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POSTAL CUSTOMER

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE

September 27, 2012 Issue 257-16-20

Pork Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Fall Irrigation . . . . . . . 10-13 Threads Across NE . . . . . 14 Weather Al Dutcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Country Living House Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Lighter Side

Using Irrigation Canals for Groundwater Recharge Might Work

Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Markets Grains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Government Report Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Ag Management Nebraska Farmers Compare Current, Former Droughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Livestock News Heartland Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

A Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District irrigation canal north of Funk was full of water for irrigation in early June. Two natural resources districts have proposed changing the use of Central’s canal system to groundwater recharge that would allow surface water irrigators to switch to wells and also would augment Platte River flows. Lori Potter, The Kearney Hub KEARNEY — There already are bumps in the road for a project proposed by two natural resources districts (NRDS) to convert Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District (CNPPID) irrigation canals to groundwater recharge. At the Nebraska Association of Resources Districts conference in Kearney, CNPPID and NRD officials disagreed Monday about whether all computer models from a project feasibility study have been shared. Brent Cain, supervising hydrologist for the Brown and Caldwell study commissioned by the Grand Island-based Central Platte NRD and North Platte-based Twin Platte NRD, presented an overview of the study done by his Denver firm, which indicates the project is feasible.

For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com

The proposal is to use CNPPID canals to hold water in times of excess Platte River flows to enhance groundwater recharge. Essentially, it would be storing more surface water in an underground reservoir, Cain said. CNPPID’s primary irrigation area is 105,000 acres in Gosper, Phelps and Kearney counties. Cain said the study found that such conjunctive water management would allow about 450 more wells to be drilled within the Central district to provide a more consistent water source for all acres now irrigated with surface water. The changes also could reduce nonconsumptive losses of irrigation water during transport from Lake McConaughy, leave more water in the river during dry times and provide groundwater recharge that augments streamflows. After Cain’s presentation, CNPPID General Manager Don Kraus of Holdrege said his staff

Production News The Value of Irrigation in a Drought Regime: The Case of 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-23

still doesn’t have all the information needed, specifically computer models used for the study, to make conclusions. Kraus said model files were promised within 10 days of a June 22 study presentation in Holdrege to Central board members, staff and water users. Some files were received last month, and another set arrived Sunday night. “We're not going to comment on this study until we have more information,” he said. “... We can't do it overnight. They spent two years on this.” Central Platte NRD General Manager Ron Bishop and Cain both said all model files and supporting materials have been sent to CNPPID. “Maybe what they're wanting doesn't exist,” Bishop said. “That’s why we're offering to help, financially, to do [more] studies." Continued on page 15

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 9/14/12

Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$116.80 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .150.26 Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137.46 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . .184.27 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88.62 Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . .* Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . .95.09 Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .183.50 Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404.92

120.68

126.97

159.00 144.82 190.23 85.32 * 91.82 118.13 320.41

162.91 153.29 191.50 63.46 * 78.05 84.00 317.08

Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.71 Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.82 Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.09 Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . .11.20 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .3.60

8.01 8.04 16.96 13.29 4.02

8.58 7.67 17.09 13.07 3.99

Hay (per ton) Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . . .185.50 Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . . .117.50 Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . .92.50 Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204.50 Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75.50 * No market.

242.50 242.50 220.00 212.50 155.00 185.00 307.50 292.00 120.88 103.63


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Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Weather

September 27, 2012

Weather Outlook Al Dutcher Report Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Allen Dutcher

Although weather models had several chances for moisture during the previous two-week forecast, very dry surface conditions limited precipitation to little more than sprinkles in a few isolated locations. The Climate Prediction Center indicates that there is no definable precipitation trend in the October and October-December precipitation forecast. They do shift drier than normal conditions for October into the central and eastern Corn Belt. Temperatures are forecasted to be above normal for the next 30 and 90 days across the entire state. Although a couple of precipitation events are indicated by the models for the next two weeks, there is no supporting evidence that an extended wet spell is on tap for the next two weeks. Week One Forecast, 9/29 - 10/5: Weather forecast models indicate predominately dry conditions during this forecast period. Only two precipitation events are indicated by the models, with the first chance of moisture indicated for the 9/30-10/1 period for the western half of the state. As a reinforcing shot of Canadian air pushes into the central and eastern Corn Belt, the backside of the high pressure system is projected to generate upslope flow

conditions and isolated showers are possible as low level moisture will not be optimum for widespread precipitation. After a couple of dry days, the weather models indicate that a robust cold front will slowly sag southward from and through the Dakotas and enter northern Nebraska during the evening hours of 10/4. Current weather models are very aggressive with their depiction of moisture across the entire state on 10/5. If the forecast materializes, beneficial moisture of 0.50-1.00 inches are possible, which would be welcome news to wheat producers who have been stymied by the lack of surface moisture available for germination and early stand establishment. High Temperatures: 9/29-10/1 (67 E - 75 W), 10/2-10/3 (75 E - 83 W), 10/4 (67 NW - 80 SE), 10/5 (55 N - 70 SC). Week Two Forecast, 10/6 - 10/12: Models indicate that the 10/5 moisture event will continue across eastern Nebraska during the first half of the day, before shifting south and east of the state during the afternoon hours. Dry conditions are then projected by the models for the 10/7-10/10 period before a cutoff low is projected to slowly drift eastward into the Central Plains from the Central Rockies. If the models verify, precipitation is possible across the entire state during the 10/11-10/12 time frame. However, it should be noted that confidence in this solution is very weak as weather models usually have very poor forecasting ability with closed lows two weeks into the future. High Temperatures: 10/6 (48 N - 57 S), 10/7 (48 E - 61 W), 10/8 (55 NE 64' W), 10/9-10/10 (61 NE - 75 SW), 10/11 (70 SE - 80 SW), 10/12 (56 N 64 SE).

Nebraska Weather and Crops Report Agricultural Summary: For the week ending September 23, 2012, cooler temperatures and limited rainfall aided crop drydown and harvest progress across the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Soybean harvest picked up momentum as producers turned attention from dryland corn. Corn harvest progress is near one month ahead of average and over one-third complete. Winter wheat seeding was nearing the halfway point but fields were slow to emerge due to dry soil conditions. Sorghum harvest has started and proso millet harvest was near twothirds complete. Cattle producers continued seeking forage supplies and culling of livestock remained active. Weather Summary: Small amounts of precipitation were recorded along some border counties, but most areas of the state received no rain. Temperatures averaged near normal in the western third of the state, 2 to 4 degrees below normal in the central third, and 6 to 7 degrees below normal in the

eastern third. Highs were in the lower 90’s and lows were mainly in the mid 30’s with some locations receiving the first frost of the season. Field Crops Report: Corn mature reached 87 percent, compared to 43 last year and 46 average. Corn harvested for grain was 36 percent, compared to 5 last year and 28 days ahead of 5 average. Corn conditions rated 22 percent very poor, 19 poor, 26 fair, 29 good, and 4 excellent, well below 75 percent good to excellent last year and 78 average. Irrigated corn conditions rated 54 percent good to excellent and dryland corn rated 2. Soybeans turning color were at 98 percent, compared to 87 last year and 90 average. Soybeans dropping leaves were 69 percent, compared to 38 last year and 53 average. Soybeans harvested were 19 percent, well ahead of 1 last year and 3 average. Soybean conditions rated 19 percent very poor, 28 poor, 35 fair, 17 good, and 1 excellent, well below last year’s 79 percent good to excellent and 78 average. Continued on page 7

Western

Central

Eastern

Saturday, September 28

Saturday, September 28

Saturday, September 28

High: 72 Low: 54

High: 75 Low: 54

Chance of Precip: 25%

Chance of Precip: 40%

Scattered Showers

Isolated Showers

High: 79 Low: 50 Chance of Precip: 15%

Partly Cloudy

Sunrise: 7:31 AM - Sunset: 7:22 PM

Sunrise: 7:46 AM - Sunset: 7:36 PM

Sunrise: 7:24 AM - Sunset: 7:15 PM

Sunday, September 29

Sunday, September 29

Sunday, September 29

High: 70 Low: 54

High: 75 Low: 54

Chance of Precip: 5%

Chance of Precip: 15%

Partly Cloudy

Isolated Storms

High: 72 Low: 52 Chance of Precip: 5%

Mostly Sunny

Sunrise: 7:32 AM - Sunset: 7:20 PM

Sunrise: 7:47 AM - Sunset: 7:35 PM

Sunrise: 7:25 AM - Sunset: 7:13 PM

Monday, September 30

Monday, September 30

Monday, September 30

High: 72 Low: 54

High: 77 Low: 52

Chance of Precip: 5%

Chance of Precip: 15%

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

High: 75 Low: 55 Chance of Precip: 5%

Mostly Sunny

Sunrise: 7:33 AM - Sunset: 7:18 PM

Sunrise: 7:48 AM - Sunset: 7:33 PM

Sunrise: 7:26 AM - Sunset: 7:11 PM

Tuesday, October 01

Tuesday, October 01

Tuesday, October 01

High: 73 Low: 55

High: 77 Low: 54

High: 79 Low: 55

Chance of Precip: 5%

Chance of Precip: 5%

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Chance of Precip: 5%

Mostly Sunny

Sunrise: 7:34 AM - Sunset: 7:17 PM

Sunrise: 7:49 AM - Sunset: 7:31 PM

Sunrise: 7:27 AM - Sunset: 7:10 PM

Wednesday, October 02

Wednesday, October 02

Wednesday, October 02

High: 73 Low: 59

High: 79 Low: 61

Chance of Precip: 5%

Chance of Precip: 5%

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

High: 79 Low: 63 Chance of Precip: 5%

Mostly Sunny

Sunrise: 7:35 AM - Sunset: 7:15 PM

Sunrise: 7:50 AM - Sunset: 7:30 PM

Sunrise: 7:28 AM - Sunset: 7:08 PM

Thursday, October 03

Thursday, October 03

Thursday, October 03

High: 75 Low: 45 Sunny

High: 77 Low: 45 Mostly Sunny

High: 79 Low: 54 Sunny

Sunrise: 7:36 AM - Sunset: 7:13 PM

Sunrise: 7:51 AM - Sunset: 7:28 PM

Sunrise: 7:29 AM - Sunset: 7:06 PM

Friday, October 04

Friday, October 04

Friday, October 04

High: 45 Low: 37 Isolated Showers

High: 46 Low: 32 Partly Cloudy

High: 57 Low: 37 Sunny

Sunrise: 7:37 AM - Sunset: 7:12 PM

Sunrise: 7:53 AM - Sunset: 7:26 PM

Sunrise: 7:30 AM - Sunset: 7:04 PM

Saturday, October 05

Saturday, October 05

Saturday, October 05

High: 39 Low: 34 Drizzle

High: 48 Low: 39 Partly Cloudy

High: 50 Low: 36 Sunny

Sunrise: 7:38 AM - Sunset: 7:10 PM

Sunrise: 7:54 AM - Sunset: 7:24 PM

Sunrise: 7:31 AM - Sunset: 7:03 PM

Sunday, October 06

Sunday, October 06

Sunday, October 06

High: 41 Low: 36 Scattered Snow Showers

High: 50 Low: 37 Isolated Showers

High: 37 Low: 32 Rain

Sunrise: 7:39 AM - Sunset: 7:08 PM

Sunrise: 7:55 AM - Sunset: 7:23 PM

Sunrise: 7:32 AM - Sunset: 7:01 PM

Monday, October 07

Monday, October 07

Monday, October 07

High: 54 Low: 45 Partly Cloudy

High: 55 Low: 46 Sunny

High: 43 Low: 39 Isolated Showers

Sunrise: 7:40 AM - Sunset: 7:07 PM

Sunrise: 7:56 AM - Sunset: 7:21 PM

Sunrise: 7:33 AM - Sunset: 7:00 PM

Farm and Ranch Publishers - Central Nebraska Publications General Manager - Marc Currie Sales Representatives Todd Smith • John Lynott • Jodi Newtson Micah Adams • Daphne Hemshrot • Darlene Overleese

Production - Chris Frazer Production Assistant - Laura R. Zayas Web Development - news@agnet.net Important Notice: The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertising herein, and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertisers and not the publishers. The publisher is not liable to any advertiser herein for any misprints in advertising not the fault of the publisher, and in such an event the limit of the publisher’s liability shall be the amount of the publisher’s charge for such advertising. In the event of misprints, the publisher must be informed prior to the printing of the next publication

Published by: Central Nebraska Publications, Inc. 21 W. 21st Street, Ste. 010 • P.O. Box 415 • Kearney, NE 68847 • 1-800-658-3191 Copyright © 2012


September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Country Living

Fish Facts Susan Hansen, Extension Educator, Colfax County When we say “fish," we have a tendency to think of all fish that we eat as being pretty much the same. Not so. There are two main categories of fish: freshwater and saltwater. Within those categories are a variety of fish. Fish can be baked, broiled, steamed, or grilled. Tuna fish brings to mind a small can with a fishy smell. Tuna is one of the most common types of fish eaten. All tuna, however, is not the same. Take time to read the label on cans of tuna. Some tuna is packed in water, others in oil. The label must state whether the tuna is in one piece (solid pack); made of irregular pieces (chunk); made of less desirable irregular pieces (flake); or pieces cut to small uniform size (grated). The label will list if the fish is white, light or dark. The darker grades have inferior flavor. So, don’t just grab a can of tuna; look to see what you’re buying.

There is Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon. Fresh salmon steaks are a treat. That was not always the case. In England, in the 1700's and 1800's, the indentured apprentices petitioned that they should not be forced to eat fresh salmon more than twice a week. The flesh of salmon may be pink, white, red or yellow depending on the type of salmon and where the fish lives. Herring is usually known as pickled herring or kippered herring. Pickled herring is what it sounds like — herring with salt, vinegar, and spices. Kippered herring is a herring that has been split, salted, and smoked and usually has a reddish hue. Herring is inexpensive, nutritious, and contains twice as much calcium as milk. The reason for the high calcium content is because herring contains many tiny, fine bones. Because of all the tiny bones, people often choose not to eat herring. Check out the seafood section of your grocery store to what kinds of fish are available. It might surprise you.

