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PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE

September 29, 2011 Issue 247-15-20

Special Features

Nebraska's Crops Still Looking Good

Threads Across Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Fall Irrigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 Pork Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Weather Al Dutcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Country Living House Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Lighter Side Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Markets Grains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Government Report Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Ag Management “I Think I’m Going to Have a Tax Problem This Year”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Livestock News Heartland Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Production News Prepare Bins and Equipment Before Harvest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-23

By Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent Harvest is beginning on some area soybean fields, but corn maturity is still behind the fiveyear average, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In its weekly weather and crop report, the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field office, reported that for the week ending Sunday, the state's corn crop was rated 76 percent good or excellent, which is among the best in the nation. The five-year average is 75 percent good or excellent. Last year's corn crop, at the end of September, was rated 81 percent good or excellent. According to the USDA report, the state's irrigated corn was rated 79 percent good or excellent,

while dryland corn was rated 69 percent good or excellent. Nationwide, among the 18 major corn-growing states, the corn crop was rated 52 percent good or excellent. Because of weather delays in planting last spring, Nebraska's corn crop was rated 52 percent mature, compared to 74 percent last year and 57 percent for the five-year average. Six percent of the state's corn has been harvested, equal to the five-year average. The state's soybean crop was rated 79 percent good or excellent, compared to 53 percent for the nation's 18 top soybean-growing states. While soybean harvest is just getting under way, statewide the percentage of soybeans dropping leaves was rated at 47

For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com

percent, well behind last year's 76 percent and the five-year average of 67 percent. Nebraska's sorghum crop was rated 77 percent good or excellent, above last year's 72 percent. Sorghum maturity was rated at 34 percent, slightly below the fiveyear average of 35 percent. The fourth cutting of alfalfa was 82 percent completed, with the crop rated 74 percent good or excellent. Pasture and range condition statewide was rated at 71 percent good or excellent, above the five-year average of 59 percent. With the corn and soybean crop slow to mature this year, the National Weather Service said the late-September through midOctober time period typically

Ethanol Worth Billions to NE Economy

Continued on page 16

Continued on page 19

By Lori Potter, The Kearney Hub KEARNEY - Nebraska's ethanol industry has $5.56 billion of direct benefits to the state economy and nearly $5.9 billion worth of total impacts, according to Nebraska Public Power District Economist Kenneth Lemke. His report Friday at the Nebraska Ethanol Board meeting in Kearney also shows that the 25 ethanol plants provide 1,322 direct manufacturing jobs, with a total of 7,703 on-site and indirect jobs.

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 9/16/11

Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$97.68 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .124.00 Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113.35 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . .158.15 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80.30 Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . .* Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . .91.34 Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .139.00 Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .327.61

114.08

116.80

151.84 150.26 138.17 137.46 185.05 184.27 98.09 88.62 * * 107.24 95.09 178.75 183.50 410.93 404.92

Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.95 Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.59 Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.49 Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . . .8.13 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .3.26

7.34 7.29 13.75 12.34 3.71

6.71 6.82 13.09 11.20 3.60

185.00 117.50 85.00 196.50 67.75

185.00 117.50 92.50 204.50 75.00

Hay (per ton) Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . . .152.50 Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . . .72.50 Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . . . .* Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124.00 Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41.50 * No market.


Page 2

Heartland Express - Weather

September 29, 2011

Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Al Dutcher Report This past two weeks has been dominated by dry weather with the only moisture recorded occurring during the 9/17-9/19 period. Even then, moisture was limited to southeast and western sections of the state. The upper air ridge responsible for the dry weather is expected to hold on for Allen Dutcher much of the first half of this forecast period before shifting to a wetter and cooler pattern during the latter part of this forecast. Although this could delay harvest activities temporarily, the moisture is desperately needed to reduce an ever increasing fire danger. Even with the expected cool down, there are currently no frost/freeze indications by the models during the next two weeks.

Farm and Ranch Publishers - Central Nebraska Publications General Manager - Marc Currie Sales Assistant/Circulation LeAnne Killion

Sales Representatives Dana Gieber • Chelsie Shaw • Tim Lingg Todd Smith • Lesli Goodsell • Darlene Overleese Production - Chris Frazer

Web Development - news@agnet.net Important Notice: The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertising herein, and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertisers and not the publishers. The publisher is not liable to any advertiser herein for any misprints in advertising not the fault of the publisher, and in such an event the limit of the publisher’s liability shall be the amount of the publisher’s charge for such advertising. In the event of misprints, the publisher must be informed prior to the printing of the next publication

Published by: Central Nebraska Publications, Inc. 21 W. 21st Street, Ste. 010 • P.O. Box 415 Kearney, NE 68847 • 1-800-658-3191 • Copyright © 2011 Front cover mast head background photo courtesy of OWH, Jeff Beiermann

Week One Forecast, 10/1 - 10/7: The upper air ridge responsible for the recent stretch of dry weather is expected to slowly move eastward during this forecast period as an upper air trough begins to build into the region by 10/6. Therefore, dry conditions will prevail from 10/1-10/5 for the entire state, with above normal highs expected. The western U.S. upper air trough will begin to move eastward on 10/6 and models indicate that scattered showers should develop across western Nebraska during the latter half of 10/6. The upper air trough and associated surface low is projected to cross the state on 10/7 and bring the first widespread rain event in over 3 weeks to the entire state. If the models are correct, most areas should receive 0.25-0.50 inches of moisture, with localized heavier totals if thunderstorms materialize. High Temperatures: 10/1 (70 NE - 83 SW), 10/2 (80 E - 86 W), 10/3 (80 NE - 86 SW), 10/4-10/5 (76 NE - 83 W), 10/6 (70 NW - 76 SE), 10/7 (63 NW - 74 SE).

Week Two Forecast, 10/8 - 10/14: Dry weather is projected by the weather models for the 10/8-10/9 period as the upper air trough responsible for precipitation during the 10/6-10/7 period shifts toward the Great Lakes. Another upper air trough is then projected to move into the central Plains and cutoff from the upper air flow. If the models have correctly portrayed this feature, the cutoff low will remain over the central Plains from 10/10-10/13 and develop widespread light to moderate rain across the state. With the extensive cloud cover indicated by the models, a persistent period of cool and damp weather will develop. The upper air low is then projected to move east of the region on 10/14 and dry weather will return to the state.. High Temperatures: 10/8 (58 N - 63 S), 10/9 (64 NE - 71 SW), 10/10 (58 W 64 SE), 10/11-10/12 (52-58 statewide), 10/13 (54 NE -65 SW), 10/14 (62 NW - 68 SW).

Nebraska Weather and Crop Report Agricultural Summary: For the week ending September 25, 2011, dry weather allowed for harvesting to pick up momentum, but progress was limited due to high grain moisture levels, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Frost was recorded in portions of Nebraska, however, a statewide hard freeze has yet to occur. Harvest of corn silage, high moisture corn, and seed corn were winding down. Dry bean harvest was near the halfway point and sugarbeet harvest has begun in the west. About one quarter of the winter wheat crop has emerged. Weather Summary: Temperatures for the week averaged 4 to 8 degrees below normal for the eastern half of the state and from near normal to 4 degrees below normal for the western half. Highs were in the 80’s and lows were in the 30’s. Very little rain fell during the week. The South East District had the highest accumulation of near one tenth of an inch of precipitation. The rest of the state was mostly dry. Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 2 percent very poor, 5 poor, 17 fair, 55 good, and 21 excellent, below 81 percent good to excellent last year but near 75 average. Irrigated corn conditions rated 79 percent good to excellent and dryland corn rated 69. Corn mature was 52 percent, well behind 74 last year and 57 average. Corn harvest was at 6 percent, behind 9 last year but equal to average. Soybean condition rated 1 percent very poor, 3 poor, 17 fair, 57 good, and 22 excellent, above 76 percent good to excellent last year and 74 average. Soybeans turning color was 92 percent, behind 94 last year and average. Soybeans dropping leaves

was 47 percent, well behind 76 last year and 67 average. Soybean harvest was just underway. Winter Wheat seeded was 66 percent, equal to last year but ahead of 63 average. Wheat emerged was 27 percent, ahead of 22 last year and near 26 average. Proso Millet harvest was 37 percent, behind 59 last year and 49 average. Sorghum conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 3 poor, 19 fair, 58 good, and 19 excellent, above last year’s good to excellent rating of 72 percent and average. Sorghum turning color was 95 percent, equal to last year but ahead of 93 average. Sorghum mature was 34 percent, behind 41 last year and near 35 average. Sorghum harvested was 2 percent, equal to last year and average. Dry Beans condition rated 3 percent very poor, 13 poor, 22 fair, 50 good, and 12 excellent, below 66 percent good to excellent last year. Dry beans turning color was 97 percent, behind 100 percent last year but equal to average. Dry beans dropping leaves were 91 percent, near last year’s 90 but ahead of 81 average. Dry beans harvest was 49 percent, well behind 76 last year but near 50 average. Alfalfa rated 0 percent very poor, 3 poor, 23 fair, 63 good, and 11 excellent, below 78 percent good to excellent last year. The fourth cutting of alfalfa was at 82 percent, ahead of 75 last year and 68 average. Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 6 poor, 22 fair, 61 good, and 10 excellent, below last year’s 83 percent good to excellent but above 59 average.


September 29, 2011

Heartland Express - Country Living

Learning at Play Susan Hansen, Extension Educator UNL Extension in Colfax County Pre-school children spend a large part of their day at play. What are sometimes looked at as all fun and games are actually learning experiences. A child’s work is his/her play. There is more happening than just a game or a paint brush moving across paper. Painting on paper helps develop creativity and imagination. A child learns the names of colors and how colors combine to make new colors. Holding and moving a paint brush helps develop coordination that will later be used when writing. Children often make up stories about things that they have painted; this helps in language development. Art projects of any type help a child learn design principles - texture, line, balance, proportion. Eye-hand coordination is also developed through cutting, gluing and taping. The sand box offers many learning experiences. Developing creativity and imagination by making shapes and figures is one of these experiences. Pouring sand or moving sand sets the

stage for basic math concepts of addition and subtraction. In other words, adding sand to one pile and taking away from another pile helps begin math learning. Sand can also help soothe a child (and an adult). Running hands through the sand can relieve tension and stress. Games such as puzzles, blocks and snap-apart toys help develop coordination between the eyes and the hands as well as learning about size, color and shapes. Puzzles are good at developing skills of deduction - which of the pieces definitely won’t fit together and why; which of the pieces may fit together and why. Playing house helps develop social skills and an understanding of the world around them. The make-believe situations and roles help develop skills in language, creativity and imagination. Playing in the yard offers great opportunities to learn about the environment - plants, insects, animals, weather. Curiosity runs wild. Curiosity is essential in the world of science. Reading a book, looking at pictures, or being read to can increase language skills. Next time you see a child playing, remember that learning is also taking place.

Conservation of Textile Items Susan Hansen, Extension Educator, Colfax County Textile heirlooms and keepsakes require special care to preserve them for future use. Conserving textile keepsakes and heirlooms involves an understanding of light, temperature, humidity, insects, storage, display and cleaning. Any type of light can cause fading. Low light levels or darkness are recommended for textile storage and display areas. Ultraviolet rays from sunlight and flourescent lights can damage fibers and cause fading. Moist air, warmth and lack of air circulation encourage growth of mold which can stain fibers and cause deterioration. Textiles should be inspected regularly for mildew. A relative humidity of around 50 percent and temperatures of 60 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit are generally the best for most textile items. Avoid storing textile items in basements or attics where there can be extreme fluctuations of humidity and temperature levels. Moth crystals with paradichlorobenzene (PDB) will aid in controlling insects. PDB is toxic so take caution when using the moth crystals. Read the product label for correct use information. Insecticides such as PDB can react with the textiles to cause color change. Avoid placing the moth crystals directly on the textile fabric. Cedar chests and closets may deter moths but do not kill moths at all stages of their development. Cedar has no effect on carpet beetles. What is best to store textile items in? The best is acid-free boxes and acid-free tissue paper. However, those items can be expensive and cost can add up if you have several items. Washed, unbleached cotton muslin can be used to protect the textiles and to line boxes or containers. Wash the muslin yearly to retain its neutral state.

Ordinary cardboard, metal and wooden boxes contain acid that can migrate from the container to the textile item. Using the unbleached muslin or acid-free tissue can reduce that acid migration and better protect the textile item. Plastics should not be used for storage as they may not allow air circulation. Moisture that is trapped inside tightly sealed plastic covers can result in mildew. Plastics also attract dust because of the static electricity generated. Textile items should be stored flat if possible. Have as few folds as possible if flat storage is not possible. Refold items occasionally to distribute the wear. Textile items can also be loosely rolled onto acid-free cardboard tubes. Fragile items should not be hung. If items are sturdy enough to be hung, pad the hanger with polyester fiberfill and then add the garment. Cover stored textiles with acid free tissue or washed unbleached muslin, not plastic bags. Clean old textiles only if the process will not affect the color, shape or strength of the fabric. Color loss, bleeding, shrinkage and distortion can result. Do not wash old textiles in the washing machine as your textile item will literally fall apart in most cases due to the agitation. Correctly cleaning can protect the fabric by removing materials such as food or grease. These materials attract insect pests. The correct cleaning procedure varies with the type of fabric and the type of stain. Hand washing in mild detergent may be used in some cases; others may require spot cleaning rather than the whole item. Dry cleaning is appropriate for some textile items but not all. Discuss with your dry cleaner the options available. One final thing to do with your textile heirloom is to take a photograph of the item and write down the history of the heirloom. Each heirloom usually has a history.

Page 3

Charming Country Exterior

Plan #HMAFAPW01306 Charming Country Exterior Visit www.houseoftheweek.com

This lovely home has plenty of country flavor with a wraparound porch, bay window, and a sideentry garage that preserves curb appeal. The harmonious exterior is joined by an elegant, versatile interior. Formal living and dining rooms sit to the right, full of elegance with bay windows, a fireplace, and graceful columns. The casual family area occupies the back with one large, open area designed for togetherness and relaxation. The gourmet kitchen features a large work island and a breakfast area with its own bay window. A fireplace warms the family room, which opens to the rear porch through French doors. Second-floor sleeping quarters include the master suite with a soaker tub, separate shower, and a walk-in closet. Two additional bedrooms use the full hall bath. Nearby, a huge bonus room with skylights adds flexible space that can become almost anything: a home office, playroom, or art studio are possibilites.

Detailed Specifications

House Style Country Farmhouse Victorian Victorian Eclectic. Kitchen Extras Country / Family Foundation Type Crawlspace Unfinished Basement Fireplace Key Information 1,924 Square Feet Beds: 3 Baths: 2 ½ Stories: 2 Garage Bays: 2 Width:53' Depth:44' Room Summary Formal Dining Room Formal Living Room Master / Main Suite Special Features Corner Lot / Side-Load Garage Family Room Porch - Front, Rear & Wraparound Main Level

Fall Fertilizing/Mowing Height Noel Mues, Extension Educator, Furnas County University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Fertilizer recommendations for cool season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue include an application to be made during the fall. Now thru early November is an excellent time. In late October, weather conditions favor the application of nutrients for carbohydrate storage and root growth. Nitrogen applied in late fall stimulates some top-growth, but not the extent that occurs in the spring. As top-growth slows, carbohydrates produced are stored in the crown, or used in production of roots and rhizomes. The late October/early November fertilizer application is crucial. If one were to fertilize only once each year, this would be the time to do it. Generally, late season applications do not eliminate the need for fertilizer at other times, but do allow the homeowner to use lighter rates in the spring. Lighter applications in the spring will reduce the incidence of foliar diseases, including leaf spot. The late season application improves fall and winter color retention, stress tolerance, root growth and spring green-up. Take time now to apply a “winterizer”, or fertilizer with a significant component of slow release nitrogen and phosphorus. The analysis of a typical product would be 18-25-0. Apply fertilizer at a rate of 1.5-2.0 pounds of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet. Do not apply fertilizer after the turf has become mostly brown or the soil is frozen. Under these conditions, significant amounts of

nutrients can be lost due to surface runoff or leaching. Keep mowing and don’t set the mower down – Many people ask how long to continue mowing into the fall. The answer is to keep mowing as long as the grass continues to grow, which is normally into late October or early November. Frequency of mowing can decrease, but continue to mow regularly into the fall. Avoid the urge to set the mower down and scalp your lawn for the final mowing. In years past, publications have recommended mowing low late in the fall. About the only advantage to this is that the tree leaves will blow from your lawn into the neighbor's lawn. Agronomically, mowing your lawn low in the last mowing should be avoided because photosynthesis is occurring deep into the fall, well beyond your last mowing. The higher the photosynthesis, the more energy a grass plant will store for winter and next spring, and the healthier the lawn will be next year. Mowing off too much leaf area reduces photosynthetic capacity of a plant, reducing energy storage, and decreasing turf performance next summer. Regular mowing into the fall is also helpful to mulch tree leaves into the lawn, which research has shown to be beneficial http://turf.unl.edu/pdfctarticles/Octmulchtreelea ves.pdf. Continue mowing at your regular height until the grass stops growing in the late fall, since un-mowed tall grass can encourage snow mold in rare years.

Upper Level

A downloadable study plan of this house, including general information on building costs and financing, is available at www.houseoftheweek .com. To receive the study plan for this home, order by phone, online, or by mail. By phone: Call (866) 772-1013. Reference plan #HMAFAPW01306. Online: Go to www.house oftheweek.com.


Page 4

Heartland Express - The Lighter Side

September 29, 2011

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts • The Last Laugh (Best Of) by Lee Pitts

The cattleman sitting in one of the padded seats at the Arkansas auction was ragged out in some fancy doodads. He looked like a walking-talking Shepler's mail order catalog with his 100% pressed cotton shirt and boots so fine you could see the wrinkles in his socks. Mr. B was the kind of fellow very much appreciated at auction markets: a man with enough money that everybody in the place called him "Mister." The day of my visit a special replacement cow sale was taking place and the cows came into the auction ring one at a time. (This is one of the big differences with the way cattle are sold in the South versus the West). Mr. B bid with the confidence of an order buyer spending other people's money. When the first cow came into the ring Mr. B bid with a barely noticeable nod of his head but, much to everyone's surprise, a newcomer to the auction had the audacity to bid against Mr. B. No one had ever seen the stranger at the auction before. "He must be from Texas," Mr. B mumbled. With a much louder voice he announced to his small crowd of admirers, "No foreigner from Texas is going to come to Arkansas and buy all the cows away from me!"

Much to the pleasure of the auctioneer, and the consignors, every cow became a bidding battle between Mr. B and the sun weathered stranger. Mr. B would bid and the foreigner would raise it. But Mr. B simply would not let the stranger buy a cow. The bidding was so fast and furious that the auctioneer could barely keep up. It was like a game of checkers on steroids with each man taking his rapid turn. I’d seen this game played many times before at auctions all over the country but usually it was played by order buyers who would team up to not let a newcomer buy any cattle. It was a way of freezing out any new competition in the future and, surprisingly, the tactic usually worked. Between keeping track of his purchases and bidding, Mr. B barely had time to look in the ring at the quality of the merchandise he was buying. Mr. B glared deadly daggers at the stranger every time he’d bid and in the process of freezing out the outsider Mr. B bought an interesting assortment of cows. There were cows in his pen so poor even their shadows had holes in them. Others were burnt till they looked like a brand book. Mr. B bought an assortment of brush snakes, buttermilk cows, horned jackrabbits and mealy nosed, twisty horned crossbreds in every description and

every stage of pregnancy. If the stranger showed even the slightest interest in an animal Mr. B bought the beast away from him. Mr. B said to no one in particular, “This guy must own half of Texas by the way he’d bidding. I bet he’s got a hundred oil wells on his property too.” The only time the price dropped and Mr. B could take a break from his bidding was when the stranger went to the crumb castle to fetch a snack. Well into the evening the last cow was sold. Mr. B was trying to keep a lid on his can of cuss words as he tallied his purchases. In the final analysis he had bought a few more cattle than he’d intended. Five loads more in fact! But at least he had not let the well-to-do stranger buy any cattle. He’d bet they’d never see him around these parts ever again. As he was leaving Mr. B. saw the stranger get in his pickup, a small Toyota with wooden racks and many miles on it. "Where you from stranger?" Mr. B asked. "You from Texas?" "No, I'm from right here in Conway. I have a little half acre out behind the house and just needed something to mow the grass. You sure could have saved yourself a lot of money today," laughed the stranger. "I only needed one cow."

www.myfarmandranch.com • www.myfarmandranch.com Features In Upcoming Issues:

Nebraska’s Statewide Ag News Publication

Featured Sections In Every Issue: • Ag Management • Classified Advertising • Country News

• • • •

The Lighter Side Livestock News Production News Schedule of Events

• Weather • Weekly Ag-Market Breakdown

Every Issue Features Available News From These Sources: • AccuWeather Forecasting • Ak-Sar-Ben • Associated Press • Commodities

• Department of Ag • Institute on Agriculture & Natural Resources • Nebraska 4-H

• News from All Heartland Coverage Areas • UNL Cooperative Extension • USDA The Only Publication That Features Statewide FFA Chapter News on a Regular Basis!

