in December and January. Each session will be broadcast at 7 p.m. Dec. 16, Jan. 13, 20 and 27. Each presentation will end at 8 p.m. and be followed by a question and answer session. The short-course series is designed to help cow-calf producers remain competitive in an industry that is constantly changing. "The cow-calf enterprise is a complex production system," Rick Rasby, UNL Extension beef specialist. "For producers to be competitive, they need to integrate human, financial and feed resources in their operation." Rasby said the programs will help producers integrate resources and increase the profit potential of their cow-calf enterprise. The Dec. 16 session will focus on "Animal Identification and Using Ear Tag Technology as a Management Tool." Presenters during this session

will be Rasby, Nebraska Department of Agriculture's Lynn Gordon, producers Mark and Bonnie Wagner and Midwest Microsystems' Tim Davis. The session on Jan. 13 will cover "Working with Your Banker in Tough Economic Times: What to Include and how to Get Your Financial Portfolio Ready." "Optimum Cow Size: Matching Cow Size and Milk Production and Your Resources" will be one of two topics covered Jan. 20 with Rasby and Matt Spangler, UNL Extension beef cattle specialist. The other topic is "Getting Your Bull's Battery Ready for the Breeding Season." The final session on Jan. 27 with Rick Funston, UNL Extension beef cattle reproductive physiologist, will focus on "Managing Calving Interval and Its Impact on Profit Potential" along with "Estrous Synchronization Protocols for Beef Cows and Heifers." To get involved with the question and answer sessions, call 1-800-562-1576 or (402) 472-0638 on the nights of the sessions.

West Central Cattleman’s Day and Trade Show Beef producers should plan to attend the West Central Cattleman’s Day and Trade Show part of the “Nebraska Cow-Calf Profitability Series”. This program will be held December 2, 2010 at the Lincoln County Fair Grounds located at 5015 West Hwy 30 in North Platte from 9:30 am to 3:30 pm Central Time. Attendees will learn effective production techniques that result in improved profits, animal performance, and greater efficiency in resource use. If you can’t attend during the day in North Platte this program will be offered in the evening at Valentino’s in Ogallala from 4:00 to 8:30 pm Mountain Time. The cost of this workshop is $15 per person to cover materials and fees, lunch is provided. For additional information contact Randy Saner by email at rsaner2@unl.edu or by phone at 308-5322683 and toll free at 1-800-200-1381. Speakers include: Randy Saner, UNL Extension Educator- Lincoln and McPherson Counties; Dave Boxler, UNL Extension Educator West Central Research and Extension Center; Aaron Stalker UNL Extension Beef Range Systems Specialist, West Central Research and Extension Center; Noel Mues, - UNL Extension Educator – Furnas County; Doug Anderson UNL Extension Educator – Keith, Arthur and Perkins Counties; Dennis Bauer, UNL Extension Educator – Brown, Rock, KeyaPaha Counties; Robert Tigner UNL Extension Educator – Chase, Dundy, Hayes and Hitchcock Counties and Brian Strauch UNL Extension Educator – Red Willow County. Topics that will be discussed are: Grasshopper Issues, Developing Lower Cost Feed Rations, Grazing Strategies to Optimize Forage Use, Mineral Nutrition, and Unit Cost of Production (Budgeting). Input and feed prices in beef cow/calf and feedlot operations have been highly volatile over the past several years. Maintaining profitability and efficient operations requires staying on the cutting edge of beef best practices and business management methods. Attend this workshop to gain the latest skills and ideas to improve your profitability.

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Page 26

Heartland Express

November 11, 2010

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report Week Ending: 11/08/2010

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

MARKET: Bassett Livestock Auction - Bassett, NE; Burwell Livestock Market - Burwell, NE; Ericson/Spalding Auction Market - Ericson, NE; Huss Livestock Market LLC - Kearney, NE; Imperial Livestock Auction - Imperial, NE; Lexington Livestock Market - Lexington, NE; North Platte Livestock Auction - North Platte, NE; Ogallala Livestock Auction Market - Ogallala, NE; Tri-State Livestock Auction - McCook, NE; Valentine Livestock Auction - Valentine, NE Receipts: 29,160 Last Week: 17,735 Last Year: 26,332 Compared to last week, steer calves under 400 lbs sold 3.00 higher, over 400 lbs mostly steady. Heifers under 450 lbs sold 2.00-4.00 higher, 450 to 750 lbs unevenly steady, over 750 lbs sold steady to 2.00 higher. Demand moderate to good on calves. Demand on yearling offerings good. Slaughter steers and heifers in Nebraska sold lower this week with moderate movement. Dressed sales sold 2.00 to 3.00 lower at 154.00. Feeder supply this week included 56 percent steers, 44 percent heifers. Offerings over 600 lbs 28 percent.

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1

Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price

By David M. Fiala experience to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global marFuturesOne President ket analysis, news and advice. and Chief FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located Analyst/Advisor in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des David M. Fiala’s compa- Moines and at the Chicago Board of ny, FuturesOne, is a full Trade. You may contact David via email service risk management at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1and futures brokerage 800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to the web at www.futuresone.com. provide useful agricultural marketing Everyone should always understand the advice via daily, weekly, and monthly risk of loss and margin needed when analysis of the domestic and global mar- trading futures or futures options. kets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricThe information contained herein is ing decisions for ag producers. gathered from sources we believe to be FuturesOne also provides advice and reliable but cannot be guaranteed. management services for speculative Opinions expressed are subject to change accounts. David and his staff at without notice. There is significant risk in FuturesOne draw on decades of market- trading futures. ing, brokerage, farming and ranching

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 11/05/2010 Eastern Nebraska: Compared to last week, hay and dehy pellets sold steady. Demand was mostly light on all available forage. Producers noted they are receiving quite a few calls but buyers don’t want to purchase large quantities of hay. For the cow man, there is a lot of fall grazing that is available. So, there is no need for them to supplement their cows with hay. Reports of a lot of secondary forage baled this fall which includes corn stalks and soybean stubble. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Prices from the most recent reported sales. Nebraska Department of Agriculture has a hay and forage directory available at www.agr.state.ne. us/hayhot/hayhotline.htm. Northeast Nebraska: Alfalfa: Premium large square bales 170.00 delivered; Good large square bales 145.00; fair large square bales 130.00-135.00 delivered, Good large rounds 70.00-80.00; Fair 50.00-60.00. Grass Hay: Good large square bales 112.00; Good large rounds 65.0075.00; fair large round bales 40.00-45.00; small squares 100.00-112.00. Corn Stalks: large squares 70.00 delivered. Ground and Delivered to feedlots 95.00-100.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 180.00185.00.

Platte Valley of Nebraska: Alfalfa: Good large square bales 120.00. Good round bales 70.00-80.00; Fair round bales 50.00-60.00. Grass Hay: Good big round bales 50.00-60.00. Oat hay: Round bales 60.00. Corn Stalks: Large square bales 65.00-70.00 delivered. Ground and delivered to feedlots 105.00-110.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 175.00. Western Nebraska: Trade and movement continue slow. Demand moderate at best. Hay prices mostly steady. Most cuttings completed for the year. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Horse hay in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales.

Detailed Quotations Western Nebraska Alfalfa Premium 105.00-110.0090. Sm. Sqrs. 120.00 Fair-Good 65.00-85.00 Utility Ground & Deliv. New Crop 85.00-105.00

Mixed Grass 100.00-135.00 Wheat Straw 42.50-50.00

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, Nov. 9, 2010 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 13,964; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 6,0705 Head; Carcass Wt: 42-89 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 75.0; Wtd avg. Dressing: 50.5; choice or better; 98.6% YG 84.3% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 40 . . . .under 55 lbs . . . . . .41.8 . . . . . . . .286.00 - 295.52 . . . . . . . .288.14 881 . . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .62.0 . . . . . . .286.00 - 292.28 . . . . . . . .287.88 6,439 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .69.9 . . . . . . .249.00 - 299.38 . . . . . . . .287.65 5,514 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .78.2 . . . . . . .272.50 - 297.00 . . . . . . . .286.73 96 . . . . .over 85 lbs . . . . . .86.4 . . . . . . .275.36 - 275.36 . . . . . . . .275.36

Lean hog trade has been higher this week due to profit taking by market shorts. The weekly net change is $1.30 higher on the December contract and February is up $1.27. Cash trade stabilized last week, which has created some optimism; cash trade is called steady to $.50 higher for the remainder of the week as packers are likely to be aggressive in order to meet large weekend kill plans. Pork carcass value was lightly lower at midweek, but packer margins are estimated near $16 a head so there is profit incentive to keep chain speeds moving. Seasonally, hog supplies usually remain large through the end of November, but the sharp rally in futures over the past few sessions indicates that both commercial and speculative traders may be anticipating and early bottom. Hedgers call with questions. Dec. 10 6572 6982

Feb. 11 7240 7630

December 2010 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .67.350 High . . .68.550 Low . . .66.600 Close . .68.250 Change .+1.700

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2 Head . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . .Avg Wt 19 . . . . . .336-344 . . . . .340 60 . . . . . .369-398 . . . . .387 35 . . . . . .417-429 . . . . .426 61 . . . . . .469-495 . . . . .483 46 . . . . . .532-543 . . . . .537 104 . . . . .563-597 . . . . .585 10 . . . . . . . .633 . . . . . . .633

. . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . .Price . . .119.00-154.00 . . . .142.22 . . .132.00-143.00 . . . .136.42 . . .124.00-130.00 . . . .127.58 . . .115.50-128.00 . . . .123.65 . . .115.25-121.00 . . . .118.02 . . .110.00-117.50 . . . .114.37 . . . . . .108.50 . . . . . . .108.50

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1

Head . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . .Price 259 . . . . .300-342 . . . . .323 . . .121.00-147.00 . . . .134.53 613 . . . . .351-399 . . . . .378 . . .121.00-147.25 . . . .133.13 1244 . . . .401-449 . . . . .427 . . .115.00-136.75 . . . .124.10 33 . . . . . . . .415 . . . . . . .415 . . . . . .130.50 . . . . . . .130.50 2029 . . . .450-499 . . . . .475 . . .112.00-127.00 . . . .119.19 11 . . . . . . . .456 . . . . . . .456 . . . . . .125.00 . . . . . . .125.00 2202 . . . .501-549 . . . . .526 . . .105.00-124.00 . . . .113.90 81 . . . . . .519-523 . . . . .521 . . .122.00-126.00 . . . .123.97 1207 . . . .550-596 . . . . .569 . . .102.50-117.00 . . . .109.87 131 . . . . .553-587 . . . . .573 . . .108.00-118.50 . . . .113.36 15 . . . . . . . .603 . . . . . . .603 . . . . . .104.25 . . . . . . .104.25 766 . . . . .600-646 . . . . .619 . . .100.00-112.25 . . . .106.46 76 . . . . . . . .600 . . . . . . .600 . . . . . .120.50 . . . . . . .120.50 45 . . . . . . . .600 . . . . . . .600 . . . . . .112.00 . . . . . . .112.00 26 . . . . . . . .654 . . . . . . .654 . . . . . .108.75 . . . . . . .108.75 155 . . . . .650-696 . . . . .666 . . .103.00-114.25 . . . .109.72 280 . . . . .719-748 . . . . .729 . . .103.00-109.60 . . . .107.80 59 . . . . . . . .723 . . . . . . .723 . . . . . .107.85 . . . . . . .107.85 556 . . . . .752-796 . . . . .779 . . . .99.25-108.60 . . . .106.78 246 . . . . .806-849 . . . . .825 . . .100.00-109.50 . . . .107.64 490 . . . . .851-897 . . . . .871 . . .100.00-109.25 . . . .105.51 177 . . . . .903-947 . . . . .917 . . . .96.00-104.00 . . . .100.03 41 . . . . . .957-991 . . . . .974 . . . .95.00-102.85 . . . . .98.69

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1-2

Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price 26 . . . . . .324-329 . . . . .326 44 . . . . . .351-359 . . . . .355 109 . . . . .404-444 . . . . .431 106 . . . . .460-495 . . . . .473 116 . . . . .506-548 . . . . .535 13 . . . . . . . .568 . . . . . . .568 17 . . . . . . . .634 . . . . . . .634 32 . . . . . .654-659 . . . . .658 5 . . . . . . . . .845 . . . . . . .845