Nebraska Has Sunny Economic Outlook Now, But Will It Last? Mary Jane Skala, The Kearney Hub KEARNEY — Keeping 'em down on the farm is easy these days, Jason Henderson said at the Federal Reserve's Nebraska Economic Forum. Farms thrive when the national economy sours. "But then farms fade, too," said Henderson, branch executive and vice president of the Omaha office of the Kansas City Federal Reserve. "The bigger question: How can Nebraska attract and retain people to start new businesses, fill new jobs and create a vision for the Nebraska economy?" he asked. He posed that challenge to 135 Kearney-area business and civic leaders who attended the forum, one of five scheduled in Nebraska this year. There once was a Nebraska village called Brush Creek, founded in 1873, Henderson said. The railroad came in, business blossomed, and in just five years, the population doubled. But within a few years, prosperity withered. In 1893, residents got together to discuss "How do we build jobs and spur prosperity?" That's what Nebraska must ask itself now, Henderson said. "Here in Nebraska right now, we have one of the top 10 economies nationwide. Our 4.0 unemployment rate is second lowest in the nation. We're ninth nationwide in personal income growth," he said. Only North Dakota is growing faster, "Because they found oil," he said. Despite the drought, farm incomes are up 20 percent for the second year in a row, and land values are soaring, he said. "Farmers spend money on combines, tractors, machine sheds and silver grain bins," Henderson said. "Rural manufacturing is on the rebound. Our manufacturing gains are up 1.5 percent." On and on he went, talking positively about the sunny Nebraska economy as dozens of other states remain bruised by the recession of 2008. "We're even tapping global markets. We're above pre-recession levels," he said. Building permits for single-family homes are 2 percent more than they were a year ago, he said. There are more jobs in education, health, retail, leisure, hospital, professional and business services. In Nebraska, government jobs account for 20 percent of total compensation. Tax receipts are up. Nebraska's rural communities provide 40 percent of the state's income, he said. Since World War II, the Nebraska economy has outperformed the nation during recessions, but when the rest of the nation begins to recover, economic expansion here begins to sag. Henderson said. "Historically, agriculture responds quickly to economic stimulus. Can Nebraska keep outperforming the rest of the nation?" Henderson asked. He credited China with a bit of the boom because China is the biggest foreign buyer of

agricultural products. "China wants our stuff," he said. "Worldwide, farmers were always more than willing to produce, even to over supply," Henderson said. "How does this affect U.S. agriculture? This year, we were reminded that we have to have water to grow a crop. "The question: Are we in a bubble?" He looked back to the recession in the early 1980s, when corn sold at $3.49 a bushel, wheat at $3.96 and soybeans at $9. Today's farm prices are roughly double that, and unlike 30 years ago, debt has dwindled and has been concentrated primarily among young people and new farmers purchasing land and equipment. Henderson urged Kearney to "build a highquality workforce." "Some communities don't want their young people to leave, but it's better to let them leave, learn and then return. Tell young people we need them to come home and capitalize on this," he said. Worldwide, education is increasing. He noted, for example, that in both the U.S. and South Korea, 31 percent of the population holds college degrees. Therefore, to compete globally, he said, Americans need better skills. "We need great entrepreneurs, but entrepreneurship is difficult business. It's creative destruction. Someone is always building a better mousetrap. "We can lament business losses on Main Street, or we can figure out our ways to create new ones. Let's figure out new ways to build that mousetrap." Henderson said the most intriguing 21st century economic strategies are nontraditional and are kindled by the creative class "doing things different," but such entrepreneurs "need a champion in the community to protect them." Communities need leaders to support young entrepreneurs who are gambling with change, he said. "Agriculture, construction and manufacturing are leading economic growth in Nebraska, but as the economy recovers and strengthens, our economy will wobble a bit," he said. "The question: How can Nebraska attract and retain people to start new businesses, fill new jobs and create a vision for the Nebraska economy?" Henderson left that question unanswered. The Kansas City Federal Reserve has economic forums every other year in the seven states it serves — Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Wyoming, Nebraska and the northern half of New Mexico. The tradition began 60 years ago, Erin Redemske, senior public affairs specialist, said.

Page 3

Destined for Great Views

#HMAFAPW1711 Destined for Great Views Visit www.houseoftheweek.com

Here's what you want in a home destined for a scenic location: maximum deck space and plenty of windows. Two levels of decks — the bottom one wrapping nearly all the way around the home — give you both sunny and shady places to kick back and relax. The upper level is reserved for the super-spacious master suite, which is really more like a studio with its private balcony and deluxe bathroom with a jet tub and separate shower. A large walk-in closet has space even for bulky winter clothing. When it’s time to socialize, head downstairs to the great room. Here, window seats and a gas fireplace create a welcoming atmosphere, and the open kitchen serves up snacks on the counter. The cooktop faces out, so you won't miss a minute of fun while preparing food. A guest room accesses a full bathroom, with a door to the porch nearby.

Detailed Specifications

House Style Cottage Country Craftsman Farmhouse Contemporary Traditional Bedroom Extras Private Patio / Deck Access Second Floor Sitting Room Kitchen Extras Country / Family Snack Bar Foundation Type Unfinished Basement Key Information 1,904 Square Feet Beds: 2 Baths: 2 ½ Stories: 2 Width: 40' Depth: 51' Room Summary Great / Gathering Room Guest Suite-incl. Bath Special Features Split Bedrooms Vaulted Ceilings Walk-In Closet Bay / Box / Bow Window Wall Balcony - Inside Cabinets Plant Shelves Windows Seats Doors - French Fireplace Loft Open Floor Plan

Main Level

Upper Level

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Page 4

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - The Lighter Side

September 27, 2012

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts • B a c k To T h e C a v e s by Lee Pitts

I know I’m getting old but when a tiny tot recently asked me if I’d ever seen a real live dinosaur it caused me to rethink my antiquity. Although I’ve never seen a live brontosaurus I have interacted with CAVE people, and you have to, that’s CAVE as in Citizen’s Against Virtually Everything. These are the folks who want to tear down the dams, reduce their carbon footprint, and give the land back to wolves and bears. If we’re going to do this, let’s do it right. Let’s get rid of Genetically Modified food, bread and butter, soda pop and pizza and farmers and ranchers. From now on get your own food. If the locavores want locally produced food let them grow it themselves. You can’t get any more local than that! If the vegetarians don’t want to eat beef and the health fanatics don’t want to eat anything that isn’t “natural,” let them try to live on the nuts and berries they collect when they go into the forest where evil lurks around every tree. They’ll soon discover that tofu is not a naturally occurring substance in the wild. For people who hate fast food let them see how long it takes them to gather up breakfast, lunch and dinner. If PETA members don’t like farrowing crates, let them try to kill a wild boar with a crudely made slingshot someone will have to make for them. I guarantee they’ll be eating horses, their pet dogs, endangered species and anything else they can get their hands on.

I have a feeling the CAVEmen and CAVEwomen, excuse me, CAVEpersons, won’t be nearly as worried about political correctness when they have other things to worry about, like finding dinner with a pack of wolves circling. The animal rightists won’t be as concerned about rat’s rights and will have an entirely different outlook, as will all CAVEpersons who are freezing to death in their loincloths without Big Oil to complain about. If they want to reduce their carbon footprints, let’s go all the way: no more cars, heating and air conditioning, dams or electricity. That means no more Google, Facebook or irritating their fellow CAVEpersons talking on their cell phones in restaurants. There won’t be any restaurants. And that means Starbucks too! You won’t need your daily adrenaline rush anyway when you have lions and bears to outrun. We’ll satisfy the anti-NRA crowd by eliminating guns. You’ll have to throw rocks for your supper and your life expectancy will be about 20 minutes. You want to turn the entire West into one big wilderness? Why stop there, let’s make the whole country one big national monument without roads or fire trucks. And remember, NO harvesting of trees. That’s what you want, isn’t it? Let’s go back to nature where your choice of mate won’t be determined by personality or money, but by how much potential body heat they’ll

produce when your entire family is all rolled up into one big ball trying to keep warm. Entire families will stay together in the cave forever simply for the heat. Women will be freed from daily chores like dusting and vacuuming the cave, polishing the silver or taking the kids to school. What school? There won’t be any dishes to wash and you can clean the family loincloths in the river. Watch out for rattlesnakes though. There won’t be any symptoms of civilization such as spas, Monday night football, Twitter, colonoscopies, Prozac, Louis Vuitton bags, $200 jogging shoes, cable TV, chocolate, 200 thread-count sheets, Disneyland, or Walmart. Socialists will be happy because BIG Business will be a thing of the past; in fact, there won’t be any business to overregulate and tax to death to pay for social programs. There won’t be any Medicaid, Social Security or Obamacare. If you get a toothache, so what? Mountain lion rip your arm off? Suck it up. This is what you wanted, wasn’t it? Just think, it will be one big happy campout. Won’t that be fun? Actually I think I’ll fit right in as I already work with primitive tools on hide, my writing looks like hieroglyphics, and I like to eat with my hands. Hey, I can take it if you can.

www.myfarmandranch.com • www.myfarmandranch.com Features In Upcoming Issues: • Gateway Farm Expo • McCook Farm Expo Nebraska’s Statewide Ag News Publication

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Farm & Ranch . . . Where Agriculture Is Always A Business 50726


September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Pork Month

Page 5

Pork Recipes Honey Roasted Pork Loin

Sesame Pork Stir Fry

Stuffed Pork Chops

2 lbs pork loin (boneless) to taste salt and pepper 1/4 cup honey 2 tablespoons orange juice 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 teaspoon thyme 1/2 cup chicken broth

2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted 1 tablespoon sesame oil or vegetable oil 1 lb pork loin, cut into thin strips 2 tablespoons honey 3 tablespoons soy sauce 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 1/3 lb snow peas, washed, ends removed

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Season the pork and place in a roasting pan. In a separate bowl, mix together the honey, juice, oil and thyme. Pour over the pork. Add the broth to the pan. Bake until internal temperature reaches 150 (45-60 minutes). Baste frequently. Strain the pan juices into a saucepan. Reduce until slightly thickened. Serve over the sliced pork.

Add oil to a skillet. Brown the pork over high heat, lower heat and add seeds and honey, soy, and ginger; mix well Add snow peas and cook for 2 minutes, stirring. Serve with rice or noodles.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat the oil in a large skillet and brown the pork chops. Toss the bread cubes, onions, celery and seasoning together and drizzle the butter and broth over all; toss again to distribute evenly. Mound the stuffing over the pork chops (you could also cut a slit in the side of each chop and stuff them, piling any extra stuffing on top of them). Whisk the soup and water together until smooth and pour it over the chops. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover pan and bake 10-15 minutes more or until the juices run clear and meat thermometer reads 160-170°F.

Sweet and Sour Pork Pork Chops Yum-Yum 2-4 pork chops, 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch thick 1/4 cup chicken broth 1/8 cup honey 1/8 cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon ketchup 1/4 teaspoon ginger 1/8 teaspoon garlic salt Brown chops on both sides. Place in greased casserole dish. Mix all remaining ingredients and pour over pork chops. Bake, uncovered, at 350°F for one hour.

Pork Roast 4 lbs pork loin roast 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon wine vinegar 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon white pepper Place roast, fat side up, in foil-lined roasting pan. Mix remaining ingredients and brush on all sides of roast. Cover with foil and bake at 325°F for 2 1/2 hours basting frequently. Uncover the last 45 minutes to brown roast.

4 pork chops (1 inch thick) 1 tablespoon olive oil or canola oil 3 cups stale bread, cut in 1/2 inch cubes 1/4 cup butter or 1/4 cup margarine, melted 1/4 cup chicken broth 1/4 cup finely diced celery 1/4 cup finely diced onion 1 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1 (10 3/4 ounce) can condensed cream of mushroom soup, or cream of celery soup 1/3 cup water

oil, for deep fat frying 2 lbs pork tenderloins 1/2 cup flour 1/4 cup cornstarch 1/2 cup cold water 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 egg 1 (20 ounce) can pineapple chunks (drain but keep the syrup) 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup white vinegar 1 teaspoon salt 4 teaspoons soy sauce 4 carrots, sliced thin 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 2 tablespoons cornstarch 2 tablespoons cold water 1 medium green pepper, chopped

Pork Steak

Add enough water to drained pineapple syrup to measure 1 cup. Heat the syrup, brown sugar, vinegar, 1/2 t salt, soy sauce, carrots and garlic to boiling. Cover and reduce heat until carrots are tender. In the meantime, trim fat from pork and cut into large pieces. Heat oil to 360°F. Blend flour, 1/4 cup cornstarch, 1/2 cup cold water, 1/2 tsp salt and egg in large bowl until smooth. Add pork and stir to coat well. Fry pork pieces (don't crowd in pan) about 5 minutes, turning frequently until browned. Drain on paper towel and keep warm. Mix 2 Tbsp cornstarch and 2 Tbsp water and mix until smooth. When the carrots are done, increase the heat on the sauce and stir in the cornstarch and water, stirring constantly. When thickened, add the pork, pineapple chunks and green pepper. Continue to stir 1 minute or until warmed through. Serve with rice.

2 tablespoons canola oil 4 pork steaks salt and pepper garlic powder 1 large onion, chopped 1 cup fresh mushrooms, sliced 2 (10 3/4 ounce) cans cream of mushroom soup 1 3/4 cups water 1 (1 ounce) package dry onion soup mix 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Brown steaks on each side. While browning, season steaks with salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Transfer steaks to a 9x13 inch casserole dish. Sauté the onions and mushrooms in the same skillet. Add water, Worcestershire sauce, dry soup mix, and mushroom soup; mix together until sauce forms. Pour sauce over steaks. Cover dish with aluminum foil. Bake in preheated oven for 90 minutes.

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Page 6

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Government

September 27, 2012

Preventing a Lapse in Farm Policy for Producers by Congressman Adrian Smith Grand Island Office 1811 West Second Street, Suite 105 Grand Island, NE68803 Phone: (308) 384-3900 Fax: (308) 384-3902

Scottsbluff Office 416 Valley View Drive, Suite 600 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Phone: (308) 633-6333 Fax: (308) 633-6335

For more than a year I have worked with agriculture groups, producers across Nebraska and my colleagues in Congress to pass a responsible long-term Farm Bill. Like many others, I am frustrated and disappointed by the failure to come to an agreement, and I believe both parties bear some responsibility for not getting a bill passed. This is not the first time the Farm Bill has expired without a new policy in place. The previous five-year Farm Bill expired on September 30, 2007, was extended on December 26, 2007, and a new bill was signed into law after a series of short-term extensions. While not ideal, it was not disastrous, and our producers were able to rise above the politics. Historically, Farm Bill reauthorizations are brought to the floor with near unanimous and bipartisan support from Agriculture Committee members. This Farm Bill before the House passed committee with a division of support. No challenges in the bill are insurmountable, but there cannot be progress without a willingness to consider meaningful reform. One such concern is the bill’s failure to significantly reform the food stamp program, which has increased by 105

percent since we last considered a Farm Bill. I will not allow “perfect to be the enemy of good,” but it’s reasonable to seek modest reforms of a nearly trillion-dollar program. In fact, the American people are demanding reforms of this nature. Such reform is not impossible. The Housepassed budget saved billions by suspending automatic qualification for food stamps through other government assistance programs and by providing states more flexibility to administer the program. We are not talking about changing the qualifications for food stamps or denying assistance to those in need, but applying meaningful reform which would likely earn enough support to move the bill through the House. As it is, the Farm Bill contains a variety of titles and provisions designed and written to attract broad regional support from around the country. If full reauthorization of a Farm Bill were to fail on the floor of the House, producers would face far more uncertainty. I believe we are close to having the votes for a bill in the House which can get us to a conference committee where compromise appropriately takes place.

Washington Office 503 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6435 Fax: (202) 225-0207

I would have strongly preferred to pass a bill before September 30. When the current Farm Bill expires, however, there remains time to prevent a major lapse in policy and come to an agreement. That’s because most of the programs authorized by the Farm Bill have been funded through March of next year by the House-passed Continuing Resolution, including crop insurance. In fact, commodity programs will not be immediately impacted because the 2008 Farm Bill will cover the 2012 harvest. Unlike 2007, the country is currently in the midst of a heated election, and unfortunately politics has hijacked the Farm Bill Debate. It is my sincere desire for Congress to return postelection and work to pass a bill based on good policy rather than political gamesmanship. Passing a Farm Bill should be among our top priorities. Agriculture groups, rural communities, producers and elected officials should be united in our efforts to pass responsible long-term farm policy. We all want to get a bill passed; patience and good policy will ultimately be in the best interests of producers and all Nebraskans.

Congress Undone by Senator Ben Nelson Omaha Office 7502 Pacific St.,Suite 205 Omaha, NE 68114 Phone: (402) 391-3411 Fax: (402) 391-4725

It is both frustrating and disappointing how Congress has adjourned weeks before the election with so much major legislation left undone. There was once a time before partisan gridlock froze the wheels of Congress, when both sides actually worked together to iron out differences and put the people ahead of politics. Sadly, those days seem to be gone. Over the past few weeks, I’ve written about some of the major bills that should have been passed this Congress, including one to protect cyberspace and another to help veterans returning from war find jobs. Perhaps the most frustrating of all was the House’s refusal to take up the 2012 Farm Bill, commonsense legislation that actually cut spending on farm programs while providing a safety net for ag producers so America can continue producing its own food. What Americans Need to Know Nebraskans aren’t being told the local consequences of not having a Farm Bill. They don’t know that without a Farm Bill, almost 40 programs will lose their financing, and that if the current law is allowed to expire, the Farm Bill defaults to the 1949 law.