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• Gateway Farm Expo • McCook Farm Expo • FFA District 3, 7 & 10 • FFA District 2, 8 & 12 • Soybean/Sorghum Results • Parts & Service • Farm Power Show • FFA District 1 & 9 • FFA District 5 & 6 • Corn Results • Tax Prep • Home Shows

Farm & Ranch . . . Where Agriculture Is Always A Business 47559


September 29, 2011

Heartland Express

Pork Recipes

Roasted Ham Saltimbocca 6 to 8 lbs fully cooked bone-in ham, trimmed 1/4 cup fresh sage leaves, chopped, divided Pepper 4 thin slices prosciutto 1 cup chicken broth 1 cup dry white wine or chicken broth 4 tablespoons unsalted butter 3 tablespoons flour, dissolved in 1/3 cup cold water Salt Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Position rack in lower third of oven. Place ham flat side down in a large shallow roasting pan and score a diamond pattern about 1/8-inch deep into any fat. Sprinkle all over with 2 tablespoons sage and season with pepper. Bake until internal temperature reaches 140 degrees F, 15 to 18 minutes per pound total cooking time. After the first hour, baste with pan juices about every 15 minutes. Remove ham from the oven, transfer to a cutting board, and let rest 15 to 30 minutes. While ham is resting, increase oven to 400 degrees F. Arrange prosciutto on a baking sheet and bake until crisped, about 10 minutes. Set aside to cool. Also drain the roasting pan, discarding liquid. Place the pan on the stovetop over medium-high heat. Add broth and wine, bring to a boil, and cook, scraping up any browned bits in the pan, until liquid is reduced to 1 1/2 cups, about 4 minutes depending on the size of the pan. Reduce to a simmer and add butter and remaining 2 tablespoons sage, stirring until butter melts. Whisk in flour mixture and cook, whisking, until sauce thickens, 30 to 60 seconds. Remove from the heat. Season with salt and pepper. Carve ham and arrange on plates or a platter. Crumble prosciutto on top. Serve sauce on the side.

Braised Pork Medallions with Apples 1 pork tenderloin, sliced into 8 pieces 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 1 teaspoon vegetable oil 1 small onion, chopped 1 large apple, cored and coarsely chopped 1/2 cup apple cider Season medallions on both sides with pepper and pumpkin pie spice. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat; brown pork on both sides, remove from pan and reserve. Add onion and apples to skillet, saute until soft. Add apple cider to skillet, heat to a simmer. Return pork medallions to pan, cover and simmer for 5 minutes.

Cheesy Ham and Macaroni 1 1.8-oz package white sauce mix* 2 cups milk 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated 1/2 cup American cheese, cubed 1/8 teaspoon ground pepper 7 ounces macaroni, cooked 1 1/2 cup ham, fully-cooked 1 cup frozen green peas Thaw the frozen peas. In a large saucepan stir together white sauce mix and milk. Following package directions, cook until thickened. Stir in cheese and pepper. Add macaroni, ham and peas and cook, stirring until heated through. Serve hot. *If you want to make a white sauce from scratch, melt 3 tablespoons butter in a saucepan. Stir in 1/4 cup flour and cook until mixture bubbles. Stir in 2 cups milk and cook, stirring until thickened.

Bacon-W Wrapped Pork Chops 4 6-7-ounce 1 1/4” boneless pork loin chops 4 slices Bacon, thick-cut Garlic-Mustard Butter Dry the chops with paper towels and season generously with salt and pepper. Wrap a strip of bacon around each one, securing with a toothpick. Broil 4 inches from heat source, 6-7 minutes. Turn and continue broiling to desired doneness, approximately 5-6 minutes until internal temperature on a thermometer reads 145 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a 3-minute rest time. Serve with Garlic-Mustard Butter on top.

Page 5

Italian-S Stuffed Pork Tenderloin 2 Pork Tenderloins, about 1 pound each 2 tablespoons butter 1 8-oz carton fresh mushrooms, chopped 1/2 cup green onions, sliced 1 6-oz package long-grain and wild rice mix, cooked and cooled 1 cup pecans, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped 2 teaspoons dried Italian seasoning 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 10-oz container Alfredo sauce, refrigerated 3 tablespoons Chardonnay, or other dry white wine

Garlic-Mustard Butter 1/4 cup butter, (1/2 stick), softened to room temperature 2 teaspoons dijon mustard 1 clove garlic , minced In a small bowl, stir together ingredients until well mixed. Wrap in waxed paper to shape like a stick of butter. Chill

Bavarian Chops 4 boneless 1/2” pork loin chops 2 tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon butter 1/2 cup green onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic , minced 8 ounces mushrooms, sliced 1/2 teaspoon thyme 8 ounces beer , room temperature salt black pepper, freshly ground Butter noodles fresh parsley Lightly flour chops. Melt butter in nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until foaming. Brown chops 1-2 minuters per side. Remove, reserve. Add green onion, garlic, mushrooms and thyme; saute for 2-3 minutes, until onion is soft. Return chops to skillet, add beer; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 6-7 minutes until internal temperature on a thermometer reads 145 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a 3-minute rest time. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with buttered noodles, garnished with parsley.

Wild Rice and Pork Soup 2 boneless pork chops, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 1 teaspoon oil 1/2 cup onions, chopped 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1 cup wild rice, cooked 1 15 1/2-oz can Great Northern beans, drained 1 15 1/2-oz can chick peas, drained 1 4-oz can diced green chiles, drained 1/8 teaspoon hot pepper sauce 1 14 1/2-oz can chicken broth parsley , chopped In 4-quart saucepan sauté onions and pork in oil over medium-high heat until onions are soft and pork lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Stir in all remaining ingredients except parsley; bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer 20 minutes. Serve garnished with parsley.

Heat oven to 425 degrees F. Cut lengthwise slit in each pork tenderloin, cutting to but not through the other side. Set pork aside. Melt butter in large saucepan over medium heat. Add mushrooms and green onions; cook until tender. Remove from heat. Stir in cooked long grain and wild rice mix, pecans and parsley. Set aside 3/4 cup of the rice mixture. Spoon remaining rice mixture into 1 1/2quart casserole; cover and set aside. Divide 3/4 cup rice mixture between slits in pork tenderloins, spreading evenly in slits. Close slits; secure with toothpicks. Stir together Italian seasoning and salt in small bowl. Sprinkle evenly over top of pork tenderloins. Place pork tenderloins on rack in shallow roasting pan. Roast tenderloins, uncovered, for 25-27 minutes until internal temperature is 145 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a 5-minute rest time. Bake casserole of rice mixture alongside tenderloins. Meanwhile, for sauce, combine Alfredo sauce and Chardonnay in medium saucepan. Cook and stir over low heat until bubbly. To serve, spoon rice mixture onto serving platter. Remove toothpicks from tenderloins. Cut pork tenderloins into 1-inch-thick pieces; arrange on rice mixture on platter. Serve sauce with pork and rice mixture.

Saucy Pizza Pockets 1/3 pound Ground Pork 1/4 teaspoon garlic salt 3/4 cup pizza sauce 1 16.3-oz package refrigerated biscuits 2/3 cup mozzarella or pizza blend cheese 16 slices pepperoni, Canadian-style bacon Heat oven to 425 degrees F. Place ground pork and garlic salt in large skillet over medium-high heat; cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until pork is no longer pink. Stir in pizza sauce and cook, stirring, until heated through. Spray a large baking sheet with cooking spray. Flatten each biscuit into a 4-inch circle. Spoon 1 tablespoon of meat sauce onto one side of the biscuit. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of cheese and top with 2 slices of pepperoni or Canadian bacon. Fold dough over the filling, forming a half-moon shape. Pinch edges to seal well. Place on the prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle with additional cheese if desired. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden brown. Recipes source: www.porkbeinspired.com


Page 6

Heartland Express - Government

September 29, 2011

Get to Know the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality By Governor Dave Heineman Lincoln Office/State Capitol P.O. Box 94848 Lincoln, NE 68509-4848 Phone: 402-471-2244 Fax: 402-471-6031

The primary role of the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) is to help ensure that our state’s natural resources are protected from contamination. Nebraskans can take pride in the high quality of Nebraska’s air, land and water. Under the direction of Mike Linder, the 215 employees of NDEQ work with businesses, communities and individuals toward the common goal of protecting the environment. NDEQ’s permitting; compliance, remediation, monitoring, and assistance programs are designed to help achieve this goal. NDEQ’s permitting programs establish specific limits on the types of pollutants that can be emitted into the air or discharged into water. Emission limits in air quality permits help ensure that Nebraska’s outdoor air complies with all health standards. The agency also enforces rules to ensure wastewater is being properly treated, and that a variety of

Western Office 4500 Avenue I • P.O. Box 1500 Scottsbluff, NE 69363-1500 Phone: 308-632-1370 Fax: 308-632-1313

types of wastes are being managed, treated and disposed of properly. These activities are designed to help protect our streams and lakes as well as the state’s groundwater. If contamination occurs, NDEQ’s remediation programs make sure that proper investigation and cleanup procedures are followed so that contamination is removed and public health and the environment are protected. The monitoring programs measure the quality of Nebraska’s rivers, lakes, groundwater and outdoor air across the state. This information helps to establish whether there are areas within the state that have particular environmental challenges. In addition to making sure environmental laws are followed, NDEQ also provides technical and financial assistance to communities, businesses and individuals. Financial assistance is provided to recycling and waste reduction efforts, lake restoration and other water

quality projects, and projects to update or replace wastewater treatment facilities. All of us can be a part of these efforts to protect Nebraska’s natural resources. At the local level, we can become involved in recycling and waste reduction efforts. We can look for more efficient ways to use energy - in fact, making new cans with recycled aluminum uses up to 95% less energy. Likewise, recycling paper helps protect our environment. Each ton of paper recycled prevents 60 pounds of air pollution, and saves 17 trees and 7,000 gallons of water. Pitch in on litter cleanup efforts in your community. Become involved in local improvement projects, such as community lake restoration projects and park improvement efforts. For more information about NDEQ, visit their web site at www.deq.state.ne.us.

Every “Little Bit” Counts When Cutting the Budget by Senator Ben Nelson Omaha Office 7502 Pacific St.,Suite 205 Omaha, NE 68114 Phone: (402) 391-3411 Fax: (402) 391-4725

Two hundred million dollars is a lot of money. Two hundred million dollars is the amount I recently helped cut from a major budget. It totals a 5.2 percent reduction in spending from that budget and is an effort to lead by example, so Washington can return to fiscal sanity. Admittedly, it’s not a lot when compared to 14 trillion dollars, which is the size of the national debt, but wouldn’t it be nice if every branch of the federal government would cut two hundred million from its budget? Even cutting just a “little bit” like that, pretty soon, you could balance the budget. To use a variation of a popular phrase coined by the late Senator Everett Dirksen years ago, “200 million here and 200 million there, and pretty soon you’re talking real money.” Cutting Senate and House Budgets As most Nebraskans know from all the years I served as Governor and Senator, I’m a fiscal conservative with a history of cutting budgets and I have taken that philosophy to the Senate. I am Chairman of the Senate Appropriation Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch. That

Lincoln Office Federal Building, Room 287 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Phone: (402) 441-4600 Fax: (402) 476-8753

subcommittee has control over the budgets of such things as the Library of Congress, Capitol Police, Congressional Budget Office, Government Accountability Office, Capitol Visitors Center and the office budgets of members of the Senate and the House. I have a bully pulpit when it comes to these budgets that are under our control. So, I’ve crafted a bipartisan bill that cuts spending by 5.2 percent below this year ’s spending. Furthermore, the Senate bill cuts spending more than the House version. The House bill cuts the 2012 Legislative Branch spending by 5 percent. In the Senate, I’ve worked closely with Senator John Hoeven of North Dakota, the ranking member on our committee, to make strategic, sensible and real cuts. A History of Cuts When I became Legislative Branch Subcommittee chairman several years ago the first thing I did was to hold down spending. The second year I held spending flat; no increase. The third year I cut the Senate’s budget by 5

Washington Office 720 Hart Senate Office Building United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6551 Fax: (202) 228-0012

percent. This year we’re cutting spending by 5.2 percent for all of Congress, which includes senators’ office accounts, including my own office. The cuts we’ve made to the budget that runs from October 1st until the end of September 2012 are real. They amount to several hundred million dollars in less spending. The example we offer can be a model for all of Washington to follow on how to cut spending across the federal government. What if everyone cut their budgets by 5.2 percent? Lead By Example This effort builds on my sense of the Senate resolution that the Senate overwhelmingly approved last March to lead by example and cut its own budget by 5 percent. My hope is that this will serve as a clear example of how Washington can get off its spending binge and get onto its much-needed diet. If we all do our part, even if it seems small in the big picture, we can reduce the deficit and balance the budget, which will strengthen the economy and create jobs.

Three Bills to Halt Over-Regulation by Senator Mike Johanns Kearney Office: 4111 Fourth Avenue, Suite 26 Kearney, NE 68845 Tel: (308) 236-7602 Fax: (308) 236-7473

Lincoln Office: 294 Federal Building 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Tel: (402) 476-1400 Fax: (402) 476-0605

Lifting federal regulations that smother job creators and stifle economic growth remains a top priority. I introduced three bills earlier this month to help temper the current Administration's quest for regulatory power. This three-fold approach would throw up an immediate roadblock to federal overreach, while confronting situations in which the Administration is evading Congress to pursue its own agenda. The first bill I introduced attacks the problem directly: a two-year moratorium on the growing mountain of proposed regulations that would cost job creators billions. The Obama Administration doesn't dispute the enormous size of this mountain. It has proposed 219 regulations that would cost more than $100 million, 6 of which would cost more than $1 billion each. My bill would halt these and many other regulations dead in their tracks. In some areas where Congress has not granted certain authority to regulatory agencies, the Administration has continued at full speed anyway by issuing "guidance documents." These documents ignore Congress and create uncertainty for our job creators and ag

Scottsbluff Office: 115 Railway Street, Suite C102 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Tel: (308) 632-6032 Fax: (308) 632-6295

producers. The second bill would eliminate this loophole. Like rules required by Congress, agency-initiated guidance documents would be subject to Congressional Review. This would not only rein in aggressive federal overreach, but preserve the balance of powers. My third bill focuses on a specific concern for our farmers and ranchers: the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s effort to regulate farm dust. Anyone who's plowed a field or driven a truck on a gravel road knows farm dust is simply a fact of life. Regardless, EPA is considering plans that would bring down the hammer on American agriculture by severely regulating everyday farm dust – despite there being absolutely no scientific evidence it is harmful. Administrator Lisa Jackson and other EPA officials have been telling farmers differently in recent months. EPA has no plan to increase regulations on farm dust, they say. Yet actions speak louder than words. It's a fact that EPA continues its review of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter, which includes farm dust. In April, a final review proposed cutting the dust standard in

Omaha Office: 9900 Nicholas St., Suite 325 Omaha, NE 68114 Tel: (402) 758-8981 Fax: (402) 758-9165

Washington, D.C. Office 404 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510

half. This would cripple farmers and ranchers' ability to operate, for no clear environmental benefit. To confront this, I signed a letter with nine of my colleagues asking EPA not to regulate farm dust. In response, an EPA official told us the agency is not considering the source of dust. In other words, they don't care where the dust comes from or whether farmers and ranchers can avoid kicking it up – they contend the law forces them to regulate it. My farm dust legislation would make it inescapably clear: EPA must consider the source of dust, and they cannot regulate farm dust without first providing scientific justification and then applying a little common sense. It is Congress' responsibility to rein in the Obama Administration's overreach, and that's exactly what these bills would do. They make sense at a time when agencies are senselessly expanding their grip on federal power. In an uncertain economy, our job creators and producers need certainty, and I will work tirelessly to get these bills passed.


September 29, 2011

Heartland Express - Market

Page 7

By David M. Fiala

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

Country Grain Prices as of 9/27/11 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Scottsbluff Sidney St. Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon

New Corn

$6.34 $6.07 $6.12 $6.19 $6.22 $6.40 $6.26 $6.47 $5.93 $6.34 $6.22 $6.47 $6.12 $6.20 $6.22 $6.16 $6.24 $6.17 $6.07 $6.22 $6.22 $6.09 $6.22 $6.17 $6.27 $6.20 $6.27 $6.20 $6.12 $6.12 $6.22 $6.02 $6.11 $6.07

Beans

$6.11 $5.97

$11.71 $11.67 $11.63 $11.40 $11.78 $11.49 $11.78 $11.63

$6.19 $6.08 $6.15 $6.22 $5.86 $6.11 $6.22 $6.22 $6.10 $6.20 $6.22

New Beans

Wheat

$11.78 $11.67 $11.40 $11.78 $11.49

$6.77

$6.80 $6.30

$6.47

$11.63 $6.78

$11.68 $11.40 $11.68

$11.68 $11.40

$11.53 $11.40 $11.63

$11.53 $11.40

$6.24 $11.48 $11.83 $11.40 $11.45 $11.43 $11.73 $11.78 $11.52

$6.07 $6.22 $6.22

$6.27 $6.10 $6.09 $6.20

$11.73 $11.60

$11.83 $11.40 $11.45

$11.52 $11.73 $11.60

$6.12 $11.68 $11.75 $11.58 $11.58

$6.02 $6.04

671 Northern Above Oil Flowers Above Spring Wheat 30.

New Wheat

$6.73

$42.00 $31.20 $8.27

$11.58

$6.64 $6.72

$5.78

$6.76 $6.17

$6.72 $6.52

$6.77

$6.72

$6.28

$6.37

$7.02 $7.08

$7.02 $6.77

$6.62 $6.47 $7.06

Navy

$5.77

$5.97 $5.67

$5.97 $5.67

Corn Basis

Soybean Basis

Wheat Basis

Sorghum Basis

$5.87

N/A

Soybeans

Wheat

Dec. 10 594 700

Dec. 10 556 629

December 2011 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart

The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

Crop Basis Charts from Reporting Locations as of 9/27/11

$5.77

$6.12 $5.87

to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options.

$7.41

Corn trade has slipped further this week with trade down sharply into Thursday morning. An early week rally gave way to long liquidation from continued economic concerns. The weekly net change is 15 lower on the December Chicago contract so far. The Friday close low is over $1.41 off the summer high printed about 4 weeks ago. The long commodity funds have been big sellers and may go to the sidelines waiting on a bigger correction. They see risk in staying long markets near the historic highs, especially grains around harvest time. The fund liquidation driven by world wide economic concerns have also helped to promote a stronger dollar. Commodity funds are selling gold, silver, and copper, and shifting their holding into dollars and treasury bonds. Supply and demand fundamentals remain supportive; South Korea has been noted as an active corn buyer this week, and processor and export basis bids have firmed, especially in the east. Despite the expected decline in harvested acres, harvest pressure and uncertainty regarding the upcoming Quarterly Stocks have kept market bulls on the defensive. That report is expected to give the trade a better indication of what demand items have been over the last quarter. The market has corrected this week, but market bears expect that recent and current prices have rationed demand, which should lead to a higher stocks number at the end of the month. The weekly crop progress report on Monday listed the crop as 63% mature versus the 65% 5-year average. Harvest was estimated at 15% complete versus the 16% 5-year average. The crop ratings were unchanged at 51% good to excellent. The weekly export sales were within expectations at 787,900 tons. Hedgers call with questions.

Open . . .6.310 High . . .6.342 Low . . . .6.230 Close . . .6.306 Change .-0.000

$5.78

$6.47 $5.98 $6.92 $6.72 $6.47 $6.92 $6.47

Corn

Support: Resistance

New Milo

$6.17

$6.64

$6.40 $6.82 $6.93 $6.77 $6.40 $6.68 $6.30 $6.54 $6.96 $6.66 $6.47

Pinto $45.00 Oil Flowers (new) Spring Wheat(new) $4

Milo

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience

Wheat trade has been mixed this week, with strength in Minneapolis helping to fuel a brief rally, and putting the appearance of a double bottom in some of the charts. Wednesday’s selloff spilled over from the outside markets and took the Chicago and Kansas City contracts back near their recent lows, while Minneapolis was able to hang on to much of the gains since Friday. The weekly net change is 2 lower on the December Chicago contract, KC is down 18, and Minneapolis is up 10. The Chicago December contract has re-established its premium to December corn for the moment. If this is sustained it will begin to crimp the feed wheat demand that emerged this summer with the discounts to corn. Weather items remain supportive with continued dryness in the HRW belt, and Argentina’s wheat growing areas. Conditions are expected to remain dry for the next 710 days, so the trade may remain choppy into the USDA quarterly stocks report at the end of the month. Argentina lowered expectations on its wheat crop 1113 million metric tons, down from last year’s 14.4. The downward chart trend is intact, but there are signs of bottoming in the near term. Long-term support is down at the low of the move at 6.24 Chicago. Spillover direction from the grains and outside markets however, will continue to direct trade. Feed wheat interest was noted from Asia. Winter wheat planting came in at 26%, 9% below the 5 year average, and emergence was at 6%, below the 5 year average at 10%. Exports were within expectations at 428,900 metric tons.

Support: Resistance

Chicago 599 690

K City 695 777

Minneapolis 786 928

December 2011 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .6.384 High . . . .6.474 Low . . . .6.272 Close . . .6.434 Change .+0.046

Soybean trade slid sharply midweek as the outside market driven rally Monday and the first half of Tuesday, shifted into an outside market driven sell-off as widespread selling again arose from macro nervousness. The weekly net change is over 24 lower as of Wednesday closing, November futures were $2.31 below the summer high printed in late August. Meal is around $41 lower on the week and $71 off its highs; bean oil is down 487 points on the week and down nearly 733 points from its high. On the chart, the trade has moved below support at 12.50, and has placed new lows for the year at 12.21.The trend is certainly down and nearby support is down at the 12.00 psychological level. South Korea was active is seeking soybeans this week, and the trade continues to hint at further Chinese interest. Processor and exporter basis bids have firmed as farmer selling has stopped for the moment. Ahead of Friday’s quarterly grain stocks, the trade continues to debate how much high prices have slowed demand this summer with many looking for higher than expected stocks. On the weekly report, good to excellent ratings were unchanged at 53% good to excellent as the growing season winds down. The crop progress report had 58% of the crop is now dropping leaves versus the 68% 5-year average. Initial harvest progress was seen at 5% below the 5 year average of 11%. The weekly export sales exceeded forecasts coming in at 1.0335 million metric tons. Soymeal exports were towards the high side of expectations at 125,000 metric tons. Soy Oil export sales were within expectations at 4.500 metric tons for the 2011/12 marketing year. If Friday’s report leaves a solid bottom, there should be an opportunity for hedgers to cover early sales with calls in the near term.