. . .124.50-125.00 . . . .124.69 . . .123.00-130.25 . . . .127.00 . . .110.50-121.50 . . . .117.20 . . .111.00-114.00 . . . .112.77 . . .105.00-107.50 . . . .106.70 . . . . . .107.00 . . . . . . .107.00 . . . . . .105.00 . . . . . . .105.00 . . .101.00-104.50 . . . .103.74 . . . . . . .98.50 . . . . . . . .98.50

www.myfarmandranch.com

5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 11/08/10

Confirmed: 127,125 Week Ago: 92,457

Year Ago: 106,394

Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,713 . . . . . . . . .1,250-1,500 . . . . . . . . . . . .95.00-99.00 1,410 . . . . . . . . . . . .96.79 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,018 . . . . . . . . .1,250-1,520 . . . . . . . . . . . .96.00-99.00 1,383 . . . . . . . . . . . .97.53 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28,657 . . . . . . . .1,100-1,450 . . . . . . . . . . . .93.75-98.50 1,319 . . . . . . . . . . . .97.79 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,801 . . . . . . . . .1,175-1,375 . . . . . . . . . . . .95.50-98.00 1,298 . . . . . . . . . . . .96.79 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,689 . . . . . . . . .1,068-1,325 . . . . . . . . . . . .95.50-98.50 1,223 . . . . . . . . . . .97.63 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19,929 . . . . . . . .1,050-1,300 . . . . . . . . . . . .97.00-98.50 1,172 . . . . . . . . . . . .97.90 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dressed =======================================================================================================D Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) (Paid on Hot Weights) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,758 . . . . . . . . . .803-961 . . . . . . . . . . . . .153.00-156.00 904 . . . . . . . . . . . .153.91 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,760 . . . . . . . . . .812-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .153.00-154.50 903 . . . . . . . . . . . .153.86 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,754 . . . . . . . . . .781-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .152.00-157.00 891 . . . . . . . . . . . .154.00 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,732 . . . . . . . . . .746-864 . . . . . . . . . . . . .153.00-155.00 813 . . . . . . . . . . . .153.91 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,035 . . . . . . . . . .723-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .150.00-154.00 796 . . . . . . . . . . . .153.78 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,421 . . . . . . . . . .704-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .150.00-154.00 782 . . . . . . . . . . . .153.58 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .39,388 . . . . . . .1,341 . . . . . . . .97.61 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .31,419 . . . . . . .1,200 . . . . . . . .97.70 Dressed Del Steer . . .20,272 . . . . . . .899 . . . . . . . .153.91 Dressed Del Heifer . . .15,188 . . . . . . .796 . . . . . . . .153.76

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Year Ago Averages:

Week Ago Averages:

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .24,053 . . . . . . .1,355 . . . . . . . .99.69 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .26,603 . . . . . . .1,186 . . . . . . . .99.79 Dressed Del Steer . . .17,537 . . . . . . .883 . . . . . . . .156.51 Dressed Del Heifer . . .11,700 . . . . . . .791 . . . . . . . .156.17

Cattle

Hogs

Support: Resistance

5 . . . . . . . . .290 . . . . . . .290 . . . . . .163.00 . . . . . . .163.00 146 . . . . .305-347 . . . . .332 . . .131.00-163.00 . . . .153.71 474 . . . . .351-399 . . . . .374 . . .140.00-169.75 . . . .152.60 1132 . . . .400-449 . . . . .426 . . .129.00-154.50 . . . .141.93 108 . . . . .403-419 . . . . .411 . . .146.00-147.00 . . . .146.52 17 . . . . . . . .447 . . . . . . .447 . . . . . .138.00 . . . . . . .138.00 1955 . . . .450-498 . . . . .474 . . .125.00-143.00 . . . .134.60 36 . . . . . . . .451 . . . . . . .451 . . . . . .143.50 . . . . . . .143.50 2676 . . . .500-549 . . . . .525 . . .116.00-136.00 . . . .126.90 185 . . . . .500-547 . . . . .511 . . .134.50-145.75 . . . .139.61 2759 . . . .550-599 . . . . .572 . . .110.50-132.00 . . . .121.13 22 . . . . . . . .550 . . . . . . .550 . . . . . .127.75 . . . . . . .127.75 172 . . . . .580-587 . . . . .583 . . .124.00-125.50 . . . .124.87 2300 . . . .600-649 . . . .622 . . .109.00-125.00 . . . .117.66 54 . . . . . . . .620 . . . . . . .620 . . . . . .125.00 . . . . . . .125.00 44 . . . . . . . .674 . . . . . . .674 . . . . . .118.50 . . . . . . .118.50 411 . . . . .650-696 . . . . .666 . . .107.50-120.00 . . . .114.61 30 . . . . . . . .668 . . . . . . .668 . . . . . .118.50 . . . . . . .118.50 147 . . . . .703-737 . . . . .732 . . .108.00-117.75 . . . .110.83 129 . . . . .703-734 . . . . .721 . . .105.50-118.00 . . . .111.59 66 . . . . . . . .700 . . . . . .700 . . . . . .119.00 . . . . . . .119.00 253 . . . . .751-788 . . . . .766 . . .107.00-115.75 . . . .115.21 528 . . . . .804-846 . . . . .830 . . .107.25-115.75 . . . .113.26 241 . . . . .859-892 . . . . .872 . . .106.75-109.50 . . . .108.60 81 . . . . . .906-934 . . . . .910 . . .107.75-112.50 . . . .111.78 24 . . . . . .973-993 . . . . .987 . . . .97.50-101.50 . . . . .99.12 17 . . . . . . .1022 . . . . . .1022 . . . . . .104.50 . . . . . . .104.50

58 . . . . . .702-733 . . . . .710 . . .105.00-111.00 . . . .109.19 6 . . . . . . . . .740 . . . . . . .740 . . . . . .105.00 . . . . . . .105.00

Live FOB Steer . . . . . .31,682 . . . . . . .1,365 . . . . . . . .86.42 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .28,399 . . . . . . .1,235 . . . . . . . .86.48 Dressed Del Steer . . .14,951 . . . . . . .876 . . . . . . . .134.25 Dressed Del Heifer . . .12,695 . . . . . . .784 . . . . . . . .134.83

Support: Resistance

Dec. 10 9602 10152

Jan. 11 Feeder 10805 11915

Live cattle trade has been higher this week due to profit taking by market shorts and chart buying. The weekly net change is $1.85 higher on the December contract and February is up $1.22. Cattle slaughter was down 2.5% last week so show lists have been large this week. Cash trade has still managed to register steady sales, but the bulk of the trade will occur today and Friday. Cutout values slipped yesterday which may limit upside in the futures the

remainder of the week. Choice was down 92 at 157.35 and select was 36 lower at 149.14. On the chart, December cattle did close above the 40-day moving average for the first time since October yesterday. This may promote additional chart buying today. Hedgers call with questions.

January 2011 Feeder Cattle (CBOT)

December 2010 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open .113.700 High .115.700 Low . .113.650 Close .114.950 Change +1.525

Open . .98.650 High . .99.850 Low . . .98.325 Close . .99.400 Change +1.200


November 11, 2010

Heartland Express - Market

Page 27

ISU, USDA Discover Simple Light Test for Diseased Livestock By Laura Millsaps, The Ames Tribune It sounds too much like a Halloween tale to be real science - diseased sheep eyeballs literally glow when exposed to a blue excitation light. The discovery, made by Iowa State University and USDA researchers, may lead to a simple, quick way to test livestock for neurological disorders, such as mad cow disease. Jacob Petrich, a professor of chemistry at ISU, and a team of researchers tested 140 sheep eyeballs from 73 sheep. Thirty-five sheep were infected with scrapie, a neurological disorder similar to mad cow disease. Thirty-eight were not. When put under light, the retinas of the diseased sheep glowed, or fluoresced, "like crazy," Petrich said. The healthy sheep retinas did not. The findings were published this year in the journal "Analytical Chemistry," and Petrich is working to develop a testing device that could be used in the meat-packing industry to quickly identify infected carcasses. The discovery that neural tissue fluoresced was an accident. In 2001, Petrich and his researchers were working in a meat lab, testing a device that could detect fecal matter on carcasses. Working with an extremely bright light -"It's so bright we refer to it as the 'death star,'" Petrich said - they discovered that the spinal cord of sheep glowed so brightly it could be seen through the skin of the animal. "It was a 'Hey, come look at this!' moment," he said. "We all gathered around. We were all scratching our heads, wondering what it could mean." Petrich had already developed a fluorescence spectroscopy device that could detect fecal contamination on carcasses. After a massive E. coli contamination in processed beef in the 1990s in

the Pacific Northwest, one which resulted in several deaths, Petrich and USDA researchers were able to find a way through spectroscopic technology to quickly identify carcasses contaminated with feces, the prime carrier for E. coli bacteria. Standard biochemistry tests, while accurate, were slow and impossible to use for a large number of animals. "Several hundred head of cattle go by an inspector in an hour's time," Petrich said. "They needed a device that works pretty much instantaneously." The research team wondered if the same type of technology could be used to detect the presence of these neurological diseases, some of which are transmissible to humans through contaminated meat. To reduce the risk of human exposure, the brains and spinal cords of animals are removed during slaughter and processing. But just like the E. coli problem years before, there was no quick, reliable test that could keep up with the rapid processing of fresh meat. Petrich and a team of researchers began studying the feasibility of a fluorescence test. The team included Ramkrishna Adhikary, an ISU graduate student in chemistry; Prasun Mukherjee, a former ISU graduate student and current post-doctoral associate in chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh; Govindarajan Krishnamoorthy, a former ISU post-doctoral research associate and current assistant professor of chemistry at the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati; Robert Kunkle, of the USDA's National Animal Disease Center in Ames; Thomas Casey, of the NADC; and Mark Rasmussen, of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine in Laurel, Md. It took Petrich and his team almost 10 years from the idea to the published research paper.

"The science behind it wasn't the problem," he said. "The problem was getting the specimens. We needed 'Igor' to go out and get the body parts." Eventually Petrich's research team happened upon sheep that were bred for research specifically to have scrapie, a type of neurological disease similar to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease. Petrich said he liked the light testing device because it was so simple, and his study has gotten attention from the British Broadcasting Companhy, news media in Australia and Canada, the USDA, and even the Office of Homeland Security. What he hasn't received yet is a commitment of research dollars to develop the instrument for use outside the laboratory. "If I had the money to develop the instrumentation, this could be a marketable product in three years," he said. Part of the problem, Petrich said, could be that the test doesn't test for the prions that carry neurological diseases, but the presence of the diseased tissue itself. He ran into the same objections for the device that detects fecal matter. "Reviewers like to see standard biochemistry, and it isn't there," he said. "This is an indirect test. My argument is so what? Even if E.coli isn't there, no one wants to eat poop on his hamburger." By the same extension, he said, with the risk of these types of neurological diseases being transmissible to humans, who wants stray bits of spinal cord in their meat? "This device could create another level of confidence to consumers that the meat they buy is safe to eat," Petrich said. "But I've learned that playing around the lab and getting something to market is two entirely different things."

Consider Corn and Milo Stalks as Valuable Feed Resources Noel Mues, Extension Educator University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Furnas County Here in south central Nebraska, beef cattle producers rely on crop residues to get them through the fall and winter months to reduce feed expenses. I would like to share the following information from Bruce Anderson, Extension Forage Specialist. After harvest, corn and milo stalks can continue to benefit your farming operation. As standing residue they help provide valuable protection of your soil resources or, if you have cattle, they can provide a valuable feed source. They also can be baled and used to extend more costly hay this winter. Last years stalks should be grazed as soon as possible after harvest. The nutrient value of stalks declines the longer they are exposed to weathering. Grazing stalks right after harvest will put more condition on cows and faster gains on young stock. Be sure to check fields for excess grain before grazing. Dryland fields with small ears may have more grain loss than usual this year. Too much corn can cause acidosis and founder. Adapt cattle to a higher grain ration before grazing if a problem is expected. Grazing management - strip grazing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; When animals are given only one or two weeks of

grazing stalks at a time, this uses the stalks most efficiently. It permits a higher stocking rate and provides a more uniform diet. However, if heavy snow or mud occurs before you graze the entire field some good quality feed can be lost. Leaving cattle in the same

entire field for a couple months or longer is more common than strip grazing. Whole-field grazing permits fast early gains, but more supplements are needed late in the season after all grain has disappeared. Be sure to provide salt, calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin A free choice at all times -- and

once all the grain is gone, cows need about half a pound per day of an all-natural protein to meet nutrient needs. Baling corn or milo stalks for winter feed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Depending on hay supplies and prices, feeding hay all winter may not be a particularly attractive option. One alternative might be to use corn and milo stalks cut and then rolled or packed into bales just like other hay crops. Haying some of your crop residues instead of grazing them often will increase the number of cow-days of feed from them by three or four fold. This can really help stretch hay supplies. Make stalk hay as soon after combining as possible to minimize nutrient loss. Weathering after combining can really lower the energy value of stalk hay. This may mean cutting while stalks are still partially green, especially milo stubble, so be sure to let it dry long enough before baling for safe preservation. Stalk hay will have fair nutrient value, but supplements will likely be needed. Average stalk hay could have 4 - 7% protein with TDN somewhere in the 50s, depending on the percent leaf and husk in the bales. Before feeding, send a sample to a laboratory and have it tested for protein and energy, and if the field was moisture stressed, have it tested for nitrates. Source: CropWatch Newsletter


Page 28

Heartland Express - Ak-Sar-Ben

November 11, 2010

2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition All Photos taken by Ak-Sar-Ben Photo For additional results visit the World Wide Web at http://www.aksarben.org Jennie Johnson of Craig, Ne exhibited the Overall Champion Feeder Calf Heifer at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Ashley Schweitzer of Broken Bow, NE exhibited the Champion Senior Holstein at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Sidney Williams of Wisner, Ne exhibited the Overall Reserve Champion Feeder Heifer at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Jacob Ruth of Rising City, NE exhibited the Reserve Champion Market Beef Catch-ACalf at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Katie Thunker of Bartlet, Ne was named the Reserve Champion Feeder Calf Showman at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Abby Nelson of Valpraraiso, NE exhibited the Champion Simmental Breeding Heifer at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Atlanta Maronde of York, NE exhibited the Reserve Champion Division I Market Steer at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Katie Thunker of Bartlet, Ne was named the Reserve Champion Feeder Calf Showman at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Jennie Johnson of Craig, NE was named the Champion Market Beef Showman at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Cody Burke of Genoa, NE exhibited the Champion Division III Market Steer at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Allee Maronde of York, NE exhibited the Reserve Champion Market Heifers at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Emily Long of Springfield, NE exhibited the Reserve Champion Shorthorn Breeding Heifer at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Eden Moore of Wahoo, NE exhibited the Reserve Champion Salers Breeding Heifer at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Cody Burke of Genoa, NE exhibited the Champion Market Steer at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Morgan Burke of Genoa, NE exhibited the Reserve Champion Chianina Breeding Heifer at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Eden Moore of Wahoo, NE exhibited the Champion Salers Breeding Heifer at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition. Megan Humlicek of Columbus, NE exhibited the 3rd Place Market Broilers at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Samantha Yonkers (Second from left) of Mccook, NE was named the Reserve Champion Premier Exhibitor for the Beef Division at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Bailey Core - Marion County IA (4th), Samantha Yonkers Red Willow County NE (2nd), Austin Thummel - Worth County MO (Champion), Erin Steele - Cass County IA (3rd), Kyle Kleinknecht Dawson County NE (5th), were the Top 5 Beef Premier Exhibitors at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Jared Mckeever of Wymore, NE exhibited the 5th Place Market Broilers at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.