Lincoln Office Federal Building, Room 287 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Phone: (402) 441-4600 Fax: (402) 476-8753

Washington Office 720 Hart Senate Office Building United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6551 Fax: (202) 228-0012

national military cemetery that will serve as a final resting place for those who gave their all to our country. Also, I won’t support wild cuts to local education or slashing repair funds for roads, bridges and other infrastructure. These vital programs and many others don’t have a lot of media advocacy, and the services they provide aren’t often highlighted in the national Washington “Noise” Media There’s been a lot of noise in Washington about noise media. the messy politics behind the Farm Bill, but Americans aren’t being told about the local A Whole Congress of Noise Makers? I wonder what America — what Nebraska — will consequences of leaving the Farm Bill undone. We can’t rely on the national news media and do if we have a whole Congress of noisemakers talk shows to tell us about the consequences. They who make news about their political fights, but not concentrate on the political noise and not the about the community impact of what they’re important details of legislation so it’s up to state, fighting for. My hope is that Nebraskans will take time to local and regional media to do it. I wholeheartedly support reigning in out-of- become more informed about legislation left control government spending and cutting waste, undone and communicate their opinions to those fraud and abuse, but I will not support reckless who represent them in Washington. When people and counterproductive cuts made to programs that understand the local consequences of the Washington noise, they’re going to cast informed serve a vital local and national interest. These programs include a new U.S. Strategic votes, which are the best kind. Command Headquarters at Offutt Air Force Base, modernizing the aging Omaha VA Medical Center that serves over 150 thousand veterans, and a new They don’t know that the conservation, rural development, and support for farm commodity programs won’t be renewed. They don’t know that the disaster programs to assist livestock producers impacted by the drought are gone, too.

2012 Charitable Giving Campaign By Governor Dave Heineman Lincoln Office/State Capitol P.O. Box 94848 Lincoln, NE 68509-4848 Phone: 402-471-2244 Fax: 402-471-6031

I would like to take this opportunity to highlight the generosity of Nebraska’s state employees. This year, more than 4,000 workers contributed to the Nebraska State Employees Charitable Giving campaign, which raised over $526,000 for charities across the state – a 19% increase from last year’s efforts. For the last three years, the State of Nebraska has been the largest donor for the United Way, and this is the first time the State Campaign has raised over $500,000. I appreciate what our state employees do to help Nebraskans every day in their jobs, and their donations to important charities throughout our great state are to be commended. I want to personally thank Beverly Neth and her team for this extraordinary success. Bev is the director of the Department of Motor Vehicles and our leader of the Charitable Giving Campaign. She has done an outstanding job. For the last three years, the State of Nebraska has been recognized as the number one overall campaign by the Lincoln and Lancaster County United Way and has also received additional honors including recognition for leadership giving.

Since 2003, the State’s campaign has raised more than 3.5 million dollars to support more than 400 charitable organizations throughout Nebraska. This year’s 19% increase is in part attributed to some large increases in agency donations. For example, Nebraska Game and Parks increased their contributions by 264%. Employees have the option of supporting one of 17 local United Way chapters or local partners, giving to one of the 37 non-profit groups registered with the Community Services Fund, or directing their contribution to one of the 23 health-related groups affiliated with the Community Health Charities of Nebraska. The annual charitable giving campaign is just one of the many ways that State of Nebraska employees continue to give back to their communities. Besides monetary gifts, state employees are also generous with volunteer work. In 2011, employees from the Nebraska Department of Revenue served in the community through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program. This volunteer group provides assistance in the filing of individual income tax

Western Office 4500 Avenue I • P.O. Box 1500 Scottsbluff, NE 69363-1500 Phone: 308-632-1370 Fax: 308-632-1313

returns for low income individuals and families. Overall, 221 volunteers assisted in filing 4,676 federal and Nebraska individual income tax returns, resulting in $6,327,825 in refunds to these citizens. It is one of many ways state employees use the expertise they gain on-the-job to go above and beyond. Additionally, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture each year “Adopts a Family for Christmas.” They fill all family members’ wish lists, along with a few extras, as well as gift cards for gas, groceries, and even paid the propane bill for a second family to ensure they had heat. In April, state offices in Lincoln collected food and cash contributions to benefit the Food Bank of Lincoln. The State Campaign Against Hunger raised over $42,000 in cash donations and more than 11,000 pounds of food. I am very proud of what our employees do each year during the Charitable Giving Campaign, but more important is what they do for their neighbors each day.


September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Page 7

Census Data Reveal Surprises About Nebraska Income Erin Grace, The Omaha World-Herald The same near-record share of America’s population is still poor. Household income is down for another year and by a whopping 8 percent since 2007, the year before the recession. And then there’s Nebraska, where household income is the highest ever and 10 percent higher than the national average. The latest census figures, released Wednesday, September 12, paint a national picture of a still-stagnant middle class with a flat poverty rate of 15 percent, where the bright spot was an increase in Americans with health insurance. But Nebraska stands out for its median household income, which at $55,616 in 2011 was 2.7 percent higher than it was the previous year and well above the national and Iowa numbers. That Nebraska is outperforming most of the country at a time when recovery still feels like recession is not a total surprise. The state’s unemployment rate — 4.0 percent in July — is among the nation's lowest. While low unemployment helped the metro areas, farm earnings buffeted the rest of the state. Those earnings grew by over a third between 2010 and 2011. And that measure doesn’t even count farm-support industries, which also did well.

“We’ve seen better profitability in farming than we've seen in a lot of years,” said John Crabtree, media director for the Lyons, Neb.based Center for Rural Affairs. “But it’s more complex than it looks.” While crop-growers have enjoyed high commodity prices, Crabtree said, ranchers and dairy farmers have struggled. He also said skyrocketing land and rental costs have edged out would-be and younger farmers. Nebraska has been sheltered from bursting tech and housing bubbles, which hit other regions of the country harder, said Eric Thompson, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln economist who directs the Bureau of Business Research. Before either bubble burst in 1999, when the national median household income stood at a high point of $54,932 (a figure adjusted for inflation), Nebraska was about $2,800 behind. “The economic stability plays a sizeable part,” said David Drozd, a research coordinator with the University of Nebraska at Omaha. More census income data is coming next week that will give a clearer idea of what’s happening in cities. But Drozd said Omaha — which last year saw a decline in real income — still has large employers in enough different sectors to help the city “weather the storm.” Iowa’s story echoes what’s happening nationally. Median household income in Iowa peaked in 1999; in 2011, it was $50,219, down slightly from the previous year.

But when household income growth is compared in two-year weighted averages — a more accurate measure given year-to-year volatility — Iowa's net household income fell 4.5 percent, while Nebraska's rose 4.6 percent. This pushed Iowa to 36th among states; it elevated Nebraska to third. Why the difference between two seemingly sister states, especially given the agriculture role? Iowa was hit by manufacturing losses. Appliance giant Electrolux bought Maytag and moved manufacturing from Webster City, Iowa, to Mexico, cutting 925 jobs — among tens of thousands of jobs Iowa lost in the past decade, according to news reports. Dave Swenson, an Iowa State University economist, said the state has weathered “some persistent declines” in manufacturing but has recaptured a number of jobs. He acknowledged farm incomes have been “robust” but said ag is a small part of the state’s overall economy. The rest of Iowa’s economy, he said, flatlined. “Stuck in neutral,” Swenson said. “It's waiting for the rest of the U.S. to get healthy because that’s where we sell our stuff. We really depend on the rest of the country to drive our economy.” Thompson, the Nebraska economist, characterized the difference between Nebraska and Iowa this way: “Part of that Iowa economy is more like an Illinois, a Michigan and an Ohio — they're more of an industrial midwest state,” he said. “And we're a pure Plains state.”

NEBRASKA WEATHER AND CROP REPORT Continued from page 2 Winter wheat seeded was at 47 percent, behind both 59 percent last year and average. Winter wheat emerged was 5 percent, behind 19 percent last year and 21 average. Proso millet harvest was 65 percent complete, ahead of 33 last year and 45 average. Sorghum turning color was 80 percent, compared to 94 last year and 91 average. Sorghum mature was 33 percent, near 31 last year but ahead of 25 average. Sorghum harvested was 4 percent complete, ahead of 2 last year and 1 average. Sorghum conditions rated 14 percent very poor, 45 poor, 31 fair, 10 good, and 0 excellent, well below 76 percent good to excellent last year and 77 average. The fourth cutting of alfalfa was 83 percent complete, ahead of 76 last year and 65 average. Dry beans dropping leaves were 89 percent, equal to last year but ahead of 82 average. Dry beans harvested were 44 percent, ahead of 40 last year but behind 48 average. Dry bean conditions rated 2 percent very poor, 8 poor, 45 fair, 42 good, and 3 excellent, well below 61 percent good to excellent last year. Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 70 percent very poor, 28 poor, 2 fair, 0 good, and 0 excellent, well below 71 percent good to excellent last year and 69 average.

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McCook Cappel Sales, Inc. 308-345-5115 ••• Prague Prague Hay Equipment & Supply 402-663-6333 ••• Shelton Ostermeyer Equipment, Inc. 308-467-2345

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Page 8

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Market

September 27, 2012

By David M. Fiala

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

Country Grain Prices as of 9/25/12 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon *** Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial *** Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Sidney St.Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon Hemingford

New Corn

$7.14 $7.06 $7.22 $7.03 $7.14 $7.06 $7.30 $7.13 $6.78 $7.14 $7.08 $7.13 $6.98 $7.08 $7.08 $7.09 $7.06 $7.28 $7.13 $7.14 $7.13 $7.18 $7.32 $7.29 $7.20 $7.25 $7.13 $7.14 $7.06 $7.22 $7.31 $7.08 $7.23 $7.44 671 Above Above Above

$5.54 $5.53 $5.74 $5.72 $6.03 $5.79 $5.58 $5.54 $5.74 $5.79 $5.83 $5.79 $5.74 $5.80 $5.74

$5.74 $5.74 $5.94 $5.91 $5.94 $5.79 $7.19 $5.80 $5.75 $5.94 $5.99 $5.53

Beans

New Beans

$15.33 $15.32 $15.52 $15.03 $15.38 $15.20 $15.69 $15.33

$12.30 $12.27

$15.32 $15.03 $15.37

$12.26 $12.10 $12.48

$15.25 $15.03 $15.23

$12.34 $12.10

$12.11 $12.29 $12.45

Wheat

New Wheat

$8.62 $8.13

$7.74

$8.35 $9.13 $8.36 $8.13

$7.76 $8.71 $7.76 $7.77

$8.16 $8.54 $8.31 $8.28 $8.16 $8.33 $8.13 $8.16 $8.54 $8.26 $8.18 $8.43

$7.74 $7.94 $7.97 $7.74 $7.74

$8.33 $8.11

$7.85 $7.83

$15.25 $15.31

$12.40

$8.30 $8.17

$7.74 $7.69

$12.62 $12.34

$8.71 $8.46

$8.38 $8.09

$6.63

$5.24

$6.83

$5.44

Crop Basis Charts from Reporting Locations as of 9/25/12 Corn Basis

Soybean Basis

$6.78 $6.64 $6.63

$7.74 $7.74

Wheat Basis

Sorghum Basis

$6.94 $6.73

$5.14 $5.14

$5.61 $5.48

Soybeans

Wheat

Corn trade is 24 lower for the week and the trend remains down. Harvest pressure and shaky outside markets have continued to keep the pressure on corn. A fresh round of rioting in Europe has promoted a risk off type mentality. On the December futures chart support is now at $7.22 from Wednesday’s low, with $7.17 and $7.09 below it. Resistance is at the $7.43 and $7.59 areas for the moment. Corn harvest should be over 50% complete nationwide by the end of the week. Ethanol production was flat on the week and although this should normally be a timeframe where plants thrive, this year they will struggle. RBOB (unleaded gas) strength should help margins, but it seems like the consumer is getting it stuck with $4 range gas even though ethanol is in a middle ground price right now. The point being ethanol production margins are in a place that would suggest slow downs. The corn export inspections slipped to 24.2 million bushels with the export pipeline is still filling. The crop is virtually all mature now and 39% harvested as of this past weekend which is well ahead of normal. Yield reports remain variable, but strong yields are being reported in irrigated areas. Quality issues will be around for a while with Illinois securing an alfatoxin waiver for feeding to non-lactating cattle. Weekly export sales were 400k metric tons, which was lower than expected. On Friday, we will have the Quarterly grain stocks report with many in the trade expected a bigger corn number due to early harvest. Estimates are for 1.126 billion bushels, and a range of 887 million to 1.261 million bushels. This is the old crop carryover number, with September 1 the start o the 2012-13 crop year. Chart selling and harvest pressure with lower prices in this tight year should be very hard to sustain. Higher prices should cut back usage and provide incentive to plant more acres in the southern hemisphere this winter and northern hemisphere next spring, although early talk out of Argentina has corn acres down due to Government policy. So the market action the past two weeks has illustrated the market did its job to the upside for now. But production needs to be near perfect in South America otherwise there will need to be a huge demand rationing push in the first half of 2013. If you are debating your hedging strategy after this break, or how to manage crop insurance give us a call to assist.

Dec. 12 700 770

Dec. 12 601 654

December 2012 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .7.250 High . . .7.266 Low . . . .7.192 Close . . .7.192 Change .-0.054

$5.24

$35.00 Pinto Oil Flowers (new) Spring Wheat(new) $8.31 Spring Wheat(new) $8.36

Corn

Support: Resistance

$6.63

The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

$7.74

$12.22 $12.10 $12.52 $12.82 $12.71 $12.36

Northern $40.00 Oil Flowers Spring Wheat $8.50 Spring Wheat $8.55

New Milo

to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options.

$6.66

$15.56 $15.66 $15.11 $15.08 $15.34 $15.72 $15.57 $15.24

$15.51 $15.57 $15.22 $15.58

Milo

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience

Wheat trade has been sucked down by row crop weakness, but is holding above its recent lows. The December contract weekly net changes are 28 lower in Chicago, 32 lower in KC and 28 lower in Minneapolis. Winter wheat is 25% planted and the more southern growing areas should of a got a drink. Chart wise the Chicago contract is back below the 10, 20, and 50-day moving averages, as are Minneapolis and KC. Support is at $8.65 for now. Spreads for higher protein wheat slipped a bit this week. France is the world price leader for the moment, and split the Egyptian tender with Romania. Russia is looking at releasing intervention stocks. The Northern Hemisphere planting is going ok for now. Australian weather was generally disappointing. Report expectations are for 2.281 billion bushels with a range of 2.16 to 2.53 billion bushels, and total production at 2.27 billion bushels. Exports were 426,000 metric tons, which was little better than expected. Export shipments were firm at 22.4 million bushels. Hedgers call with questions. Make sure you are looking at 2013 prices on this rally to start a program for next year.

Support: Resistance

Chicago 840 922

K City 865 948

Minneapolis 902 978

December 2012 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .8.710 High . . . .8.760 Low . . . .8.654 Close . . .8.710 Change .+0.014

Soybean trade has remained under pressure this week, with soft outside markets and harvest pressure doing a number on soy complex. The wide trading ranges remain a feature, and bean trade is 57 lower for the week. Meal is $9 lower, and oil was 280 points lower on the week. On the chart, we have support at $15.51, and resistance is at $15.90 for the moment. Sliding palm oil values have added stress on the oil trade, which has added pressure to beans. Harvest pressure is also peaking in China. US soybean harvest is at 22% complete and should progress rapidly the next couple of weeks. Fund liquidation has continued in pre-report trade, with adequate South American weather, and encouraging yield reports from some areas. Export shipments were 12 million, which was an improvement, and there are reports of ships lining up to take beans abroad once rail traffic gets it there. Basis levels have fluctuated quite a bit as deliveries start. On the stocks report this Friday expectations are for 132 million bushels September 1 Stocks number, the range of estimates 115-152 million bushels. The weekly export sales were improved at 799,500 metric tons of beans, 436,000 metric tons of meal, and 16,100 metric tons of oil. Hedgers call with questions.