Support: Resistance

Nov. 1157 1353

Dec. Meal 302 353

Dec. Oil 4840 5696

November 2011 Soybeans (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .12.226 High . . .12.244 Low . . .12.092 Close . .12.180 Change .-0.054


Page 8

Heartland Express - Threads Across Nebraska

September 29, 2011

Stars Over the Prairie

October 7 & 8, 2011

Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Buffalo County Fairgrounds, Expo Building 3807 Avenue N • Kearney, NE

• 32 Vendors from NE, KS, SD, CO, ID, IA & WY • Over 100 Quilts • 4 Presentations by Jenny Raymond • Jenny Raymond textile display • NSQG & other raffle quilts • Quilts of Valor display • Quilt appraisals on Saturday • Door prizes

Pattern Designed by

Diane Volk Harris • Quilt Classes • Lectures • • Programs • dhstitches@gmail.com • 402-705-3107

6101 South 56th St., Ste. 6,

Think Pink CeleBRAtion

Lincoln, NE 68516

Plum Creek Quilt Guild, Lexington NE

402-420-9292 866-422-9292 www.quiltedkitty.com 46411

• Fabric • Kits • Notions • Quilts • Gifts • Collectibles • Candles

Store Hours Tu-Fri 10 - 5:00 PM; Sat 10 - 4 Mondays by Appointment Phone/Fax: 308-697-4000 www.cottageinspirations.com

710 Nasby St. Cambridge, NE 69022 46407

When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer, her life suddenly changes forever and she will be faced with the trying challenges of treatment and recovery. To show support for these women and raise awareness of breast cancer, Plum Creek Quilters Guild and Lexington Regional Heath Center have teamed up to present THINK PINK. THINK PINK is a unique celebration featuring one-of-a-kind bras created by members of the quilt guild. The evening program will feature, Dr. Maria deVilla, an oncologist, who will present an update on breast cancer. The THINK PINK event will be held at the Holiday Inn Express, in Lexington on

Thursday, October 13, 2011. Doors will open at 6:30 with a free-will donation entry fee. The program will begin at 7:00 with a style show of bras to follow. The “art bras” will be modeled by cancer survivors, then auctioned off so you can take your favorite one home AND support breast cancer research. Proceeds of the evening will go to the Eppley Cancer Center in Omaha. Throughout the evening, the Plum Creek Quilt Guild members will be selling handmade creations at THE THINK PINK BOUTIQUE. Come early to view the “art bras”, enjoy the smacks, shop for unique items and to sign up for the door prizes. This will be an exciting and fun-filled evening. We’ll see you there!! Think Pink co-chairmen: Jan Hibbs 308-7852652 and Kathy Beck 308-325-1174

Prairie Point Junction Quilt Shop

Country Fabrics & Crafts

Stop by our shop bursting with tons of displays. You’re sure to find inspiration for a quilting project with 2500+ bolt of cotton fabrics, patterns, books original designs, kits, and 90+ colors of wool felt too!

Your Baby Lock Sewing Machine and Serger Dealer

Carol Hammer ~OWNER~

124 East 8th P.O. Box 184 Cozad, NE 69130 • 308-784-2010

148 N. Main • Valentine, NE

prairiepointjunction@yahoo.com • www.prairiepointjunction.com

402-376-3544 • 866-228-6987

Mon - Fri 10:00 - 5:00, Sat 10:00 - 4:00 46409

47952

The Quilt Shop • • • • •

Over 3500 bolts of quilting cottons Over 350 bolts of flannels Notions Books and patterns Block of the month

• • • •

Quilt kits Classes Custom machine quilting Custom and ready made quilts

216 North Main • Ainsworth, NE 69210

www.TheQuiltTrail.com

402-382-3282

301 Main, PO Box 88 Wakefield, NE 68784 (402) 287-2325 quilts@huntel.net

Handi Quilter Dealers Loren and Laurel Appleman

www.thenetpages.com/quiltshop/ 46427

46420

Supplies for Quilting Sewing Tatting Knitting Crocheting Embroidery Swedish Weaving Counted Cross Stitch Also AvailableLongarm Quilting Sewing Machine Repair

Find us on FA s on The Quilt Trail FACEBOOK -> In Stitcher Stitchers 46415

46418


September 29, 2011

Heartland Express - Threads Across Nebraska

Page 9

Instructions Designed by Diane Volk Harris Finished block: 6" Overall Size: 49.93 by 58.41

%

Each block takes four foundation sections (lettered B, C, D and E) and an A1 patch that is cut 2" x 2". Patch A1 uses dark fabric. On all of the sections, patch 1 is light and patches 2 and 3 are dark. This makes a great scrap quilt, using one fabric for all the light areas and assorted reds, rusts, oranges and pinks for all the dark areas. Make your quilt larger or smaller by making more or fewer blocks. The borders shown are cut 1.25" wide and 3.5" wide. Make paper copies of the foundations. Foundation piece the sections in numerical order. Join a section to A using a partial seam. Add the remaining sections and then complete the partial seam to complete the block. Join the blocks in diagonal rows to complete the quilt top.

%

&

%

' &

'

& $

'

(

(

CORRECTION

The quilt pattern, Panel Beauty, printed in the September 1 Heartland Express, Fabric list should have been: 2 1/2 yds. background 2 1/4 yds. print 3/4 yds. large focal print

(

Stories of Inspiration Quilt Show Coleridge, NE --- The Laurel-ConcordColeridge Marching Band is going to play in the New Year’s Day Parade and at the Ticket City Bowl in Dallas, Texas. The band is raising funds to get to the Bowl game. An upcoming fundraiser is the Quilt Show – Stories of Inspiration. Come listen to regional artist Diane Gubbels tell her Stories of Inspiration as she displays many of the quilts that she has created. Diane’s quilts are inspired by many life experiences which she says have become the “music in her soul.” Mrs. Gubbels says sharing the “music” is her goal. This wife, mother, and grandmother has been sewing as long as she can remember. The Quilt Show will take place at the Immanuel Lutheran Church in Coleridge,

Nebraska at 1:30 p.m. on October 9, 2011. Band members will be serving desserts and drawing for door prizes during the afternoon of stories. As a special feature tickets will be sale for folks to win two quilts specially designed and created to commemorate the band’s trip. The LCC Bear Band will be the only Nebraska Band to perform at the Ticket City Bowl this coming year. For further information about the Stories of Inspiration or to support the band contact Laura Dendinger at (402) 3690110, Diane Gubbels at (402) 283-4979, or Sharon Kneifl at (402)584-2643 or read more about the projects on the Dollars for Dallas Facebook page.

Quilters Cottage

The

Phyllis Hamaker

2220 Central Ave. • Kearney, NE 68847

308-237-2701 Cell: 308-367-6348

Baby Lock Authorised Dealer Summer Sale is on for all Babylock Machines

www.quilterscottage.net email: quilters.cottage@hotmail.com quilts, classes, kits, fabrics, notions, unique sewing furniture, patterns, books, etc.

46405

A Million Pillowcase Challenge Shop Come See All the New Fabric! 511 Main Plattsmouth, NE 68048

402-296-3360 www.seamstobequilts.com 46412

The Udder Store

CFabrics, alico AnSupplies, nie’s QuClasses ilt Shop

636 Seward St. Seward, Nebraska 68434 402-646-1000

210 Broadway • PO Box 661 • Fullerton, NE 68638

1221 “M” St. Aurora, NE 68818

402-694-6694 picketfence@mainstaycomm.net

www.pfquilts.com

Panel Palozza Oct. 1-31 Visit with Shirley Chaffin Oct. 8, 10-4 Stop by and see what you can create using panels • Baby • Halloween • Christmas panels and more Get ready and finished in time for the holidays

(308) 536-2925 calicoannie@qwestoffice.net Mon-Fri 9:00 to 5:00, Sat 9:00 until noon Anne Wemhoff, Owner www.calicoanniesquiltshop.com

PC Quilter, Hinterburg Frames, Voyager 17, Janome Sewing Machines, Wonderful Fabrics! Notions, Books, Patterns, Classes Owner: Cheryl Trautman

(so local so Seward) Tuesday - Saturday 10 - 5 46291

46359

MON-FRI 10-5 • SAT 10-4

46406

Claus’en Paus Quilt Shop

HOURS: Mon.-Fri: 9:30 - 5:30 Thurs. ‘till 7:00 Sat. 9:30 - 3:00

718 N. Lincoln Ave. York, NE 68467 (402) 362-5737

Quilt Supplies, Fabric, Classes & Custom Quilting

2417 13th Street, Columbus, NE 68601

Mon.-Fri. • 10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sat. • 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Sun. • 1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

402-564-1618

email: clausenpaus@frontiernet.net

www.thequiltbasket-york.com • info@thequiltbasket-york.com 46422

Hours: 10 a.m. - 5:30 pm Monday-Sat. Open ‘till 8 pm on Thursday 46426

46425


Page 10

Heartland Express - Fall Irrigation

September 29, 2011

Irrigation Season Ends, Cautious Water Management Continues By Sandra Hansen, The Scottsbluff Star-Herald Managing the North Platte River during the past 12 months has kept officials along the main water artery of southeastern Wyoming and western Nebraska on high alert. Larger than normal releases were passed down the river last winter and early spring, disrupting farming and everyday life. A look at the Sept. 1 water supply and utilization report from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation office in Mills, Wyo., reveals the extent of the water supply that harassed producers throughout the summer. It gives a good idea of the amount of water that came downstream from the headwaters in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming. Final numbers for Water Year 2011 (October 2010-September 2011) will be available after Oct. 1 Under normal conditions, by September, flows in the North Platte are slowing down and irrigation districts are taking the last of their requirements for the growing season. The reduced flows this year will not be as much as they were in 2010, Serving the agriculture industry for 78 years. Irrigation wells, pumps, motors, geardrives, pump repairs - all makes.

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according to water officials, because they are still managing outflows of the upstream reservoirs for future storage as needed. According to the latest numbers, Seminoe Reservoir, the first on the North Platte in Wyoming, has experienced an inflow of 2,297,700 acre-feet of water during Water Year 2011 (Oct. 1, 2010 through Sept. 30, 2011). Its storage capacity is 1,017,300 acre-feet. It has released 2,203,400 acre-feet as of Aug. 31. The Seminoe total outflow for WY 2011 is 252 percent of the 30-year average, while Pathfinder's is 233 percent of the 30-year average. The other five reservoirs along the river have also had outflows of more than 200 percent of the 30-year average, at more than 2,000,000 acre-feet each. During August, above average outflows occurred at all North Platte reservoirs. Glendo and Guernsey reservoir numbers were considerably ahead of previous years because of a late silt run. Their 30-year averages are 279,900 acre-feet at Glendo, and 292,100 acre-feet at Guernsey. This year Glendo released 458,600 acre-feet, and

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448,400 acre-feet passed through Guernsey Reservoir. August storage was near or above average for all North Platte River reservoirs. The total for all seven was 2,316,500 acre-feet. This is 83 percent of the total storage capacity of the system's reservoirs, which is 2,787,800 acre-feet. With Seminoe at 905,800 acre-feet, it was at 139 percent of the 30-year average. Pathfinder, with 796,100 acre-feet, was at 152 percent. Glendo was at 273 percent of the 30-year average, with 399,600 acre-feet. Ownership in the North Platte Project, which serves eastern Wyoming and western Nebraska, was 702,500 acre-feet, or 143 percent of the 492,100 acre-foot 30-year average. Storage capacity of the project is 1,062,100 acre-feet. The Inland Lakes were also above average at the end of August. Lake Minatare was at 24,165 acre-feet, and Lake Alice held 3,947 acre-feet. Little Lake Alice ended the month with 367 acrefeet, and Lake Winters Creek held 837 acre-feet.

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September 29, 2011

Heartland Express - Fall Irrigation

Page 11

Platte Water Managers Acting Now in Case 2012 Continues High Water Trend By Lori Potter, The Kearney Hub KEARNEY - North Platte Basin water management has not been for the faint of heart the past two years because of a surprise, late-spring surge of water in 2010 and more record-breaking runoff in 2011. Managers are taking a better-safe-than-sorry approach for 2012. "We're at least planning and positioning ourselves from the standpoint of dealing with another 2011," said John Lawson of Casper, Wyo., manager of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Wyoming Area office, which manages the basin's federal reservoirs. Lawson and North Platte Natural Resources District General Manager Ron Cacek of Scottsbluff reviewed flooding and water management issues Monday at the Nebraska Association of Resources Districts annual conference in Kearney. Lawson said irrigators in eastern Wyoming and the Nebraska Panhandle are concerned that water released now or in the early spring won't be available for their crops next summer. "But from a risk standpoint, this is a very prudent thing to do," he said. "... I keep pushing the dividends of early action." Lawson said the Wyoming reservoirs now hold 2,041,689 acre-feet of water, but the system will be down to 2 million a-f by Saturday. Those reservoirs have combined storage of 2.8 million a-f - about 1 million a-f each in Seminoe and Pathfinder - which compares to 1.7 million af in Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District's Lake McConaughy. Lawson said that except for a small flood pool set aside in Glendo

Reservoir, all other water storage in Wyoming is for water conservation. Seventy percent of the water supply upstream of the Wyoming-Nebraska state line is from snowpack, and 80 percent of the basin's annual supply comes in April through July. 2011 forecasts too low Water managers try to project water supplies about one year ahead for planning and then create minimum and maximum plans. For 2011, the maximum April-July forecast above Seminoe Reservoir was 1.3 million acre-feet. "I looked at that and thought I'd never want to have to deal with a maximum plan, and then we exceeded that by 600,000 a-f," Lawson said. Actual April-July inflows this year were a record 1,969,400 acre-feet, or 276 percent of the 30-year average. Lawson and Cacek said the fact that there was only moderate flooding in the basin is due to the work of water managers throughout the basin and some help from Mother Nature. In 2010, Glendo area (southeast Wyoming) precipitation in the April-July period was 243 percent of average, further complicating floodcontrol plans. In 2011, it was 138 percent of average. "This is the thing that kept me up all night, every night," Lawson said about wondering how to manage a record 2011 snowmelt and possibly double the average precipitation downstream.

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At least water managers could make some preemptive decisions for 2011, including fall and early spring releases of water from reservoirs. "This year is gonna have all the records, but it won't be known for all the floods, and that's fine with me," Lawson said. Upper basin inflows of around 136 percent of normal in 2008 and 2009 were seen as a welcomed start in refilling drought-depleted reservoirs. Then came the 176 percent of average water supply in 2010. "That was a total surprise to everybody," Lawson said. June was the wettest on record in the Rocky Mountains that are the Platte Basin's headwaters, plus there was rain downstream. Within the past 10 years, the basin has had record high and record low annual water supplies. From 2002-2007, the numbers all were below the 30-year average. The record low above Seminoe of 118,000 a-f, or 15 percent of average, was recorded in 2002. "All of a sudden, we have more water than we know what to do with," Cacek said. "... How things can change so quickly is incredible." He recalled hearing many people say in the early 2000s that Lake McConaughy never would fill again. "That didn't turn out to be the case," Cacek said. "Lake McConaughy filled."

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Heartland Express

September 29, 2011

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Heartland Express

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Prepare Bins and Equipment Before Harvest Tom Dorn, UNL Extension Educator As we approach harvest, grain bin preparation is a timely subject. Remember, grain harvested in Nebraska is essentially insectfree, but can become infested by storage insects, which originate in or around the bin or in contaminated equipment such as combines and grain augers. Following are some tips on how to prepare bins and equipment to ensure insect problems are minimized. First, be sure to store sound, clean, dry grain. It may be advisable to screen out broken grains, trash, and fines to increase the quality of the final storage product. Also, the elimination of trash will enhance fumigation, should this procedure be required later. Since stored-grain insects can invade new grain from infested harvesting and handling equipment (combines, augers, etc.), cleanup is essential. Carefully remove all traces of old grain from combines, truck beds, grain carts, augers, and any other equipment used for harvesting, transporting, and handling grain. Even small amounts of moldy or insect-infested grain left in equipment can contaminate a bin of new grain. Then clean grain bins thoroughly, disposing of spilled, cracked, and broken grain and grain flour, along with the insects feeding on such material. A simple broom and a vacuum cleaner are essential pieces of equipment in cleaning grain bins. “How clean is clean enough?” is a question many producers ask. A good rule of thumb to follow when cleaning bins and equipment is: If you can tell what was stored or handled last season by looking in the auger, bin, or combine, it is not clean enough to prevent re-contamination of the new crop. Around the bins, be sure to remove old equipment, junk, and clutter to reduce attractiveness to insects and rodents. Make sure the bin is insect and rodent-proofed by plugging holes, sealing bins, caulking, and making general repairs. Grain spilled near the bin attracts insects and draws mice and rats. Clean up and dispose of any spilled grain several weeks prior to harvest. If rats have tunneled under founda-

tions, use baits or traps to reduce or eliminate them. Tall weeds can harbor insects and provide cover for rodents. Mow around the bin site to remove tall grass and weeds to reduce the potential for insect and rodent infestation. If necessary, re-grade the site so water readily drains away from bin foundations. You cannot always wait for the soil to dry before loading or unloading grain from bin sites. Make certain travel lanes have enough rock or gravel to bear the weight of heavy trucks and grain carts. Landscaping should be maintained away from grain storage facilities. Leave a four-footwide strip of bare gravel around the perimeter of storage bins. If purchasing old crop grain for storage with newly harvested grain, be sure to watch for insects in the incoming grain. If infested grain is purchased for livestock feed, store it away from the new crop, and feed it as soon as possible. Grain stocks may be rotated, or moved and a grain protectant applied at the time of turning. Stored grain insects cannot live on extremely dry grain (less than 10%), however it is impractical to reduce grain moisture much below minimum moisture levels necessary for longterm storage. Insect activity and reproduction are favored, however, by high grain moisture (14% or more), especially when condensation and molds occur, and fermentation raises temperature in the grain mass. Spoilage and internal heating allow insects to remain active even in the winter. Through proper management of aeration, you can manipulate grain temperature. Since insects are “cold-blooded,” they are not active much below 50°F, and grain cooling can be particularly important in reducing insect reproduction. Condensation of moisture in the grain mass is prevented by slow cooling and gradual reduction of the gradient between the grain mass temperature and the outside (ambient) temperature. A bin of 19% moisture corn with a starting temperature of 75°F can lose a full market grade in about five days if the aeration system shuts down, allowing the grain to heat and deteriorate. Electrical system maintenance

before harvest can prevent costly downtime. Wiring for fans and other electrical components should be inspected for corrosion and cracked, frayed, or broken insulation. Exposed wiring should be run through waterproof, dust-tight conduit. Avoid kinking the conduit, and make sure all connections are secure. Mice often nest in control boxes where they are protected from predators. They can strip insulation from wires for nest material and their urine sometimes causes corrosion on relays and other electrical components. If rodent damage is found, clean and repair or replace damaged wiring, relays, and other electrical equipment. Then seal over knock-outs and other openings that may permit rodent entry. Fans, heaters, transitions, and ducts should be checked for corrosion and other damage. Remove any accumulated dust and dirt that may reduce operating efficiency and be sure all connections are tight to prevent air leaks that can reduce operating efficiency. Once empty bins have been thoroughly cleaned, a residual treatment may be applied to bin surfaces to protect incoming grain from insect infestation. Follow label instructions carefully. The following materials are listed for empty grain bin surface treatments: silicon dioxide a.k.a diatomaceous earth (many brand names). Butylcarityl + Pyrethrins (many brand names). Some related chemicals include Binfenthrin (Capture), Pybuthryn (Butacide, Pyrenone Crop Spray) For bins with false floors, which are inaccessible for cleaning, chloropicrin, a bin “cleanout” fumigant, is legal to use, prior to binning the grain. Other fumigants that could be used on empty bins would be magnesium phosphide and methyl bromide. Caution! Fumigants are dangerous, restricted-use pesticides, and may require gas monitoring devices and respirator protection for the applicator. It is highly recommended fumigation be done by a commercial pesticide applicator who has been trained and EPA/NDA-certified in safe fumigant handling and application techniques. Refer to current labels for specific details and instructions.

Groundbreaking for Outdoor Learning Area at State Fair's Kidz Zone (GRAND ISLAND, NE) Now that the 2011 State Fair is in the books, the Grand Island Groundwater Guardians are ready to start implementing an outdoor learning area in the Kidz Zone, just north of the 4-H Building. A groundbreaking ceremony will be held on Friday, October 7, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. at the site. The Groundwater Guardians first realized the potential of educating thousands of people about groundwater and its uses when they received first place through a national on-line contest held by Rainbird: The Intelligent Use of Water Awards. That first place prize was $10,000 to implement features such as a rain garden, xeric garden, bioswale, gazebo, willow tunnel, prairie maze and tree fort. Marcia Lee, Groundwater Guardian member, said, “The community was really excited about this project and we wouldn’t have been able to start the project without their support. We’ve received a lot of positive feedback from across the state and even from other states.” Dave Johnson, Rain Bird Corporation of Tucson, AZ, will be a guest at the groundbreaking ceremony. The project received 30,597 votes; about 1,000 more than any other project in the country. Gary Mader, project manager, said “The GI Groundwater Team is excited about starting the construction of this educational project. It is

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designed to provide an attractive greenscape area for use by Fair-goers while providing educational opportunities regarding one of our most precious resources -- groundwater.” Since the outdoor learning area will be located in the Kidz Zone, it will provide the community a stimulating place for play, learning, and environmental education-- particularly water education. Although the site will be located at the State Fair grounds, the outdoor learning area will be available year-round to allow educators and the public an educational, leisurely place to enjoy nature. The Guardians have been working diligently to raise additional funds needed to implement as many features as possible in the design. Roger Andrews, Guardian team leader, said $37,500 in other grants have been awarded by Vetter Health Services, Water of the West and Waterwise. A few private donations have also been received. The Guardians are planning and ordering native plants and grasses to be implemented for the 2012 Nebraska State Fair.