November 11, 2010

Page 29

Heartland Express - Ak-Sar-Ben

2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition

Preston Bolte of McCool Junction, NE exhibited the Champion Market Broilers at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

All Photos taken by Ak-Sar-Ben Photo For additional results visit the World Wide Web at http://www.aksarben.org Continued

Colt Wakefield of Blair, Ne exhibited the Reserve Champion Senior Holstein at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Mason Jager of Ravenna, NE exhibited the 4th Place Market Broilers at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Levi Meyer of Hallam, NE was exhibited the Reserve Champion Dairy Steer at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Tyler Marotz of Mead, NE was exhibited the Champion Junior Holstein at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Morgan Marotz of Mead, NE was exhibited the Reserve Champion Junior Holstein at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Tessa Klein of Wahoo, Ne was named the Champion Premier Dairy Exhibitor at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Tyler Marotz of Mead, Ne was named the Reserve Champion Dairy Showman at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Colt Wakefield of Blair, NE received 3rd Place and Morgan Marotz of Mead, NE received 4th Place in the Dairy Showmanship contest at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Torri Dethlefs of Ravenna, NE exhibited the Lamb Challenge Reserve Champion at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Torri Dethlefs of Ravenna, NE exhibited the Reserve Champion Lamb Challenge Live animal at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Chase Ott of Wisner, Ne exhibited the Reserve Champion - Division I Lamb at the 2010 AkSar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Listed by placings first through forth(tie), Jaclyn Dingels, Redwood Falls, MN; Amanda Clymer, David City, NE; Torri Dethlefs, Ravenna, NE; Jodee Oelke, Barrett, MN; and Tanner Berry, Sac City, IA; were the Top 5 Lamb Premier Exhibitors at the 2010 Ak-SarBen Youth Livestock Exposition.

Linden Kaliff of York, NE was named the Reserve Champion Market Swine Showman at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Nathan Filipi of Davey, NE exhibited the Reserve Champion Division III Market Hog at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Ashley Wallander of Bertrand, NE was named the Champion Market Swine Showman at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Tessa Klein of Wahoo, NE was named the Champion Dairy Showman at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Carl Jacobson of Geneva, NE was named the Market Swine Premier ExhibitorReserve Champion at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Nathan Filipi of Davey, NE exhibited the Champion Overall Market Hog at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.

Nathan Filipi of Davey, NE exhibited the Champion Division IV Market Hog at the 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben Youth Livestock Exposition.


Page 30

Heartland Express

November 11, 2010

Schedule of Events Nov 17-18 - McCook (Red Willow County) McCook Farm and Ranch Expo; Red Willow County Fairgrounds. Promoting and demonstrating products and services in agriculture. Nov 17, 9am-7pm; Nov 18, 9am-4pm, Free Darren. Dale (785) 426-2092 www.mccookfarmandranch expo.net Nov 20 - Franklin (Franklin County) Parade of Lights; 15th Ave Parade of lights followed by a chili cook-off. 6pm, Free Pat Ayres (308) 470-0499 www.franklinnebraska.com Nov 20 - Grand Island (Hall County) 18th Annual Gift Show & Bake Sale; Northwest High School, 2700 N. North Rd. All types of crafts and home base businesses. 9am-3pm, Free. Karen Olson (308) 379-7753 www.ginorthwest.org Nov 20 - Ogallala (Keith County) Annual Arts and Crafts Show; Fairgrounds. Orla Kitt (308) 284-4066 www.visitogallala.com Nov 20 - Ord (Valley County) Candy Cane Lane Craft Show; Veterans Club, 246 15th St. More than 50 booths. 9am-4pm, Free Angie Kokes (308) 496-4477 www.ordnebraska.com Nov 20 - York (York County) Holiday Craft, Art and Food Show; City auditorium, 6th & Nebraska Ave. Hand-made products, entertainment, vendors, prizes and taste of the holidays. 9am-5pm, Free Todd Kirshenbaum (402) 362-5531 www.yorkchamber.org Nov 20-21 - Platte Center (Platte County) Harvestfest; Town hall Craft show and pancake feed. Sat, 9am-4pm; Sun, 8am-4pm, Free Sharon Pohlman (402) 564-1845 Nov 20-Dec 31 - Hastings (Adams County) 28th Annual Festival of Trees; Hastings Museum, 14th & Burlington Ave. See the museum in a whole new light. More than 50 decorated trees on display to celebrate the holiday season. $5-$7 (800) 508-4629 www.hastingsmuseum.org

Nov 22-Dec 31 - Grand Island (Hall County) Fantasy of Trees Stuhr Museum, 3133 W. Hwy 34. Experience the wonder of the Christmas Tree through this beautiful display. Mon-Sat, 9am5pm; Sun, noon-5pm, $4-$6 Kari Stofer (308) 3855316 www.stuhrmuseum.org Nov 25 - Elgin (Antelope County) 86th Annual Thanksgiving Bazaar; St. Boniface auditorium, 209 Remington St. Turkey, sausage and dressing dinner with all the trimmings including homemade pie. 11am-2pm, $9 Michele Reicks (402) 843-2345 www.stbonparishes.com Nov 26 - Minden (Kearney County) Christmas Traditions Celebration; Downtown Square. Enjoy an old-fashioined celebration including a craft show, free Christmas movie, projects for the kids, twilight parade and lighting of the courthouse lights. 11am-6pm, Free Marcy Brandt (308) 832-1811 www.mindenne.org Nov 26 - Papillion (Sarpy County) Winter Wonderland Holiday Lighting Ceremony; 122 E. Third St. Lighting ceremony, hot chocolate, huge bonfire, carriage rides, visits from Santa, crafts and more. 6-8pm, Free Racheal Cascio (402) 331- 3917 www.papillionfoundation.org Nov 26 - Sidney (Cheyenne County) OldFashioned Christmas and Lamplight Tours; 10th & Illinois and Ft. Sidney Museum. Santa arrives, lighting of the community tree, music, hayrack rides and hot chocolate. Events begin at 5pm, Free (308) 254-5851 www.cheyennecounty chamber.com Nov 26 - Wymore (Gage County) Treasure Hunt Holiday Event; Downtown. Hunt for your number to win a prize! Visits from Santa and Mrs. Claus and soup supper. 5-7pm (402) 674-3205 Nov 26-Dec 31 - Omaha (Douglas County) Holiday Poinsettia Show; Lauritzen Gardens. Spectacular exhibit includes a 20-ft poinsettia tree, beautifully decorated Christmas trees, antique sleighs and a model trail that travels through the display. 9am-5pm, $3-$6 Maureen Thomsen (402) 346-4002 www.lauritzengardens.org

Nov 27 - Odell (Gage County) 35th Annual Craft Show; High School. 9am-4pm Jull Scheele (402) 766-4377 www.odell-nebraska.us Nov 27 - Ord (Valley County) Winter Fest; Downtown. Christmas parade, caroling, children's movies and more in the spirit of the holiday season. Free Brenda Knight (308) 728-3639 www.ordnebraska.com Nov 27, Dec 5 & 12 - Minden (Kearney County) "Light of the World" Christmas Pageant; Downtown square. Since 1946 this outdoor pageant has been performed annually by volunteers of all ages. The finale is the illumination of over 10,000 lights. 7pm, Free Marcy Brandt (308) 832-1811 www.mindenne.org Nov 27-28 - Columbus (Platte County) Turkeyfest Crafts; Center 30 Mall, 23rd St & 32nd Ave. Sat, 9am-5pm; Sun, 10am-4pm, Free Sharon Pohlman (402) 564-1845 Nov 27-28 - Fordyce (Cedar County) 9th Annual WJ Ranch Cowboy Christmas; WJ Ranch, 55659 892 Rd. Featuring arts and crafts from more than 45 vendors, buggy and pony rides, trick roping demonstrations and more. 11am-5pm, Free. Jan Schiferl (402) 357-2102 www.schiferlswjranch.com Nov 27-Dec 31 - Omaha (Douglas County) LightPLAY; Omaha Children's Museum, 500 S. 20th St. Children and families celebrate the holidays with playful lights that dance to music. Imaginations will soar with light, sound and special effects. Museum admission (402) 342-6164 www.ocm.org Nov 28-Dec 12 - Schuyler (Colfax County) Craft Show; Saint Benedict Center, 1126 Rd I. Variety of crafts and gifts by area artists and unique display of nativity scenes from around the world. Mon-Fri, 2-6:30pm; Sat-Sun, 10am-7pm, Free (402) 352-8819 www.stbenedictcenter.com

NE WEATHER & CROP REPORT

NATIONAL FFA CONVENTION RESULTS

Continued from page 2

Continued from page 23

Field Crops Report: Corn harvest was 94 percent complete, well ahead of 28 last year and 66 average. Most of the corn remaining for harvest was in the western half of the state. Sorghum harvested was 92 percent, well ahead of 24 last year and 66 average. Winter wheat conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 9 poor, 46 fair, 38 good, and 6 excellent, well below last year. Winter wheat emerged was 97 percent, equal to last year, but behind 99 average. Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 6 poor, 29 fair, 59 good, and 5 excellent, below year ago levels.

Last Name Niedermeyer Niewohner Nolan Nollette Olberding Overturf Paige Pedulla Peters Pick Pick Pierce Pillen Poulas Race Rador Reese Reimers Ridgeway Ringland Rocker Roehrs Ryan Saathoff Schildt Schilke Schlautman Schumacher Schurr Scott Setlik Setlik Sheffield Sherman Siebert Slatt Smith Smith

OSCEOLA FFA Continued from page 10 ed field must meet a minimum dollar figure as well. Shelbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SAE included hogs, working on the family farm, working in the family chicken house, clerking in Columbus at Bomgaars, working for her motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landscaping business and working as the chicken farm supervisor at Northwest Missouri State College in Marysville, Missouri. Shelby is the 3rd person from OHS and the 1st female to receive this honor. Landon Peterson and Max Marak received their American Degrees in 2008. DECEMBER - The Osceola FFA chapter will be selling Nebraska- produced products such as candies, fruits, jerky, and sauces. If you are interested, please contact an Osceola FFA member or Mr. Schmit. 2010-2011 members are Aaron Neujahr, Aaron Oquist, Alex Fehringer, April Giesbrecht, Ashlynn Klein, Austin Gabriel, Camille Marak, Clyde Ericson, Colton Kuhnel, Courtney Gabriel, Dallas Talbot, Eli Green, Erik Oquist, Jadyn Brouillette, Jake Zahm, Jordan Zahm, Joshua Fleischmann, Karen Bonilla, Kristi Cerny, Madison Euse, Montana Gable, Nathan Bentley, Stephanie Steele, Taylor Meysenburg, Tori Meysenburg, and Zach Oquist.