Support: Resistance

Nov. 1487 1729

Dec. Meal 452 519

Dec. Oil 4909 5809

November 2012 Soybeans (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .15.734 High . . .15.840 Low . . .15.574 Close . .15.660 Change .-0.082


September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Teen Wins Horse Essay Contest -- Wins Horse Heather Johnson, The North Platte Telegraph Not many people can say they wrote an essay and won a horse. Thanks to a recent contest, a Hershey teen can. For her, the experience was a dream come true. As a member of the American Quarter Horse Association's (AQHA) youth division, Shianne Hoatson, 14, periodically receives information about upcoming promotions and events the organization is planning. On Aug. 22, she was surprised and excited when she was sent an email about the opportunity to win a foal through the AQHA Ranching Heritage Young Horse Development Project contest. She was given two days to submit an application and a 200-word essay outlining why she would like to own and raise an American quarter horse. "With hay prices the way they are now, we wondered if it was going to be worth it to enter," Leigh Anne Hoatson, Shianne's mother, said. "But, ultimately, we decided she needed to do this." Shianne wrote the essay, met the deadline and on Sept. 6, was notified by the AQHA that she was one of 13 winners from across the nation. As a result, she was allowed to choose a foal. The KT Ranch in Washington donated four. The Open Box Rafter Ranch offered six, and the other three were from the Lauing Mill Iron L Ranch, Moreau River Quarter Horses and Le'Ann Bender, all from South Dakota. Shianne liked the breeding on the Open Box Rafter Ranch horses and traveled to the annual production sale Sept. 8 in Rapid City. She joined another girl who drove 24 hours from Indiana, as well as contest winners from Idaho, Iowa and South Dakota. "We went up the day before so she could get into the corral with the colts that were available," Leigh Anne said. "That way, she could see who was friendly and who wasn't."

A high school rodeo contestant, Shianne picked out a dun stallion colt with a big blaze face and two stockings on its hind legs. Because he was a grandson of nationally known barrel racing sire Frenchmans Guy, Shianne hoped to use him for speed events. She wasn't the only one who wanted the weanling, however. Another winner did too, and they had to flip a coin. "My heart dropped," Shianne said. "My mom tapped my shoulder and said 'Say tails.' I did, and sure enough, it was tails. I was so happy." Leigh Anne's mom was happy for her. "I was so excited," she said. "It's a pretty special deal. Two AQHA executives flew in for the presentation, and they gave the kids horsemanship books with CDs. The kids also got brand new skid boots and cowboy Bibles." According to Leigh Anne, there are some requirements with the project. Shianne will have to keep records of the work she does with her foal. She will also have to take her colt to at least one show and meet with a professional horseman designated by the AQHA. "The closest is in Kearney," Leigh Anne said. "Within a year, Shianne will have to submit documents to the AQHA demonstrating her progress with the colt. They want to see if she can tie him, lead him and pick up his feet among other things. After that, she will receive a scholarship and can keep or sell the horse." Shianne says she plans to keep him. "I think it's an amazing opportunity to be able to have my own horse to train, especially with the breeding of my colt," she said. "I named him 'Flash' because he is very flashy. Hopefully, he will go far." Leigh Anne said the win was good timing. "We bought a mare for her for high school rodeo, but the mare developed a nervous disorder and we had to put her down," she said. "Shianne never even got to run her. I've always told her when one door closes, another opens, and it did."

Page 9

Nebraska Farmers Compare Current, Former Droughts Julie Blum, The Columbus Telegram COLUMBUS (AP) — Farmers spent the summer dealing with one of the worst droughts faced by the agricultural industry in decades. Crops were hit hard by hot and dry weather. Cattle and other animals suffered as well because of a feed shortage. The repercussions the lack of rain will have on the future of farming have yet to be seen. Retired farmers, who sowed the land through dry stretches before, said it is all going to depend on if the drought lasts years like in the 1930s and again in the 1950s. A couple of farmers, who now live at Meridian Gardens, reflected on their years raising crops and animals and dished out some advice for farmers of today. “The drought we had this summer was worse than anything I saw in the 30s,'” said Ken Torczon. “The only hope we have is it only lasts this one year.” Torczon was only a child in the 1930s when the Great Depression hit and a multi-year drought devastated much of the country. Even in the 1930s, Torczon remembers that the family farm he grew up on still had creek water running through it during the Dust Bowl. But not so this year. This summer the creek dried up, thanks to lack of rain and use of irrigation to water crops. “This was the first year I saw Prairie Creek dry up in all my years,” he said. Dallmont and Bernadine Erickson farmed a 1,500-acre farm near Elgin after they got married in 1949. Continued on page 15

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Page 10

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Fall Irrigation

September 27, 2012

The Value of Irrigation in a Drought Regime: The Case of 2012 The 2012 drought that bore down on much of the United States Corn Belt left a wide swath of production loss and commodity market spirals. For many dryland crop producers across the country, the short crop will make their economic picture somewhat reliant on crop insurance indemnities — payments, by the way, which will be enhanced by record price levels for the insured crops. But for irrigated crop producers, 2012 will look quite different. And here is where the value of irrigation comes into focus. [Note: The value of water (irrigation) is not to be confused with the cost of water. While the cost of water as an input for production is the cost required to pump and distribute water, the value of the water can be attributed to the difference in irrigation revenue vs. dryland revenue.] The economics of irrigation largely hinge upon the productivity enhancement which irrigation provides from year to year. For example, in the case of corn, Nebraska’s primary crop, yield differentials between irrigated and non-irrigated can range from 60 to 100 bushels per acre in any given year, depending on where one is in the state. However, in addition to this productivityenhancement pattern, irrigation also serves as a very critical risk management tool for dealing with crop losses due to extreme rainfall-deficit conditions — such as occurred this year. This downside risk of extreme weather events creates a whole new ballgame for the value of irrigation. To illustrate these impacts for 2012, we have constructed three different scenarios for an Eastern Nebraska irrigated corn farm. Scenario I is the farm under more historical production patterns, as well as cost and revenue conditions. It is basically a “without drought” condition, with irrigation water only supplementing the historical rain-fed conditions. This scenario essentially represents the economic factors as producers entered the 2012 crop season. Scenario II is the “with drought” situation we have actually experienced. Certainly, the

dependence on supplemental water and the additional expenses of pumping could hardly have been anticipated at the beginning of the year. But even more so, the commodity price runup due to the geographic pervasiveness of this year’s drought (which climate experts are calling a “once in 50 to 100 year event”) was not even on the screen — a seemingly expected annual probability of one to two percent. Scenario III would be considered a “Nebraska — only drought” situation, with the rest of the country experiencing more normal 2012 production. The obvious result would be production shortfalls in Nebraska, but without the extreme commodity price run-up which has been experienced this year. Using University of Nebraska-Lincoln crop budgets and our UNL Farm Lease Calculator (http://agecon. unl.edu/resource.html), we have constructed the various cost and price conditions under these different scenarios that would ultimately impact the acreage revenue differential between irrigated and non-irrigated cropland in corn production (Table 1). Under Scenario I, which reflected early 2012 conditions, per-bushel costs of production at the more normal expected yield levels were fairly similar for both irrigated and non-irrigated corn producers. And at projected commodity prices of the time, the net revenue differential was in the

$80/acre range. This might essentially reflect the income attributed to irrigation over the long-run. Enter widespread drought across the major Corn Belt states (Scenario II), and the water differential takes on considerably greater magnitude. To be sure, irrigated yields were also reduced (we estimate here 10%), and costs of irrigation in 2012 rose an additional $75 per acre. But these changes were more than compensated for by commodity prices rising nearly 50 percent. And while non-irrigated revenues were also buffered by commodity price spikes that essentially brought revenues to without-drought levels, the irrigated revenue differential spiked to $375 per acre. In short, some $295 of this differential basically represents a risk premium attributed to irrigation this season. Of course, not all irrigated acres in the state were able to apply water to levels to limit yield losses to just ten percent. In areas of pumping restrictions, irrigated yield reductions were much greater than that. But even in those areas, with few exceptions the revenue differential attributed to supplemental water was considerable. Scenario III poses quite a different situation, such that the commodity price run-up would have been much less if the 2012 drought would have been limited to Nebraska. Yield impacts and cost increases for irrigation would have still occurred Continued on page 15

Table 1. Corn Production in Eastern Nebraska Under Three 2012 Scenarios Items

Scenario I “Without Drought”

Scenario II “With Drought”

Scenario III “Nebraska-Only Drought”

Irrigated

Non-irrigated

Irrigated

Non-irrigated

Irrigated

Non-irrigated

220

135

200

95

200

95

Corn Price (per Bushel)

$5.25

$5.25

$7.75

$7.75

$5.50

$5.50

Total Cash Receipts ($/Acre)

$1,155

$709

$1,550

$736

$1,100

$523

($/Acre)

$916

$550

$989

$550

$990

$550

($/Bushel)

$4.16

$3.93

$4.95

$5.79

$4.95

$5.79

$239

$159

$561

$186

$110

($28)

Corn Yield (Bushel/Acre)

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Revenue Differential: Attributed to Irrigation ($/Acre)

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$375

$138

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September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Fall Irrigation

Page 11

Fall is a Great Time for Tree Planting

Pay Close Attention to Planting Site To avoid conflicts with buildings, utility lines and other trees, look up and around as you consider the mature height and width of any tree(s) you plant. Before you dig, call Diggers Hotline at 800-331-5666 and within two days any buried utility lines on your property will be marked. This is especially important if you have recently moved onto a new property, since you are liable for damage to utility lines. Don’t Forget About the Soil If it’s sandy, select species adapted to sandy conditions or that are drought tolerant. A few good choices include the common juniper, Juniperus communis; eastern red cedar, J. virginiana; eastern cottonwood, Populus deltoides; Blackjack oak, Quercus marilandica; Bur oak, Q. macrocarpa; and Scarlet oak, Q. coccinea. Clay soils also require trees that are welladapted to their heavier texture, and potential higher soil pH and moisture content. Strive for diversity. There are many species of trees that grow well in Nebraska, but aren’t widely planted. To promote these species, ReTree Nebraska has developed a list of “Good Trees for the Good Life.” To find out more about these species and where you can purchase them, go to www.retree nebraska.unl.edu. Or check out these Nebraska Forest Service publications: • “Trees for Eastern Nebraska,” http://go .unl.edu/b39 • “Recommended Trees for Western Nebraska,” http://go.unl.edu/e3k Buy Good Roots Be sure plants are vigorous and healthy when you purchase them. End of the year close-out sales on plants can seem attractive to your pocketbook, but if plants die in a year or two it’s not much of a bargain. Avoid plants that appear too large for their container; they are probably root bound. Look for plants with deep green foliage; avoid those with yellow or wilted leaves. Inspect the roots and pass by those with heavy circling roots. These plants often don’t establish well in the new location, or die in future years from stem girdling roots. Purchase plants with white, healthy roots and minimal circling. Look for nurseries using RootMaker or grow-bag production methods for the healthiest tree root systems. Check out ReTree Nebraska’s list of

Husker Drilling & Irrigation • Torque Meter testing to check your pump horsepower & efficiency • Irrigation Wells & Pump Service • New & Rebuilt Electric Motors • Electric Motor & Panel Installation • Repair & Service on All Makes & Models of Pumps • Test Wells • Domestic Wells, Pumps & Whitewaters • Gearhead Repair & Service

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participating nurseries, www.nfs.unl.edu/ReTree /participating.asp. Remove Excess Soil When you’re ready to plant, remove the tree from its container. If the tree is balled and burlapped, cut away the metal basket and pull off the burlap. Using a flat tile spade or hand trowel, remove excess soil from the top of the root ball until you find the tree’s first primary lateral root. This will determine the depth of your planting hole. Even a couple of inches of excess soil over the root system can be detrimental to the health and vigor of the root system. Plant Your Tree Properly You only get one shot at planting a tree properly, so do it right the first time. After determining the depth of the tree’s root system, dig a hole as deep as the root ball and twice as wide. This ensures you’ve loosened the soil around the new tree’s root system, and created a planting site where newly developing roots can easily establish themselves into the surrounding soil. Don’t add any soil amendments to the planting site. This encourages tree roots to stay within the nicely amended soil and not move out into the native soil. If the root ball contains just a few spiraling roots, the sides of the root ball can be teased apart by hand or scored with a sharp knife to cut through the circling roots. This will encourage new root development. After placing the tree in the planting hole, the first lateral root should be located at or near the soil surface. Planting at the proper depth is a necessary step to support the tree’s health and vigor, and won’t promote shallow rooting in your tree. Shallow root development is more closely related to watering practices, than tree planting depth. Backfill the planting hole with crumbly loose soil, removing any hard soil clods or rocks, and eliminating air pockets. Gently compact the soil around the sides of the root ball with your hands or shovel. Don’t compact the soil by stomping on it with your boots. Watering right after planting will also help eliminate air pockets in the soil. Don’t Forget Mulch After your tree is in the ground, add a layer of wood chip mulch to protect the tree’s roots from extreme weather conditions, eliminate weed and grass competition and preserve soil moisture. Aim for a mulch layer 3-4 inches deep and as wide as possible — ideally, out to the dripline of the tree’s canopy. Don’t pile mulch up against the tree’s trunk; pull it back a couple inches and allow the trunk bark to stay dry.

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Fall’s cooler temperatures, increased moisture, and reduced humidity allow properly planted trees to establish their root systems quickly, giving them a jump-start on spring growth. Consider the following tips to help make your fall planting a success.

Skip the Fertilizer Nebraska soils have good levels of naturally occurring nutrients. Supplementary nitrogen in particular can be detrimental at planting because it promotes leaf growth, over root growth. Development of a strong, vigorous root system is the first goal of tree planters, and is necessary before additional foliage can be supported. Skip Staking, If Possible Staking is not always required at planting, particularly for small trees or trees planted in protected areas. However, trees that are tall and leggy or in high wind areas should be staked. The goal of staking is to anchor the root ball and prevent newly developed root hairs from breaking, not to eliminate all movement within the stem of the tree. If staking is necessary, don’t use the old “wire in garden hose” technique. Instead choose a 1½ to 2 -inch wide strapping material that won’t create small pressure points on the trunk. Staking the tree with a 2-point system allowing some trunk movement will strengthen the trunk and encourage good root development. Leave the staking materials in place for one year only, and periodically check to make sure the strapping material is not damaging the trunk. Trees not establishing a strong root system within one year will most likely never root into the soil properly. This is often due to mistakes in planting depth (too deep) or container-grown trees with heavy circling roots not addressed at planting. Watering The amount of water needed will depend on soil type and the type of tree planted. Water thoroughly at planting, the day after planting, three days later and three days after that. Continue monitoring your newly planted tree to be sure it doesn’t get too dry, but remember more newly planted trees die from too much water than from not enough. If you can easily push a 6-inch screwdriver into the soil surrounding the tree, you are probably providing adequate moisture. Using a turf irrigation system to water trees is usually not ideal, because turfgrass watering doesn’t moisten a deep enough layer of soil to support good tree growth and root development. For more information about ReTree Nebraska, species selection, proper tree planting and care, go to www.retreenebraska.unl.edu. To view treerelated videos, go to Backyard Farmer at http://byf.unl.edu/treeshrub. Source: Jessica Kelling, ReTree Nebraska coordinator with the UNL Nebraska Forest Service.