Continued on page 23

Upcoming Special Sections October 13 ......................................................Gateway Farm Expo October 27....................McCook Farm Expo, FFA District 3, 7 & 10 November 10 ................................................FFA District 2, 8 & 12 November 24 ....................FFA District 1 & 9, Soybeans/Sorghum, Parts & Service, Farm Power Show

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The cost to develop the entire outdoor area is estimated at $50,000. Those interested in helping support the project may contact: Roger Andrews at (308) 384-5771 or email rajandws@kdsi.net . Rain Bird: The Intelligent Use of Water Awards is an interactive grant program that awards funds in $1,500, $5,000 or $10,000 funding categories to

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Heartland Express - Pork Month

September 29, 2011

Pigs on Parade Project Raises over $1,000 for Food Bank The Pigs on Parade art project was an endeavor to help promote the 50 great years of pork production in Nebraska and raise money for the Food Bank of the Heartland. Sixteen pigs were on display during NPPA’s 50th Anniversary celebration and the three pigs with the most votes at the end of the evening

Hog Haven donated by Dave Hansen of Hartington won first place

were auctioned off. Those pigs winning top honors were: Hog Haven donated by Dave Hansen of Hartington won first place. David City’s FFA scenic farm entry took second place and UNL’s CASAR mosaic corn pig was third. Col. Dick Schoenholz of Dick Schoenholz Real Estate & Auction Service located in Geneva did

the auctioneers duties. Proceeds from the auction along with 1500 pounds of pork product donated by Nebraska packers, Farmland Food, Tyson Fresh Meats, and Hormel will be given to the Food Bank of the Heartland.

David City’s FFA scenic farm entry took second place UNL’s CASAR mosaic corn pig was third

Pork Producers Add Millions to NE’s Economy

Study Finds Pork Producers Receive Return on Investment in USMEF’s Market Development Programs

By Larry Sitzman, NPPA Executive Director Nebraska has a breeding herd inventory of 380,000 sows and a kept for market inventory of over 2,720,000 head. Our breeding herd is 6.5% and our kept for market herd is 4.6% of the total U.S. inventory. There are about 7.5 million pigs marketed annually in Nebraska. According to our market report there was $737,288,448 worth of gross market value of hogs sold in 2010. Each market pig consumes 12.82 bushels of corn and 183 lbs of soybean meal. Nebraska pigs utilized about 90,000,000 bushels of corn with an average value of $4.00 per bushel or $360,000,000 worth of corn. Nebraska pigs utilized about 1,372,500,000 lbs of soybean meal with an average value of .1250 cents per pound or about $171,562,500 worth of soybean meal. The 2010 estimated export value of every hog marketed was $56.89 and 19.01% of all pork marketed was exported. In reality about $68,436,000 worth of corn and $32,614,031 worth of soybean meal was exported in the form of value added pork from Nebraska. This safe, abundant, humanely managed, quality, consistency and value production miracle is supported by hundreds of producers, millers, truckers, grain producers, buyers, packer employees and countless others adding millions to Nebraska’s economy.

U.S. pork producers are receiving a positive return on their Checkoff investment in international markets through the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF), according to a study by Dr. Harry Kaiser, the Gellert Family Professor of Applied Economics and Management, at Cornell University. The economic analysis of USMEF’s Export Market Development Programs was commissioned by USMEF to quantify the returns that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agriculture Service and the Pork Checkoff programs received from their investments in USMEF’s export market development programs. The study also quantified the contribution of USMEF’s programs to the growth in exports that has occurred over the past decade. Producer investments account for roughly 50 percent of USMEF’s expenditures on export promotion programs and the Foreign Agriculture Service funds account for the other half. "It’s important to producers to understand and quantify the value of their investments," said Craig Christensen, chair of the Pork Checkoff ’s Trade Committee and a producer from Ogden, Iowa. "The results indicated a positive impact of export market development and promotion on imports of U.S. pork." Specifically, the study found: •An average annual increase in net pork industry revenue due to USMEF’s programs ranging from $39.9 million to $169.7 million •A contribution of 324 million lbs. per year to the growth of U.S. Pork exports over the past 10 years and •A median return on investment of dollars at $7.42 to $1.

The research was conducted using an economic model which utilized statistical procedures to help researchers account for the impact of a variety of factors that affected import demand, including price of imports of U.S. pork, price of imports of pork from other countries, consumer income in importing countries, exchange rates and USMEF expenditures on pork export market development. Eight importing regions, accounting for 82 percent of U.S. Pork exports, were used in the model. Mexico, South Korea, Hong Kong, EU, Japan, Taiwan, China and Russia Mexico and Japan had the highest gains in imports due to export market development. The USMEF has been performing market development activities in numerous markets since 1976, with the goal of increasing demand for U.S. Pork by improving product image, increasing market presence, promoting total carcass utilization and providing trade support. Nearly 24 percent of U.S. Pork and pork variety meat production was exported in 2010. The National Pork Board has responsibility for Checkoff-funded research, promotion and consumer information projects and for communicating with pork producers and the public. Through a legislative national Pork Checkoff, pork producers invest $0.40 for each $100 value of hogs sold. The Pork Checkoff funds national and state programs in advertising, consumer information, retail and foodservice marketing, export market promotion, production improvement, technology, swine health, pork safety and environmental management. For information on Checkoff-funded programs, pork producers can call the Pork Checkoff Service Center at (800) 456PORK or check the Internet at www.pork.org.

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Heartland Express

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Business Grows by Gallons By Chabella Guzman, The Scottsbluff Star-Herald BUSHNELL - Nestled in the farmland just outside of Bushnell is the Irish Cream Sheep Dairy. That's right, a sheep dairy. The dairy has been growing over the past eight years, when Virginia and Bill Halligan decided to diversify their farm. "We moved here 35 years ago," Virginia said. "I'm from Colorado and Bill is from South Dakota, and this place is about halfway between our families." It also helped that Bill took a job at First National Bank in Kimball. They then found a place they could afford, about 480 acres near Bushnell, which is about 25 miles west of Kimball. "It worked out well for us," she said. "With not very many acres we went with sheep, as cattle need more acres." For about 30 years the Halligans raised meat sheep, but after Virginia remembered an article she read when the children were in high school, she began to think of diversifying the ranch. "The article was about a sheep dairy in central Nebraska. I said, 'My sheep can do this.'" "We had a 200 percent lamb crop, so nearly every ewe was having twins, and I knew it could work." The couple researched the market and found there was very little research on the sheep dairies. So they have been building their dairy by trial and error. A positive they had working for them was that Virginia had grown up on a dairy farm, and her son Cody had recently been working at a dairy of 2,700 head. "I called up my son and said I was thinking of diversifying the farm and was going to be milking sheep," she said. "He came home and helps me manage the dairy." The dairy now milks 24 head of ewes at a time, and about 350-400 ewes. The dairy bags

1,200 pounds of milk every morning about four pounds of milk per ewe. "We are getting towards the end of the lactating so it's not as heavy right now as at their (ewes) peak," Virginia said. In order to grow the business and be more efficient, the dairy is trying to alternate the breeding season so they can milk year round. "Our dairy had 200 ewes, lamb in December, 200 in January, 200 in February, April and May and close to 100 in July," she said. "We are getting close to lambing again soon. "The ewe will build her milk production according to birth," Virginia said. "So in theory the ewe will produce for twins." A single birth will mean less milk production. Virginia and Cody pull the baby lambs from their mothers around six to 12 hours after birth, resulting in 30 percent more milk from the ewes. Virginia takes special care of the baby lambs, as many of them will be replacement milking ewes. "We keep back replacement lambs as there are very few dairy sheep in the U.S., and we had to build our own genetics pool as we went," she said. The baby lambs are sent to a barn where they learn to take milk from plastic nipples. People will help push the babies to the "Lamb Bar" as Virginia calls it. Once the lambs go to the nipples on their own, they are moved to another table pen where they can still be monitored for a few more days before they move to outside lots. The outside pens hold around 50 lambs, which would seem a problem to feed, but innovation on Cody's part keeps the lambs satiated at all times. A long narrow barn runs the length of several pens with nipples that face outside so the baby lambs can come up whenever they desire, simulating having a mother all the time to feed from. The nipple system runs on gravity flow and is quite possibly the only one of its kind. The

milk for the lambs is kept inside in a tank that uses gravity to flow milk to the lambs when they come up to feed. Cody designed and built the system. "For the first few years we did our own milking and used little machines to feed the lambs. The machines had thermostats and agitators," she said. "They were expensive, and if there were electrical problems the lambs could be without milk, and then we would have sick lambs." In the United States and Canada there are only about 100 sheep dairies, so getting ewes or bucks for their dairy has been challenging. For the past six to seven years the Halligans have been running about 800 head of ewes, in order to build up the ewes' genetics so they will produce more volume at one time. Virginia said they started with a flock of Dorset sheep and had hoped to cross them with East Friesian and Lacaune dairy sheep. The problem was there weren't any to be found as only a handful had come across from Canada before the border was closed. "Now that we've built up our genetics, we're going back and being more selective," she said. "We're looking at lactation, udder size, teat placement, things that make milking and production more efficient." They have also started trying AI (artificial insemination) with their sheep. The borders are closed to bringing in live sheep, but semen can be shipped. "Sheep are difficult to AI," Virginia said. "So we were extremely excited when we did get a few from AI. Our goal is to get to the point where we milk fewer ewes and still get the same production." The Halligans are in the dairy business for the long haul, Virginia said. They have a buyer in California and are starting to pick up buyers in Idaho, Utah and Colorado. For more information on the Halligans' operation, visit www.irishcreamsheepdairy.com

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Heartland Express

September 29, 2011

“I Think I’m Going to Have a Tax Problem This Year” Tina Barrett, Executive Director Nebraska Farm Business, Inc Many things in agriculture move fast. Technology is growing and changing rapidly. Input dealers are knocking on your doors earlier and earlier each year. This summer it seemed like many producers were dealing with marketing their 2010 crop, growing their 2011 crop and making input decisions on their 2012 crop. Each of these things complicates the tax planning each year. Add that to the record high profitability many agricultural producers have seen over the past five years, and one of the most common comments I’m hearing is “I think I’m going to have a tax problem this year.” You’re not alone, but it creates a need for tax planning to be more than something you do two weeks before the end of the year. Ten years ago, the income patterns for many farmers seemed to be one good year followed by one not so good year, followed by another good year. Somewhere along the past decade we lost that pattern. According to the accrual net farm income numbers we generate each year, we have seen five straight years of record high incomes at levels that were unheard of before this. While this has been great for the economies of many agriculturally based states and for the producers themselves, it does bring us right back to having a tax problem. Depreciation Agriculture has been blessed the past few years with the downturn of the general economy, based on the fact that due to the need to boost business spending, we have the opportunity to write off new asset purchases at a rate that has never before been allowed. In December of 2010, Congress expanded the Bonus Depreciation from 50 to 100 percent for 2011 (and the last few months of 2010). This has allowed for the full write-off of a new machine shed for the first time in history. There has been some confusion about

this ability by those tax preparers who are not familiar with the special laws associated with farming. Most building’s life classes are much more than 20 years, depending on their use. But farm buildings specifically have a designated life class of 20 years. Since the bonus depreciation’s definition is for new assets with a life class of 20 years or less, machine sheds are included. This has made getting a building up and “placed in service” before the end of the year a challenge for most building companies, but if you can get it done, it’s a great deal. There is no limit on the amount of Bonus Depreciation you can use, but remember, it does have to be a brand new asset (first use, not just new to you). For those used assets, we continue to have Section 179 Expense Election, which allows each taxpayer with a trade or business to write-off up to $500,000 of new or used capital assets with a life class of less than 20 years. They also limit your use of Section 179 if you purchase more than $2 million worth of qualified assets, so some producers will need to be aware of this. There has started to be some talk in Congress of again extending the amount of time to use both of these accelerated depreciation options. At this time, the bonus depreciation will expire at the end of 2011, and the Section 179 limit will fall to $125,000 ($1 million purchase limit) for 2012, and again to $25,000 for 2013. Without Congressional action it seems that 2011 could be the year to take advantage of these benefits. The question moving forward will be, if the need to stimulate the economy by offering this to businesses will be greater than the need to generate more income taxes by letting it expire. Income Averaging Any high income year is a good time to evaluate the use of income averaging, since it allows us to take a high income year and spread it evenly over the past three years and recalculate the tax as if the income was earned in those years. Due to the much higher incomes we’ve been seeing it’s also

important to think about amending past returns, using it if you didn’t already in those years. For example, if your incomes from 2008, 2009 and 2010 were as follows: $100,000, $50,000 and $50,000, respectively, and you didn’t use income averaging in 2008, you can elect to amend that return now, carry as much income back into 2005, 2006 and 2007 as you can, which will make more room for this year’s income to be taxed at a lower level. It’s not an easy process and your tax preparer may not want to do the work, but if the circumstances are right, it can be a way to save a lot of tax. Entity Structures It seems the higher incomes are driving more producers to think about the option to incorporate or find some tax savings through an entity. We are also struggling to control incomes within some old corporate structures. These are complicated topics, but it may be a topic to raise with your tax preparer this year. General Tax Planning There are so many issues for many agricultural producers that it seems year-end tax planning is just not enough anymore. Many producers I work with have added pre-harvest tax planning, as well as looking two years out at a time to make sure that the decisions they make this fall don’t come back to haunt them next year. The old planning strategy of putting off paying any tax for a bad year is getting harder to adhere to. For a lot of producers I work with, the amount of grain they have in carryover inventory is equal to, or in some cases greater than, a whole year’s production. With crop insurance, it is impossible to plan for a total disaster year with no income, therefore, the number of “bad years” in a row that would need to occur in order to use up inventories is so large it isn’t realistic. This may be the year that we need to consider changing “the plan” and paying the tax while the rates are still relatively low.

NEBRASKA’S CROPS STILL LOOKING GOOD Continued from page 1

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brings the first onset of frost or freezing temperatures to south Central Nebraska and north central Kansas. According to the weather service, at several locations, the morning of Sept. 22 brought the first 36-degree-or-colder readings of the season, with a few sites, including Cambridge and Alton, reaching 32 for the first time, though no widespread, killing frost has occurred. The weather service said that for the Grand Island area, the average date when the temperature drops to 36 degrees or lower is Sept. 29 over the last 30 years. That average has already been broken this year as Grand Island recorded 36 degrees on Sept. 23. The average date for the temperature to reach 32 degrees or colder in Grand Island during the last 30 years is Oct. 8, and the average date for the temperature to drop to 28 degrees or lower is Oct. 15. According to the weather service, since 1981, the earliest the temperature dropped to 32 degrees or lower was Sept. 19, 1991, and the latest date was Oct. 26, 2007. So far, in September, the weather service reports it has been a cooler and drier month than average, with the average daily temperature 5 degrees below what September temperatures have averaged over the last 30 years. Rainfall so far this month has been 1.13 inches below the average for the last 30 years. The average daytime high and nighttime low for late September for the Grand Island area, according to the weather service, are 72 and 46, respectively. This month's nearly ideal early fall weather will continue through the beginning of next week, with highs in the 70s and lows in the 40s and 50s and no precipitation in the forecast.

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September 29, 2011

Heartland Express

Page 17

Farm and Ranch’s

HEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Dedicated to the Livestock Industry

Livestock ID/Traceability Economic Assessment restrictions imposed by trading partners. Brazil and Argentina face FMD (foot and mouth disease)-related restrictions and traceability systems are critical for exports from these South American countries which are not entirely free of FMD. The United States faces BSE-related product and age restrictions from a number of major importing countries (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Russia and Mexico) as well as restrictions from the European Union based on hormone use. In addition, China’s beef market remains closed to imports from the United States due to BSE-related restrictions. The report notes that competing beef exporting nations are using their industries’ mandatory traceability systems as marketing tools to enhance their sales and as a point of differentiation with the US industry. While market access and producer profitability have been important factors in exporting countries’ decisions to establish traceability systems, the report concludes that animal health management and food safety are the primary drivers behind most countries’ decisions to build animal ID and traceability into the regulatory frameworks for their livestock industries. Improved supply chain coordination and enhanced producer management opportunities are secondary motivators. "The most widely recognised international animal health, food safety, and trade organizations have endorsed animal ID programmes as essential components of food animal production and meat product trade. In response, major beef exporters and importers have developed mandatory animal ID and traceability systems," the report states. "As more countries adopt animal and meat tracking systems, those early adopters of live-

US - A study assessing the impact of traceability and animal identification programmes on the international market for red meat has been released by the US Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Conducted by researchers at Kansas State University, Colorado State University and Montana State University, the study assesses the potential impact on US producers and processors of evolving thinking about animal ID and traceability in leading export markets and traceability systems that have already been put in place by other major beef and pork exporting countries. The study – Economic Assessment of Evolving Red Meat Export Market Access Requirements for Traceability of Livestock and Meat – points out that the US and India are the only two major beef exporters that do not already have mandatory traceability systems. Argentina, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Uruguay all have animal identification/traceability programmes in place. In addition to the traceability systems of exporting nations, the report, which was commissioned by USMEF on a contract awarded based on a request for proposal, provides an analysis of the domestic cattle traceability systems employed by selected major importers of US beef. Of special note, Japan and Korea, among the highest value markets for US red meat exports, have adopted mandatory traceability programmes which could eventually lead to similar requirements being applied to imports. Finally, the report compares the sanitary and phytosanitary restrictions imposed on the major beef exporters by the top importing countries. For some exporting nations, such as Australia and New Zealand, there are no

stock and meat traceability systems have the opportunity to gain significant market advantages through increased consumer confidence." "Countries with well-developed mandatory animal identification and traceability programmes enjoy comparative advantages in red meat exports relative to countries without such systems,” the researchers add. “They are better positioned to respond quickly to crisis situations and mitigate potential damages." The value of the research report was emphasised by Leann Saunders, president of IMI Global, a member of USMEF’s executive committee and chairperson of the USMEF working group on traceability. "When you first consider the value of the export market to US cattle and hog producers, with export value this July equating to $236.88 per head of fed cattle harvested and $59.35 per head for hogs – there is no denying the importance of exports for US producers," said Ms Saunders. “As we have seen in the beef industry engaged in voluntary USDA PVP and QSA verification programmes for countries like Japan and the EU – countries that have export verification requirements specific to animal identification and traceability – it can work effectively." "Since we are currently exporting about 16 per cent of total US beef and variety meat production and 29 per cent of pork, traceability is a form of insurance that would insulate American producers in the event that importing countries change their import requirements or in the event of an animal disease outbreak." Sorces: www.thebeefsite.com

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September 29, 2011

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report Week Ending: 9/24/2011

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown experience to provide customers By David M. Fiala ranching and readers quality domestic and global FuturesOne President market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located and Chief in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s Moines and at the Chicago Board of company, FuturesOne, is a Trade. You may contact David via email full service risk manage- at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1ment and futures 800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on web at www.futuresone.com. brokerage firm. A primary the focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful Everyone should always understand the agricultural marketing advice via daily, risk of loss and margin needed when weekly, and monthly analysis of the trading futures or futures options. domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and The information contained herein is will also actively manage pricing deci- gathered from sources we believe to be sions for ag producers. FuturesOne also reliable but cannot be guaranteed. provides advice and management serv- Opinions expressed are subject to change ices for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades without notice. There is significant risk in of marketing, brokerage, farming and trading futures.

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 9/23/2011 Eastern Nebraska: Compared to last week, alfalfa and grass hay steady, dehy pellets in the Platte Valley and Northeast sold steady to 15.00 higher, ground and delivered to feedlots steady. Good demand on all hay products. Quite a lot of hay has been sold but buyers and seller alike are having a hard time finding trucks. Light freeze in some North central areas of the state Thursday. Quite a few producers continue to bale grass hay from native meadows and some are on fourth cutting alfalfa. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Prices from the most recent reported sales. Nebraska Department of Agriculture has a hay and forage directory available at www.agr.state.ne.us click on Hay Information. Northeast Nebraska: Alfalfa: Premium large square bales 180.00-190.00, Good large square bales 150.00-165.00, few at 200.00; fair large square 135.00-140.00. Good large rounds 120.00-135.00. Alfalfa/grass mix large squares 180.00. Grass Hay: Good large square bales 95.00-115.00; Good large rounds 90.00-95.00; small square bales 150.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 240.00-260.00. Platte Valley of Nebraska: Alfalfa: Good to premium large square bales 170.00-200.00; Fair to good large square bales 135.00-145.00, some going to dairy’s 200.00. Fair to good large rounds 110.00125.00. Premium small square bales 195.00-200.00. Grass: Premium large square bales 145.00-150.00; Good large square bales 110.00. Good large rounds

few at 95.00 delivered. Alfalfa ground and delivered to feedlots 160.00-165.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 250.00-270.00. Western Nebraska: Trade and movement fairly active. Demand very good with very good buying inquiry noted in all areas. Hay prices steady. Very good interest noted from out-of-state hay buyers. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Most horse hay sold in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales.