First Name Chapter Name Lisa Johnson Co. Central Jacob Lyons-Decatur NE Sarah Red Cloud Justin Cody-Kilgore Joshua Stuart Samantha Sutton Sydney Northwest Cody Scottsbluff Alivia McCool Junction Karla Hartington Kelsy Hartington Steven Milford Joelle Lakeview Abby Logan View Katarina Wheeler Central Danielle Blair Bethany Stanton Lizabeth Centura Sean Bayard Dalton Palmyra Kelsey Franklin Brandi Hampton Cary West Holt Danielle Franklin Kara Milford Vanessa Imperial Taylor Sutton Joseph Ainsworth Ty Eustis-Farnam Talon Ansley Alan Ord Nichole Ord Brett Shickley Jason Heartland Jamie Hampton Ashlie Oakland-Craig Matthew Pender Travis Wheeler Central

Last Name Snider Spilinek Spilinek Stamp Starkey Steinhauser Sterup Stewart Straight Strope Sudbeck Swanson Swett Thoene Timmerman Trapp Urwiller Venteicher Vlasin Wall Wallen Warren Wehrbein Wehrs Wellensiek Welsh Went Wetovick Wheeldon Wichman Wigle Williams Wilmes Witte Woods Zabel Ziegenbein Zinnell

First Name Chapter Name Monte Wheeler Central Shari Elba Tyler Elba Derek Heartland Brandon St. Paul Andrew Rock County Shelby Osceola Ryan Rock County Cody Shickley BriAnn Creighton Matthew Hartington Kerry Imperial Katie Wheeler Central Jesse Hartington Ryan Southwest Spencer Superior Kody Ravenna Adam Pierce Ashley Crete Dwayne Hampton Matt Palmyra Jenny Heartland Kalby Conestoga Colton Milford Alma Syracuse Jessica West Holt Dani Lakeview Bradley Fullerton Sarah Schuyler Brant Pender Shelby Ashland-Greenwood Erik Centura Randy Creighton Kristin Logan View Courtney Kimball Allison Tekamah-Herman Austin Ashland-Greenwood Luke Ravenna


November 11, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 31

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, November 18th. The next Heartland Express will be printed on Thursday, November 25th. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, simply fill out the form below and mail it to us with a check. This will eliminate any errors and help keep the classified cost to a minimum. 1001 - MOWERS WANTED TO BUY NE - IHC #24 MOWER & PARTS, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE NE - REBUILT KOSCH HAYVESTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - IHC H W/WO MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - KOSCH SIDE MOUNT MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - EMERSON DOUBLE VICON DISC, (308) 544-6421 NE - VICON 3 PT DISC MOWER, (308) 5446421 NE - 10 BOLT SPACERS, 36" ROW FOR JD, (308) 390-0642 NE - REBUILT KOSCH TRAILVESTER MOWERS, 14', WITH WARRANTY, $5,000.00, (308) 544-6421 IA - SICKLE MOWERS 7', $275 TO $975, (712) 299-6608 IA - NI 7' PULL TYPE W/CYL, $375.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - IH 2 PT, 9', $975.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - JD 350 3PT, 9', $1,275.00, (712) 2996608 1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE NE - NH 411 DISCBINE 10' EXCELLENT CONDITION, $5,500.00, (308) 874-4562 KS - 2001 9352 MACDON SWATHER, 1849 HRS, 922 16' AUGER HEAD. $35,000 EXCELLENT CONDITION, CALL TODAY, (316) 323-3974 1005 - RAKES WANTED TO BUY NE - LH CHANNEL IRON FRAME ON NH56 OVER 56B SIDE RAKE, AND A WHEEL, (308) 587-2344 NE - 12 WHEEL V RAKE, (402) 482-5491

1005 - RAKES FOR SALE IA - WWW. RAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 3662114 NE - '02 VERMEER R23A TWINRAKE CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - 10 WHEEL V RAKE, (402) 482-5491 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE NE - BALER BELTS AND CHAINS; BEARINGS & FLANGES, (308) 587-2344 NE - BELTS FOR MOST BALERS & SWATHERS, (308) 587-2344 AL - ROUND BALER BELTING: LRGST DEALER IN US. ORIGINAL BELTING FOR ALL ROUND BALERS INCLUDING NEW JD IN STOCK! SAVE HUNDRED$! FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE! NO 800#, JUST BEST PRICES. SINCE 1973. HAMMOND EQUIP. MC/VISA/DISC/AMEX OR COD, BALERBELTS.COM, (334) 627-3348 TX - BALER BELTS- ALL BRANDS. MADE IN THE U. S. A. ! JD WITH GENUINE JD PLATE FASTENERS. FREE SHIPPING ON SETS. WWW. BALERBELTSANDHAYBEDS. COM, (800) 223-1312 NE - USED BELTS FOR VERMEER 605XL BALER CELL 308-962- 6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - JD 530 BALER, (308) 882-4588 NE - NH 858 ROUND BALER FOR PARTS, (402) 482-5491 NE - 1998 CASE 8580, BIG SQ, SET UP FOR CORN STALKS, EXTRA GOOD SHAPE, $15,000.00, (308) 874-4562 1007 - BALE FEEDERS/MOVERS FOR SALE KS - E-Z HAUL INLINE SELF DUMPING HAY TRAILER, 32' 6 BALE, GOOSENECK, BUMPER HITCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480

1007 - BALE FEEDERS/MOVERS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - NEW EMERSON BALE MOVER-FEEDERS, (308) 544-6421 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 NE - 1993 KOSCH 8 BALE RETRIEVER, NO WELDS, EXCELLENT CONDITION, $9,000.00, (308) 348-2065 1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 NE - JD 200 STACKMAKER, $900.00, (308) 876-2515 NE - EMERSON 13X24 STACK MOVER, ELECTRONIC SCALES, W/ OR WITHOUT HYDRAFORK, (308) 544-6421 1010 - CHOPPERS/FORAGE HARVESTORS WANTED TO BUY KS - JOHN DEERE CHOPPERS & HEADS, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, KS, (785) 336-6103 FOR SALE NE - KNIFE BAR & RECUT SCREEN FOR JD 35, (308) 995-5515 NE - RECUT SCREEN & AXLE EXTENSION FOR IHC 730, (308) 995-5515 1013 - DUMP WAGON WANTED TO BUY KS - JD SILAGE WAGONS & HIGH DUMPS, ROEDER IMPLEMENT, (785) 336-6103 1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY KS - NH SELF PROPELLED & PULL-TYPE, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, (785) 336-6103

Classified Advertisement Order Category of your Ad (from above):

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Number of Issues to Run Advertisement

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Price per Issue (From Above, $6.00 Minimum)

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Complete this form and mail with payment to: Farm and Ranch • PO Box 415 • Kearney, NE 68848 A $2.50 billing charge will be added if payment is not enclosed. Complete the following Information (Please Print):

Name:_________________________________Phone: ________________________ Address: _____________________________________________________________ City, State, & Zip: ______________________________________________________

1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY - CONT’D ID - NEW HOLLAND 2 & 3-WIDE, SELF-PROPELLED, PULL-TYPE MODELS. JIM,, (208) 880-2889 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND'S-ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/ TRADE. WWW. BALEWAGON. COM, (208) 880-2889 NE - NH 1044, 119 BALES, GOOD, $3,500.00, (402) 545-2255 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE WANTED TO BUY NE - HAYBUSTER GEAR BOX FOR 1600 STACKER, BEDROLLERS, PUSH OFF ASSEMBLY, A FEW OTHER PARTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - HAY PROBE FOR TESTING, (308) 5872344 IA - JD HAYLOADER, (712) 299-6608 IA - ROTARY CUTTERS, 5', 6'& 7', $375 TO $1475, (712) 299-6608 1101 - TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - MF 35, 50, 65, 135, 235, 245, OR 255 TRACTOR, (402) 678-2277 NE - BUYING TRACTORS FOR SALVAGE MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (800) 5824303 MO - AC D17'S & UP, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - IH 560 TO 1566, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - LINDSAY BRO WAGON, NEED PARTS: 6 BOLT HUB #Q563, (816) 378-2015 NE - 6420 MFD, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE IA - JD B'S 1937 TO 1950, (712) 299-6608 IA - IH NICE SUPER C W/LOADER, (712) 2996608 NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885 NE - NEW, USED AND REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (800) 582-4303 IA - IH, NICE SUPER C, (712) 299-6608 IA - OLIVER SUPER 88D, WF, PS, (712) 2996608 IA - OLIVER SUPER 77G, WF PS, (712) 2996608 IA - IH 300U, W/HYD BUCKET, $4,500.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - JD A, 1935, (712) 299-6608 NE - 8 HOLE 15" TRACTOR FRONT WHEELS, FITS IHC, (308) 587-2344 IA - AC WC ROAD PATROL, (712) 299-6608 NE - JD 4020 W/ NEW TIRES, NEW DIESEL INJECTOR PUMP, (308) 478-5451 IA - AC WD45, WF, PS, LOADER, (712) 2996608 IA - IH-B WITH WOODS 60"PT, $2,550.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - AC-WC 1938 ELECTRIC START, $1,850.00, (712) 299-6608 NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, (308) 436-4369 IA - SUP A, H, M, MTA, 350, 460, 560 NICE TRACTORS, (712) 299-6608 NE - 2 JD DR WH & LIFT ASSIT 7300, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 IA - C-AC W/BELLY MOWERS, $1850 TO $2850, (712) 299-6608 KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS BELLY MOWER, $3,500.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - IHC 504, 3 PT, (308) 544-6421 IA - OLIVER 88G, W/LDR, $3,850.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - IH 504G, PS, LPTO, 2PT, $3,850.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - IH 1939 H STD, NICE, $2,850.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - IH 1954, SMTA ORIGINAL, NICE, $4,550.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - IH 460, 2PT, HYD BUC LDR, $4,850.00, (712) 299-6608 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1102 - LOADERS FOR SALE IA - SEVERAL LOADERS OFF JD 3010-4020, (712) 299-6608 NE - DUAL LOADER MOUNTS TO FIT JD 4520 OR 4620. CUSTOM BUILT, VERY HEAVY, VERY NEAT, WITH CUSTOM GRILL GUARD BUILT IN. DUAL LOADER 325 OR 345, (402) 482-5491 IA - SEVERAL TRACTOR LDRS, SH, DUAL, KOYKER, WEST, BUSH, (712) 299-6608 IA - JD, 45, 46A, 48, 148 LDRS, (712) 2996608 NE - FARMHAND XL740 QUICK-TACH LOADER, IH MOUNTS, 7' BUCKET, JUST LIKE NEW, $4,000.00, (308) 348-2065 1103 - LOADER ATTACHMENTS WANTED TO BUY NE - DIRT OR MANURE BUCKET HEAD FOR F10 LOADER, NEEDS TO HAVE ORANGE FRAMEWORK W/GRAPPLE, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE IA - 3 PT 90" GNUSE BUCKET, $1,250.00, (712) 299-6608 1105 - DISKS WANTED TO BUY NE - 25' OR SMALLER DISK, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE NE - DISK BLADES AND BEARINGS, (308) 587-2344 IA - 3 PT OR PULL TANDEM DISKS, 6'-18', (712) 299-6608 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE KS - FLEX KING 4X5' SWEEP PLOW, GOOD CONDITION, $1,250.00, (620) 865-2541 IA - OLIVER PLOWS, 2 & 3 BOTTOM, PULL, (712) 299-6608 IA - 25 PLOWS, 2, 3 & 4 BOTTOM, 2/3PT, (712) 299-6608 NE - NEW FLEX KING PICKER WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 NE - IH 560, 6-16'S WITH HARROW, LIKE NEW, $950.00, (308) 874-4562 1109 - PLANTERS WANTED TO BUY NE - LIFT ASSIST WHEELS FOR A JD 7300 12RN, (402) 545-2255 FOR SALE NE - NEW #92 IHC COVERING DISK ASSEMBLY, (308) 995-5515 NE - LIFT ASSIST AND/OR TRANSPORT KIT FOR IHC LISTER/ PLANTER, ALSO GAUGE STRIPE WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 IA - NEW & USED KINZES, SORENSEN EQUIPMENT, HARLAN, IA, (712) 755-2455 KS - INSECTICIDE BOXES FOR JD 7200, 16 ROWS, $900 OBO. DISK FURROWERS, $1600., (620) 865-2541 NE - IHC SEED DRUMS, (308) 995-5515 NE - MOORE BUILT 16 ROW PLANTER MARKERS, $2,750.00, (308) 485-4486 NE - 2008 ST 100 BULK SEED BUGGY, ALWAYS SHEDDED, LIKE NEW, (308) 9958049 NE - 2008 JD 1770 NT PLANTER, 16R, 30", 3 BU. BOXES, SUNCO OPENERS, FERT. FRAMES, MARKERS, PRO SHAFT DRIVES, SEED STAR MONITOR DISPLAY, ALWAYS SHEDDED, $75,000.00, (308) 995-8049 1111 - DRILLS WANTED TO BUY NE - TYE DRILL FOR PARTS, (402) 482-5491 FOR SALE NE - !! ROUND CAPS !! THE ULTIMATE GRAIN DRILL PRESS WHEEL CAP! COVERS COMPLETE FACE OF WHEEL. CONVERTS V FACED WHEELS TO ROUND FACE FOR BETTER FLOTATION & DEPTH CONTROL. PERFECT FIT! EASY TO INSTALL! DON YUNG DISTRIBUTING, KIMBALL, NE., (308) 2352718 NE - KRAUSE 3PT DRILL, MODEL 5215, DOUBLE DISC, (402) 683-5395 KS - 30" HOE AIR SEEDER DRILL $3500. 40' DISC AIR SEEDER DRILL, $14,000, (785) 871-0711 NE - 150 & 7100 DRILLS, FERT. BOXES, BLACK HEAVY DUTY WHEELS, DBL HITCH, TRANSPORTS & PARTS, (308) 995-5515


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Heartland Express

1112 - ROTARY HOE FOR SALE NE - 30 FOOT JD ROTARY HOE CALL FOR DETAILS, (308) 882-4588 1113 - CULTIVATORS FOR SALE SD - 3-PT 8R FLAT FOLD, $1,500.00, (605) 386-2131 NE - IHC GO-DIG PARTS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 4 ROW ORTHMAN TOOL BAR, CAN BE USED TO CULTIVATE OR RIDGE, (308) 3900642 NE - HAWKINS 12 ROW HILLER (DITCHER), (308) 882-4588 NE - 12 ROW CULTIVATOR, (308) 882-4588 1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE KS - 1600 GAL. FLOATER. 3000 WET BOOM SPRAYER, $4,500.00, (785) 871-0711 NE - 2-200 GALLON SADDLE TANKS, FITS 4450, (308) 478-5451 NE - 1984 MERTZ 3250 FLOATER, 1600 GAL TANK, (402) 683-5395 NE - IHC TRUCK FLOATER W/8 TON DRY BOX, (402) 683-5395 KS - JD 600 HI-CYCLE W/40' WICK BOOM. REBUILT MOTOR, $2,500.00, (620) 8652541 NE - JD 25A, 3 PT. HITCH, 150 GAL, 20" BOOM, (308) 587-2344 NE - CENTURY 500 GALLON PULL BETWEEN, $800.00, (402) 787-2244 1115 - MULCHERS/SHREDDERS FOR SALE NE - 20' BESLER STALK CHOPPER, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1116 - BUSH HOGS FOR SALE IA - 7' 3PT, BUSH HOG CUTTERS; $1,050 TO $2,250, (712) 299-6608 1117 - FIELD CULTIVATORS WANTED TO BUY NE - MULCH FINISHER NO LARGER THAN 25 FOOT, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE NE - HINIKER 25', (402) 726-2488 1119 - ROD WEEDER FOR SALE KS - 45' OF MILLER ROD WEEDER USED PARTS, DRIVES, TEETH, RODS, ETC. ALL FOR $500, (620) 865-2541 1130 - TRACTORS,TILLAGE OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - MULCH FINISHER NO LARGER THAN 25 FOOT, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE NE - FRONT WEIGHTS FOR CASE IH MAGNUM, (308) 995-5515 NE - HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS, HOSES & PTO PUMPS, (308) 587-2344 IA - TRACTOR CHAINS 28" TO 38", (712) 299-6608 IA - 3 PT CARRIERS, $175 TO $575, (712) 299-6608

Double Diamond Enterprises California, MO

573.291.4316

Buy, Sell And Install Propane (LP) & Anhydrous Ammonia (NH3) Tanks

Inventory: 3-‘77 Trinity 30,000 Gallon LP Tanks ‘66 Delta 30,000 Gallon NH3 Tank ‘68 Delta 12,000 Gallon NH3 Tank Several 30,000 Gallon & Small LP Tanks In Stock! CALL FOR PRICING!!