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Page 12

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Fall Irrigation

September 27, 2012

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September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Fall Irrigation

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Page 13

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Page 14

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Threads Accross Nebraska

September 27, 2012

Threads Across Nebraska Event Celebrates 8th Year, October 12 & 13 Threads Across Nebraska, which is sponsored by the Nebraska State Quilt Guild (NSQG), will celebrate its eighth year on October 12 and 13 at the Buffalo County Fairgrounds Exposition Building in Kearney. The purpose of the show is to increase and fund the awareness of quilting across the state. Alice Torpin, Doniphan, Nebraska, will be the featured quilter. Born during the Depression, Alice was introduced to needlework as a young girl in grade school. She learned to embroider, cross stitch make French knots, weave and braid. Alice grew up helping her mother cut blocks and tie comforters to use during the cold winter nights. With encouragement from her Missouri grandmother she made her first quilt, “The Lone Star,” at age 16. As her quilt making improved, she began to enter contests, shows, and finally the Nebraska State Fair where she fulfilled a life-long dream of winning “Best Quilt” in 1991 with “Begin with Butterflies.” Fifteen to twenty of her quilts will be on display at the 2012 Threads Across Nebraska. She will speak, share ideas and sources of the designs used in the quilts, and demonstrate the

appli-piecing technique throughout the two days of the show. Quilters from across the State of Nebraska will showcase over 150 quilts at this event. Something different this year will be various displays of challenge quilts or mystery quilts that guilds across the state have participated in. One display will be from a group of long-arm quilters from Omaha showing the different way each person quilted the same pattern! The NSQG raffle quilt will be on display as well as opportunity quilts from other guilds. Vendors from Nebraska, Kansas, Arkansas, Missouri, South Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa will have a variety of products, including fabric, patterns, books, notions, hand-dyed, painted fabrics, fabrics and sewing accessories. Come ready to shop! There will be long-arm quilting machines to view and compare. One vendor will be selling handmade wooden products. A concession stand will provide breakfast and lunch items. On Saturday, quilt and textile appraisals will be done by appointment only from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Jan Sears, AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted Textiles, will offer written appraisals

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for insurance purposes as well as consultations on age and history of antique quilts. Quilts can be newly made or antique. There will be a charge for written appraisals. For more information, contact Jan Sears at 308-279-0163 or searsjmh@gmail.com. Another feature of Threads Across Nebraska will be Quilts of Valor. This is a national organization of volunteers creating heirloom quality quilts for those wounded in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is a tangible way to say “Thank you for your service, sacrifice and valor” for our country. To date, more than 67,537 quilts have been presented. To learn more, visit www.qovf.org. Threads Across Nebraska will be held at the Buffalo County Fairgrounds Exposition Building at 3807 Avenue N, Kearney. Hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday, October 12, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 13. Admission: Adults, $6.00 per day; Children, 412, $3.00, and under 4 is free. There is free parking. For more information, contact LeAnne Killion at 308-440-8867.

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September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Page 15

NEBRASKA FARMERS COMPARE CURRENT, FORMER DROUGHTS

THE VALUE OF IRRIGATION...

Continued from page 9

Continued from page 10 “I couldn't say no,” he said. Torczon, 87, said he had too much respect for his dad to refuse the request, even though he never wanted to be a farmer It was a career he stuck with, despite saying he hated every minute of it. What kept him in farming was the ability to be his own boss and the opportunity to get involved in local and state issues. Over the years, he served on several boards, including the state board of agriculture and helped oversee the start of Central Community College-Columbus. Because of his interest in so many other areas away from his farm, Torczon said he wasn’t a very good farmer. He often had to hire help to keep the land as he tended to other interests. He rents his land out now. Farmers will most likely have to take a big hit this year. But Torczon said most should be able to survive after one bad year. “It's going to be depend on the length of the drought. The average farmer can survive one year. But when you start adding them up like three or four years like we did in the ‘30s, then I don't know,” Torczon said.

USING IRRIGATION CANALS FOR GROUNDWATER RECHARGE MIGHT WORK Continued from page 1 The NRDs’ managers have said other incentives also may be offered. Bishop has said that without other options to return the overappropriated part of the Platte Basin west of Elm Creek to fully appropriated status and shrink deficits to target river flows at Grand Island for threatened and endangered species habit, "something in excess of 250,000 acres of irrigated land would have to be returned to dryland production." Cain said the feasibility study found that the NRDs' proposal could provide river benefits, plus enough groundwater mound recharge to meet the needs of CNPPID irrigators switching fully to groundwater. "We wanted absolutely no negative impacts to CNPPID irrigators," he said, while also reducing river flow shortages and maintaining Lake McConaughy, the district's huge storage reservoir near Ogallala, at a consistent, but somewhat lower level. That could enhance recreation opportunities, provide flood control in high-water years, reduce evaporation and still allow hydropower production to be maintained or increased, Cain said. There currently are wells available to 75 percent of CNPPID-irrigated acres, he said, and total annual groundwater recharge of 138,000 acre feet, which should increase if the system is managed more specifically for that purpose. The proposal focuses on off-season seepage from river diversions into the canals in wet

years. There would be water savings from not having water in Central canals during the summer irrigation season when it's most susceptible to evaporation. Cain said it's estimated that the overall efficiency of the system, with water deliveries and recharge, currently is 41 percent. His team looked at a basic plan using the Phelps and E65 canals, primarily in northern Phelps and Kearney counties, with options that include an additional small reservoir to hold unappropriated Platte water in times of excess. Cain said streamflow credits to the adjacent Republican River Basin could be maintained, as could benefits to Nebraska Public Power District projects — irrigation and cooling water for the Gerald Gentleman power plant — and hydropower generation. Using river, reservoir and other data from the past 50 years, some models estimated there could be groundwater mound increases of 20 to 30 feet or more over the next 50 years. Cain said it might not be that much, "But we were pleased to see that the number was positive." He added that any actual project benefits would depend on the management scenario used. Brown and Caldwell has no additional work assignment from the two NRDs, Cain said. "We're just presenting education, listening to people's thoughts".

in Nebraska, but the commodity price side runup would not have been there to buffer yield losses. The irrigated producer would have seen a more modest return above costs in 2012, but the dryland producer would have experienced negative net revenues. The revenue differential attributed to water is reduced, but still significantly greater than what would be considered a more normal production pattern. Scenarios II and III highlight the importance of the Ogallala Aquifer, which is relied upon even more heavily during drought years. Research of climatologists suggest that the ‘water cycle’ has been gaining more energy in recent years, the implication being more ‘harsh’ weather conditions, such as flooding and drought. Under the extremes, underground water resources such as the Ogallala Aquifer function like a ‘natural insurance’ for crop production. In our illustration above, the value of water is nearly 75 percent higher under Scenario III and increases by more than fourfold in Scenario II, which is reflecting the basic economic principle that as the resource becomes more ‘scarce’ the value (price) increases. The other aspect of the story is that Nebraska is on the ‘forefront’ of water technology for irrigation. Nebraska’s irrigation system is, without doubt, one of the most efficient irrigation systems in terms of water used. Had this not been the case, the additional cost of water in 2012 would have increased more than our estimated $75 per acre, and reducing the overall net revenue differential. In summary: • Irrigation in Nebraska is paying a considerable dollar premium in 2012. • While 2012 drought conditions may not be replicated again for some time to come, it is safe to say that climate-related extremes from year to year are more likely to increase and not decrease in the years ahead. • Long-term sustainable management of Nebraska’s portion of the Ogallala Aquifer will become increasingly critical on a more weathervariable future. Anil Giri, Graduate Research Assistant Department of Agricultural Economics University of Nebraska-Lincoln Bruce Johnson, Professor Department of Agricultural Economics University of Nebraska-Lincoln

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The Great Plains and the Southwest experienced another drought in the 1950s, which Dallmont Erickson, 92, said was a trying time. “You just had to go on. You went to the bank and borrowed money and continued to try to operate,'” he said. It was much more difficult then than now, Erickson said, because there was no irrigation. He said that changed farming. Before then, farmers were lucky to make money three years out of every five. Luckily, Erickson said he and his wife had good credit, which helped them make it through the drought. “You have to have credit. You have to have a good banker, he's got to go along with you. I always tell young farmers that you have to have a good banker,” Erickson said. Torczon farmed 160 acres of land just west of Columbus near the Platte River. It was family owned land that he oversaw after his brother, who took over for their parents, died in an accident. Even though he had two other brothers, Torczon's dad called him to come home to care for the farm.

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Page 16

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

September 27, 2012

Farm and Ranchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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Evaluate Your Nutrition Program by Looking at Calving Records Rick Rasby Beef Specialist, University of Nebraska Introduction Take time now to evaluate your nutrition program for the spring-calving cows. A way to do that is to evaluate the reproductive performance of the cow herd because reproduction is so closely linked to body condition of the cows and body condition is linked to the nutrition program. The greatest loss of potential calves to wean is due to cows not getting pregnant during the breeding season. Cows that don't get pregnant during the breeding season, for spring-calving herds, are usually a result of cows being in poor body condition at calving, as a result of the nutrient management program. There can be some losses due to abortion, but these losses are few especially if you have worked with your veterinarian on a herd health and bio-security program. Once baby calves are on the ground and have nursed their dam in a timely manner so that they get colostrum, calf losses between calving and weaning should be minimal. Calf losses at calving can be high in the Plains states for spring-calving herds due to weather, extremely cold condition and snowstorms accompanied by high wind and not enough protection. If the percentage of calves weaned per female exposed is in the 80's, in most situations it is nutrition related, and it should raise a red flag. Calves and pregnant cows are worth a lot of money. Feed efficiency in the cow/calf enterprise may be best described in reproductive efficiency (pregnancy percentage), or the number of cows that have a 365day calving interval, or the percentage of cows calving the first 21 days of the calving season. Efficiency needs to include not only output, which would be weaning weight, but also inputs, which would be cow costs. Analyzing Reproductive Performance Some specialists might raise the red flag if percent weaned of exposed is in the low 90's. There are producers that are profitable when percent of calves weaned of cows exposed is less than 90%. If weaned of exposed is below 90% and your cost of production allows you to have a profitable cow/calf enterprise, then the red flag is not warranted. The key is to have a good handle on cow costs. There are Standardized Performance Analysis (SPA) guidelines that outline how to calculate

production measures for the cow herd. These guidelines bring standardization-to-performance calculations so that when comparisons are made annually, they are made using the same calculations. The SPA guidelines also guide a producer through how to handle pregnant cows that are purchased or sold and other situations that may arise in regard to pregnant and non-pregnant females. SPA guidelines can be found on the NCBA website. There is an abbreviated way to dissect your cow herd by stage of production. Percentage of calves weaned of females is the number of calves weaned based on the females that were exposed to the bulls to produce the calves that are being weaned. Mathematically it is the number of calves weaned (numerator) divided by the number of females exposed to produce that calf crop (denominator) and this number times 100 to get it to a percentage [(# calves weaned/# cows exposed) x 100]. The challenge sometimes is that the numbers needed to do the calculation are collected over a year apart. For females that wean a calf in October of 2012, the number of females exposed would be the number of females exposed to a bull during the breeding season in 2011. We can also use this process to dissect percent weaned of exposed into different phases of the production cycle to get at pregnancy percent, calving percent, and weaning percent. We define percent pregnant as the number of pregnant females divided by the number of females exposed to the bulls, calving percent as the number of females that calve divided by the number of pregnant females, and weaning percentage as the number of calves weaned divided by the number of live calves born and nursed by their dam. Percent pregnant would give an indicator of number of non-pregnant females. Calving percent would give an indicator of abortions and calves lost at calving due to dystocia. And, weaning percent would give an indicator of calf losses from calving to weaning. As an example, in a 300 head cow herd, 255 cows weaned a calf. Records indicate 37 cows had no calving records, 6 calves were lost at calving, and 2 calves were lost between calving and weaning. We assumed the 37 head were non-pregnant because there was no record that they aborted. Pregnancy percentage is 87.7% ([(300 37)/300) x 100] = (263/300) x 100)], calving percentage is 97.7% [(263 - 6)/263) x 100) = (257/263) x 100], and weaning percentage is 99.2% [(257 -

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2)/257) x 100 = (255/263) x 100]. If you multiply pregnancy percent x calving percent x weaning percent, it should be close to 85% (.877 x .977 x .992 = .8499). You can further dissect cow reproductive performance by age group using the process described above. If a lot of young spring-calving females are not pregnant with their second calf, it is likely due to the lack of energy in their diet after calving. Calving Distribution Calving distribution, the number of cows calving in 21-day periods during the calving season, is impacted by the nutrition program and therefore body condition at calving, especially for springcalving cows. Cows that cycle early in the breeding season conceive early in the breeding season, and calve early in the calving season. Twenty-one day calving intervals can be easily calculated if you know when to start the first 21-day interval. SPA guidelines indicate there are two ways to determine when to start the first 21-day calving interval: start when the third mature cow (3 years old or older) has calved or start the first 21-day calving period 285 days after the start of the breeding season. Dr. Rick Funston (Beef Reproductive Physiologist, West Central Research & Extension Center, University of Nebraska) summarized data from steer calves that were born either the first, second, or third 21-day period of the calving season. Carcass weight and percentage of carcasses grading Choice was greater for steers born during the first or second 21-day calving periods. In addition, the percentage of the carcasses grading Average Choice or greater nearly doubles for calves born the first 21 days of the calving season compared to the second or third 21day periods. When heifer performance was compared by when they were born during the calving season, more heifers born the first 21 days of the calving period were cycling before the start of the breeding season, pregnancy rate was higher, and more of those heifers calved the first 21 days of the calving season. Management strategies to calve 65% of the cows during the first 21-day period of the calving season compared to 40% of the herd calving the first 21 days of the calving season will add about 25 pounds to the average weaning weight.

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September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch - Market

Page 17

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report Week Ending: 9/22/2012

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience to provide customers FuturesOne President and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. and Chief FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des company, FuturesOne, is a Moines and at the Chicago Board of full service risk Trade. You may contact David via email management and futures at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1brokerage firm. A primary 800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful on the web at www.futuresone.com. agricultural marketing advice via daily, Everyone should always understand the weekly, and monthly analysis of the risk of loss and margin needed when domestic and global markets. trading futures or futures options. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management The information contained herein is solutions and will also actively manage gathered from sources we believe to be pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and reliable but cannot be guaranteed. management services for speculative Opinions expressed are subject to change accounts. David and his staff at without notice. There is significant risk in FuturesOne draw on decades of trading futures.

By David M. Fiala

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 9/21/2012 Eastern Nebraska: Compared to last week: Alfalfa and grass sold steady. Ground/delivered alfalfa sold steady. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets sold steady. Very few loads of hay sold this week. Most alfalfa is going to dairies in or out of state. Few, cattlemen are buying hay. Some cattlemen have started to turn out in area corn stalks. There will be a lot of cornstalks or bean stubble baled this fall. Some alfalfa producers are on their 6th cutting this week. Corn and bean harvest appears to be in full swing this week. Quite a lot on hay is being imported from surrounding states and Canada (prices are not included in this report). Prices are dollars per ton FOB (freight on buyer) stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Prices from the most recent reported sales. Nebraska Department of Agriculture has a hay and forage directory available at www.agr.state.ne.us click on Hay Information. Northeast Nebraska: Alfalfa: Supreme large squares 250.00-270.00. Premium large squares 225.00-250.00. Alfalfa/orchard grass large squares 275.00. Good large rounds 200.00-230.00. Grass Hay: Good large rounds 170.00-200.00. Cornstalks round bales 85.00-100.00. Deydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 325.00-350.00; Organic alfalfa pellets, 17 protein: 430.00. Alfalfa meal: 330.00-350.00 Platte Valley of Nebraska: Alfalfa: Supreme large squares 275.00-300.00; Good large squares

200.00. Premium small squares 350.00. Good large rounds 200.00-225.00. Grass Hay: Good large rounds 150.00-160.00. Drought corn stalks baled in large rounds 115.00 delivered. Alfalfa ground/del local hauls 250.00-260.00. Cane ground/del 170.00. Corn stalks ground/del 150.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 330.00. Alfalfa meal: 337.00. Western Nebraska: Compared to last week: All classes trading steady to firm with some resistance noted at the higher end price levels this week. Both producers and buyers are waiting to understand the upcoming feeding needs of the region before contracting remaining hay. Light to moderate demand with slow trading activity. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Most horse hay sold in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales.