Detailed Quotations Western Nebraska Alfalfa Mixed Grass Premium Lg. Sqs 200.00-205.0090. 70.00 Good Lg. Sqs. 165.00-180.00 Wheat Straw Fair Lg. Sqs. 130.00-160.00 60.00-65,00 Large Round 120.00 Ground & Deliv. New Crop 140.00

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, Sept. 19, 2011 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 6,690; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 6,871 Head; Carcass Wt: 54-100 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 75.9; Wtd avg. Dressing: 50.6; choice or better; 98.2% YG 77.4% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 78 . . . .under 55 lbs . . . . . .49.4 . . . . . . .363.88 - 370.06 . . . . . . . .369.16 796 . . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .61.7 . . . . . . . .360.00 - 390.03 . . . . . . . .379.02 2,147 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .69.8 . . . . . . .344.95 - 388.84 . . . . . . . .370.81 3,954 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .78.2 . . . . . . .339.40 - 378.40 . . . . . . . .369.98

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 10 . . . . . . . .293 . . . . . . .293 . . . . . .177.00 . . . . . . . . .177.00 37 . . . . . . .311-349 . . . . .333 . . .173.00-183.00 . . . . . .177.90 96 . . . . . . .351-392 . . . . .378 . . .159.00-184.00 . . . . . .174.10 212 . . . . . .400-449 . . . . .424 . . .148.50-176.00 . . . . . .167.70 288 . . . . . .450-498 . . . . .485 . . .135.00-158.50 . . . . . .149.91 259 . . . . . .504-545 . . . . .536 . . .139.00-148.00 . . . . . .143.47 205 . . . . . .514-548 . . . . .531 . . .151.00-152.00 . . . . . .151.93 489 . . . . . .550-599 . . . . .576 . . .130.00-150.00 . . . . . .141.93 83 . . . . . . . .558 . . . . . . .558 . . . . . .156.75 . . . . . . . . .156.75 80 . . . . . . .615-645 . . . . .637 . . .130.00-146.00 . . . . . .140.28 199 . . . . .600-644 . . . . .624 . . .131.50-142.00 . . . . . .137.91 267 . . . . . . .638 . . . . . . .638 . . . . . .152.00 . . . . . . . . .152.00 111 . . . . . .653-686 . . . . .676 . . .120.00-151.25 . . . . . .145.24 93 . . . . . . .653-698 . . . . .672 . . .131.00-139.00 . . . . . .135.34 331 . . . . . .701-746 . . . . .718 . . .136.00-142.85 . . . . . .139.69 65 . . . . . . .706-745 . . . . .733 . . .125.00-134.50 . . . . . .131.75 650 . . . . . .750-795 . . . . .767 . . .128.50-141.50 . . . . . .137.07 778 . . . . . .804-840 . . . . .826 . . .120.00-138.25 . . . . . .134.65 901 . . . . . .851-898 . . . . .878 . . .126.25-134.85 . . . . . .131.67 864 . . . . . .900-945 . . . . .921 . . .124.75-134.10 . . . . . .130.79 674 . . . . . .950-987 . . . . .963 . . .120.50-129.75 . . . . . .126.56 115 . . . . . .951-959 . . . . .955 . . . . . .131.50 . . . . . . . . .131.50 117 . . . . .1008-1046 . . . .1024 . . .117.75-123.50 . . . . . .122.62

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 14 . . . . . . .282-290 . . . . . .287 . . . .153.00-156.00 . . . . .154.73 56 . . . . . . .307-344 . . . . . .329 . . . .141.00-164.00 . . . . .154.34 81 . . . . . . .358-395 . . . . . .375 . . . .147.00-156.00 . . . . .150.38 264 . . . . . .401-441 . . . . . .423 . . . .135.00-148.50 . . . . .143.56 306 . . . . . .453-499 . . . . . .481 . . . .129.00-138.25 . . . . .134.15 436 . . . . . .506-549 . . . . . .528 . . . .124.00-136.75 . . . . .131.90 263 . . . . . .550-591 . . . . . .574 . . . .121.50-139.00 . . . . .132.57 184 . . . . . .605-649 . . . . . .628 . . . .122.00-134.50 . . . . .129.16 119 . . . . . .609-648 . . . . . .627 . . . .124.00-128.75 . . . . .126.59 172 . . . . .677-698 . . . . . .691 . . . .110.50-130.75 . . . . .127.66 49 . . . . . . .655-664 . . . . . .660 . . . .122.50-129.75 . . . . .127.22 627 . . . . . .701-748 . . . . .731 . . . .118.00-131.25 . . . . .127.58 449 . . . . . .751-799 . . . . . .781 . . . .121.00-133.10 . . . . .128.20 1026 . . . . .802-848 . . . . . .827 . . . .118.00-131.10 . . . . .123.60 775 . . . . . .855-898 . . . . . .872 . . . .116.25-126.75 . . . . .123.45 596 . . . . . .903-948 . . . . . .923 . . . .110.00-125.25 . . . . .121.70 47 . . . . . . .950-989 . . . . . .973 . . . .108.75-121.25 . . . . .115.77 21 . . . . . .1006-1031 . . . .1022 . . . .115.00-115.50 . . . . .115.17

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2 Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 38 . . . . . . .402-440 . . . . . .431 . . . .150.00-160.00 . . . . .152.21 17 . . . . . . .491-495 . . . . . .493 . . . .141.00-143.50 . . . . .142.33 5 . . . . . . . . .538 . . . . . . . .538 . . . . . . .137.00 . . . . . . . .137.00 37 . . . . . . .587-593 . . . . . .590 . . . .130.50-134.50 . . . . .132.64 15 . . . . . . . .626 . . . . . . . .626 . . . . . . .133.00 . . . . . . . .133.00 13 . . . . . . .650-696 . . . . . .668 . . . .129.00-140.50 . . . . .135.89 35 . . . . . . .705-742 . . . . . .719 . . . .130.00-139.50 . . . . .132.20 124 . . . . . .751-790 . . . . . .770 . . . .125.50-132.25 . . . . .129.76 199 . . . . . .801-845 . . . . . .826 . . . .125.00-132.25 . . . . .127.61 86 . . . . . . .855-897 . . . . . .879 . . . .115.50-129.75 . . . . .124.37 105 . . . . . .905-932 . . . . . .914 . . . .116.00-123.85 . . . . .120.71 86 . . . . . . .963-985 . . . . . .975 . . . .117.75-124.75 . . . . .121.70

Lean hog trade has been steady this week; the strong cattle market has been supportive, but overall the trade was defensive ahead Wednesday’s quarterly pig report. The weekly net change is $.40 higher on the October contract and December is up $1.45. The quarterly pig report was seen as slightly bearish, with heavyweight hogs coming it at 103% vs. 102% expected, farrowings at 100% vs. 99%, and kept for breeding at 101% vs., 100% expected. Initial reaction seemed to point to more selling in the deferred months than nearby. Worldwide economic concerns will continue to weigh on the market as well, as fund selling has pressured almost all commodity markets. Export demand and fresh pork sales have been seen as steady to slightly better so far this week.

Oct. 11 8710 9040

Dec. 11 8052 8602

October 2011 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1-2 Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 8 . . . . . . . . .379 . . . . . . . .379 . . . . . . .130.00 . . . . . . . .130.00 69 . . . . . . .413-433 . . . . . .425 . . . . . . .135.00 . . . . . . . .135.00 53 . . . . . . .511-542 . . . . . .527 . . . .122.00-128.00 . . . . .125.58 6 . . . . . . . . .556 . . . . . . . .556 . . . . . . .117.00 . . . . . . . .117.00 151 . . . . . .650-658 . . . . . .650 . . . .124.00-125.75 . . . . .125.68 12 . . . . . . .711-720 . . . . . .716 . . . .121.00-122.25 . . . . .121.62 39 . . . . . . . .818 . . . . . . . .818 . . . . . . .117.50 . . . . . . . .117.50 11 . . . . . . . .893 . . . . . . .893 . . . . . . .117.25 . . . . . . . .117.25

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5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 9/25/11

Confirmed: 149,969 Week Ago: 78,897

Year Ago: 162,494

Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,925 . . . . . . . . .1,300-1,490 . . . . . . . . . . .114.00-117.00 1,409 . . . . . . . . . . .115.55 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,197 . . . . . . . . .1,200-1,500 . . . . . . . . . . .113.00-117.00 1,399 . . . . . . . . . . .115.81 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24,208 . . . . . . . .1,145-1,453 . . . . . . . . . . .113.50-117.00 1,323 . . . . . . . . . . .115.95 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .680 . . . . . . . . .1,260-1,350 . . . . . . . . . . .116.00-116.00 1,318 . . . . . . . . . . .116.00 Weighted Averages Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,046 . . . . . . . . .1,150-1,375 . . . . . . . . . . .114.00-117.75 1,296 . . . . . . . . . . .115.69 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,575 . . . . . . . .1,075-1,370 . . . . . . . . . . .114.00-117.00 1,248 . . . . . . . . . . .116.00 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22,908 . . . . . . . .1,035-1,300 . . . . . . . . . . .115.00-116.50 1,175 . . . . . . . . . . .115.99 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .301 . . . . . . . . . .1,156-1,240 . . . . . . . . . . .116.00-116.00 1,194 . . . . . . . . . . .116.00 ============================================================================================================== Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) (Paid on Hot Weights) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,330 . . . . . . . . . .718-968 . . . . . . . . . . . . .181.00-184.00 895 . . . . . . . . . . . .183.21 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14,699 . . . . . . . . . .775-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .181.00-185.00 898 . . . . . . . . . . . .183.06 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,290 . . . . . . . . . .822-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .181.00-184.00 886 . . . . . . . . . . . .183.19 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,623 . . . . . . . . . .685-880 . . . . . . . . . . . . .181.00-185.00 813 . . . . . . . . . . . .182.82 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,412 . . . . . . . . . .727-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .181.00-185.00 807 . . . . . . . . . . . .182.84 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,453 . . . . . . . . . .685-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .181.00-184.00 787 . . . . . . . . . . . .183.34 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .43,010 . . . . . . .1,357 . . . . . . .115.83 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .39,830 . . . . . . .1,211 . . . . . . .115.96 Dressed Del Steer . . .23,319 . . . . . . .896 . . . . . . . .183.11 Dressed Del Heifer . . .17,488 . . . . . . .802 . . . . . . . .182.99

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Week Ago Averages:

Year Ago Averages:

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .21,660 . . . . . . .1,346 . . . . . . .116.95 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .16,107 . . . . . . .1,225 . . . . . . .117.14 Dressed Del Steer . . .13,397 . . . . . . .889 . . . . . . . .185.75 Dressed Del Heifer . . .9,238 . . . . . . . .781 . . . . . . . .184.91

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .45,461 . . . . . . .1,346 . . . . . . . .97.48 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .46,719 . . . . . . .1,200 . . . . . . . .97.61 Dressed Del Steer . . .27,785 . . . . . . .892 . . . . . . . .153.35 Dressed Del Heifer . . .15,655 . . . . . . .796 . . . . . . . .153.74

Cattle

Hogs

Support: Resistance

MARKET: Bassett Livestock Auction - Bassett, NE; Burwell Livestock Market - Burwell, NE; Ericson/Spalding Auction Market - Ericson, NE; Imperial Livestock Auction - Imperial, NE; Loup City Commission Co. - Loup City, NE; North Platte Livestock Auction - North Platte, NE; Tri-State Livestock Auction - McCook, NE Receipts: 15,470 Last Week: 14,190 Last Year: 24,774 Compared to last week, feeder steers under 600 lbs sold 2.00-3.00 lower with 5 weights as much as 8.00 lower, 600 lbs and over sold steady to 2.00 lower. Feeder heifers 650 lbs and under sold steady to 3.00 higher, 650 lbs and over sold steady to 2.00 lower. Demand was noted as good with many buyers in their seats at most auctions. The CME live cattle futures gained up until Thursday when it took a sharp hit. Nebraska live sales sold at 116.00 and dressed sales sold at 183.00 for the week. This week's reported auction volume was 57 percent steers, 43 percent heifers with 75 percent over 600 lbs.

Support: Resistance

Dec. 11 11325 12545

Nov. 11 Feeder 13295 14705

Live cattle trade has been stronger this week following Friday’s friendly cattle on feed report. The weekly net change is $3.80 higher on the October contract and December is up near $4 as well. Cattle on feed numbers were significantly below expectations of 108% of last year, coming in at 99%. Cash trade has been slow to develop this week but is called steady; early week calls were firmer but the sharp increase in futures prices at midweek may discourage packers from being active buyers. Asking prices are firm at $120 live

and $188 dressed. The cutout finished mixed on Wednesday with choice down $.05 at $183.00 and select was up $.15 at $168.81. Significant movement of boxed beef has been noted this week, and export trade remains supportive. Trade should remain active due to outside market concerns. Feeder cattle have seen similar strength as the unexpected decline in the number of cattle on feed increases concerns about diminished availability coming forward.

November 2011 Feeder Cattle (CBOT)

December 2011 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open .141.750 High .142.200 Low . .141.375 Close .142.025 Change +0.100

Open .120.425 High .121.300 Low . .120.225 Close .120.875 Change +0.025

Open . . .88.750 High . . .88.900 Low . . .88.600 Close . .88.775 Change .+0.150

AG NEWS COMMODITIES myfarmandranch.com


September 29, 2011

Heartland Express

New Areas Added to Nebraska Platte-Republican CREP The Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency today are announcing the addition of the Lodgepole Creek, South Platte and upper Pumpkin Creek areas to the priority areas eligible to participate in the Nebraska Platte-Republican Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP). The announcement is being made at Sidney, Nebraska at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency’s 25th Anniversary Celebration for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). The Nebraska Platte-Republican Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program was the first CREP of its kind in the nation. It was initiated in 2005 through a Memorandum of Agreement signed by Governor Heineman and the U.S. Farm Service Agency and its goal was to convert 100,000 acres of irrigated lands to grass or similar habitat cover, to reduce the amount of irrigated water consumption, improve fish and wildlife habitat, and improve water quality by reducing sediment an agricultural chemicals from entering the water. There had been CREPs prior to 2005, but none had included the purpose of reducing water consumption. Currently there are about 50,000 acres under the Nebraska PlatteRepublican CREP. The Nebraska Platte-Republican CREP is an additional tool for the farmer to use and also a tool for the State of Nebraska as a means of reducing water use in areas where the State has interstate compacts, decrees, or agreements that require a reduction in water use and in areas of the State where there are conflicts between water users and the State

has determined the areas are fully or overappropriated. The Nebraska Platte-Republican CREP is a voluntary program for landowners. Landowners can sign up for the program if their land is included in the priority areas and they are able to meet certain criteria. Landowners enter into contracts with the federal government and the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources for ten to fifteen years in exchange for an annual payment that approximates current irrigation rental rates. New rental rates are effective in certain areas. Landowners also receive financial assistance for the cost of establishing the habitat cover on the land. Nebraska and the federal government receive contractual assurance that the lands under contract are not irrigated during the period of the contract and that the water previously used for irrigation is not used on other lands or for other purposes. The Nebraska Department of Natural Resources committed to pay up to five million dollars for its share of habitat establishment costs over a period of years. The federal cost over the contract period is estimated at 158 million dollars. Individuals who have Nebraska PlatteRepublican CREP contracts now may also apply to the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources to amend their contracts to allow them to enter into easements with local natural resources districts to permanently retire the irrigation on lands under the contracts. Such easements would go into effect immediately following the expiration of the CREP contract.

Page 19

ETHANOL WORTH BILLIONS TO NE ECONOMY Continued from page 1 "It's a huge wealth generator just in wages," Lemke said, explaining that in non-metro areas, manufacturing jobs tend to provide the highest wages. Nebraska Public Power District serves 91 of the 93 counties - all but Sarpy and Douglas - with the entire area considered non-metro. Lemke's report shows that non-metro manufacturing jobs have an annual average wage of $39,145, but the ethanol industry's average is $56,158, or $17,000 more. The state, which ranks second to Iowa in U.S. ethanol production, has processing capacity for more than 2 billion gallons per year. Ethanol Board Project Manager Steve Sorum said 1.85 billion gallons were produced in 2010. Lemke's report shows that ethanol production had direct effects on household income of nearly $85.8 million and total impacts of nearly $251 million. That boosts annual retail sales by around $105.4 million. Direct tax revenues were $19.6 million and the total with indirect additions was $32.2 million a year. The report doesn't give a dollar figure for ethanol's huge impact in replacing oil products that would come from imports. Lemke said total U.S. ethanol production corresponds to 867,000 barrels of oil per day. If that production is ranked with crude oil and oil product imports by country in 2010, it would rank between No. 5 Venezuela and No. 6 Iraq. Nebraska's ethanol capacity would be between No. 13 Kuwait and No. 14 the United Kingdom. Lemke determined that ethanol continues to add 5 to 10 cents per bushel to corn prices. The ethanol industry also is a boost to NPPD and other energy providers, using 6.7 percent of Nebraska's "native load" overall. Lemke said the 23 plants served by NPPD use 12 percent of his district's production used within Nebraska. "It's a very good load because it's stable," he said, explaining that stable loads keep costs down when electricity is priced because capital costs for manufacturing plants continue even if they don't operate all of the time.

Schedule of Events Oct 6-9 - Valentine (Cherry County) Old West Days & Cowboy Poetry Gathering; City-wide. Yvonne Hollenbeck (800) 658-4024 nebraskacowboypoetrygathering.com Oct 7 - Plattsmouth (Cass County) Cruizin Main Show and Shine Car Show; Main St. 5:30-8:30pm, Free (402) 296-5544 www.platts mouthchamber.com Oct 7-9 - Fremont (Dodge County) Bluegrass & Country Old Time Rural Music Gathering; Christensen Field House Celebration of America's musical heritage and dance. Old-time fiddling, dances, contests and concerts by superstars of oldtime acoustic music. 9am-midnight, $15/day Bob Everhart (712) 762-4363 www.orgsites.com/ia/old timemusic Oct 7-Dec 31 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Storytelling in African-American Quilts; International Quilt Study Center & Museum, 1523 N. 33rd St. Featuring layers of meaning, reflection and storytelling in the art of several well-known quilt artists. 10am-5pm (402) 4726549 www.quiltstudy.org Oct 7-8 - Kearney (Buffalo County) Threads Across Nebraska Quilt Show; Buffalo County Fairgrounds-Expo Building, 3807 Avenue N, Quilts & Vendors from across Nebraska, Merchants Mall, Raffle Quilts, Quilt Appraisals and more. LeAnne Killion, (308) 440-8867 or email: llkillion@gmail.com

Oct 8 - Filley (Gage County) Harvest Festival; Filley Stone Barn, 13282 E. Scott Rd. Antique tractors, crafts, farmers market, broom making, working horses, blacksmithing, farm equipment and gas engines, molasses making, corn shelling, music and food. 10am-4pm, Free Lesa Arterburn (402) 228-1679 www.beatricene.com/gagecountymuseum Oct 8 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Seasons of Crafts; Lancaster Event Center, 84th & Havelock Ave. 9am-5pm, Free Mary Marik (402) 489-5001 www.lancastereventcenter.com Oct 8 & 15 - Ponca (Dixon County) Hallowfest at Ponca State Park; 88090 Spur 26 E. The park's annual autumn event featuring haunted hayrack rides, pumpkin rolling and carving contest, campsite decorating contest and more. (402) 755-2284 www.outdoornebraska.org Oct 8-11 - Wymore (Gage County) Great Plains Welsh Heritage Festival; Great Plains Welsh Heritage Center, 807 S. 7th St. Welsh music, dance, history, food, language and national costumes. Descendants re-enact stories from departed immigrants. Daily, 9am-10pm, $45 Berwyn Jones (402) 421-8192 www.welshheritage.org Oct 8-22 - Shubert (Richardson County) Haunted Hollow Hayrack Rides; Indian Cave State Park 2 mi. N. & 5 mi. E. on Hwy 64E. Fri & Sat, 7:30-10pm, Park permit plus $4-$6 Kevin Holliday (402) 883-2575 www.outdoor nebraska.org

Oct 8-9 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Lancaster Antique Show and Sale; Lancaster Event Center, 84th & Havelock Ave. Established show of 30 years featuring quality antiques including books, country primitives, furniture, glassware, pottery, folk art, early Americana and more. Sat, 9am-5pm; Sun, 10am-4pm, $3.50 Rhonda Blank (402) 432-1451 www.lancastereventcenter.com Oct 9 - Ohiowa (Fillmore County) Craft Show; City auditorium. Homemade and commercial items. 10am-3pm, Free Carol Kapperman (402) 295-2515 Oct 15 - Grand Island (Hall County) Bob & Tom Comedy All Stars Tour; Heartland Events Center, Fonner Park Clubhouse. Starring Nick Griffin, April Macie, Shane Mauss, Jimmy Pardo and special guests Donnie Baker, Kenny Tarmac and Floyd the Trucker. 7pm (308) 382-4515 heartlandeventscenter.com Oct 15 - Loup City (Sherman County) Annual Cow Pie Trail Run; In the beautiful rolling hills of central Nebraska, 10 mi. W. of Loup City. Halfmarathon, 5K run/walk, and kid's fun run benefiting the Rebecca Adams Green Foundation. Make a day of it with a post-race BBQ, music, hay rack rides, and more. (239) 682-0484 www.RebeccaAdamsGreenFoundation.com Oct 15-16 - Beatrice (Gage County) Family History Weekend; Homestead National Monument of America, 8523 W. Hwy 4. (402) 2233514 www.nps.gov/home