573-291-4316 lptanks@yahoo.com

1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 413 CHRYSLER FOR SALVAGE, (308) 995-5515 NE - USED VEE BELTS: 3-IHC C176" $15 EA; 4 GATES C240" $20 EA; 3 DAYCO C240" $15 EA; 4 DAYCO C270" $15 EA 1 DAYCO C116 $10 EA; 1 DAYCO 94" X 1 1/4" WIDE $10, (402) 564-5064 NE - USED 460 CU IN ENGINE WITH NEW HIGH PRESSURE BERKELEY PUMP, (800) 554-8715 1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE NE - 10" WLR BOWLS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 5 NEW PTO PUMPS IN STOCK, (800) 284-7066 NE - 3X4 BERKELEY PUMPS, PRIMING VALVES AVAILABLE, (402) 364-2592 NE - USED MANURE PUMP, BETTER BUILT, (800) 554-8715 NE - USED BERKELEY PTO PUMPS & SUCTION EQUIPMENT, (800) 554-8715

1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 8 USED BERKELEY PTO PUMPS IN STOCK, (800) 284-7066 NE - BERKELEY FLOATER PUMP, (800) 2847066 1203 - PIPE WANTED TO BUY KS - GATED PVC W/BAD GATES, (785) 2218173 FOR SALE NE - 8" TEXFLO 20" GATES, ALL KINDS OF FITTINGS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6" BAND & LATCH MAIN LINE, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6" PLAIN PIPE, ALUM AND PLASTIC, (308) 946-3396 NE - 10" X 20" PVC, (308) 946-3396 NE - USED 6" AND 10" PVC, CALL FOR LENGTHS, (308) 946-3396 NE - 6" ALUM MAIN LINE PIPE, HOOK & BAND, (308) 946-3396 NE - 6" X 20" GATED ALUMINUM, (308) 9463396 NE - 8" X 20" ALUMINUM GATED, (308) 9463396 NE - 10" X 20" ALUMINUM GATED PIPE, (308) 946-3396 NE - 8"X 30' PLAIN ALUMINUM PIPE, (308) 946-3396 NE - USED 8"X20" PVC PIPE, (308) 9463396 NE - 60 LINKS OF GATED, 20" X 30', (308) 478-5451 NE - 8" MAIN LINE HASTINGS, (308) 9955515 NE - 9" MAIN LINE RING LOCK, (308) 9955515 NE - 9" MAIN LINE HIGH PRESS, (308) 9955515 NE - 5000' 6" HP RINGLOCK PIPE, (800) 284-7066 NE - 10" & 8" IRRIGATION PIPE SHUT-OFF VALVES & FITTING, (402) 726-2488 NE - PIPE TRAILER, (402) 726-2488 1205 - GENERATOR WANTED TO BUY NE - USED WINPOWER PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 FOR SALE NE - WINPOWER - NEW & USED PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 IA - WINCO PTO GENERATORS, CALL US FOR PRICE BEFORE YOU BUY! HARVEY AT EDEN SUPPLY 8AM - 10PM., (515) 679-4081 1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE NE - 150 HP GEARHEAD, 6 RATIO, (308) 995-5515 NE - AMARILLO GEARHEADS: 110HP 4:3 $700, 80 HP 6:5 $700, 70 HP 4:5 $650, 50 HP 1:1 $700, 50 HP 4:5 $600, (402) 5645064 NE - GEAR DRIVE REPAIR- AMARILLO WARRANTY CENTER. REPAIR ALL MAKES/MODELS. 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES. CENTRAL IRRIGATION, (402) 723-5824 NE - US MOTORS GEARHEADS 90HP 4:3 $450, 70HP 2:3 $400, 30HP 4:3 $300, (402) 564-5064 NE - DERAN/RANDOLPH GEARHEAD 100HP 4:3 $500, PEERLESS GEARHEAD 2:3 $300, (402) 564-5064 1207 - PIVOTS FOR SALE NE - 1998 4 TOWER T-L PIVOT, (308) 9463396 NE - 10 TOWER REINKE PIVOT, (800) 2847066 NE - MODEL 680 REINKE 8 TOWER PIVOT, VERY CLEAN, HAS DROP END GUN, BOOSTER PUMP, TOWER BOX, HAS BEEN UPDATED., (308) 636-8349 NE - 1987 REINKE MODEL 60, 6 TOWER, 1100 FORTY FT. HAS DROPPS, GUNS & GALVANIZED PIPES. CALL KENT AT, (308) 6368349 1208 - TRAVELER SYSTEMS FOR SALE NE - NEW OCMIS HH: 4" X 1312', (800) 2847066 NE - NEW GREENFIELDS, 6 NEW CADMAN HARD HOSE, 5 USED HARD HOSE TRAVELERS, 9 USED SOFT HOSE, (800) 284-7066 NE - HEINZMAN TRAVELER WITH HOSE, (308) 390-0642 1209 - PUMPS WITH MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 3/4 BERKELEY PUMPS WITH PRIMING VALVES, ATTACHED TO YOUR CHOICE OF INDUSTRIAL 300 FORD OR 262 ALLIS W/RADIATORS, AND CARTS, (402) 3642592 1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. FOR SALE WI - SERVING THE MIDWEST WITH COMPLETE IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. CONTACT ROBERTS IRRIGATION COMPANY AT 1500 POST ROAD, PLOVER, WI 54467, (800) 434-5224 NE - 8" SURGE VALVE, (308) 946-3396

1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - ORTHMAN 3-PT PIVOT TRACK CLOSER, EXCELLENT COND, (308) 390-0642 NE - PIVOTS, HARD & SOFT HOSE TRAVELERS, PUMPS, WHEEL ROLLS, FITTINGS, PVC UNDERGROUND FITTINGS, NEW AND USED, "YOUR COMPLETE IRRIGATION HEADQUARTERS" NORTHERN AGRI-SERVICES INC, HENDERSON, NEBRASKA 68371, (402) 723-4501, (800) 554-8715 NE - 1200' SIDE ROLL SPRINKLER, OLDER MODEL, FOB $1200 LEAVE A MESSAGE, (308) 278-2728 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE OK - REBUILT COMBINE SIEVES. NEW REEL BATS, GALVANIZED AND BLACK, (580) 3612265 OK - '86 C-IH 1660, 25' 1010 HEADER, $19,000.00, (580) 361-2265 KS - LARGE BISH BIN EXT OFF 9610 W/HYD. PUSH UP AUGER. $750 OBO, (620) 8652541 OK - '82 GLEANER N6, 24' HEADER, $8,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - C-IH 1480, 810 24' HEAD, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - TR85 NEW HOLLAND, 3208 CAT, 24' HEADER, $5,000.00, (580) 361-2265 CO - 22'AIR REEL AND ACCESSORIES. RECENTLY TAKEN OFF JD 105 COMBINE. $450 OBO. PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER., (719) 643-5267 NE - SERVICE OPS & PARTS MANUALS FOR MANY BRANDS OF MANY OLDER COMBINES & PICKERS. GLEN MLNARIK (888) 8025782. (NE) HRS MON-FRIDAY 8AM-6PM., (402) 986-1352 NE - JD, 1981 7720, 4300 HRS, JD DEALER SERVICED YEARLY, $9,500.00, (402) 5452255 OK - SEED CLEANER, CLIPPER, 92DB TRAVELER ON TRAILER, GOOD CONDITION, LOTS OF SCREENS, (580) 829-2543 KS - SALVAGING SEVERAL 6620, 7720 & 8820 JD COMBINES. LOTS OF GOOD PARTS AT DISCOUNT PRICES. CALL 785 -564-0511 OR, (785) 382-6848 1302 - COMBINE HEADS WANTED TO BUY MO - GLEANOR 318 OR 320 L OR M BEAN HEAD, (816) 378-2015 FOR SALE SD - WE REBUILD COMBINE & WINDROWER HEADER AUGERS TO LIKE NEW CONDITION. PONCELET'S WELDING, RAMONA, SD. (605) 480-4860 OR, (605) 482-8405 OK - MACDON 960 25' DRAPER W/IHC ADAPTER & PICK UP REEL, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - JD 925 FLEX HEAD, SEE THRU REEL, GOOD, $4,500.00, (402) 545-2255 NE - JD, 643 CORN HEAD, OIL DRIVE, $4,950.00, (402) 545-2255 NE - CASE IH 1063 CORN HEAD, 6RN, GOOD CONDITION, HARVEST DONE, $7,800.00, (402) 923-1721 1305 - WAGONS/GRAVITY WAGONS FOR SALE IA - FLARE, BARGE & GRAVITY WAGONS $150 TO $1850, (712) 299-6608 IA - WAGON GEARS, STEEL, WOOD OR RUBBER TIRES, (712) 299-6608 1306 - GRAIN CARTS FOR SALE KS - BIG 12 GRAIN CART 400 BU. , EXTRA WIDE AXLE, $850.00, (785) 871-0711 1307 - GRAIN DRYERS FOR SALE NE - 1995 MC 1175, 1992 MC 1175, 1995 MC 970, 1989 MC 973, MC 975, MC 675, 3 FARM FANS, M&W 650, (800) 284-7066 NE - USED 2009 BROCK SQ20D, USED '05 SUPERB SE1000C, USED '05 SUPERB SE750C, 3 NEW BROCK DRYERS., (800) 284-7066 NE - USED FARM FANS 4" AIR SYSTEM, (800) 284-7066 1310 - AUGERS FOR SALE NE - SPEED KING 52' 8" WITH ELECTRIC MOTOR, (308) 478-5451 NE - MAYRATH 55' GRAIN AUGER, 8" W/ ELECTRIC MOTOR, (308) 478-5451 NE - MAYRATH 65', 8", (402) 726-2488 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE NE - 8" AERATION TUBING AND AERATION FANS, (308) 995-5515 NE - BULK HEAD FOR 51' CURVET, (308) 995-5515 NE - SINGLE PHASE MOTORS, (308) 9955515 NE - BROCK BINS & GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, EPS & BEHLEN BLDG SYSTEMS, BUCKLEY STEEL, AINSWORTH, NE, (402) 387-0347 IL - 1/2 MILLION AND 1 MILLION TEMPORARY GROUND STORAGE UNITS WITH FANS AND TARPS, (800) 641-7822