Detailed Quotations Western Nebraska Alfalfa Mixed Grass Supreme Lg. Rd. 250.00 165.00 Premium Lg. Rd. 200.00 Wheat Straw Fair-Good Lg. Sqs. 220.00 105.00-120.00 Wheat Lg. Round Corn Stalks Ground & Deliv. New Crop 70.00-85.00 220.00-240.00

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, September 17, 2012 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 11,144; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 4,956 Head; Carcass Wt: 50-126 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 88.1; Wtd avg. Dressing: 50.7; choice or better; 80.5% YG 57.4% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 90 . . . .under 55 lbs . . . . . .40.6 . . . . . . .220.00 - 340.00 . . . . . . . .298.89 1,779 . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .62.1 . . . . . . . .194.79 - 280.14 . . . . . . . .246.54 1,837 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .69.7 . . . . . . . .194.15 - 272.67 . . . . . . . .263.63 1,006 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .81.1 . . . . . . . .186.07 - 261.66 . . . . . . . .252.85 5,818 . . . .over 85 lbs . . . . . .112.2 . . . . . . .195.93 - 223.00 . . . . . . . .212.54

Lean hogs have ground higher this week, supported by better cash trade. The October contract is 200 higher on the week and has resistance at $7700 for the near term, with support at $7505. If we can get above the $77 area definitively both for the October it should fuel a little more buying. Back months have seen some pressure as the break in grain limits liquidation ideas. Cash prices have continued to work higher with packers having a harder time securing supplies for an aggressive kill schedule. Pork is plentiful right now, but exports should pick up with hog herds around the world beginning to shrink. With aggressive liquidation slowing, carcass weights should begin to edge higher. The harvest break should be a good opportunity to secure feed needs. Hedgers call with questions. Oct. 12 7365 7855

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 270 . . . . . .306-348 . . . . .330 . . .169.00-233.00 . . . . . .211.81 495 . . . . . .350-399 . . . . .376 . . .175.00-212.50 . . . . . .201.05 8 . . . . . . . . .354 . . . . . . .354 . . . . . .222.00 . . . . . . . . .222.00 794 . . . . . .400-448 . . . . .424 . . .169.00-204.00 . . . . . .187.40 176 . . . . . .400-434 . . . . .409 . . .192.00-215.00 . . . . . .207.18 1627 . . . . .450-499 . . . . .475 . . .165.00-189.50 . . . . . .176.93 63 . . . . . . . .477 . . . . . . .477 . . . . . .185.00 . . . . . . . . .185.00 24 . . . . . . . .495 . . . . . . .495 . . . . . .170.00 . . . . . . . . .170.00 1933 . . . . .500-545 . . . . .520 . . .162.00-182.50 . . . . . .172.91 186 . . . . . . .502 . . . . . . .502 . . . . . .179.75 . . . . . . . . .179.75 995 . . . . . .550-598 . . . . .570 . . .156.25-174.00 . . . . . .165.15 14 . . . . . . . .596 . . . . . . .596 . . . . . .154.00 . . . . . . . . .154.00 60 . . . . . . . .584 . . . . . . .584 . . . . . .170.00 . . . . . . . . .170.00 490 . . . . . .600-646 . . . . .631 . . .152.00-168.50 . . . . . .158.46 39 . . . . . . .628-643 . . . . .631 . . .156.00-157.00 . . . . . .156.82 141 . . . . . .662-699 . . . . .682 . . .143.00-159.00 . . . . . .150.82 90 . . . . . . .713-739 . . . . .731 . . .145.25-155.25 . . . . . .150.48 292 . . . . . .758-795 . . . . .784 . . .145.00-151.00 . . . . . .148.25 330 . . . . . .810-846 . . . . .828 . . .140.00-150.75 . . . . . .144.31 579 . . . . . .851-899 . . . . .873 . . .137.25-151.80 . . . . . .145.11 236 . . . . . .900-945 . . . . .917 . . .134.00-141.25 . . . . . .138.12 160 . . . . . .950-970 . . . . .959 . . .136.25-137.85 . . . . . .137.57

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 10 . . . . . . . . 272 . . . . . . .272 . . . . . . .191.00 . . . . . . . .191.00 76 . . . . . . .314-347 . . . . . .338 . . . .172.00-190.00 . . . . .181.41 729 . . . . . .350-399 . . . . . .368 . . . .150.50-188.00 . . . . .177.39 10 . . . . . . . .360 . . . . . . . .360 . . . . . . .195.00 . . . . . . . .195.00 1107 . . . . .400-449 . . . . . .427 . . . .147.75-179.75 . . . . .165.87 32 . . . . . . .409-446 . . . . . .421 . . . .172.00-174.00 . . . . .173.34 1362 . . . . .451-499 . . . . . .467 . . . .146.00-166.50 . . . . .156.21 14 . . . . . . .457-480 . . . . . .470 . . . .167.00-169.00 . . . . .167.83 23 . . . . . . . .487 . . . . . . . .487 . . . . . . .149.25 . . . . . . . .149.25 44 . . . . . . . .460 . . . . . . . .460 . . . . . . .175.00 . . . . . . . .175.00 1177 . . . . .500-547 . . . . . .519 . . . .143.75-158.50 . . . . .152.45 484 . . . . . .550-593 . . . . . .569 . . . .140.75-151.00 . . . . .147.44 208 . . . . . .601-640 . . . . . .613 . . . .136.00-153.25 . . . . .148.02 661 . . . . . .666-697 . . . . . .692 . . . .134.00-148.25 . . . . .143.93 278 . . . . . .705-749 . . . . . .720 . . . .130.00-143.50 . . . . .138.85 1001 . . . . .750-798 . . . . . .778 . . . .135.75-143.00 . . . . .139.53 769 . . . . . .802-848 . . . . . .826 . . . .129.00-140.00 . . . . .136.82 457 . . . . . .850-893 . . . . . .866 . . . .129.50-139.10 . . . . .135.33 309 . . . . . .903-942 . . . . . .919 . . . .127.00-135.25 . . . . .131.67 110 . . . . . .950-992 . . . . . .971 . . . .129.00-133.25 . . . . .129.46 39 . . . . . .1000-1043 . . . .1032 . . . .118.00-131.50 . . . . .121.02

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 121 . . . . . .308-349 . . . . . .333 . . . .145.00-178.00 . . . . .167.56 133 . . . . . .359-394 . . . . . .381 . . . .153.00-178.00 . . . . .168.02 167 . . . . . .403-448 . . . . . .431 . . . .141.00-160.00 . . . . .149.28 124 . . . . . .472-497 . . . . . .481 . . . .142.50-153.00 . . . . .149.88 66 . . . . . . .520-546 . . . . . .530 . . . .140.00-146.25 . . . . .142.28 8 . . . . . . . . .520 . . . . . . . .520 . . . . . . .149.00 . . . . . . . .149.00 32 . . . . . . .551-566 . . . . . .563 . . . .135.00-142.75 . . . . .141.33 12 . . . . . . . .584 . . . . . . . .584 . . . . . . .144.50 . . . . . . . .144.50 61 . . . . . . . .645 . . . . . . . .645 . . . . . . .146.00 . . . . . . . .146.00 18 . . . . . . .660-666 . . . . . .664 . . . .128.00-138.00 . . . . .131.87 26 . . . . . . .777-790 . . . . . .787 . . . .122.50-132.00 . . . . .129.47

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 273 . . . . . .354-399 . . . . . .385 . . . .161.00-198.00 . . . . . 181.43 107 . . . . . .414-434 . . . . . .426 . . . .160.00-185.00 . . . . .178.30 183 . . . . . .450-499 . . . . . .484 . . . .160.00-172.00 . . . . .166.00 221 . . . . . .506-549 . . . . . .532 . . . .153.00-166.00 . . . . .160.14 120 . . . . . .550-598 . . . . . .573 . . . .148.00-158.00 . . . . .154.17 17 . . . . . . . .555 . . . . . . . .555 . . . . . . .161.00 . . . . . . . .161.00 19 . . . . . . .785-795 . . . . . .790 . . . .135.00-142.75 . . . . .138.65 12 . . . . . . . .897 . . . . . . . .897 . . . . . . .134.50 . . . . . . . .134.50

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1-2

Look for more news @ www.myfarmandranch.com

5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 9/23/12

Confirmed: 102,182 Week Ago: 118,307 Year Ago: 149,969

Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,483 . . . . . . . . .1,300-1,545 . . . . . . . . . . .122.50-126.00 1,452 . . . . . . . . . . .124.79 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,364 . . . . . . . . .1,251-1,565 . . . . . . . . . . .122.00-126.00 1,430 . . . . . . . . . . .125.06 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,303 . . . . . . . .1,150-1,485 . . . . . . . . . . .123.00-126.00 1,353 . . . . . . . . . . .125.93 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,034 . . . . . . . . .1,270-1,385 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00-126.00 1,338 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00 Weighted Averages Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,244 . . . . . . . . .1,200-1,400 . . . . . . . . . . .121.00-126.00 1,303 . . . . . . . . . . .125.14 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,522 . . . . . . . . .1,150-1,380 . . . . . . . . . . .124.00-126.00 1,252 . . . . . . . . . . .125.74 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,830 . . . . . . . .1,090-1,375 . . . . . . . . . . .125.00-126.00 1,203 . . . . . . . . . . .125.92 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .884 . . . . . . . . . .1,140-1,300 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00-126.00 1,171 . . . . . . . . . . .126.00 ============================================================================================================== Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) (Paid on Hot Weights) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,369 . . . . . . . . . .800-1,002 . . . . . . . . . . . .194.00-197.00 910 . . . . . . . . . . . .195.63 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,485 . . . . . . . . . . 819-987 . . . . . . . . . . . .192.00-197.00 914 . . . . . . . . . . . .194.71 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,419 . . . . . . . . . .723-957 . . . . . . . . . . . . .194.00-199.00 907 . . . . . . . . . . . .194.98 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,088 . . . . . . . . . .734-869 . . . . . . . . . . . . .194.00-197.00 821 . . . . . . . . . . . .195.15 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,282 . . . . . . . . . .725-913 . . . . . . . . . . . . .194.00-200.50 833 . . . . . . . . . . . .195.35 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,735 . . . . . . . . . .678-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .194.00-200.50 746 . . . . . . . . . . . .199.24 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .29,184 . . . . . . .1,406 . . . . . . .125.32 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .25,480 . . . . . . .1,239 . . . . . . .125.68 Dressed Del Steer . . .17,273 . . . . . . .913 . . . . . . . .195.02 Dressed Del Heifer . . .12,105 . . . . . . .803 . . . . . . . .196.50

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Week Ago Averages:

Year Ago Averages:

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Heifer . . . . .28,852 . . . . . . .1,227 . . . . . . .126.43 Dressed Del Steer . . .14,413 . . . . . . .916 . . . . . . . .195.41 Dressed Del Heifer . . .8,607 . . . . . . . .814 . . . . . . . .195.90

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .43,010 . . . . . . .1,357 . . . . . . .115.83 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .39,830 . . . . . . .1,211 . . . . . . .115.96 Dressed Del Steer . . .23,319 . . . . . . .896 . . . . . . . .183.11 Dressed Del Heifer . . .17,488 . . . . . . .802 . . . . . . . .182.99

Support: Resistance

Cattle prices have seen pressure from speculative non-commercial selling and long liquidation amidst concerns about demand coming forward due to economic weakness. The October contract is 640 lower on the week, and the October feeder cattle are 125 lower due to the commodity liquidation. Cash trade started at $122 as packers were able to pick off hedged feeders. Packer margins remain poor The cutout has been mixed this week. Choice is down 1.43 at 192.45 and select down 2.68 at 181.51. The choice select spread has been fairly steady. Feedlots are showing signs of being a little less current. The break in corn prices should help November 2012 Feeder Cattle (CBOT)

Dec. 12 7282 7642

Oct. 12 12100 13095

Oct. 12 Feeder 14517 14982

feedlots improve coverage, and should support the feeder cattle contracts. The October contract has support at $119.60 for now, and will need to work sharply higher to improve the chart. Better cash trade will be required to do this. Feeder cattle placement should pick up more once harvest is done. Some alfatoxin waivers have been granted to feed to cattle in limited situations. Hedgers call with questions

December 2012 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open .124.825 High .125.275 Low . .124.475 Close .125.000 Change +0.250

October 2012 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open . . .76.500 High . . .76.950 Low . . .76.450 Close . .76.875 Change .+0.600

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1

Cattle

Hogs

Support: Resistance

MARKET: Bassett Livestock Auction – Bassett; Burwell Livestock Market – Burwell; Ericson/Spalding Auction Market – Ericson; Huss Livestock Market LLC – Kearney; Lexington Livestock Market – Lexington; Ogallala Livestock Auction Market – Ogallala; Tri-State Livestock Auction – McCook Receipts: 23,395 Last Week: 21,390 Last Year: 15,470 Compared to last week, steer calves sold unevenly steady and heifer calves sold mostly steady to 2.00 higher. Yearling steers sold steady while their sisters sold 1.00 to 2.00 higher. Demand was good for preconditioned calves, light to moderate for spring vaccination programs and good for yearling feeders. Rather large number of bawling calves continue to come to market for this time of year. Most yearling offerings are starting to get in short supply. Slaughter steers and heifers sold steady to weak this week with live sales at 126.00 and dressed sales at 195.00. Supply this week was even split of steer and heifers with 32 percent weighing over 600 lbs.

Open .147.575 High .147.600 Low . .147.200 Close .147.675 Change +0.475

AG NEWS COMMODITIES myfarmandranch.com


Page 18

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

September 27, 2012

New Facility to Open Near Anselmo Kris Williams, The Kearney Hub ANSELMO — The Andersons' new 3.8 million bushel capacity grain elevator facility near Anselmo will begin receiving grain Monday. It is the first elevator The Andersons has constructed in Nebraska and is the largest in Custer County. It is located along the Burlington Northern Railroad mainline and has both train and truck loading capabilities. "Constructing the new facility in Custer County, Neb., fits well with our strategy to provide service to customers west of our traditional Eastern Corn Belt market," said Chief Executive Officer Mike Anderson in an October 2011 press release. Groundbreaking for the facility was Nov. 11. Jim Cripe, regional director for The Andersons Grain Division added, "We received an outstanding reception by the community leaders and residents in this area, which was one of the several sites we considered for this project. We are looking forward to establishing a long-standing relationship in this progressive agriculture community." On the company's Nebraska website at experiencetheandersons.com, it says the company doesn't jump quickly into new markets, but spends a lot of time and resources deciding if one can truly be an asset to business. When it does expand into a new area, The Andersons considers it a new home. "That is especially true to Nebraska," the website says. "With a strong farming background and a network of close-knit

communities, we knew this was an ideal fit for The Andersons and how we do business." Melissa Garcia, president of Custer Economic Development Corp., said a facility like The Andersons is a "tremendous addition" to the region that will have a direct effect on ag producers and a trickle-down effect to all area businesses. "We are lucky to have this facility and a company whose mission statement so [closely] matches the mentality of our area," she said. In an email, Erin Lampe, senior account representative for The Andersons’ Nebraska Grain division, wrote, "The Andersons has a strong commitment to serving the communities in which we have operations." That includes generously sharing time, talents and financial resources on solutions to social problems and in support of other worthwhile community endeavors, Lampe wrote. The elevator has both an inbound and outbound scale, four 500,000-bushel bins, two receiving pits at 50,000 bushel per hour, a 2 million-bushel ground pile, a 100,000 bushel wet bin and a 7,500-bushel-per-hour grain dryer. The Andersons facility has a loop track for 100-car unit trains and will be able to load out by rail at 60,000 bushels per hour. Staff expects only a six- to seven-minute lapse from when a grain truck weighs in full until it weighs out empty. The county road in front of the facility has been upgraded and concreted for safe access of

customers and employees. A grain marketing staff is on site. Lampe said the corn received at the facility will go to the best market, but she anticipates it will flow south or west by rail. "While we realize this year's crop is challenged due to the drought, we believe the accessibility we provide to a variety of outlets, as well as our many services will provide added value to area farmers during this year and well into the future," Mike Anderson said last month. Regional Operations Manager Chris Reed said the facility at this location has the newest technology, fast receiving systems and a lot of storage for local farmers that bring their commodity there. With the addition of this elevator near Anselmo, The Andersons Grain Group now has capacity of nearly 113 million bushels throughout Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Nebraska. The Andersons has recently expanded its operations in Nebraska to nine locations, both through acquisitions and merchandising agreements. It also has a presence in Kearney, Riverdale and Paxton. "We are looking forward to the added value this facility will bring to all our customers, and are looking forward to the future of The Andersons in Nebraska," Lampe said. For bids, delivery times or to discuss the markets, The Andersons team can be reached in Kearney at 308-236-8438.