Page 20

Heartland Express

September 29, 2011

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, October 6th. The next Heartland Express will be printed on THURSDAY, October 13th. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, simply fill out the form below and mail it to us with a check. This will eliminate any errors and help keep the classified cost to a minimum. 1001 - MOWERS WANTED TO BUY NE - IHC #24 MOWER & PARTS, (308) 5872344 MO - JD 1008 OR 1508 GEAR BOX OR GEAR BOX PARTS, (816) 378-2015 FOR SALE NE - REBUILT KOSCH HAYVESTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - IHC H W/WO MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - KOSCH SIDE MOUNT MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - EMERSON DOUBLE VICON DISC, (308) 544-6421 NE - VICON 3 PT DISC MOWER, (308) 5446421 NE - 10 BOLT SPACERS, 36" ROW FOR JD, (308) 390-0642 NE - REBUILT KOSCH TRAILVESTER MOWERS, 14', WITH WARRANTY, $5,000.00, (308) 544-6421 NE - NH 450 SICKLE MOWER, 7' BAR, EXCELLENT CONDITION, $1,100.00, (308) 874-4562 1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE KS - 1996 NEW HOLLAND 2550, 16 FT HEAD, (620) 340-3358 KS - NEW HOLLAND 2216 HEAD, (620) 3403358 KS - NEW HOLLAND 2218 HEAD W/2300 ADAPTER TO FIT 9030 BI-DIRECTIONAL, (620) 340-3358 KS - NH HS HEAD. PLANETARY DRIVE & PUMP FOR NH 8040, (785) 731-5190 1005 - RAKES WANTED TO BUY NE - LH CHANNEL IRON FRAME ON NH56 OVER 56B SIDE RAKE, AND A WHEEL, (308) 587-2344

1005 - RAKES FOR SALE IA - WWW. RAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 3662114 NE - '02 VERMEER R23A TWINRAKE CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE NE - BALER BELTS AND CHAINS; BEARINGS & FLANGES, (308) 587-2344 NE - BELTS FOR MOST BALERS & SWATHERS, (308) 587-2344 AL - ROUND BALER BELTING: LRGST DEALER IN US. ORIGINAL BELTING FOR ALL ROUND BALERS INCLUDING NEW JD IN STOCK! SAVE HUNDRED$! FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE! NO 800#, JUST BEST PRICES. SINCE 1973. HAMMOND EQUIP. MC/VISA/DISC/AMEX OR COD, BALERBELTS.COM, (334) 627-3348 TX - BALER BELTS- ALL BRANDS. MADE IN THE U. S. A. ! JD WITH GENUINE JD PLATE FASTENERS. FREE SHIPPING ON SETS. WWW. BALERBELTSANDHAYBEDS. COM, (800) 223-1312 NE - USED BELTS FOR VERMEER 605XL BALER CELL 308-962- 6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - JD 530 BALER, (308) 882-4588 1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - NEW EMERSON BALE MOVER-FEEDERS, (308) 544-6421 KS - E-Z HAUL INLINE SELF DUMPING HAY TRAILER, 32' 6 BALE, GOOSENECK, BUMPER HITCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889

1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE - CONT’D KS - 24' FLAT HAY ELEVATOR W/24' EXTENSION. GOOD ELEC. MOTOR, (785) 255-4579 1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS FOR SALE NE - JD 200 STACKMAKER, $900.00, (308) 876-2515 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 NE - EMERSON 13X24 STACK MOVER, ELECTRONIC SCALES, W/ OR WITHOUT HYDRAFORK, (308) 544-6421 KS - NH 1030 STACK WAGON, EXCELLENT, ALWAYS SHEDDED, (785) 731-5190 1010 - FORAGE HARVESTORS WANTED TO BUY KS - JOHN DEERE CHOPPERS & HEADS, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, KS, (785) 336-6103 FOR SALE NE - KNIFE BAR & RECUT SCREEN FOR JD 35, (308) 995-5515 NE - RECUT SCREEN & AXLE EXTENSION FOR IHC 730, (308) 995-5515 1013 - DUMP WAGON WANTED TO BUY KS - RICHARDTON HIGH DUMP WAGONS, ROEDER IMPLEMENT, (785) 336-6103 1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY KS - NH SELF PROPELLED & PULL-TYPE, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, (785) 336-6103 ID - NEW HOLLAND 2 & 3-WIDE, SELF-PROPELLED, PULL-TYPE MODELS. JIM,, (208) 880-2889

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Complete this form and mail with payment to: Farm and Ranch • PO Box 415 • Kearney, NE 68848 A $2.50 billing charge will be added if payment is not enclosed. Complete the following Information (Please Print):

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1014 - BALE WAGONS FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND'S-ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/ TRADE. WWW. BALEWAGON. COM, (208) 880-2889 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE WANTED TO BUY NE - HAYBUSTER GEAR BOX FOR 1600 STACKER, BEDROLLERS, PUSH OFF ASSEMBLY, A FEW OTHER PARTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - HAY PROBE FOR TESTING, (308) 5872344 1101 - TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - BUYING TRACTORS FOR SALVAGE MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (308) 5824303 NE - MF 35, 50, 65, 135, 235, 245, OR 255 TRACTOR, (402) 678-2277 MO - AC D17'S & UP, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - IH 560 TO 1566, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 KS - AGGRESSIVELY BUYING JD TRACTORS, NEWER MODELS, DEALERS WELCOME, WILL TRADE, CALL FOR CASH OFFERS, (785) 776-6176 FOR SALE NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885 NE - NEW, USED AND REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (308) 582-4303 NE - 8 HOLE 15" TRACTOR FRONT WHEELS, FITS IHC, (308) 587-2344 NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, (308) 436-4369 NE - 2 JD DR WH & LIFT ASSIT 7300, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS BELLY MOWER, $2,900.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - IHC 706 FOR SALVAGE, (308) 269-2586 NE - 4, 18 X 4 X 38 BIAS-PLY TRACTOR TIRES, (308) 269-2586 NE - NEW & USED COMPACT TRACTORS. USED LENAR 25 HP W/LOADER. USED LENAR 30 HP W/LOADER, 170 HOURS. (2) NEW LENAR 30 HP W/LOADER. SEVERAL 3 PT ATTACHMENTS FOR TRACTORS, SCOTTHOURIGAN CO., (800) 284-7066 NE - M FARMALL TRACTOR W/BAD MOTOR. $600 COMPLETE. OR WHAT PARTS DO YOU NEED?, (308) 624-2177 IA - 1965 FARMALL IH 1206, EXCELLENT CONDITION. 6, 524 ACTUAL HOURS. 1 OWNER. EXCELLENT MAINTENANCE. NEW RUBBER & PAINT. MUST SEE TO BELIEVE IT! CALL:, (319) 461-3294

FOR SALE 400 Farmall Diesel Tractor. Also for sale a Ford 7410 HD Loader with bucket grapple.

Call 307-742-3624 1103 - LOADER ATTACHMENTS WANTED TO BUY NE - DIRT OR MANURE BUCKET HEAD FOR F10 LOADER, NEEDS TO HAVE ORANGE FRAMEWORK W/GRAPPLE, (308) 587-2344 1105 - DISKS FOR SALE NE - DISK BLADES AND BEARINGS, (308) 587-2344 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE KS - FLEX KING 4X5' SWEEP PLOW, GOOD CONDITION, $1,100.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - NEW FLEX KING PICKER WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 NE - IH 560, 6-16'S WITH HARROW, LIKE NEW, $950.00, (308) 874-4562

1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - JI CASE 308 4-18'S, CUSHION COULTERS, $1,000.00, (308) 874-4562 1109 - PLANTERS FOR SALE NE - NEW #92 IHC COVERING DISK ASSEMBLY, (308) 995-5515 NE - IHC SEED DRUMS, (308) 995-5515 NE - LIFT ASSIST AND/OR TRANSPORT KIT FOR IHC LISTER/ PLANTER, ALSO GAUGE STRIPE WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 IA - NEW & USED KINZES, SORENSEN EQUIPMENT, HARLAN, IA, (712) 755-2455 KS - 1990 JD 7200, 16R30", 250 MONITOR, MARKERS, IN-ROW FERT. GOOD CONDITION., $23,000.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - MOORE BUILT 16 ROW PLANTER MARKERS, $2750. 308-380-7161 OR, (308) 4854486 NE - C-IH 12R36" VERTICAL FOLD 3 PT, ALWAYS SHEDDED, (308) 995-5515 1111 - DRILLS FOR SALE KS - 30" HOE AIR SEEDER DRILL $3500. 40' DISC AIR SEEDER DRILL, $14,000, (785) 871-0711 NE - 150 & 7100 DRILLS, FERT. BOXES, BLACK HEAVY DUTY WHEELS, DBL HITCH, TRANSPORTS & PARTS, (308) 995-5515 1112 - ROTARY HOE FOR SALE NE - 30' JD ROTARY HOE CALL FOR DETAILS, (308) 882-4588 1113 - CULTIVATORS WANTED TO BUY NE - WANTED GOERTZEN RIDGING WINGS AND SWEEPS. CALL 308-380-7161 OR, (308) 485-4486 NE - 12R 30" CULTIVATOR OR HILLER, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE SD - 3-PT 8R FLAT FOLD, $1,500.00, (605) 386-2131 NE - IHC GO-DIG PARTS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 4 ROW ORTHMAN TOOL BAR, CAN BE USED TO CULTIVATE OR RIDGE, (308) 3900642 NE - 12 ROW CULTIVATOR, (308) 882-4588 NE - 2-6R 30" 885 JD CULTIVATOR W/RIDGING WINGS, (402) 726-2488 1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE KS - 1600 GAL. FLOATER. 3000 WET BOOM SPRAYER, $4,500.00, (785) 871-0711 NE - JD 25A, 3 PT. HITCH, 150 GAL, 20" BOOM, (308) 587-2344 NE - CENTURY 500 GALLON PULL BETWEEN, $500.00, (402) 787-2244 1115 - SHREDDERS FOR SALE NE - 20' BESLER STALK CHOPPER, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1119 - ROD WEEDER FOR SALE KS - USED PARTS OFF 45' MILLER ROD WEEDER, DRIVES, TEETH, RODS, ETC. ALL FOR $500, (620) 865-2541 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE KS - SURE CROP QUALITY LIQUID FERTILIZERS. SEMI-LOAD DISCOUNTS. SOIL ANALYSIS CREDITS. FLEXIBLE FINANCING OPTIONS. "ASSURING CROP SUCCESS FOR YOU". DELIVERY DIRECT TO YOUR FARM. ASSURE CROP - SENECA, KS, (800) 6354743 1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER FOR SALE NE - FRONT WEIGHTS FOR CASE IH MAGNUM, (308) 995-5515 NE - HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS, HOSES & PTO PUMPS, (308) 587-2344 TX - NEW & USED FARM EQUIPMENT AND NEW & USED PARTS. SALVAGE YARD FOR TRACTORS & FARM EQUIPMENT. KADDATZ AUCTIONEERING & EQUIPMENT SALES. KADDATZEQUIPMENT. COM, (254) 5823000


September 29, 2011 1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 413 CHRYSLER FOR SALVAGE, (308) 995-5515 NE - USED VEE BELTS: 3-IHC C176" $15 EA; 4 GATES C240" $20 EA; 3 DAYCO C240" $15 EA; 4 DAYCO C270" $15 EA 1 DAYCO C116 $10 EA; 1 DAYCO 94" X 1 1/4" WIDE $10, (308) 624-2177 1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE NE - 10" WLR BOWLS, (308) 995-5515 NE - NEW DODA PUMPS, SEVERAL USED PTO PUMPS, (800) 284-7066 NE - 3X4 BERKELEY PUMPS, PRIMING VALVES AVAILABLE, (402) 364-2592 1203 - PIPE FOR SALE NE - 8" TEXFLO 20" GATES, ALL KINDS OF FITTINGS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6" BAND & LATCH MAIN LINE, (308) 995-5515 NE - 8" MAIN LINE HASTINGS, (308) 9955515 KS - 8" ALUMINUM MAIL LINE, $1.25 PER FOOT, (785) 221-8173 1205 - GENERATOR WANTED TO BUY NE - USED WINPOWER PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 FOR SALE NE - WINPOWER - NEW & USED PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 IA - WINCO PTO GENERATORS, CALL US FOR PRICE BEFORE YOU BUY! HARVEY AT EDEN SUPPLY 8AM - 10PM., (515) 679-4081 1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE NE - 150 HP GEARHEAD, 6 RATIO, (308) 995-5515 NE - GEAR DRIVE REPAIR- AMARILLO WARRANTY CENTER. REPAIR ALL MAKES/MODELS. 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES. CENTRAL IRRIGATION, (402) 723-5824 NE - AMARILLO GEARHEADS: 110HP 4:3 $700, 70 HP 5:4 $650, 50 HP 4:5 $600, (308) 624-2177 NE - US MOTORS GEARHEADS 90HP 4:3 $450, 70HP 2:3 $400, 50HP 10:11 $700, 50HP 5:4 $600, 30HP 4:3 $300, (308) 6242177 NE - DERAN/RANDOLPH GEARHEAD 100HP 4:3 $500, PEERLESS GEARHEAD 2:3 $300, (308) 624-2177 NE - AMARILLO GEAR HD 1:1 RATIO, 100 HP, 308/380/7161 OR, (308) 485-4486 1208 - TRAVELER SYSTEMS FOR SALE NE - NEW OCMIS HH: 4" X 1312', (800) 2847066 NE - NEW CADMAN 4" X 1250' HOSE, (800) 284-7066 NE - NEW GREENFIELD 3" X 1200', USED BOSS 4. 5" X 660', 8 USED HEINZMAN 4. 5" X 660', VERMEER 3" X 660', BAUER 4" X 1180', (800) 284-7066 NE - HEINZMAN TRAVELER WITH HOSE, (308) 390-0642 1209 - PUMPS WITH MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 3/4 BERKELEY PUMPS WITH PRIMING VALVES, ATTACHED TO YOUR CHOICE OF INDUSTRIAL 300 FORD OR 262 ALLIS W/RADIATORS, AND CARTS, (402) 3642592 1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. FOR SALE WI - SERVING THE MIDWEST WITH COMPLETE IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. CONTACT ROBERTS IRRIGATION COMPANY AT 1500 POST ROAD, PLOVER, WI 54467, (800) 434-5224 NE - ORTHMAN 3-PT PIVOT TRACK CLOSER, EXCELLENT COND, (308) 390-0642

Heartland Express 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE OK - REBUILT COMBINE SIEVES. NEW REEL BATS, GALVANIZED AND BLACK CELL 580525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 KS - NH TR98, 2000 SEP HRS, 30' 73C FLEX HEAD, (620) 340-3358 OK - '82 GLEANER N6, 24' HEADER CELL 580-525-1265, $7,500.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - C-IH 1480, 810 24' HEAD CELL 580525-1265, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - TR85 NEW HOLLAND, 3208 CAT, 24' HEADER CELL 580- 525-1265, $5,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - IH 1440 COMBINE WITH 3400 HRS., (308) 269-2586 NE - PARTS FOR 1680 CLEANING SYSTEM, CALL FOR LIST, (308) 269-2586 OK - 1988 1680 IHC, STANDARD ROTOR, 3045 X 32 TIRES, $15,000 CELL 580-5251265 OR, (580) 361-2265 OK - R70 GLEANER, 2689 ENGINE HRS, 1904 SEPARATOR HRS, $20,000 CELL 580525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 IA - 2007 9760 WITH 851 SEPARATOR HOURS, 179, 000. 2008 9770 WITH 1000 SEPARATOR HOURS WITH AUTO TRAX, 199, 000. 2009 9770 WITH 562 SEPARATOR HOURS WITH AUTO TRAX, 239, 000. WILL DELIVER WITHIN 500 MILES. CALL 712-6523722 OR, (515) 386-8117 NE - 1994 AGCO 8 ROW 36 HUGGER CORNHEAD, 400 ACRES ON TOTAL REBUILD, $8K. 27' AGCO RIDGED HEAD WITH FOUR AND AFT WHEEL, $3,500. 26' EZ TRAIL HEADER TRAILER LIKE NEW $2,350, JUNIATA, NE; CALL:, (402) 461-6637 NE - 2007 JD 9660, 1550 SEP HRS, C/M, 18. 4 X 38 DUALS, 350 BUSHEL BIN EXTENSION. FREE DELIVERY., $135,000.00, (308) 250-0522 1302 - COMBINE HEADS FOR SALE KS - SHELBOURNE 20' STRIPPER HEADER, $5,500.00, (785) 871-0711 OK - MACDON 960 36' DRAPER W/50 SERIES JD ADAPTER, BAT REEL, $12,500 CELL 580-525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 IA - COMBINE HEAD CARRIERS. 30', 35', 41'. REASONABLE. 712-653-3411 TO LEAVE MESSAGE OR, (712) 210-6587 1305 - WAGONS/GRAVITY WAGONS FOR SALE IA - DEMCO 550 OR 650 GRAVITY WAGONS. CALL, (712) 210-6587 1306 - GRAIN CARTS FOR SALE KS - BIG 12 GRAIN CART 400 BU. , EXTRA WIDE AXLE, $850.00, (785) 871-0711 IA - 25', 30' & 36' GRAIN HEADER CARTS. CALL, (712) 210-6587 1307 - GRAIN DRYERS FOR SALE NE - M & W 650, SUPERB SA500C, GSI 525C, 8 MC'S, '09 BROCK SQ20D, 600 HOURS, 4 FF'S, (800) 284-7066 NE - NEW BROCK SQ20M, (800) 284-7066 NE - USED 4" & 5" AIR SYSTEMS, (800) 2847066 NE - USED FARM FANS 5" AIR SYSTEM, (308) 282-1330

M-C Dryers Made in America Using Innovation, Expertise, & Quality. Call Now for Best Deals

515-577-7563

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

MEYERS TRACTOR SALVAGE Aberdeen, So. Dak. 1000+ Tractors & Combines 400+ Reground Crankshafts 500+ Tractor Tires 300+ Radiators Large line of Swather, Baler & Cutter Parts

GOOD BUYS AND SERVICE WANT TO BUY TRACTORS & COMBINES & SWATHERS FOR SALVAGE

Phone (605) 225-0185 5 Miles North & 1 Mile West of CASE IH Mon. - Fri. 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM & Sat. 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM

1310 - AUGERS FOR SALE NE - HUTCHINSON BIN OR TRUCK FILL AUGER, 8-10", PORTABLE, WITH SPECIAL ORDER OF 1/4" THICK FLIGHTING ALL THE WAY UP. "BIG WINTER DISCOUNTS" CALL HARLEY AT, (402) 649-6711 NE - WESTFIELD MK 10" X 71' SWING HOPPER, $5000. 308-380-7161 OR, $5,000.00, (308) 485-4486 NE - KEWANEE 10" X 27', 7. 5 HP SINGLE PHASE MOTOR, NEW FLIGHTING, $3000. 308-380-7161 OR, (308) 485-4486 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE NE - 8" AERATION TUBING AND AERATION FANS, (308) 995-5515 NE - BULK HEAD FOR 51' CURVET, (308) 995-5515 NE - SINGLE PHASE MOTORS, (308) 9955515 NE - BROCK BINS & GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, EPS & BEHLEN BLDG SYSTEMS, BUCKLEY STEEL, AINSWORTH, NE, (402) 387-0347 NE - 2 RODLOCK CORN CRIBS WITH ROOFS $250, (402) 447-2388 1315 - COMBINE TRAILERS FOR SALE SK - COMBINE TRAILERS: TRAILTECH OR JANTZ, SINGLE & DOUBLE. HYDRAULIC FOLD HEAD TRANSPORTS. FLAMAN SALES, BOX 280, SOUTHEY, SK, CANADA S0G 4P0, (306) 726-4403 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - CHICAGO FANS, (308) 995-5515 FOR SALE NE - 8" AERATION TUBES, FANS, TUNNELS FOR CONCRETE FLOORS, (308) 995-5515 IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LEASE OR LOAN AT 7. 1%. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487 NE - NEW ORTHMAN DRY BEAN CUTTERS, (308) 995-5515 OK - ROTEX GRAIN CLEANER, HAS CORN SCREENS RIGHT NOW, CELL 580-525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 1406 - LAWN MOWERS FOR SALE NE - HIS & HERS MOWERS, MADE BY DEINES CORP, BOTH HAVE 48" FRONT DECKS, 1 W/BAGGER, 1 W/DUMP BOX, BOTH W/BRAND NEW 14 HP TECUMSEH ENGINES, HEAVY DUTY MOWERS, EXCELLENT. ALSO LOTS OF SPARE PARTS, (308) 390-0642 NE - WORKHORSE LAWN TRACTOR W/SIDE PULL TYPE MOWER W/ BRIGGS & STRATTON ENGINE, WILL MOW TALL GRASS, PRACTICALLY NEW. REEL TYPE MOWER FOR SHORT GRASS, 10' WIDE SWATH. CAN BE PULLED BEHIND 4 WHEELER OR WORKHORSE TRACTOR, (308) 390-0642 1407 - ELECTRIC MOTORS FOR SALE NE - COMPLETE LINE OF SHEAVES, BEARINGS, DRIVES, & MOTORS, (402) 387-0347 1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY WI - USED BULK MILK TANKS, ALL SIZES, (800) 558-0112 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC WANTED TO BUY NE - 110V WELDING ROD DRYING OVEN, (308) 587-2344 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - ELSTON GOPHER MACHINE, (308) 5872344 IA - WWW. WHEELRAKE. COM, (712) 3662114 KS - ORTHMAN & BUCKEYE FRONT 3 PT HITCHES, $1500 EACH., (620) 865-2541

Farmhand F358 Loader 3 valves, 8’ bucket, IH mounts. $4200. Good condition

970-371-2854 1501 - ALFALFA HAY WANTED TO BUY IA - QUALITY SML OR LG SQ ALFALFA OR MIXED IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - ALFALFA, 4X4X8 BALES, DAIRY QUALITY, SHEDDED & TARPED, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - 1ST, 2ND, & 3RD CUTTING OF ALFALFA HAY, (308) 882-4588 NE - GRINDING QUALITY ALFALFA IN LG RD BALES, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-9626399 HOME, (308) 962-5474