November 11, 2010 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 1050 6' TRUSSED BULK HEAD FOR GRAIN STORAGE, $450.00, (308) 390-6336 1315 - COMBINE TRAILERS FOR SALE SK - COMBINE TRAILERS: TRAILTECH OR JANTZ, SINGLE & DOUBLE. HYDRAULIC FOLD HEAD TRANSPORTS. FLAMAN SALES, BOX 280, SOUTHEY, SK, CANADA S0G 4P0, ASK FOR AL. EVES 306-949-8458. DAYS, (306) 726-4403 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - CHICAGO FANS, (308) 995-5515 FOR SALE NE - 8" AERATION TUBES, FANS, TUNNELS FOR CONCRETE FLOORS, (308) 995-5515 NE - GSI GRAIN BINS, GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, ALL KINDS, GSI FANS & HEATERS, PORTABLE GRAIN DRYERS, (800) 554-8715 NE - NEW & RECONDITIONED KONGSKILDE AIR GRAIN VAC EQUIPMENT, (800) 554-8715 IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LEASE OR LOAN AT 7. 1%. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487 NE - NEW ORTHMAN DRY BEAN CUTTERS, (308) 995-5515 NE - DMC MODEL 44 GRAIN CLEANER, (800) 284-7066 IL - ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A MOISTURE TESTER THAT WILL GIVE YOU FAST & ACCURATE RESULTS? THEN CALL US NOW & ASK ABOUT OUR MODEL 920 & 930. SHORE SALES. MOISTURETESTERS. COM, (800) 837-0863 1401 - 3 POINT BLADES FOR SALE IA - 2 OR 3 PT BLADES 6', 7', 8' OR 9' AC, IH, JD & OTHERS, (712) 299-6608 1404 - SNOW BLOWER/PLOWS FOR SALE IA - 3 PT SNOWBLOWERS, $1550 TO $2850, (712) 299-6608 NE - V-SNOW PLOW ORIGINALLY FOR COUNTY MAINTAINER, COULD ADAPT TO FIT LOADER TRACTOR OR WHATEVER, $375.00, (308) 894-6965 1406 - LAWN MOWERS FOR SALE NE - HIS & HERS MOWERS, MADE BY DEINES CORP, BOTH HAVE 48" FRONT DECKS, 1 W/BAGGER, 1 W/DUMP BOX, BOTH W/BRAND NEW 14 HP TECUMSEH ENGINES, HEAVY DUTY MOWERS, EXCELLENT. ALSO LOTS OF SPARE PARTS, (308) 390-0642 NE - WORKHORSE LAWN TRACTOR W/SIDE PULL TYPE MOWER W/ BRIGGS & STRATTON ENGINE, WILL MOW TALL GRASS, PRACTICALLY NEW. REEL TYPE MOWER FOR SHORT GRASS, 10' WIDE SWATH. CAN BE PULLED BEHIND 4 WHEELER OR WORKHORSE TRACTOR, (308) 390-0642 IA - 5'-6'BELLY MOWERS; $375 - $975, (712) 299-6608 1407 - ELECTRIC MOTORS FOR SALE NE - COMPLETE LINE OF SHEAVES, BEARINGS, DRIVES, & MOTORS, (402) 387-0347 1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY WI - USED BULK MILK TANKS, ALL SIZES, (800) 558-0112 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC WANTED TO BUY NE - 110V WELDING ROD DRYING OVEN, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - METAL BENCH LATHE 3 JAW CHUCK, 5 1/2" SWING, $200.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - BRAKE DRUM/ROTOR TURNING LATHE, $110.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - ARMITURE TURNING LATHE, $70.00, (785) 778-2962 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - ELSTON GOPHER MACHINE, (308) 5872344 IA - WWW. WHEELRAKE. COM, (712) 3662114 KS - ORTHMAN & BUCKEYE FRONT 3 PT HITCHES, $1500 EACH., (620) 865-2541 1501 - ALFALFA HAY WANTED TO BUY IA - QUALITY SML OR LG SQ ALFALFA OR MIXED IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - ALFALFA, 4X4X8 BALES, DAIRY QUALITY, SHEDDED & TARPED, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - 1ST, 2ND, & 3RD CUTTING OF ALFALFA HAY, (308) 882-4588

1501 - ALFALFA HAY FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - GRINDING QUALITY ALFALFA IN LG RD BALES, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-9626399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - HORSE QUALITY IN SM SQ BALES, SHEDDED & TARPED HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - CUSTOM GRINDING, GROUND HAY DELIVERIES, HAZARD, NE., (308) 452-4400 OR - TEST MOISTURE. HAY, GRAIN, SILAGE, SOIL, WOOD, WINDROW TESTER. BALE STROKE COUNTER. MOISTURE READ OUT AS YOU BALE! WWW. LEHMANFARMS. NET, (503) 434-1705 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE IA - LARGE RD & BIG SQ BALES GOOD QUALITY GRASS HAY, DELIVERED IN SEMI LOADS ONLY, (641) 658-2738 NE - LARGE ROUND & SMALL SQUARE BALES PRAIRIE HAY, CALL EARLY AM OR LATE PM, (308) 894-6743 KS - TOP QUALITY SM SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - TOP QUALITY 4X4X8 SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - BALED 4X8, SM SQ OR BIG ROUNDS, (620) 625-2402 KS - 2008 BROME BIG ROUND BALES, (785) 935-2480 NE - CERTIFIED MEADOW HAY, BIG ROUND BALES, HORSES, CATTLE, MULCH, (308) 587-2344 NE - 117 BG ROUNDS, MAINLY GRASS MIX, (308) 436-5491 1503 - BROME HAY FOR SALE KS - BROME HAY $60-$70/TON, DIFFERENT QUALITY HAY $40- $55/TON, NET OR TWINE, (785) 731-5190 1505 - STRAW WANTED TO BUY IA - GOOD CLEAN, BRIGHT SM SQ IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - 96 BG RDS CERT WHEAT STRAW, 1000#/BL. 308-641-1240,, (308) 436-5491 1512 - SEED FOR SALE TX - FORAGE-TYPE TRITICALE SEED, CALL GAYLAND WARD SEEDS, (800) 299-9273 IA - BUYER & SELLER OF PRAIRIE GRASS & WILDFLOWER SEED, OSENBAUGH SEEDS, LUCAS, IA., (800) 582-2788 KS - TRITICALE SEED, A+ QUALITY, VOLUME DISCOUNT. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. CALL BROCK BAKER @, (800) 344-2144 NE - PASTURE & HAY MIXES, OATS, TURNIP, COVER CROPS, TEFF, MILLET, WILDLIFE, ALFALFA, ETC. , PRAIRIE STATES SEED 866373-2514 TOLL FREE, (866) 373-2514 NE - NATIVE GRASS SEED, WILDFLOWER, LEAD PLANT, SMART WEED & OTHERS. SOUTH FORK SEED COMPANY, (402) 4825491 1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER FOR SALE IA - WWW. REPLACEMENTRAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 366-2114 1806 - GRINDER MIXERS FOR SALE IA - IH 950, $950.00, (712) 299-6608 NE - 420 ART'S-WAY GRINDER MIXER, VERY GOOD, HAMMERS NEVER TURNED, SHEDDED, (402) 482-5491 1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471 CO - TUB GRINDERS, NEW & USED (W/WARRANTY). OPERATE WELL W/70-175 HP TRACTORS, GRINDS WET HAY, TOUGH HAY & ALL GRAINS. HIGH CAPACITY. LOW PRICE. WWW. ROTOGRIND. COM, (800) 724-5498, (970) 353-3769 1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - BULK CAKE & GRAIN FEEDERS, (308) 587-2344 IA - 24' MEAL ON WHEELS HAYFEEDER. SAVE YOU MONEY, SAVES ON TIME & SAVES ON HAY., (712) 210-6587 1815 - WATERERS/TANKS FOR SALE NE - BULL TOUGH BOTTOMLESS HEAVY GAUGE STOCK TANKS, (402) 387-0347 NE - LIFETIME WATER TANKS, LIFETIME WARRANTY, TIRE TANKS ARE 20 PLY & UP. AUTOMATIC WATERERS, HAY BALE FEEDERS, 6' & 7' SNOW & MANURE YARD SCRAPERS, USA TIRE MANAGEMENT, WWW. USATIREPRODUCTS. COM, (800) 755-8473 MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com


November 11, 2010 1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE NE - REBUILT AIR MOTORS OR REPAIRS, (308) 587-2344 TX - VIRDEN PERMA-BILT CO. FARM & RANCH PRODUCTS: ROOF & TANK COATINGS, WINDMILL PARTS. SEND OR CALL FOR FREE CATALOG. 2821 MAYS AVE. BOX7160FR AMARILLO, TX 79114-7160 WWW. VIRDENPRODUCTS. COM, (806) 3522761 NE - MONITOR PUMP JACK-CHOICE OF GAS & ELECTRIC MOTOR, $650.00, (308) 4364369 1820 - LIVESTOCK BEDDING FOR SALE NE - CORRUGATED WINDBREAK STEEL, 8 GAUGE THROUGH 20 GAUGE, (402) 3870347 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - 20' BULL WHIP, (308) 587-2344 KS - USED HOG OR SHEEP PANELS & GATES, (785) 778-2962 FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", FOR FENCING CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - WE ARE YOUR STAMPEDE LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT DEALER. EMERSON EQUIPMENT. WHITMAN, NE, (308) 544-6421 KS - TIRE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS: WATER TANKS, MINERAL FEEDERS, SILAGE COVER WEIGHTS. WWW. GEETIRE. COM, (785) 231-8397 NE - GOPHER CONTROL MACHINE, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1901 - FEEDER STEERS FOR SALE MO - WE SPECIALIZE IN LOCATING "QUALITY" FEEDER CATTLE, (816) 688-7887 1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - GELBVIEH AND BALANCER OPEN HEIFERS, (402) 879-4976 MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT CATTLE LOCATORS - MAX HARGROVE, (816) 6887887 NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD VIRGIN REG ANGUS HEIFERS, (308) 569-2458 1904 - BRED HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - YOUNG COWS & BRED HEIFERS, AI'D TO ABS BULLS, AND CLEANED UP WITH SUMMITCREST BULLS, (308) 569-2458 1906 - BRED COWS FOR SALE NE - I'M DEALING ON COWS COMING OUT OF DROUGHT AREAS EVERY DAY. WWW. BREDCOWSWRIGHTLIVESTOCK. COM OR CALL, (308) 534-0939 1908 - COW CALF PAIRS FOR SALE NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD REG ANGUS COW/CALF PAIRS, (308) 569-2458 1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - REGISTERED ANGUS, CELL: 308-8701119, (308) 732-3356 NE - 25 PB CHAROLAIS BULLS COMING 2S ALL RECORDS 40 YRS, (308) 995-5515 NE - GELBVIEH BULLS, RED & BLACK, 1 & 2 YR OLDS, (402) 879-4976 NE - (25) COMING 2 YR OLD CHAROLAIS BULLS(308) 567-2288, (308) 995-5515 NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, (402) 395-2178 NE - EASY CALVING, REG POLLED CHAROLAIS BULLS, (402) 395-2178 NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, 2 YEAR OLDS AND YEARLINGS, SONS OF 878, BLUEPRINT 202 AND TRAVELOR 722, (308) 569-2458 1910 - SHOW STOCK FOR SALE NE - CLUB CALVES, "THE WINNING KIND", STEERS/HEIFERS, (402) 395-2178 1915 - SEMEN/EMBRYO/AI SERVICE FOR SALE NE - DBL BLACK DBL POLLED CALVING EASE GELBVIEH BULLS, (402) 879-4976 1916 - DAIRY HEIFERS FOR SALE WI - DAIRY EQUIP- STALLS, GATES, HEADLOCKS, TMR MIXERS, BARN CLEANERS, MANURE AUGERS/PUMPS, VENTILATION, ALLEY SCRAPERS. REASONABLY PRICE LONG LASTING EQUIP EQUALS VALUE. MEETING ALL DAIRYMEN'S NEEDS SINCE 1919. BERG EQUIPMENT CORP. WWW. BERGEQUIPMENT. COM, (800) 494-1738 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT & BREEDING CATTLE LOCATORS, (816) 688-7887 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Heartland Express 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE - CONT’D CO - IT'S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292 2200 - REGISTERED HORSES FOR SALE NE - 2003 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, MORGAN BROOD MARE, 2004 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, 1995 MORGAN STALLION, (308) 587-2344 NE - AQHA, YEARLINGS, MARES AND COLTS, (308) 569-2458 NE - PEPPY DOC SAN, SHINING SPARK, JET DECK, THREE BAR & SKIPPER W BRED, STALLIONS, MARES, FILLEYS, & GELDINGS, MOSTLY SORREL & PALOMINO, GREAT STOCK, GOOD DISPOSITIONS, CALL 1-888689-8924 OR, (308) 384-1063 NE - TOP QUALITY GELDINGS-DOC O'LENA, HOLIDOC, DOC BAR, COYS BONANZA, DOCS JACK SPRAT BLOODLINES- NATURAL COW SENSE-RIVER ROAD QUARTER HORSES 308452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - ONLY TWO REPLACEMENT MARES LEFT-REGISTERED QUARTERHORSESDON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY! RIVER ROAD QUARTERHORSES 308-452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - IT COSTS NO MORE TO FEED A GREAT HORSE THAN A POOR ONE. RIVER ROAD QUARTERHORSES ARE WELL FED, DON'T HAVE BAD HABITS AND ARE GOOD LOOKING. MUST CUT HERD SIZE. 308-452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - AQHA HORSES, BLUE ROAN STUD AND MARES. OLDER GREY MARE, WELL BROKE, GRANDDAUGHTERS HORSE, (308) 5692458 NE - MINIATURE PONIES & COLTS-VERY GENTLE, DOWNSIZING- MARES $150; COLTS $75., (402) 366-4585 2202 - STUD SERVICE FOR SALE NE - MORGAN STALLION STANDING AT STUD, (308) 587-2344 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE NE SELL-TRADE MORGAN STALLIONS:BESSIA'S, BON, ACCORD 135969; T-BONE, LAD, CLASSY, 149831; TBONE, B, CONGO, 164062, (308) 587-2344 2301 - DOGS FOR SALE KS - AKC FARM RAISED GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES, FIRST SHOTS, DEW CLAWS. 785398-2231, 785-731-5174,, (785) 731-5190 2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK SD - WANTED: RANCH HELP FOR COW/CALF OPERATION. NEED TO HAVE SOME FARMING EXPERIENCE. LOCATED IN CENTRAL SD. CALL FOR DETAILS 605-730-1616 OR, (605) 473-5361 OK - EXPERIENCED FARM FAMILY, MECHANICAL ABILITY A MUST, NORTHWEST OKLAHOMA, HOUSING PROVIDED, (580) 8292543 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES KS - CORN, MILO, WHEAT HARVESTING WANTED. TWO JD MACHINES & SUPPORTING TRUCKS., (785) 567-8515 2601 - CARS FOR SALE CO - 1964 FORD GALAXIE 4 DR, 390 V8 THUNDERBIRD ENGINE, FACTORY OPTION. BODY FAIRLY STRAIGHT, NEEDS PAINT. INTERIOR ROUGH. ENGINE & DRIVETRAIN ARE GOOD. 86K MILES $1500 OR BEST CLOSE OFFER. PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER, (719) 643-5267 VOLVO 2000 S80 T6 DUAL TURBOS, LOADED, 122,000 MILES, 8 AIRBAGS, 26 MPG EASY, PREMIUM SOUND, WELL BELOW BOOK. 308-325-9527. MUST SEE OVERTON ALONG HWY. 30. NISSAN 2006 MAXIMA SL SILVER SEDAN, AUTO, 6-CYL. 26,300 MILES, A/C, AM/FM/CD BOSE STEREO, LEATHER INTERIOR, VERY CLEAN, GREAT CONDITION. $16,900. 308-455-1018. 2602 - PICKUPS WANTED TO BUY NE - HD COIL SPRINGS FOR 1971 3/4 TON CHEVY PICKUP, END GATE FOR 1980 GMC 3/4 TON, (308) 587-2344 KS - GOOD LONG WIDE FACTORY BED FOR '73-'79 FORD, (620) 865-2541 FOR SALE KS - 88 CHEVY 1 TON, 4WD, 6. 2 DIESEL, 4 SP, FLATBED, (785) 935-2480 NE - THIRD SEAT FOR 95-99 SUBURBAN, TAUPE LEATHER, $100.00, (402) 564-5064 NE - FRONT BUMPER FOR 2005 CHEVY SILVERADO, (308) 587-2344