Schedule of Events Oct 3 - Grand Island (Hall County) The Silver Celebration; Fonner Park/Heartland Events Center, 700 E. Stolley Park Rd. Fun festival for anyone 55 and older. (308) 382-1000 www.theindependent.com Oct 4-7 - Valentine (Cherry County) Nebraska Cowboy Poetry Gathering & Old West Days; Valentine Rural High School. Cowboy poetry, music, trail ride and more. 9am-9pm, $10, (402) 376-3000 www.nebraska cowboypoetrygathering.com Oct 5-7 - Sidney (Cheyenne County) Oktoberfest and Crusin' Class Rod & Roll Show; Fairgrounds & Legion Park. Entertainment, crafts, vendors, farmers market, parade and other events. More than 150 classic cars compete, show and shine at Legion Park. Fri, noon-midnight; Sat, 7am midnight; Sun, 9am-2pm, Free, Judy Harris (308) 2542932 www.sidneycheyennecountytourism.com Oct 6 - Grand Island (Hall County) Harvest of Harmony Parade; Downtown on 3rd St. Nebraska's largest parade features 50 different floats and a variety of marching bands. 8:15am, Free, Micki Ward (308) 382-9210 www.gicham ber.com Oct 6 - Orleans (Harlan County) Applefest; Fairgrounds. Crafts, parade, entertainment and buggy rides. 9am-5pm, $1, Charlene Hunt (308) 473-5120 Oct 6-7 - Ashland (Saunders County) Autumn Harvest Art Show 2012; Eugene T. Mahoney State Park, I-80 Exit 426. A fine arts celebration featuring wildlife, landscape, still life, impressionistic, southwest and western paintings in a variety of mediums. Sat, 9am8pm; Sun, 9am-4pm, Park entry permit required, Adam Offner (402) 944-2523 www.out doornebraska.org Oct 6-7 - Columbus (Platte County) Cornhusker Vintage Nationals; US 30 Speedway. Sat, 8am-10pm; Sun, 10am-4pm (402) 721-8306 www.visitcolumbusne.com

Oct 6-7 - Omaha (Douglas County) Omaha North Hills Pottery Tour; Florence, Ponca Hills, Fort Calhoun and N. of Blair. A healthy sampling of pottery styles and firing techniques, face-to-face chats with potters, glances into local history and some local wine tasting. Sat, 10am-7pm; Sun, 10am-5pm, Free, Liz Vercruysse (402) 456-7669 www.omahanorthhillspotterytour.com Oct 6-7 - Ponca (Dixon County) 3rd Annual Homemade Living Weekend and Farmer's Market; Ponca State Park, 88090 Spur 26E. Demonstrations of canning, beekeeping, organic and heirloom gardening, fiber arts, flour milling and more. Horse drawn wagon rides and pioneer games too. Free, Jennifer Wolff (402) 755-2284 www.outdoornebraska.org Oct 6-7 - Spencer (Boyd County) Wild Turkey Days; City-wide. Historical release and wild propagation of native turkeys. Craft fairs, children's activities, chili cook-off, turkey dinner and special events. 9am-6pm Vicki Pecena (402) 589-1038 www.spencerne.net Oct 6-7 - York (York County) Tractor, Engine, Auto Show and Barn Dance; Wessels Living History Farm, 1 mi. S. of I-80 Exit 353. Working demonstrations, games and assorted activities. Sat, 10am-dark, Sun, 10am4:30pm, $2-$5, Dale Clark (402) 710-0682 www.livinghistoryfarm.org Oct 7 - Scottsbluff (Scotts Bluff County) Art in the Courtyard; Barn Anew B&B Country Retreat. A gathering of artists and their works in the courtyard of the Barn Anew Bed and Breakfast. A yearly event for the North Platte Valley Artist's Guild. 10am-4pm, Free, (308) 632-8647 www.barnanew.com Oct 12 - Stanton (Stanton County) Oktoberfest - Uptown's 31st Anniversary Party; Uptown Café, 801 10th St. German beer and wine tastings with authentic German food and live music. 7pm, Free, Rosalind Lamson (402) 439-5100

Oct 12-13 - Fremont (Dodge County) Holiday Splendor Quilt & Needlework Show; City auditorium, 929 N. Broad St. More than 200 quilts and needlework items, vendors, mini-raffle, country store with homemade items and more. Fri, 9am-8pm; Sat, 9am-5pm, $5, Jan Larsen (402) 721-8759 Oct 12-13 - Kearney (Buffalo County) Threads Across Nebraska; Buffalo County Fairgrounds. Quilt show, merchants mall and quilt raffle. Fri, 9am-6pm; Sat, 9am-4pm, $3$6, LeAnn Killion (308) 440-8867 nsqg.org Oct 13 - Grand Island (Hall County) The Big Grape; Fonner Park/Heartland Events Center, 700 E. Stolley Park Rd. Sponsored by Hy-Vee, this event features wine tastings from vineyards around the world, gourmet foods and live music. (308) 381-3678 Oct 13-14 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Lancaster Antique Show and Sale; Lancaster Event Center, 84th & Havelock Ave. Established show of 30 years featuring quality antiques including books, country primitives, furniture, glassware, pottery, folk art, early Americana and more. Sat, 9am-5pm; Sun, 10am-4pm, $3.50, Rhonda Blank (402) 4321451 www.lancastereventcenter.com Oct 14 - Ohiowa (Fillmore County) Ohiowa Craft Day; Auditorium. Crafts, cookbooks, homemade items, food and more. (402) 2952515 Oct 14 - York (York County) October Czechfest; City auditorium, 6th & Nebraska Sts. Authentic Czech foods, accordion jam, raffle, silent auction, demonstrations and geneology information. 9:30am-5:30pm, Free, JoAnn Kuester (402) 362-6413 www.nebraskaczechso fyork.org Oct 14-20 - Hastings (Adams County) 32nd Annual Nebraska Country Music Foundation Festival; Adams County Fairgrounds, 947 S. Baltimore Ave. Performers of all ages including amateur, semiprofessional and professional acts. 7pm, $5-$7, Deb Shaw (402) 726-2140 www.necmf.net


September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Page 19

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, October 4th. The next Heartland Express will be printed on THURSDAY, October 11th. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, call 800-658-3191 and ask for Jodi 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE KS - `2007 MF 2190 BALER, 4X4X8 BALES, 30, 000 BALES,, (800) 870-4423 1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE

STACK MOVERS FOR SALE: Lorenz New 13’x33’, 13’x35’, 16’x33’ and 13’x35’ w/heavy 2082 deck chain & 14-ply tires. 18-Ton models on hand! Lorenz 2009 13’x33’ 18-Ton, like new; Lorenz 2002 13’x33’ 18-Ton, like new; Lorenz 2008 13’x35’ w/heavy 2082 deck chain, 14-ply tires, like new; Lorenz 13’x29’ completely reconditioned, new tires & paint, very sharp; Rust 13’x29’ reconditioned, new 12-ply Firestones, excellent condition, Sharp!

402-775-2497

Tough, Reliable Hydraulic Bale Beds www.deweze.com

800-835-1042 1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS FOR SALE

Mack Truck Stack Mover 15x40 ft. live Milbrandt bed, 4 axles, new motor, drive train completely rebuilt. Ready to work! - $25,000 -

605-848-1200 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE FOR SALE

Hi-Plains Farm Eq. Dodge City, KS • PH-800-466-0068 • www.hipainsfarm.com • • New and Used Sprinklers • ‘07 Hess, 9345 w/18’ 1346h............$55,000 ‘08 Morris 1400 bale mover............$22,000 ‘97 830 Hugger................................$11,750 1-’95 565A Hesston...........................$5,500 ‘95 9000 Macdon swather ...............$24,800 Demco saddle tanks...........................$1,500 New MF small square baler............In Stock New Morris hay hikers ...................In Stock New Crustbuster no-till drls............In Stock NEW BAD BOY MOWERS ..........In Stock www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE FOR SALE - CONT’D

High Energy Liquid Feed 20% Protein 8% Fat $198 ton/ Atchison ,KS $218 ton/ Alva ,OK Minimum order 23 ton Truck loads National Feed Commodities www.nationalfeed.com

888-674-8279 1101 - TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - MF 35, 50, 65, 135, 235, 245, OR 255 TRACTOR, (402) 678-2277 MO - AC D17’S & UP, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - IH 560 TO 1566, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 KS - WANTED: VERSATILE TRACTORS, ANY CONDITION, PREFERRED NON RUNNING FOR SALVAGE. CALL:, (316) 943-0203

WANTED

DEAD OR ALIVE

Farm Tractors and Construction Equipment

Tri-County Parts & Equipment Brighton, CO (303) 659-9690 tcparts@msn.com

FOR SALE IL - LARGE SELECTION OF NEW, USED & REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, IH, JD, MM, MH, AC, OLIVER & OTHERS. WE SHIP DAILY. PLEASE CALL, (217) 370-1149

1989 JD 4955, MFWD, RADAR, low hours, 18.4-46 rubber, excellent shape, $50,000/OBO. 2011 JD 455 GRAIN DRILL, 35’m 10” spacing, select lift, low acres, $50,000/OBO. Can deliver. PH 785-979-2545 NE - HD10 ALLIS CHALMERS TRACTOR: RUNS. A GOOD FIXER UPPER OR PARTS. CALL FOR INFORMATION., (308) 537-2800

1983 John Deere 4450 8900 hours, 4x4, New KMW Loader with bucket & bale head. $45,500 Call: 307-262-6669 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1101 - TRACTORS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885 1105 - DISKS FOR SALE

DISC ROLLING STEEL BLADES ..........AND..........

GRINDING HARD BORON BLADES Installed after 2005

Now grinding both sides for maximum effectiveness and longer blade life. Will travel to your farm within 200 mile radius of Craig, NE

Call Roy’s Cell: 402-660-8298 Or Leave Message: 402-377-2437 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE NE - NEW FLEX KING PICKER WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 1109 - PLANTERS FOR SALE NE - C-IH 12R36” VERTICAL FOLD 3 PT, ALWAYS SHEDDED, (308) 995-5515 1111 - DRILLS FOR SALE NE - !! ROUND CAPS !! THE ULTIMATE GRAIN DRILL PRESS WHEEL CAP! COVERS COMPLETE FACE OF WHEEL. CONVERTS V FACED WHEELS TO ROUND FACE FOR BETTER FLOTATION & DEPTH CONTROL. PERFECT FIT! EASY TO INSTALL! DON YUNG DISTRIBUTING, KIMBALL, NE., (308) 2352718 KS - 30” HOE AIR SEEDER DRILL $3500. 40’ DISC AIR SEEDER DRILL, $14,000, (785) 871-0711 NE - 150 & 7100 DRILLS, FERT. BOXES, BLACK HEAVY DUTY WHEELS, DBL HITCH, TRANSPORTS & PARTS, (308) 995-5515 1113 - CULTIVATORS FOR SALE SD - 3-PT 8R FLAT FOLD, $1,500.00, (605) 386-2131 KS - KENT 36’ SERIES 5 FIELD CULTIVATOR: DOUBLE FOLD. GREAT SHAPE! BRENT 400 GRAIN CART WITH ROLLOVER TARP, ALWAYS SHEDDED. CALL FOR INFO,, (785) 799-3796 www.myfarmandranch.com

120 OWS 6P PL E E GEA F W O S R RH D N EP NE - SALE EAD SA E ADS W W O 1101 - TRACTORS S L S ON(3, 0 150 P E HE ' N I 5 6 I 8 H B X 0 T ) P I N M 4 PER 11 FOR SALE - CO ALE KING COND 1 E - 995-55 GEAR TRIP 8712 S S 0 ' R H 3 1 R 1 EAD 1 20 ) NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF FO FLE X OOD 5-2541 5P0IC0KHEP 4 AMAR 5 , 6 OR SALE OURNE 0, (785 G ) 86 ING HP :3 $ ILL R B 0 F . LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, KS L O A 0 0 TIOSHE P W, (62 LE X K 51N5E - R4O:W ,50 5 , 700 G DR A (308) 436-4369 PLO 00.00, F 95-5 90H HARUS 74$-600 , 70 H E ARH KS - , ER, $5 36' ER, B W 1 8 0 D , , E 9 H P P E 1 151 N 96 DAPT 0 50ITH 048:3) MOT (308 5:4 ADHSEA KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS $ W - N 308) CD9O - CJOD A ELL 58 NE EELS, ( , 6-16'S3.00H0, P(130:1 $45O0 NORS ) 624- $650 0:711 M BELLY MOWER, $2,900.00, (620) A F O I G , 0 2 0 1 $SH , 7-0 E A P ES R C H R 6 5 1 7 5 9 4 W K :3 ,$CU 700874 HP RH 7 865-2541 O NE0 SERSIA5LE00 NST-A2265 U IH W, $ E S E , ' 3 5 ) E A 2 N 08 5 361 LK NO 12, L/ N 18 : D IL - LARGE SELECTION OF NEW, 8 4- 00, (300, (3080HP 5: 3 $40 S IAWEEWEELL, $3X,4(X5880) POLY S BAOLR IKE 0 L 3 R . L 0 4 R , 6" USED & REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, E ) 62 2 0 7 , OE 456 - JI CAS , $1,00 4-21 $600, (712 1L2A6R5GE2N0," N&E.3 N36E0A-R037 IH, JD, MM, MH, AC, OLIVER & , S 7 ) E 8 R M ( R 7 N 8 3 0 E N E 2 R IND 08 N70 . O3U 200 E LT EN OTHERS. DAILY. GPLEASE THE WE YSHIP COIULE2RS H1A9Y09- C- OBRHUEL-1AL1DS24 30NDS, M ) 832- E - RE U 260 WIND RGER F 0 - O (217) B370-1149 A 3 N 6 O 1 R G O A 5 03CALL, T S R T A IST 4 T KE O 156 WFROR SBAALLE28T2AL H OL 3 S, ERE APP ES K B R AINE - 2 SALE TED KSS 32FOVR W-INTCR & '40' I- - GRAIN FFE G N F D A R A S A E L W LES CELL: D. HOR NE& G- REGISTERED FOR ANGUS, PPE INDOWION, 003 B COBB& A-L'S59O SEAL'E30'SUCKSCOND2604 LE O A S A H R J & S HAESR AS LS(308) O SA SAL GR A 6' 2 , W L2E0A04SE - MOR L ACK SD TOERT,C HI,N2G TCHHEDING T ES. S TO O WA 732-3356 999308-870-1119, 199 525BL A G AN MO FOR 11 GSI 3 L TARP SS . OLD N R VY 1 NE (25) COMING 2 EYR C 3 T P 5 U ERSA KDS -DU, R$9A9CCNOEW L 0 R C 6 2 O 73 LE AS T FO ED A NET 136 OR L 55807 MO K M BRO GAN CHAROLAIS BULLS(308)L 567 OK - ER R USIES P19AY 9 86-2 0

To place your classified ad call Jodi @ 800-658-3191

1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE NE - CENTURY 500 GALLON PULL BETWEEN, $400.00, (402) 787-2244 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE KS - APPLY PRE-PLANT, DUAL, AT PLANTING SIDE-DRESS, FOLIAR OR IRRIGATION. SURE CROP QUALITY LIQUID FERTILIZERS. BALANCED FORMULAS BLENDED TO YOUR SPECS. FLEXIBLE FINANCING OPTIONS. “ASSURING CROP SUCCESS FOR YOU”. DELIVERY DIRECT TO YOUR FARM, (800) 635-4743 1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER FOR SALE TX - NEW & USED FARM EQUIPMENT. NEW & USED PARTS. TRACTORS, COMBINES, HAY & FARM EQUIPMENT. KADDATZ AUCTIONEERING & FARM EQUIPMENT SALES. ORDER PARTS ONLINE AT: KADDATZEQUIPMENT. COM, (254) 582-3000 1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS FOR SALE DIESEL SPECIALTIES of OMAHA INC. is your one stop shop for your diesel fuel injection needs. We carry a large exchange stock of diesel fuel injection pumps, nozzle assembles, & turbochargers on hand, ready for immediate exchange. We are factory authorized. Let us help you keep downtime to a minimum. Diesel Specialties of Omaha Inc. 13325 B Street, Omaha, NE 68144 (402) 330-0580 service@dieselspecialtiesofomaha.com