Page 21 1501 - ALFALFA HAY FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - HORSE QUALITY IN SM SQ BALES, SHEDDED & TARPED HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 OR - TEST MOISTURE. HAY, GRAIN, SILAGE, SOIL, WOOD, WINDROW TESTER. BALE STROKE COUNTER. MOISTURE READ OUT AS YOU BALE! WWW. LEHMANFARMS. NET, (503) 434-1705 KS - 3X3X8'S, 3X4'S, 4X4X8'S ALFALFA HAY DAIRY & BEEF COW QUALITY. OUR DAIRY ALFALFA IS TOP OF THE LINE & TESTED. WE ARE LOCATED IN CENTRAL KANSAS. CALL FOR QUOTE. RAE RAE MUNDEN 620285-8748 OR JASON DEVINE 785-766-6501. 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE IA - LARGE RD & BIG SQ BALES GOOD QUALITY GRASS HAY, DELIVERED IN SEMI LOADS ONLY, (641) 658-2738 NE - LARGE ROUND & SMALL SQUARE BALES PRAIRIE HAY, CALL EARLY AM OR LATE PM, (308) 894-6743 KS - TOP QUALITY SM SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - TOP QUALITY 4X4X8 SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - 2008 BROME BIG ROUND BALES, (785) 935-2480 NE - CERTIFIED MEADOW HAY, BIG ROUND BALES, HORSES, CATTLE, MULCH, (308) 587-2344 NE - LARGE ROUND BALES OF PRAIRIE HAY, NET WRAPPED 402-482-5596, (308) 3482234 1503 - BROME HAY FOR SALE KS - HORSE QUALITY: 3X3, WEED/MOLD FREE. AVG. 780 LBS, (785) 255-4579 1505 - STRAW WANTED TO BUY IA - GOOD CLEAN, BRIGHT SM SQ IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - 200+ LG RDS CERT WHEAT STRAW, 1000#/BL. 308-641-1240, (308) 436-5491 1512 - SEED FOR SALE TX - FORAGE-TYPE TRITICALE SEED, CALL GAYLAND WARD SEEDS, (800) 299-9273 IA - BUYER & SELLER OF PRAIRIE GRASS & WILDFLOWER SEED, OSENBAUGH SEEDS, LUCAS, IA., (800) 582-2788 WY - CERTIFIED SAINFOIN SEED: CAN OUT PRODUCE ALFALFA., (307) 202-1569 1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER FOR SALE IA - WWW. REPLACEMENTRAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 366-2114 KS - WE BUY DAMAGED GRAIN - GRAIN VACS AVAILABLE., (316) 640-3203 NE - WANTED-GRASS FOR 2012 AND BEYOND FOR COW/CALF PAIRS. WILL CONSIDER ANY SIZE. CALL, (308) 999-3673 1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE CO - TUB GRINDERS, NEW & USED (W/WARRANTY). OPERATE WELL W/70-175 HP TRACTORS, GRINDS WET HAY, TOUGH HAY & ALL GRAINS. HIGH CAPACITY. LOW PRICE. WWW. ROTOGRIND. COM, (800) 724-5498, (970) 353-3769 MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471 1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - BULK CAKE & GRAIN FEEDERS, (308) 587-2344 IA - 24' MEAL ON WHEELS HAYFEEDER. SAVE YOU MONEY, SAVES ON TIME & SAVES ON HAY. DEMCO 650 & 550 BU GRAVITY BOXES CALL 712-653-3411 & LEAVE A MESSAGE OR CALL, (712) 210-6587 IA - 24' HAY FEEDERS MEALS ON WHEELS. SAVES HAY, SAVES TIME & SAVES MONEY! CALL, (712) 210-6587 1815 - WATERERS FOR SALE NE - BULL TOUGH BOTTOMLESS HEAVY GAUGE STOCK TANKS, (402) 387-0347 MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471

GIANT RUBBER WATER TANKS Tanks made from used earth moving tires. Sizes from 6 to 13 foot. Can be open topped or drinker holes cut for frost-free winter use. Full loads can be delivered anywhere in the United States.

Guaranteed best quality & lowest price. Call

605/473-5356

1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE NE - REBUILT AIR MOTORS OR REPAIRS, (308) 587-2344 TX - VIRDEN PERMA-BILT CO. FARM & RANCH PRODUCTS: ROOF & TANK COATINGS, WINDMILL PARTS. SEND OR CALL FOR FREE CATALOG. 2821 MAYS AVE. BOX7160FR AMARILLO, TX 79114-7160 WWW. VIRDENPRODUCTS. COM, (806) 3522761 NE - MONITOR PUMP JACK-CHOICE OF GAS & ELECTRIC MOTOR, $650.00, (308) 4364369 1820 - LIVESTOCK BEDDING FOR SALE NE - CORRUGATED WINDBREAK STEEL, 8 GAUGE THROUGH 20 GAUGE, (402) 3870347 MN - BEDDING FOR SALE. DRY SAWDUST FOR DAIRY BARNS, DELIVERED ON WALKING FLOOR TRAILERS. WILL DELIVER TO MN, EAST SD, WEST WI, & NORTH IA ONLY. ALSO AVAILABLE SWEET CORN SILAGE, CALL FOR PRICES, (888) 339-2381 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - 20' BULL WHIP, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", FOR FENCING CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - WE ARE YOUR STAMPEDE LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT DEALER. EMERSON EQUIPMENT. WHITMAN, NE, (308) 544-6421 KS - TIRE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS: WATER TANKS, MINERAL FEEDERS, SILAGE COVER WEIGHTS. WWW. GEETIRE. COM, (785) 231-8397 NE - GOPHER CONTROL MACHINE, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - GELBVIEH AND BALANCER OPEN HEIFERS, (402) 879-4976 NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD VIRGIN REG ANGUS HEIFERS, (308) 569-2458 1904 - BRED HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - YOUNG COWS & BRED HEIFERS, AI'D TO ABS BULLS, AND CLEANED UP WITH SUMMITCREST BULLS, (308) 569-2458

FOR SALE 2 year old Brown Swiss/Angus Cross Heifer. AI’d with Guernsey. To calve in late March. $1,500.

CALL 308.534.3794 1906 - BRED COWS FOR SALE NE - I'M DEALING ON COWS COMING OUT OF DROUGHT AREAS EVERY DAY. WWW. BREDCOWSWRIGHTLIVESTOCK. COM OR CALL, (308) 534-0939 1907 - DAIRY COWS FOR SALE

DAIRY COWS Commercial & Family Cows

QUALITY GENETIC COWS Jersey, Brown Swiss, Holstein, Inquire Ayrshire & Guernsey. Surge, De Laval milking machines, parts & repair.

DELIVERY AVAILABLE dallasdomedairy.com • Paul 307-349-3837 Farm Milk References

1908 - COW CALF PAIRS FOR SALE NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD REG ANGUS COW/CALF PAIRS, (308) 569-2458 1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - REGISTERED ANGUS, CELL: 308-8701119, (308) 732-3356 NE - 25 PB CHAROLAIS BULLS COMING 2S ALL RECORDS 40 YRS, (308) 995-5515 NE - GELBVIEH BULLS, RED & BLACK, 1 & 2 YR OLDS, (402) 879-4976 NE - (25) COMING 2 YR OLD CHAROLAIS BULLS(308) 567-2288, (308) 995-5515 NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, 2 YEAR OLDS AND YEARLINGS, SONS OF 878, BLUEPRINT 202 AND TRAVELOR 722, (308) 569-2458 1915 - SEMEN/EMBRYO/AI SERVICE FOR SALE NE - DBL BLACK DBL POLLED CALVING EASE GELBVIEH BULLS, (402) 879-4976 1916 - DAIRY HEIFERS FOR SALE WI - DAIRY EQUIP- STALLS, GATES, HEADLOCKS, TMR MIXERS, BARN CLEANERS, MANURE AUGERS/PUMPS, VENTILATION, ALLEY SCRAPERS. REASONABLY PRICE LONG LASTING EQUIP EQUALS VALUE. MEETING ALL DAIRYMEN'S NEEDS SINCE 1919. BERG EQUIPMENT CORP. WWW. BERGEQUIPMENT. COM, (800) 494-1738 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com


Page 22 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE CO - IT'S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292 2101 - FEEDER LAMBS FOR SALE SD - CUSTOM SHEEP FEEDLOT: LAMBS & EWES TO FEED, FATTEN & GROW!!! SHIPPY SHEEP FEEDLOT. CALL KYLE AT 605-8420935 OR DALE 605-842-3967. WWW. SHEEPFEEDLOT. COM, (605) 842-3967 2200 - REGISTERED HORSES FOR SALE NE - AQHA, YEARLINGS, MARES AND COLTS, (308) 569-2458 NE - 2003 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, MORGAN BROOD MARE, 2004 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, 1995 MORGAN STALLION, (308) 587-2344 NE - PEPPY DOC SAN, SHINING SPARK, JET DECK, THREE BAR & SKIPPER W BRED, STALLIONS, MARES, FILLEYS, & GELDINGS, MOSTLY SORREL & PALOMINO, GREAT STOCK, GOOD DISPOSITIONS, CALL 1-888689-8924 OR, (308) 384-1063 NE - AQHA HORSES, BLUE ROAN STUD AND MARES. OLDER GREY MARE, WELL BROKE, GRANDDAUGHTERS HORSE, (308) 5692458 2202 - STUD SERVICE FOR SALE NE - MORGAN STALLION STANDING AT STUD, (308) 587-2344 2208 - HORSE TRAINING FOR SALE

Colt Started Colt started on cattle Horse breaking and training Problem solved Cutting and reined cow horses Ranch horses Ranch rope work Arena work Thousands acres to ride out on Clinics and lessons

605-430-0529 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE NE - SELL-TRADE MORGAN STALLION, TBONE, LAD, CLASSY, 149831;, (308) 5872344 2301 - DOGS FOR SALE KS - AKC FARM RAISED GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES, FIRST SHOTS, DEW CLAWS. 785398-2231, 785-731-5174,, (785) 731-5190 WY - MALE PUPS FOR SALE. BORDER COLLIE/AUSSIE CROSS. SMART, LIVELY, FRIENDLY. BORN 3/6/11. WORKING PARENTS. 40 MILES N. OF RAWLINS, WY. $100., (307) 324-6450 2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK NE - EXPERIENCED DRIVERS WANTED WITH A CLEAN MVR TO HAUL LIVESTOCK. CLASS A CDL REQUIRED. ONLY SERIOUS APPLICANTS NEED APPLY. CALL:, (308) 340-8401

{HELP WANTED} TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED FOR CUSTOM

SILAGE OPERATION 2 Full-Time Positions Available in Central SD Please call: 605/730-2547

CDL TRUCK DRIVERS 2011 Harvest Season $2,800/month and bonuses, non-smoking environment.

PH-308-928-9013 CELL-308-920-0362 Full-Time Help Wanted for Western SD Cow/Calf and Horse Ranch Absolutely must be experienced in all phases of ranching. i.e. working w/cattle, calving, haying, fencing, starting colts, etc. Must be honest and reliable. Housing available. Work references required.

605-985-5235 Please leave message www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Heartland Express 2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK CONT’D NE - NEED EXPERIENCED COMBINE OPERATOR, CDL DRIVER & GRAIN CART DRIVER. WAGES BASED ON EXPERIENCE. PLEASE CALL:, (402) 469-2002 KS - OVER THE ROAD FLATBED DRIVERS, 5 YEARS EXPERIENCE HOME WEEKENDS. NO SMOKING. CLEAN MVR. YOU WILL NEED TO LIVE IN PROXIMITY OF KANSAS HIGHWAY 36 OR 100 MILES OF NORTON, KANSAS. CARTER TRUCKING, CALL, (785) 871-0560 NE - FULL-TIME FARM AND CUSTOM HAY GRINDING HELP WANTED. MUST BE RELIABLE AND ABLE TO WORK WEEKENDS WHEN NECESSARY. ONLY CALLS FROM CENTRAL NEBRASKA PLEASE. WORK LOCATED IN DANNEBROG, NEBRASKA. CALL MON. -FRI. 8 A. M. - 6 P. M., (308) 226-2400 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES KS - CORN, MILO, WHEAT HARVESTING WANTED. TWO JD MACHINES & SUPPORTING TRUCKS., (785) 567-8515 FOR SALE SD - SPREAD IT, LLC-CUSTOM FEEDLOT CLEANING & MANURE, (605) 940-3275 NE - NOW SCHEDULING TO CUSTOM HARVEST CORN, SOYBEANS, AND OTHER FALL CROPS. INSURED AND RELIABLE. PLEASE CALL, (402) 469-2002 KS - ALFALFA: PICKED UP OR DELIVERED. CALL ROY AT PLEASANT ACRES AT, (620) 804-1506

PEARCE PAINTING FARM, HOME & COMMERCIAL

2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE - CONT’D

1971 Dodge DUMP TRUCK

with newly overhauled engine. Fuller, low range w road ranger 15 speed transmission

$8,000 obo Aurora, Colorado

Please call Warren @ 303-341-7297 or 303-725-1677 OK - 1980 GMC GRAIN TRUCK, 15' STEEL BED AND HOIST. ALL FACTORY. LOW MILEAGE. HAS BEEN SHEDDED. SINGLE AXEL, $8,750. CALL:, (918) 448-0621 2604 - GRAIN TRAILERS FOR SALE OK - 2011 GSI 36' 2 HOPPER GRAIN TRAILER, ROLL TARP, WINDOWS $20,000 OR LEASE $1550/MONTH. CELL 580- 525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 KS - GOOSENECK GRAIN TRAILER, BOTTOM DUMP, SHUR-LOCK TARP, 16', 400 BU. , ONLY 400 MILES, $10,000.00, (785) 2554579 ND - 2001 WILSON 48X102X78, STAINLESS STEEL FRONT CORNERS & BACK REAR FENDERS, 3 AXLES, AIR RIDE, NEW MANUAL TARP, 11-24-S TALL RUBBER, EXC. , 12 ALUMINUM WHEELS, LOW MILEAGE, WHITE, LIKE NEW. CALL THOMAS WEGNER,, (701) 763-6480 2611 - MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE

All Exterior Painting. Bucket-Truck Available.

Call for Free Estimate

402-582-3625 308-289-2349 Serving Your Area!

CUSTOM SEED CLEANING FOR WHEAT & BARLEY SEED 20 plus years experience! Several references including Cargill & Busch Ag. On-site cleaning, completely self contained.

208-221-5338 We travel to you!

2601 - CARS FOR SALE NE - 1971 BLACK PONTIAC FIREBIRD, TIRES ARE ALL GOOD, ALWAYS SHEDDED, GOOD CONDITION, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION. COLLECTIBLE $5,500. CALL EVENINGS AT, (308) 938-2851 2602 - PICKUPS WANTED TO BUY NE - HD COIL SPRINGS FOR 1971 3/4 TON CHEVY PICKUP, END GATE FOR 1980 GMC 3/4 TON, (308) 587-2344 KS - GOOD FACTORY BED FOR '73-'79 FORD PICKUP, NO RUST THROUGH, (620) 8652541 FOR SALE KS - 88 CHEVY 1 TON, 4WD, 6. 2 DIESEL, 4 SP, FLATBED, (785) 935-2480 NE - THIRD SEAT FOR 95-99 SUBURBAN, TAUPE LEATHER, $100.00, (308) 624-2177 NE - 2001 NISSAN FRONTIER PICKUP, 4 WHEEL DRIVE, AUTOMATIC, NEW TIRES, 188, 000 MILES, RUNS GOOD, $2,750.00, (308) 874-4562 2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE KS - '59 CHEVY 60, V8, 4&2 SP, 15' B&H, 2 NEW TIRES, TUNED UP, ETC, $999.00, (620) 865-2541 SD - 1952 IH L160 TRUCK, 16' COMBINATION GRAIN & STOCK BOX & HOIST, GOOD CONDITION. $2000, (605) 386-2131 IA - 2006 DODGE HEAVY 3/4 TON 4X4 QUAD CAB SHORT BOX. 5. 9 CUMMINS DIESEL ENGINE, 6 SPEED MANUAL TRANSMISSION. 1 OWNER. 116, 000 MILES. EXCELLENT MAINTENANCE. CALL:, (319) 461-3294 MO - 1987 GMC GENERAL, CUMMINS 855, 18' STAKELESS OMAHA STANDARD GRAIN BED. EXCEPTIONAL CONDITION. WITH OR WITHOUT 2008 NEVILLE 15' PUP., (660) 548-3804 KS - 2000 IH 4900 22' GRAIN BOX, HOIST, ROLL TARP, CARGO DOORS, DT466, AUTOMATIC, $35,000. WWW.M-TSALES.NET CALL, (785) 821-2300 www.myfarmandranch.com

ONLINE AUCTION Pickups, ATVs, Boats, RVs, & More!

www.crankyape.com 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE NE - MONI MOTOR GLIDER AND TRAILER, LOW HOURS, (402) 364-2592 2616 - TIRES WANTED TO BUY NE - HOT PATCH VULCANIZING PATCHES, (308) 587-2344 NE - WANTED 4 18. 4 X 34 FIRESTONE TIRES, (308) 587-2344 NE - 11. 2 X 36 OR 12. 4 X 36 TIRES, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - 15" SPLIT RIMS, 8 HOLE, 750 MUD/SNOW, (308) 587-2344 NE - 10 BOLT RIMS W/18. 4 X 38" TIRES, (402) 336-2755 NE - RIM-GARD, NON CORROSIVE, TIRE BALLAST, (308) 587-2344 2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY IA - LATE MODEL TRLRS & TRUCKS WITH LIGHT DAMAGE OR IN NEED OF ENGINE REPAIRS, (641) 658-2738 NE - 18' STEEL TRUCK GRAIN BOX, 52" OR 60" SIDES HOIST AND ROLL TARP, (308) 436-4369 FOR SALE KS - 66 IH 2000, DETROIT, 15 SP W/HENDERSON TWINSCREW, TULSA WINCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 KS - 1975 IH SEMI, 318, 13 SP, TWIN SCREW, 5TH WHEEL, (785) 871-0711

WWW.SWATREPOS.COM

COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT AT WHOLESALE PRICES SEMITRUCKS, TRAILERS, WRECKERS,FORKLIFTS,GRAIN TRUCKS, TMR MIXERS AND MUCHMORE!! 608-574-1083

WWW.SWATREPOS.COM KS - 1974 UTILITY CHASSIS W/2-350 BU. GRAVITY BOXES, HYD AUGERS, ETC., $9,500.00, (620) 865-2541 IA - 2- 1997 W-900 60" SLEEPERS, $1,500.00. DES MOINES, IOWA. CALL DOUG AT, (515) 240-3017 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

September 29, 2011 2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 1988 MONON DRY VAN SEMI TRAILER, 53' LONG 9' HIGH 103" WIDE, CLOSED TANDEM SLIDER, SOLID ROOF, TIE DOWN BRACKETS; 2 ON EACH SIDE, GOOD CONDITION, $3,900. CALL JOE AT, (308) 4409629

2827 - BUILDING SUPPLIES FOR SALE

HOPPERS & CATTLE POTS New & Used - 2 or 3 Axle Rent • Sell • Lease • Repair Hoppers, Pots, Steps, Flats, RGN’s, Side Dumps, Live Bottoms, Trucks and More!