2602 - PICKUPS FOR SALE - CONT’D KS - 1993 F-350 CREWCAB XLT DIESEL, AUTO, 4X4, FACTORY TURBO AVAILABLE, $5,900.00, (620) 865-2541 CO - 1961 FORD F250, 292 V-8, 4 SP TRAN. 2 WH DRIVE, LONG STEP SIDE BOX, GOOD CONDITION, OLDER RESTORA TION $6500, PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER., (719) 643-5267 2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE SD - 1951 CHEVY FIRETRUCK, LIGHTS & SIREN WORK, 10K, DRIVES GREAT, REAL NICE, $4,500.00, (605) 386-2131 KS - '59 CHEVY 60, V8, 4&2 SP, 15' B&H, 2 NEW TIRES, TUNED UP, ETC, $999.00, (620) 865-2541 KS - 1976 FORD 3500 CAB & CHASSIS, $500.00, (785) 778-2962 CO - 1979 GMC 1 TON TOW TRUCK, 2WD, 350 V8, 4 SP, HOLMES 440 BED & WINCH, TOLLE TX-3000 WHEEL LIFT. 3300 MILES SINCE REPAINT & REFURBISH IN '97. NEW SEAT, INTERIOR & GOOD TIRES. $7500 OR BEST CLOSE OFFER. GOOD CONDITION LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER, (719) 6435267 KS - 2050 DIESEL TWIN-SCREW 20' BED HOIST, AIR BRAKES, $4,500.00, (785) 8710711 MO - 1974 IH TANDEM W/18' GRAIN BED, HOIST & ROLLOVER TARP, 5+2 SPEED, $7,000.00, (660) 548-3804 NE - 1987 FORD F800, AIR TAG AXLE, 22'BOX W/CARGO REAR DOORS, HOIST, 429 GAS ENGINE, 11R22. 5 NEARLY NEW RUBBER. CAN HAUL BETWEEN 750-800 BUSHEL FROM FIELD TO BIN., (308) 894-6965 2607 - FLAT BEDS & UTILITY TRAILERS FOR SALE NE - 20 FT FLATBED TRAILER. TIMPTE PINTLE HITCH TO PULL BEHIND SEMI. AIR BREAKS 24. 5 RUBBER. ALL ALUMINIUM WHEELS $4000/OBO, (308) 348-2065 IA - USED 2 AND 4 WHEEL TRAILERS; $375 - $2,275, (712) 299-6608 2613 - MOBILE HOMES & RV'S FOR SALE NE - AVION SILVER R, 30FT, TRAVEL TRAILER, VERY CLEAN, EXCELLENT SNOWBIRD TRAILER, NEW BATTERIES, $7400/OBO, (402) 564-5064 2614 - BOATS & WATER CRAFTS FOR SALE KS - 16' HOBIECAT, $600.00, (785) 7782962 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE NE - MONI MOTOR GLIDER AND TRAILER, LOW HOURS, (402) 364-2592 KS - RANS S-5 ULTRALITE, (FACTORY BUILT), (785) 778-2962 2616 - TIRES WANTED TO BUY NE - HOT PATCH VULCANIZING PATCHES, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - 15" SPLIT RIMS, 8 HOLE, 750 MUD/SNOW, (308) 587-2344 NE - 10 BOLT RIMS W/18. 4 X 38" TIRES, (402) 336-2755 IA - NEW 600X16" GOODYEAR TIRE, $95.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - 10X24" TO 18. 4X38" TIRES, (712) 2996608 2617 - VANS FOR SALE CHEVY 1992 - GLADIATOR CONVERSION VAN. BROWN, SEATS 7. 156,000 MILES. $1200. CALL 308-830-2631. 2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY IA - LATE MODEL TRLRS & TRUCKS WITH LIGHT DAMAGE OR IN NEED OF ENGINE REPAIRS, (641) 658-2738 NE - 18' STEEL TRUCK GRAIN BOX, 52" OR 60" SIDES HOIST AND ROLL TARP, (308) 436-4369 FOR SALE KS - 66 IH 2000, DETROIT, 15 SP W/HENDERSON TWINSCREW, TULSA WINCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 NE - 1975 24' SEMI LOWBOY TRLR. $1950, $2,250.00, (402) 545-2255 MO - '99 IH 4900, TS, 18K FRONT, 40K LB HENDRICKSON, (660) 548-3804 OK - 1998 FREIGHTLINER MID ROOF, DETROIT MOTOR, 10 SP, AIR RIDE, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - 1998 FREIGHTLINER, MID ROOF, C12 CAT, SUPER 10SP AIR RIDE, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - 2000 VOLVO, 60 SERIES DETROIT, 10 SP, AIR RIDE, CONDO, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - 1988 FL DAY CAB 400, CUMMINS, 9SP, 411 REAR END, GOOD RUNNING TRUCK, EXC TIRES, (402) 726-2488 KS - 1975 IH SEMI, 318, 13 SP, TWIN SCREW, 5TH WHEEL, (785) 871-0711

Page 33 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER FOR SALE NE - TRANSMISSION, GENERATOR, STARTER, REAR AXLE REMOVABLE CARRIER DIFFERENTIAL UNIT. FITS 1946 CHEVY 2 TON TRUCK, (308) 587-2344 2802 - DOZERS FOR SALE KS - TEREX 8220A DOZER, PS, TILT, GOOD RUNNING MACHINE, (785) 935-2480 KS - CAT SINGLE SHANK, DEEP PENETRATION RIPPER, FITS D8-K, WITH VALVE AND ALL, EXCELLENT CONDITION, (785) 4485893 MO - SELLING FOR PARTS, 1960'S HIGHLOADER, WITH STREET PADS, $1,500.00, (816) 378-2015 2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 NE - PULL BEHIND BOX SCRAPERS, 10' & 12'; 3PT'S 6' & 8', (402) 678-2277 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 MO - USED TOREQ 10 YD DIRECT MOUNT, EXCELLENT, (660) 548-3804 CO - MIDLANDS MODEL M66 SCRAPER, $3,500.00, (303) 536-0124 2804 - MOTOR GRADERS FOR SALE KS - CAT 12F-13K, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (785) 448-5893 2805 - BACKHOE FOR SALE KS - CAT 235-32K, VERY GOOD CONDITION, ONE OWNER, (785) 448-5893 2806 - CRANES & DRAGLINES FOR RENT NE - 28 TON NATIONAL CRANE, 152 FT. REACH, (402) 387-0347 FOR SALE KS - LORAINE 25 TON TRUCK CRANE, LOTS OF BOOM, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (785) 448-5893 2807 - GENERATORS FOR SALE MN - AUTOMATIC GENERATOR SETS 15KW500KW, NEW & USED, LOW TIME GEN SETS. REMOTE WELL GENERATORS. SERVING FARMERS SINCE 1975. STANDBY POWER SYSTEMS, WINDOM MN, MON-SAT 9-5., (800) 419-9806 ND - 20KW TO 2000KW; DIESEL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS. ALL LOW-HOUR TAKEOUT GENSETS. CUMMINS/ONAN, KOHLER, CAT, DETROIT DIESEL & MORE. ABRAHAM GENERATOR SALES COOPERSTOWN, ND (COMPLETE INVENTORY ONLINE) WWW. ABRAHAMINDUSTRIAL. COM WE SHIP NATIONWIDE!, (701) 797-4766 2809 - CONST. TRUCKS & TRAILERS FOR SALE KS - 1997 LOADKING, 55 TON, 3 AXLE, LAY DOWN NECK, W/BEAVERTAILS. CALL 785817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 KS - 15 TON TANDEM AXLE TRAILER, DUALS, TILT TOP, WENCH, EXCELLENT CONDITION, TIRES 70%, (785) 448-5893 2813 - WHEEL LOADERS FOR SALE NE - CASE 621 PAYLOADER, MODEL 6T 590 CUMMINS MOTOR, MOTOR NEEDS WORK. $21,000, $21,000.00, (402) 545-2255 2821 - CRAWLERS FOR SALE WI - UNDERCARRIAGE REPAIR. NEW, USED & REBUILT PARTS. ALSO TRACK PRESS SERVICE. M & R TRACK SERVICE., (800) 564-0383 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS WANTED TO BUY NE - 66" BUCKET FOR 1835C CASE SKID STEER, 10. 00X16. 5 TIRE-WHEEL, PLUS OTHER ATTACHMENTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - COMPLETE SET OF BOOKS (REPAIR MANUALS) T-200 BOBCAT SKID LOADER, $100.00, (785) 778-2962 2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE NE - 1500-8000# (MOSTLY 4000#), AIR TIRES & NEW FORKS, (402) 678-2277 OK - PETTIBONE, 30' LIFT, $3,500.00, (580) 361-2265 2840 - OTHER CONST. EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - 12-20'LONG 12"I BEAMS, 1/4"THICK W/ 1/2" THICK TOP & BOTTOM, 4 3/4" WIDE $180 EA OR ALL 12 FOR $2000. 12-7' LONG 10", 6" H BEAMS, 1/4" THICK, $35 EA OR ALL 12 FOR $400., (308) 894-6965 NE - 1991 BLUEBIRD BUS, 5. 9 CUMMINS, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330

3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY SD - MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE ANY OLDER MM, (605) 386-2131 FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTORS! BIEWER'S TRACTOR & MACH. SALV. SPECIALIZES IN 1920-85 TRACTOR PARTS. FREE NATIONWIDE LOCATING. BARNESVILLE, MN. SEARCH PARTS & SEE OVER 100 ANTIQUE TRACTORS PICTURED AT SALVAGETRACTORS. COM, (218) 493-4696 NE - TRACTOR PARTS FOR SALE. NEW AFTERMARKET PARTS FOR MOST MAKES OF TRACTORS. FRONT END PARTS, 3 PT HITCH PARTS, RADIATORS, SEATS, STEERING WHEELS, BATTERY BOXES, PTO PARTS, DRAWBARS, WATER PUMPS, DECALS & MORE. CLASSIC AG, AINSWORTH, NE., (800) 286-2171 NE - 1952 JD B, RECONDITIONED, PULLED IN DIV 1 4500LBS, $3,500.00, (402) 5452255 NE - 1938 JD B, UNSTYLED, RECONDITIONED, $3,100.00, (402) 545-2255 NE - 1941 JD A, ELECTRIC START, 4 SP, BEHLEN OVERDRIVE,, $2,500.00, (402) 545-2255 OK - ALLIS-CHALMERS WC56821, MASSEYHARRIS LP 55BISH, SERIAL #11062, (580) 829-2543 MN - ANTIQUE TRACTORS - 5 JOHN DEER, 4 CASE, 4 MOLINE, 16 FARMALL, 4 MASSEY, 2 OLIVER, 2 COCKSHUTT, 2 COOP, CALL JOHN @, (701) 200-9233 IA - ANTIQUE AC, IH, JD, FORD, OLIVER, MM; 100 NICE OLD TRACTORS, (712) 299-6608 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES WANTED TO BUY SD - IH 6 SPEED SPECIAL TRUCK, (605) 386-2131 SD - OLDER JEEPS, CJ 2A, 1948 OR OLDER, ALSO MILITARY, (605) 386-2131 NE - TEENS, 20'S, EARLY 30'S IHC TRUCKS, PARTS, LITERATURE, (308) 894-6965 NE - 1950 FORD CRESTLINER & 1951 VICTORIA, (308) 876-2515 FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRUCKS - 4 STUDEBAKER, 4 DODGE, 8 CHEVY, 12 INTERNATIONAL, 4 DIAMOND T, 1 MACK, 2 WHITE, CALL JOHN @, (701) 200-9233 IA - 1941 DODGE TRK W/6X10 DUMP BOX, $3,550.00, (712) 299-6608 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - PIPE 2 3/8", 2 7/8", 3 1/2", 4 1/2", 5 1/2", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 KS - HIGHWAY GUARDRAIL, OILFIELD PIPE, SUCKER RODS, FENCING CABLE. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. BUTTERFLY SUPPLY, WWW. BUTTERFLYSUPPLYINC. COM, (800) 249-7473 KS - CATTLE & HORSE PANELS, 5'3" X 10', 8-BAR, 60 LBS, GREEN OR SILVER, STARTING AT $66.00 CELL: 620-546-5155, (620) 549-6604 KS - LOTS OF USED GUARDRAIL, USED CORRUGATED METAL PIPE, LARGE & SMALL, 30' STEEL I-BEAMS, (785) 448-5893 NE - CONTINUOUS FENCE: 1 1/4", 1 1/2", 1 3/4", EXCELLENT FOR FEEDLOT, LIVESTOCK & HORSE FENCE, WEST POINT, NE. CALL, (402) 380-1107 SD - FOREVER POST 3"X7'; 4'X7'; 4"X8'; PLASTIC FENCE POST CAN BE NAILED, STAPLED, SCREWED, WON'T ROT. MAJOR DISC. W/2 BUNDLES OR MORE. QUALITY HAY TARP W/STRAP STEEL STORAGE CONTAINERS 8'X20'; 8'X40. WE DELIVER HAENSEL DISTRIBUTING. CALL CLINT 605-310-6653 JOHN, (605) 351-5760 MO - FENCING MATERIAL:2 3/8", 2 7/8", 3 1/2" SUCKER ROD, 3/4", 7/8", 1" ALSO FIBER GLASS SUCKER ROD. TRUCKLOAD LOTS, CALL 573-280-5938 OR, (573) 3924479 MO - NEW HEAVY IRON CORRAL PANELS $60.00, FREE REPLACEMENT IF DAMAGED, 816-898-0234 OR, (816) 507-3116

BARBWIRE FENCE BUILDERS: Removal, construction and repairs. (785)625-5819 • (800)628-6611 Cell: (785) 635-1922 CO - WIRE, PIPE, WOOD & VINYL. SERVING WESTERN US, (970) 396-8729 KS - HEDGE POST FOR SALE, LINES, CORNERS, CORRALS. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. SMITH POSTYARD, WWW. SMITHPOST YARD1989. COM, (620) 496-8956 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com


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3007 - PIPE FOR SALE MO - GOOD USED RR TANK CAR SHELLS FOR CULVERTS (7-10' DIAMETER)(30'-55' LONG), ALSO GOOD USED STEEL PIPE, 8 5/8" DIAMETER THRU 48" DIAMETER, 20', 30', 40' & 50' LENGTHS. CALL GARY AT GATEWAY PIPE & SUPPLY, (800) 489-4321 3009 - FUEL TANKS FOR SALE NE - 300 GAL FUEL TANK ON STAND, $50.00, (308) 894-6965 KS - '76 FORD 2000 GAL TANK WAGON FUEL TRUCK, 2 HOSE REELS, 5 COMPARTMENTS, READY TO GO, (785) 448-5893 3011 - HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS WANTED TO BUY NE - REAR TINE ROTO TILLER, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE MO - OUTSIDE WOOD FURNACE $1595. CHEAP SHIPPING. EASY INSTALL. FORCED AIR. 100,000 BTU. HOUSES, MOBILES. WWW.HEATBYWOOD.COM, (417) 581-7755 3016 - BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES FOR SALE KY - KENTUCKY BUILDINGS, LLC. ALL STEEL STRUCTURE. PACKAGES FROM 24' TO 75' WIDE. WE SELL COMPONENTS, SLIDING AND ROLL-UP DOORS, INSULATION, WINDOWS, SHEET METAL, TRIM, AND STEEL FRAMING. KYBUILDINGSLLC. COM, (606) 668-3446 3024 - FINANCIAL SERVICES MO - PUT OUR MONEY & 45 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE TO WORK FOR YOU. ALL TYPES OF AG LOANS AVAILABLE AT LOWEST RATES. FREE CONSULTATIONS. MIDWEST LOAN BROKERS. JAM@LYN. NET OR CALL, (660) 339-7410 3030 - OTHER WANTED TO BUY SD - JACOBS 32 VOLT WIND GENERATOR, ALSO WINCHARGER USED DURING THE '30'S & '40'S, WILL PAY ACCORDING TO CONDITION, (605) 386-2131 NE - SCRAP BATTERIES- WE WANT 'EM! WE ALSO BUY STEEL CASE & GLASS PACK. CALL FOR DETAILS! ALLEN'S NEW & USED BATTERIES. BUY/SELL, NEW/USED. WE CARRY ALL KINDS!! ALLEN FELTON, OWNER. LINCOLN, NE., (402) 467-2455

3030 - OTHER FOR SALE NE - REASONABLY PRICE MECHANICS GLOVES, WARM GLOVES, MITTENS & OTHER GLOVES., (308) 587-2344 DE - BIG BUD BOOK-THE INCREDIBLE STORY OF THE BIGGEST, MOST POWERFUL TRACTOR EVER BUILT. BOOK IS 12"X9" - PACKED WITH PICTURES, SIGNED BY AUTHOR, ONLY $37.47 PLUS $5 S&H. CLASSIC TRACTOR FEVER, BOX 437, ROCKLAND, DE 19732. CLASSICTRACTORS.COM OR CALL US, (800) 888-8979 5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE NE - 150 ACRES, 2 GOOD 8" WELLS PLUS GOOD 6" WELL IN REUSE PIT, 3/4 QUARTER MILE UNDERGROUND PIPE, (308) 390-6336 5004 - PASTURE RENT FOR RENT NE - FALL & WINTER GRASS FOR CATTLE, NO BULLS, (308) 587-2344 6005 - RESTAURANTS FOR SALE NE - THE COUNTRY NEIGHBOR RESTAURANT & GIFT SHOP & CATERING, NEXT TO FT. HARTSUFF STATE HISTORICAL PARK. CELEBRATING 15 YRS OF SERVICE, TUES-SUN 11AM TO 9PM. 82007 FORT AVE, BURWELL, NE, (308) 346-5049 7001 - SPECIAL EVENTS FOR SALE NE - MID-AMERICA ALFALFA EXPO, FEATURING THE NEWEST HAY EQUIPMENT & PRODUCTS, ALSO AN EXHIBITOR AUCTION. EXPO IS FEB 1 & FEB 2, 2011, 8 AM-5 PM AUCTION IS FEB 1, 3:45PM; ALL OF THIS TAKES PLACE AT BUFFALO COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, KEARNEY, NE, (800) 743-1649 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

November 11, 2010

Common Plant Families Program Coming Nov. 23 David Lott, Horticulture Extension Educator, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension, North Platte Have you ever tried to identify different plants in gardens, landscapes or fields? Some plant material is easier to identify than others. Others are part of the same family. Plan to attend the “Characteristics of Common Plant Families” program at 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, November 23, at the UNL West Central Research and Extension Center, 402 W. State Farm Road, in North Platte. Many plants found in domestic gardens and landscapes or in the wild are related to each other. This program is designed to help learners learn more about: · Major plant families represented in land-

scapes in west central Nebraska. · Physical and cultural characteristics to help identify popular plant material in each plant family. · Connect which plant family’s characteristics are good for different landscaping uses and locations. · Help gardeners learn more about the different families, and how to utilize them in the home or public landscape. Please register for this program by calling the UNL Lincoln-McPherson County Extension Office at (308) 532-2683, or by sending an e-mail message to LincolnCounty@unl.edu. There is a $10 fee for the program, payable to UNL. Current University of Nebraska-Lincoln Master Gardeners are encouraged to attend free of charge.

Midlands Classified Ad Network LOOKING FOR A CHANGE FROM YOUR FAST PACE? WANTED! CERTIFIED GM TECHS & SERVICE MANAGER AT OUR KIMBALL LOCATION. GM TECHS: EXPERIENCE A PLUS BUT WILL TRAIN THE RIGHT PERSON. SIGN ON BONUS, TOOL ALLOWANCE OR MOVING EXPENSES FOR THE RIGHT INDIVIDUAL. SERVICE MANAGER: SEEKING A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL LEADER TO JOIN OUR TEAM. QUALIFIED CANDIDATES MUST HAVE DEMONSTRATED AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE. MOTIVATED IN LEADERSHIP SKILLS & ABILITY TO PRESERVE CUSTOMER SERVICE SATISFACTION. BOTH POSITIONS HAVE UNLIMITED GROWTH OPPORTUNITY AND FULL BENEFIT PACKAGE. PLUS THE BENEFITS OF SMALL TOWN LIFE WITH ACCESSIBILITY TO THE CITY. SEND RESUME TO: WOLFAUTO@ EMBARQMAIL.COM OR APPLY IN PERSON AT WOLF AUTO CENTER, KIMBALL & ASK FOR MIKE OR WADE, (308) 235-3697 GERING PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING QUALIFIED CANDIDATES FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITION: BUSINESS MANAGER (CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS WILL BE GIVEN PREFERENCE) APPLICATION MATERIALS MAY BE

ACCESSED AT WWW.GERINGSCHOOLS.NET CURRENT OPEN POSITIONS ARE LISTED ON OUR WEBSITE. IF THE POSITION YOU ARE LOOKING FOR ISN'T OPEN, YOU MAY APPLY TO THE CONSORTIUM BY CLICKING ON "START AN APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENT", LOCATED JUST UNDER OUR OPEN LISTINGS. EOE DANA F. COLE & COMPANY, LLP, ONE OF THE OLDEST AND LARGEST PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTING FIRMS IN THE STATE, IS SEEKING A FULL-TIME ACCOUNTANT IN OUR CHADRON OFFICE. ACCOUNTING DEGREE AND EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. THIS POSITION INVOLVES WORKING ON INCOME, PAYROLL AND SALES TAX RETURNS AND WITH FINANCIAL STATEMENTS. MUST BE PROFICIENT IN EXCEL AND EXPERIENCE WITH QUICK BOOKS A PLUS. WE OFFER COMPETITIVE SALARIES, LIMITED TRAVEL, MEDICAL AND DISABILITY INSURANCE, A 401(K) AND SECTION 125 PLAN. SEND RESUME TO: DANA F. COLE & COMPANY, LLP, 244 E. THIRD, PO BOX 648, CHADRON, NE 69337 OR LULF@DANACOLE.COM EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. HOSPITAL EQUIPMENT SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE- SERVICE OF EQUIPMENT

SOME OVERNIGHT, LONG HOURS, HEAVY LIFTING. MECHANICAL APTITUDE IMPORTANT, PEOPLE SKILLS MANDATORY. FARM OR MILITARY EXPERIENCE A PLUS. FAX RESUME TO 866-744-6679 GUNS: 7X57 AL MARKC BAR AND ACTION WITH ZEISS SCOPE. ENCTHPROHUNTER NEW W/257 ROB BAR AVAILABLE. CUSTOM257 ROB AL 700 REM WITH LEOP SCOPE AND MARK C BAR AND SMITHING. 308-440-4773. SERVICE TECHNICIAN- LOCAL EQUIPMENT DEALER SEARCHING FOR A DIESEL MECHANIC TO JOIN OUR SERVICE TEAM. WE ARE LOOKING FOR TROUBLE-SHOOTING SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE WITH HYDRAULIC/HYDROSTATIC SYSTEMS, ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND GAS/DIESEL ENGINE REPAIR. WE OFFER A FRIENDLY WORK ENVIRONMENT, BENEFITS, AND STABLE, LONGTERM EMPLOYMENT WITH A LOCALLY OWNED FAMILY BUSINESS. PLEASE SEND COVER LETTER, RÉSUMÉ AND LIST OF REFERENCES TO: STAR-HERALD, PO BOX 1709, DEPT. 1736, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69363 OR EMAIL TO: BLINDBOX @STARHERALD.COM. SUBJECT: 1736

Auctioneers — Don’t miss your opportunity to get your auction bills in front of this audience across the Midwest!

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November 11, 2010

Heartland Express

“A Terrific Turkey”

continued

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“A Terrific Turkey” Brought to you by

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Heartland Express

November 11, 2010

Have You Attended the Largest Winter Ag Event in the Region?-Farmers attend the Nebraska Power Farming Show … to see NEW ag precision technologies … to see over 5.1 acres of NEW row crop, forage and livestock equipment and other ag-related products - ALL-INDOORS … to see specialty manufacturers that only attend this regional event … to talk to company representatives from over 600 companies … to attend informative seminars Register to win $1,200 of Stine LibertyLink® Soybeans each day of the show!

Wednesday, Dec. 8 Thursday, Dec. 9 Friday, Dec. 10

9:00 – 4:00 9:00 – 4:00 9:00 – 3:00

Lancaster Event Center N 84th St. & Havelock Lincoln, Nebraska

FREE ADMISSION

FREE PARKING

Easy Access off I-80, Exit 409

www.nebraskapowershow.com Sponsored in part by: 45277

45332

Contact Your Local Co-op Dealer For More Information

45313


http://www.agnet.net/pub_pages/HE_111110