800-963-1108 www.diamondtne.com 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER FOR SALE NE - TRANSMISSION, GENERATOR, STARTER, REAR AXLE REMOVABLE CARRIER DIFFERENTIAL UNIT. FITS 1946 CHEVY 2 TON TRUCK, (308) 587-2344 2802 - DOZERS FOR SALE KS - TEREX 8220A DOZER, PS, TILT, GOOD RUNNING MACHINE, (785) 935-2480 KS - CAT SINGLE SHANK, DEEP PENETRATION RIPPER, FITS D8-K, WITH VALVE AND ALL, EXCELLENT CONDITION, (785) 4485893 2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 KS - 8-12 YARD SCRAPER, LATE MODEL, EXCELLENT COND. , REASONABLE, (620) 865-2541 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 NE - PULL BEHIND BOX SCRAPERS, 10' & 12'; 3PT'S 6' & 8', (402) 678-2277 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 NE - MISKIN 5 YD DIRT SCRAPER, (308) 269-2586 MO - TOREQ 40" PTO DITCHER, $7,200.00, (660) 548-3804 MO - BUFFALO 12' BOX BLADES IN STOCK, (660) 548-3804 MO - 9 YD TOREQ, (660) 548-3804 2804 - MOTOR GRADERS FOR SALE KS - CAT 12F-13K, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (785) 448-5893 2805 - BACKHOE FOR SALE KS - CAT 235-32K, VERY GOOD CONDITION, ONE OWNER, (785) 448-5893 2806 - CRANES & DRAGLINES FOR RENT NE - 28 TON NATIONAL CRANE, 152 FT. REACH, (402) 387-0347 FOR SALE KS - LORAINE 25 TON TRUCK CRANE, LOTS OF BOOM, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (785) 448-5893 2807 - GENERATORS FOR SALE MN - AUTOMATIC GENERATOR SETS 15KW500KW, NEW & USED, LOW TIME GEN SETS. REMOTE WELL GENERATORS. SERVING FARMERS SINCE 1975. STANDBY POWER SYSTEMS, WINDOM MN, MON-SAT 9-5., (800) 419-9806 IA - MULTI-QUIP WHISPER WATT 25K VA AC GENERATOR, DIESEL ENGINE, 7000 HOURS, $7,500. CALL DOUG AT, (515) 240-3017 2809 - CONSTRUCTION TRUCKS FOR SALE KS - 1997 LOADKING, 55 TON, 3 AXLE, LAY DOWN NECK, W/BEAVERTAILS. CALL 785817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 KS - 15 TON TANDEM AXLE TRAILER, DUALS, TILT TOP, WENCH, EXCELLENT CONDITION, TIRES 70%, (785) 448-5893 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS WANTED TO BUY NE - PALLET FORK, NEEDS TO BE QUIK TATCH & TINES NEED TO BE 60" FOR SKID STEER, (308) 587-2344 2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE NE - 1500-8000# (MOSTLY 4000#), AIR TIRES & NEW FORKS, (402) 678-2277 OK - PETTIBONE, 30' LIFT CELL 580-5251265, $3,500.00, (580) 361-2265 MO - CAT 8000# 2 STAGE W/PNEUMATIC TIRES, HYDRAULICS ARE EXCELLENT, ENGINE NEEDS WORK. CHEAP!, (660) 5483804

2840 - OTHER CONST. EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - 1991 BLUEBIRD BUS, 5. 9 CUMMINS, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - 16 PCS 36" USED CONCRETE CULVERT. EACH PIECE 3' LONG. NEAR GRAND ISLAND, NE. YOU LOAD AND HAUL, (308) 624-2177 ND - SCRAPER: BUY & SELL OLD CABLE SCRAPERS, CAT 60, 70, 80; LETOURNEAU LS, LP, FP; A/C; ALL MAKES AND SIZES, WILL CONVERT OVER TO HYDRAULICS, VERY PROFESSIONALLY DONE, TIRES & PARTS. CONTACT STEVE, WWW. STEVEVOIGHTMAN. COM. CELL 701-6808015 OR BUS., (701) 742-2182 3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY SD - MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE ANY OLDER MM, (605) 386-2131 FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTORS! BIEWER'S TRACTOR & MACH. SALV. SPECIALIZES IN 1920-85 TRACTOR PARTS. FREE NATIONWIDE LOCATING. BARNESVILLE, MN. SEARCH PARTS & SEE OVER 100 ANTIQUE TRACTORS PICTURED AT SALVAGETRACTORS. COM, (218) 493-4696 NE - TRACTOR PARTS FOR SALE. NEW AFTERMARKET PARTS FOR MOST MAKES OF TRACTORS. FRONT END PARTS, 3 PT HITCH PARTS, RADIATORS, SEATS, STEERING WHEELS, BATTERY BOXES, PTO PARTS, DRAWBARS, WATER PUMPS, DECALS & MORE. CLASSIC AG, AINSWORTH, NE., (800) 286-2171 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES WANTED TO BUY SD - IH 6 SPEED SPECIAL TRUCK, (605) 386-2131 SD - OLDER JEEPS, CJ 2A, 1948 OR OLDER, ALSO MILITARY, (605) 386-2131 NE - 1950 FORD CRESTLINER & 1951 VICTORIA, (308) 876-2515 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - PIPE 2 3/8", 2 7/8", 3 1/2", 4 1/2", 5 1/2", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 KS - LOTS OF USED GUARDRAIL, USED CORRUGATED METAL PIPE, LARGE & SMALL, 30' STEEL I-BEAMS, (785) 448-5893 NE - 1000 3 1/2" DIAMETER, 6 1/2' LONG CREOSOTE POSTS, (402) 461-9336

FRANK BLACK Pipe & Supply Co. 2-3/8"; 2-7/8"; 3-1/2" oilfield tubing 3/4" thru 42" new & used line pipe square & rectangular tubing plate steel • sucker rods beam, channel & angle iron Call us for all your steel pipe needs.

WE CAN DELIVER! (620) 241-2582 • McPherson, KS

12 GAUGE USED GUARDRAIL Hot Dip galvanized. 26’ Please call for delivered quote 423-791-4771 • 721-726-3562 620-546-3507

STRUCTURAL PIPE

‹ Excellent Condition ‹ Overstock Price ‹

2 3/8 @ $.95 ALL SIZES AVAILABLE RPJ ENERGY Call or E-mail Ray: 970.405.8866 raypropes@rpjenergy.com • www.rpjenergy.com

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com


September 29, 2011 3006 - WIRE FOR SALE NE - 20 MILES OF RED BRAND BARBED WIRE, (402) 461-9336 3007 - PIPE FOR SALE MO - GOOD USED RR TANK CAR SHELLS FOR CULVERTS (7-10' DIAMETER)(30'-55' LONG), ALSO GOOD USED STEEL PIPE, 8 5/8" DIAMETER THRU 48" DIAMETER, 20', 30', 40' & 50' LENGTHS. CALL GARY AT GATEWAY PIPE & SUPPLY, (800) 489-4321 3009 - FUEL TANKS FOR SALE KS - '76 FORD 2000 GAL TANK WAGON FUEL TRUCK, 2 HOSE REELS, 5 COMPARTMENTS, READY TO GO, (785) 448-5893 3011 - HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS WANTED TO BUY NE - REAR TINE ROTO TILLER, (308) 5872344 3014 - TREES/TREE EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - FOR SALE: 250 BLUE SPRUCE TREES 4' TO 7'. REASONABLY PRICED. SELL CHOICE. (BEAUTIFUL TREES) WILL BE DIGGING IN SEPTEMBER. CALL, (402) 893-4781 3030 - OTHER WANTED TO BUY SD - JACOBS 32 VOLT WIND GENERATOR, ALSO WINCHARGER USED DURING THE '30'S & '40'S, WILL PAY ACCORDING TO CONDITION, (605) 386-2131 NE - SCRAP BATTERIES- WE WANT 'EM! WE ALSO BUY STEEL CASE & GLASS PACK. CALL FOR DETAILS! ALLEN'S NEW & USED BATTERIES. BUY/SELL, NEW/USED. WE CARRY ALL KINDS!! ALLEN FELTON, OWNER. LINCOLN, NE., (402) 467-2455 FOR SALE NE - REASONABLY PRICE MECHANICS GLOVES, WARM GLOVES, MITTENS & OTHER GLOVES., (308) 587-2344 IA - ORLAND'S SAFE-T-WEED ALL NATURAL ORGANIC LAWN CARE PRODUCTS. CORN GLUTEN HERBICIDE & FERTILIZER. U. S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION, CHILDREN & PET SAFE EMAIL:MACINC@IOWATELECOM. NET, (712) 210-6587

Heartland Express

Page 23

PLATTE WATER MANAGERS ACTING NOW...

3034 - WIND GENERATORS FOR SALE

Continued from page 11

Is Wind Energy Generated at your Home or Small Business Right for you? Receive your Report Today Small Wind or Micro-Generated Wind Energy is for Farmers, Ranchers, Small Businesses and Residential. Today’s Federal and State incentives can pay for the majority of a wind energy system installation cost. To help you understand if onsite wind energy is right for you visit

www.xzeres.com/why-wind and submit your address to receive a free report about your site locations potential or contact your local sales rep.

2012 water plans Modifications on two Wyoming reservoirs should help ease flooding in high-water years. Lawson said that raising the Pathfinder Dam spillway 2.5 feet will add 54,000 a-f of water storage, with 24,000 a-f earmarked as enhanced river flow credits for the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program. Raising the dam and dikes at Glendo Reservoir will provide more storage space for flood control. Cacek said several Platte Basin NRDs now have agreements with irrigation districts to divert high river flows in the fall and early spring into canals to recharge groundwater and help mitigate flooding. Basin managers will face a critical decision in late February or early March about how much reservoir water to release.

Lawson's concern is seeing an average or below-average snowpack. "You can sit on it, yet the heaviest precipitation and most snow you get as far as water content doesn't come until April or May," he said. Long-term weather forecasts aren't very accurate, so decisions must be made after studying the data in hand. "Even if the early March snow projections are around average, my recommendation will be that we start moving water, watching it closely so if we don't see more in April, we can back off," Lawson said. "You have to make the decision early," he added. "You can't procrastinate, and you can't second-guess yourself."

GROUNDBREAKING FOR OUTDOOR LEARNING AREA... Continued from page 13

Frank Pagano at

(515) 480-7606 XZERES Wind Energy Systems Smart investments for a new economy.

7001 - SPECIAL EVENTS FOR SALE NE - MID-AMERICA ALFALFA EXPO, FEATURING THE NEWEST HAY EQUIPMENT & PRODUCTS, ALSO AN EXHIBITOR AUCTION. EXPO IS FEB 7 & FEB 8, 2012, 8 AM-5 PM AUCTION IS FEB 7, 3:45PM; ALL OF THIS TAKES PLACE AT BUFFALO COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, KEARNEY, NE, (800) 743-1649 MT - NEED TICKETS OR PACKAGES FOR THE NFR? DECEMBER 1ST-10TH. BALCONY SEATS AVAILABLE! BEARTOOTH TRAVEL; CALL BONNIE AT 800-554-2303 OR, (406) 445-2303

water conservation and environmental sustainability projects that promote green spaces. The Grand Island Groundwater Guardian Team is a local volunteer group whose main purpose is to educate the public about the importance of groundwater. Grand Island’s team members include: Roger Andrews-president of team, Retired from Bureau of Reclamation Bill Brennan, Saint Francis Medical Center Foundation Larry Cast, Retired from Bureau of Reclamation Betty Curtis, Director of Clean Community System Julie Frandsen, Grand Island Utilities Department

Elizabeth Killinger, UNL Extension Educator Norma Janulewicz, Retired from Telephone Pioneers Erin Johnson, Nebraska Health & Human Services Department Ken Gnadt, Former Mayor of City of Grand Island Marcia Lee, Central Platte Natural Resources District Gary Mader, Retired from Grand Island Utilities Department Brad Titman, Wastewater Treatment Plant of Grand Island The Groundwater Foundation, initiated by Susan Seacrest of Lincoln, started the Groundwater Guardian Program in 1994. The Grand Island Groundwater Guardian Team was initiated in 1996.

Midlands Classified Ad Network WORK FOR DEPT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES VIEW CURRENT JOB OPENINGS AT WWW.DHHS.NE.GOV LOOKING FOR CONTRACTORS LOCATED THROUGHOUT NEBRASKA (ALSO SW IA) TO INSTALL BROADBAND INTERNET SYSTEMS. WILL CERTIFY. PAYS $130+ PER INSTALL. POSSIBLE TO EARN $1100 - $1800 WEEKLY WORKING 5 DAYS. CALL AGSL TECHNOLOGY INC FOR MORE INFO 866-443-2501 OR EMAIL RESUME TO AGSLTECH@HUGHES.NET LOCAL MEDICAL WALK-IN CLINIC IS CURRENTLY SEEKING A FULL TIME MID-LEVEL PROVIDER. PREVIOUS PRIMARY OR URGENT CARE EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. OFFERS FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING W/ NO ON-CALL DUTIES. A COMPETITIVE SALARY & BENEFIT PACKAGE IS AVAILABLE COMMENSURATE W/ EXPERIENCE. SEND RESUME: QUICK CARE MEDICAL CENTER, 3210 AVE. B, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361 FINANCIALLY STRONG AND GROWING TRANSPORTATION COMPANY IS SEEKING A CAREER MINDED INDIVIDUAL FOR A TRUCKLOAD BROKERAGE POSITION. SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE MUST BE A SELF STARTER, HAVE EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION SKILLS, PROBLEM SOLVING/DECISION MAKING CAPABILITIES, AND THE UNDERSTANDING OF STRONG CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS. EXPERIENCE IN TRUCKLOAD BROKERAGE PREFERRED BUT NOT REQUIRED. POSITION OFFERS BASE SALARY PLUS INCENTIVES WITH A VERY COMPETITIVE BENEFITS PACKAGE. SEND RESUME TO: LOGISTICS TRAFFIC/PM, P O BOX 1649, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69363-1649 FOREMAN & CREW PERSONNEL - EXPERIENCE PREFERRED, BUT WILL TRAIN THE RIGHT CANDIDATES. COMPETITIVE WAGES, EXCEL-

LENT HEALTH & FRINGE BENEFITS - SAVE FUEL & $$$ BY RIDING TO JOB SITES IN OUR CREW TRUCK! WE MAINTAIN A DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE - W/ PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TESTING & BACKGROUND CHECKS. PLEASE APPLY WITHIN FROM 8AM - 5PM M-F, OR 8AM - NOON ON SAT. AT: 721 S. BELTLINE E, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361 OR APPLY ONLINE A T : WWW.WORKFORCLEARYBUILDINGCORP.COM. MAIN STREET MARKET HAS CREATED A NEW EMPLOYMENT POSITION AND IS LOOKING FOR A SELF-MOTIVATED CHEF WHO LOVES TO ENTERTAIN! COULD YOU BE OUR NEW MASTER CHEF? FULL-TIME POSITION; VERY COMPETITIVE WAGE; EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACKAGE; CULINARY DEGREE PREFERRED OR MINIMUM OF 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN A HIGHLEVEL RESTAURANT. SEND RESUME TO RICK RENTERIA, RENTERIA@PANHANDLECOOP.COM OR P.O. BOX 2188, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361. 401 S. BELTLINE HWY WEST, SCOTTSBLUFF. DRUG FREE/EOE THE PANHANDLE HUMANE SOCIETY IS ACTIVELY SEEKING AN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. THIS PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL ACTIVITIES OF THE SHELTER INCLUDING ANIMAL WELFARE, PERSONNEL, AND FUNDRAISING. PHONE CALLS OR IN-PERSON COMMUNICATIONS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. FOR JOB DESCRIPTION, APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBS I T E W W W.PANHANDLEHUMANESOCIETY.ORG UNDER OUR LINKS SECTION. TESSIER'S INC. HAS AN OPENING FOR AN HVAC SERVICE TECHNICIAN AT THE RAPID CITY, SD LOCATION. OUR CANDIDATE WILL PREFERABLE HAVE THREE YEARS EXPERI-

Johanson Farm Real Estate Auction

~ Pivot Development ~ 1 PM Thursday, October 6, 2011 Holiday Inn Express - North Platte

Brochure at www.agriaffiliates.com

Dry Cropland with Expanded Acres for Development Listing Agent Jerry Weaver 308/539-4456 308/534-9240 www.agriaffiliates.com

ENCE WORKING IN RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL ATMOSPHERES. WE OFFER A COMPETITIVE SALARY AND BENEFIT PACKAGE. SEND YOUR RESUME WITH REFERENCES TO: TESSIER'S INC., PO BOX 2861, RAPID CITY, SD 57709. UTILITIES SUPERINTENDENT & UTILITIES WORKER POSITIONS IN SMALL COMMUNITY IN WESTERN NEBRASKA. ELECTRICAL WATER SYSTEM, SEWER SYSTEM, AND STREETS. FULLTIME WITH ON CALL AFTER HOURS AS NEEDED. ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION AND WATER CERTIFICATION PREFERRED. VALID DRIVER'S LICENSE REQUIRED. GOOD BENEFIT AND WAGE PACKAGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 308-487-3465 CHAMP, LLC ALBIN, WYOMING - AVAILABLE: HERDSPERSON POSITION: POSITION AIM: A POSITION THAT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CARE & OVERSIGHT OF DAY TO DAY SWINE PRODUCTION. QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE: ATTENTION TO DETAIL; EXCELLENT ANIMAL HUSBANDRY SKILLS; ABILITY TO UNDERSTAND & ACQUIRE TECHNICAL SKILLS; MUST BE ABLE TO CLIMB OVER, UNDER & AROUND PENNING; BASIC MATH & RECORD ACCURATE RECORDS; TEAM PLAYER. RESPONSIBILITIES: FEEDING OF LIVESTOCK ACCORDING TO MEASUREMENTS PRESCRIBED BY FARM MANAGEMENT FEEDER ADJUSTMENTS & CLEANING TO MINIMIZE FEED WASTE & SPOILAGE; THE MOVEMENT OF ANIMALS FROM ONE AREA OF THE FARM TO ANOTHER AS WELL AS THE LOADING OF ANIMALS ONTO TRUCKS TREATMENT OF SICK ANIMALS BASED ON A DIAGNOSIS BY OR IN CONCURRENCE W/ STAFF VETERINARIAN; ACCURATE RECORDKEEPING & REPORTING FOR A SPECIFIED AREA ACCORDING TO METH-

Call Us to Advertise in the Heartland Express Today! 800-658-3191

ODS PRESCRIBED BY FARM MANAGEMENT; DAILY CLEANING & EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE. IF INTERESTED PLEASE SUBMIT APPLICATION AT THE WYOMING WORKFORCE CENTER AT 1510 EAST PERSHING BLVD, WEST ENTRANCE, CHEYENNE, WY, 82002. CHAMP, LLC - ALBIN, WYOMING-AVAILABLE: ELECTRICAL TECHNICIAN. QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE: •TWO YEARS OF JOURNEYMAN’S EXPERIENCE IN THE INSTALLATION, REPAIR & MAINTENANCE OF ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS OR AN EQUIVALENT COMBINATION OF RELEVANT EDUCATION &/OR EXPERIENCE. KNOWLEDGE OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS & EQUIPMENT INCLUDING THE USE OF SPECIAL INSTRUMENTS FOR DIAGNOSTIC PURPOSES. ABILITY TO CLIMB STRUCTURES, TO WORK BENEATH MACHINES & IN CLOSE QUARTERS PERFORMING ANALYSIS & REPAIR WORK. RESPONSIBILITIES: TROUBLESHOOT & REPAIR ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO PROGRAMMABLE CONTROLS, NUMERAL CONTROLS, POWER SUPPLIES, GAGES, MOTOR EQUIPMENT & GENERATORS. PERFORMS PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE FUNCTIONS AS DIRECTED. MAINTAINS COMPANY REQUIRED MAINTENANCE RECORDS FOR IDENTIFIED EQUIPMENT. ASSISTS MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL W/ TECHNICAL TROUBLESHOOTING. BENEFIT PACKAGE INCLUDES PAID VACATION, HOLIDAYS, 401K/PROFIT SHARING & MEDICAL/DENTAL BENEFITS. COMPETITIVE WAGES. VAN POOL PROVIDED FROM CHEYENNE THROUGH PINE BLUFFS TO WORKSITE. IF INTERESTED YOU MAY APPLY AT THE FOLLOWING WORKFORCE CENTER: CHEYENNE WORKFORCE CENTER, 1510 EAST PERSHING BLVD, WEST ENTRANCE, CHEYENNE, WY

(307) 777-3729 ST. JOSEPH’S CHILDREN’S HOME SERVING CHILDREN & FAMILIES FOR OVER 80 YEARS NOW HIRING A: THERAPIST RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE INDIVIDUAL, GROUP & FAMILY THERAPY, AS WELL AS CASE PLANNING. REQUIREMENTS: MASTERS DEGREE FROM A CACREP OR CORE ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN COUNSELING OR PSYCHOLOGY, A CSWE ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN SOCIAL WORK OR AN AAMFT ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN MARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPY. WY LICENSED OR MUST BE ELIGIBLE TO MEET WY LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS W/IN 1 YR OF HIRING. BENEFITS - COMPETITIVE SALARY, MAJOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, & VISION INSURANCE, PAID TIME OFF & HOLIDAYS, EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTED RETIREMENT PLAN, LIFE & LONG TERM DISABILITY INSURANCE, SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM, & EXTENSIVE STAFF DEVELOPMENT. RESUMES SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO: HUMAN RESOURCE DIRECTOR, PO BOX 1117, TORRINGTON, WY 82240; FAXED TO 307-532-8405 OR E-MAILED TO SLOWER@STJOSEPH-WY.ORG. WEBSITE: HTTP://WWW.STJOSEPH-WY.ORG. POSITION IS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. EOE EXPERIENCED CONCRETE FOREMAN APPLY AT PAUL REED CONSTRUCTION, 2970 N. 10TH ST., GERING. THE KIMBALL PUBLIC SCHOOLS (EOE) IS TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR (2011-2012): K-8 SPED TEACHER POSITION OPEN UNTIL FILLED. SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME AND CREDENTIALS TO: TROY L. UNZICKER, SUPERINTENDENT, 901 S. NADINE, KIMBALL, NE 69341

Buccaneer Plus $8.75 Gen. Warrior $58 Will meet or beat all prices!

Box 277 • Central City, NE 68826

Quantity Discount

Livestock Mixing & Feeding Equipment Commercial Manure Spreaders • Electronic Scales

Benes Service Valparaiso, NE • 402-784-3581 48040

Tom Pullen Juke Pullen Sales Representative

WATS: 1-800-658-4375 Bus. (308) 946-3068 or 946-2224 Fax (308) 946-2672 • Res. (308) 946-2152 www.billsvolume.com

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Heartland Express

September 29, 2011

Don’t Miss Out!

Advertise in our Gateway Farm Expo Issue Call Today 16,000 Tot Distrib al ution

800-658-3191 Deadline October 6th 47251

1

See for yourself why Valley is the best value in the industry.

2

Come out and walk our machines. See up close why industry experts, independent lab tests and, most importantly, growers themselves consider Valley to offer the highest quality, for the best value. See how our commitment to the little things makes Valley the best-selling machine in the industry.

1 2

3 3

®

The closer you get, the better we look. Central Valley Irrigation

CVI Kearney

Plains Irrigation

Stoltenberg Irrigation

Holdrege, NE (308) 995-6583 •••

Kearney, NE (308) 237-2268 •••

Grand Island, NE (800) 584-9334 •••

Cairo, NE (888) 384-6741

Central Valley Irrigation

Green Valley Irrigation, Inc.

Southeast Valley Irrigation

Lexington, NE (308) 324-3434

Atkinson, NE (402) 925-2858

Bruning, NE (402) 353-6775

48041


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