1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE NE - 3X4 BERKELEY PUMPS, PRIMING VALVES AVAILABLE, (402) 364-2592 1203 - PIPE WANTED TO BUY NE - WANTED TO BUY: USED ALUMINUM PIPE. PAYING TOP CASH PRICES. WE PICK UP ANYWHERE IN THE STATE OF NEBRASKA. MINIMUM PURCHASE 1000’ PIPE. CALL FOR A QUOTE, (308) 380-4549 FOR SALE NE - IN STOCK UNDERGROUND PIPE, WIRE AND FITTINGS. TRENCHING AVAILABLE. PLEASE CALL, (402) 678-2765 1205 - GENERATOR FOR SALE IA - WINCO GENERATORS, NEW & USED, 1PH 50KW $4,170. KATO LIGHT NEW 1PH AND 3PH WINPOWER USED 1PH $1,000. CALL WES SEBETKA AT, (641) 990-1094 1207 - PIVOTS FOR SALE NE - (8) HIGH SPEED CENTER DRIVES FOR A VALLEY PIVOT., (308) 883-8662 1208 - TRAVELER SYSTEMS FOR SALE

SOUTHWEST RAAFT CO. Rotating auto-Aligning Flotation Track • Reduces center-pivot irrg rut problems • No tire slippage & digging • Works on all brands of sprinklers Bob Gruner - 806-678-0268 Bob_gruner@hotmail.com www.nostuckpivots.com

1209 - PUMPS WITH MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 3/4 BERKELEY PUMPS WITH PRIMING VALVES, ATTACHED TO YOUR CHOICE OF INDUSTRIAL 300 FORD OR 262 ALLIS W/RADIATORS, AND CARTS, (402) 364-2592

1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE NE - 1983 JD 7720 COMBINE WITH HEADER HEIGHT CONTROL, HEAVY REAR AXLE AND STRAW CHOPPER 402-826-0632 OR, (402) 826-5264 NE - 1982 JD 7720, EXTREMELY WELL MAINTAINED, CERES 8000I YIELD MONITOR, LONG AUGER, GRAIN LOSS MONITOR., (308) 380-4265 NE - 1990 1660 CASE-IH COMBINE, W/1054 5R CORN HEAD, 20’ 1020 FLEXHEAD., (308) 467-2318 1302 - COMBINE HEADS FOR SALE SD - WE REBUILD COMBINE & WINDROWER HEADER AUGERS TO LIKE NEW CONDITION. PONCELET’S WELDING, RAMONA, SD. (605) 480-4860 OR, (605) 482-8405 SD - NH 98C 12 ROW 30 CORN HEAD: HH, HDP, KNEIGHT ROLLS, FIELD READY, EXCELLENT CONDITION, $48,500 ASK FOR JOEL AT, (605) 350-1138 KS - EXCELLENT LATE MODLE 1243 CORN HEAD, LOW TIN, OIL, BATH, HARD SURFACED ROLLS & DECK PLATES, STRAIGHT TIN, 60 SERIES HOOK UP. $15,500 WITH CORN REEL. PICTURES ON NEXTTECH!, (785) 452-5685 1305 - WAGONS/GRAVITY WAGONS FOR SALE IA - DEMCO 550 OR 650 GRAVITY WAGONS. CALL, (712) 210-6587 IA - DEMCO GRAVITY WAGON AND GRAIN CART, (712) 210-6587 1306 - GRAIN CARTS FOR SALE IA - COMBINE HEAD MOVERS FROM 25’ TO 40’ WIDE, PLEASE, (712) 210-6587 NE - UFT 550 BUSHEL GRAIN CART: NEAR NEW AUGERS, NEW GEAR BOX, SHEDDED, EXCELLENT CONDITION. SERIAL #70164. CALL:, (402) 843-8836 NE - UFT 400 BUSHEL, GRAIN CART, FLIGHTING THIN, WORKS GOOD, NICE CART, USED LAST FALL $1,700, (402) 7851004 1307 - GRAIN DRYERS FOR SALE

GRAIN DRYERS

Reliable - Efficient Vacuum Cool Towers NEW Trilogy Low

Call Jeff (515)577-7563 Ask about M-C Trax Remote Monitoring 1310 - AUGERS FOR SALE NE - WESTFIELD AUGER, 91-FT, W/ HYDRAULIC SWING, 13”, USED TWICE, $20,000 BLAIR NEBR. ROB, (402) 426-8090 1312 - HARVESTORS & SILOS FOR SALE WI - SILO DOORS - WOOD OR STEEL. SHIPPED PROMPTLY TO YOUR FARM. HARDWARE AVAILABLE. PLEASE CALL, (800) 222-5726 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER FOR SALE IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LOANS W/ GREAT RATES. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487 NE - NEW ORTHMAN DRY BEAN CUTTERS, (308) 995-5515 NE - FOR SALE! AUTOMATIC GRAIN BIN CONTROLLER BY CENTRY PACK. THE EASIEST TO OPERATE & MOST RELIABLE CONTROLLER AVAILABLE. FOR MORE INFORMATION CANTACT JOHN SMEDRA AT VALLEY GRAIN MANAGEMENT. ORD NE., (308) 7300251


Page 20

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

BULK TANKS-USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT Buy-Sell-Trade

800-844-5427 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC FOR SALE

Air Compressors • Heavy duty cast iron, no alum., 3-5 & 10 h.p. elec. Disc valves, not Reed valves, rod inserts, 2 stage, 60-80-120 & 200 gal. All compressors priced delivered.

North Central Air 619 S. Morgan, Downs, KS

785-454-3409 1415 - FURNACES AND HEATERS FOR SALE ELIMINATE • RISING • FUEL COSTS: Clean, safe and efficient wood heat. Central Boiler Classic and E-Classic Outdoor Wood Furnace; heats multiple buildings with only one furnace. 25 year warranty available. Heat with wood, so splitting! Available in dual fuel ready models. www.CentralBoiler.com. WE ALSO HAVE whole house pellet/corn/biomass furnaces. Load once per month with hopper. www.Maximheat.com.

A-1 Heating Systems Instant rebates may apply! Call today! 307-742-4442. 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY

FARM MACHINERY, ALL KINDS, prefer JD: Combines & heads, planters, cultivators, balers, etc. 402-920-2125, 402-395-2383 1501 - ALFALFA HAY WANTED TO BUY IA - QUALITY SML OR LG SQ ALFALFA OR MIXED IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 KS - WANT TO BUY: ALFALFA/GRASS PICKED UP OR DELIVERED ROUND OR LARGE SQUARE BALES. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL KEVIN MELVIN AT, (620) 5463507

ALFALFA WANTED: Big squares or rounds. Alfalfa & any grass wanted.

Chris, PH-620-253-2661;

Toll Free-877-394-0890 NE - HYDRAFORK CUSTOM GRINDING, GROUND HAY DELIVERIES, BUYING & SELLING HAY. NILSEN HAY CO. HAZARD, NE, (308) 452-4400 FOR SALE KS - ALFALFA: ROUNDS OR SQUARES. PICKED UP OR DELIVERED. CALL ROY AT PLEASANT ACRES., (620) 804-1506 KS - BUYING ALFALFA HAY PICKED UP OR DELIVERED AT FARM PAID ON DELIVERY AT SCALES (800)835-2096, (877)285-8200, (800) 835-2096 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE IA - LARGE RD & BIG SQ BALES GOOD QUALITY GRASS HAY, DELIVERED IN SEMI LOADS ONLY, (641) 658-2738

1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE - CONT’D KS - TOP QUALITY SM SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - TOP QUALITY 4X4X8 SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 1505 - STRAW WANTED TO BUY IA - GOOD CLEAN, BRIGHT SM SQ IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE KS - 1, 000 BALES OF WHEAT STRAW , NET WRAPPED . CELL:, (620) 243-3112 1512 - SEED WANTED TO BUY KS - WE BUY DAMAGED GRAIN - GRAIN VACS AVAILABLE. ALSO DAMAGED GRAIN FROM GROUND PILES., (316) 640-3203 FOR SALE IA - BUYER & SELLER OF PRAIRIE GRASS & WILDFLOWER SEED, OSENBAUGH SEEDS, LUCAS, IA., (800) 582-2788 WY - CERTIFIED SAINFOIN SEED: CAN OUT PRODUCE ALFALFA. WILL NOT BLOAT LIVESTOCK. VARIETIES INCLUDE: SHOSHONE/BIG HORN REMONT. $1.45/LB. TO ORDER GO TO WWW.SAINFOIN SEED.COM OR CALL MARK AT 307-2020704 OR CARMEN AT, (307) 645-3380

Cover Crop Strategies for Soil Health Cowpeas, Sunn Hemp, Soybeans Millet, Peas, Sudan, Grazing Corn Radish, Turnips, Vetch and More. www.greencoverseed.com PH-402-469-6784 • Bladen, NE

KS - FOR SALE: HIGH QUALITY TRITICALE SEED. CLEANED, 54LB TEST WEIGHT, 90’S % GERMINATION. CALL BROCK BAKER AT 316-249-1907, (620) 983-2144 1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER WANTED TO BUY

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED ANYWHERE WE BUY DAMAGED GRAIN & CORN IN ANY CONDITION WET OR DRY INCLUDING DAMAGED SILO CORN AT TOP DOLLAR WE HAVE VACS & TRUCKS CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

NORTHERN AG SERVICE, INC. 800-205-5751 FOR SALE

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Knight 3375 Reel Mixer .........CALL Knight 3036 Reel Mixer .........CALL Knight 3136 Reel Mixer .........CALL Polaris Ranger 500..............$6,800 Knight 2375 Reel Mixer .........CALL NH 791 Tandem Sprdr. ........$4,750 New EZ Haul Hay Trlrs ...........CALL New Hyd. Augers, skid ........$1,950 JD 2020...............................$5,250 20’ Steel Feedbunks...............CALL JD 566 Baler, net ...............$13,000 JD 700 Rake, like R23 .........$3,750

BradWhiteEquipment.com Broken Bow, Nebr. 308-870-0206

TROY KUCK SILAGE HARVESTING, LLC 73388 Road 437 Bertrand, NE 68927 308-991-2979

1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER FOR SALE - CONT’D KS - BRB CORN HAY: TESTED SAFE, 9. 5% PROTEIN, 60% PDN, CAN LOAD, $130.00/TON. SMITH COUNTY KS. SAMRICE@RURALTEL.NET, (785) 476-2610

NET WRAP, TWINE, BALE wrap-acid-bags. Inventory Reduction Sale - 48”x9.480’ $189; 51”x9.840’ $192; 64”x7.000’ $180 roll; 64”x10.000’ $250; 4000’ 350knot $24.95; 20,000’ 110 $21.95; 30” bale wrap $71.95. Preservative 83/# 9x250 $442; 9x300 $500. Ask about free delivery! Jordan Ag Supply.

815-868-2220 TX - BEARDLESS BARLEY HAY: IRRIGATED AND FERTILIZED. $75/BALE. QUANAH, TEXAS. PHONE:, (940) 839-8079 1804 - FEEDING WAGONS WANTED TO BUY NE - WANTED: GOOD FEED MIXER WAGON, WITH OR WITHOUT SCALES. CALL:, (308) 641-3921 1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471 1810 - MANURE SPREADERS FOR SALE OK - 2008 INTERNATIONAL PAYSTAR. CAT, 18SP, ROTOMIX VERTICAL SPREADER 802-19. 1337 ENGINE HOURS, 21, 853 MILES. EXCELLENT CONDITION! FAMILY OWNED/ OPPERATED. WEDER FARMS: 580-735-2344 EVE. 508735 -2751 OR CELL,, (580) 727-5323 1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE IA - 24’ HAY FEEDERS MEALS ON WHEELS. SAVES HAY, SAVES TIME & SAVES MONEY! CALL, (712) 210-6587 1815 - WATERERS FOR SALE MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471

GIANT RUBBER WATER TANKS Tanks made from used earth moving tires. Sizes from 6 to 13 foot. Can be open topped or drinker holes cut for frost-free winter use. Full loads can be delivered anywhere in the United States.

Guaranteed best quality & lowest price. Call

605/473-5356

1820 - LIVESTOCK BEDDING FOR SALE MN - BEDDING FOR SALE. DRY SAWDUST FOR DAIRY BARNS, DELIVERED ON WALKING FLOOR TRAILERS. WILL DELIVER TO MN, EAST SD, WEST WI, & NORTH IA ONLY. ALSO AVAILABLE SWEET CORN SILAGE IN THE FALL. CALL FOR PRICES, (320) 8642381 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER FOR SALE 1st in the Nation for Portable Corral Sales

September 27, 2012 1906 - BRED COWS FOR SALE

T H E

CATTLE SHOP .COM

Fall Calving Cows Available Several Nice Sets of Angus Cows The Simple Way to Buy & Market Cattle The Cattle Shop helps buyers and sellers connect online

Visit www.TheCattleShop.com to learn more If you would like to speak to a Cattle Shop Representative Contact Us at 660-641-9945 or contact@thecattleshop.com

KS - 87 HEAD BLACK ANGUS COWS: 3-5 YRS. OLD, BRED TO BLACK ANGUS BULL, STARTED CALVING AUG. 15TH. $1400. CALL JASON FILMORE, (620) 767-2577 NE - 45 EXTRA FANCY 2-3 YEAR OLD BLACK COWS, BRED BLACK, CALVE 2/10/13. NORTHERN ORIGIN. SELL ANY AMOUNT., (308) 380-3676 1909 - BULLS FOR SALE

Registered Purebred

Normande

Bulls

www.JAZcrossbreds.com

308-641-3921

COMING SOON To a pasture near you

2 Bar Angus BULLS • FEMALES • EMBRYOS • SEMEN

Private Treaty Bulls & Females For Sale Year Around Home of 2 Bar Twenty X #1 REA Bull 2 Bar Entirety #3$B bull

1-877/2-Bar-ANG • 806-344-7444 WWW.2BARANGUS.COM

1912 - BACKROUNDING/FEEDING FOR RENT

Taking in all classes of cattle for fall & winter grazing/feeding. Including cow/calf pairs, bred cows & fall breeding stock. AI & calving facilities available. Reasonable Rates References Available

605-520-3182

PEN SPACE AVAILABLE Backgrounding or Finishing Small Family Operation Located in Arnold, NE. Established 1906.

Call Jess at: 308-636-8692 1914 - BISON WANTED TO BUY

BUFFALO WANTED All classes, any quantity

402-694-9353 • Daniels Doubly Alley • Sioux Steel Portable Systems • Hydraulic Chutes • Titan Double Alley • OK Corral • Diamond W Sorting System • WW Express Corral Corrals Stg@$10,800 & up + Freight 800-726-9091 Cell: 970-539-0641 www.AckermanDistributing.Com 1904 - BRED HEIFERS FOR SALE

160 Red Angus

Heifers

Approx. 1000 lbs. AI bred. Delivery Oct. 1st to Oct. 10th and 60

Black Angus Heifers John Deere 7700 and 7850 • 8 Row Narrow and 10 Row Narrow Windrow Pick-up • Two John Deere Dozers • 11 Trucks

Approx. 975 lbs. AI bred. Delivery Oct. 1st to Oct. 10th. High Elevation Raised. Shots & 1st Scourguard before delivery.

“Large or small job--we do them all; doing timely work is our main concern.”

307-761-6022 307-745-5209

Wanted to Buy:

BUFFALO

Cows, Bulls and Calves Will consider any amount

605-391-4646 To place your classified ad call Jodi @ 800-658-3191

1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE CO - IT’S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292

Hardrock Cattle Co. LLC Adequate Numbers of thin Grass Cattle with Quality “The Good Doin Kind” Call for Quotes John Stone - Palestine Texas

1-800-393-BEEF

Livestock Producers Immunize your animals for drought & winter. Add MSE to salt, mineral or feed!

Call 866-615-0299 for information concerning the best kept secret in the livestock industry. 2010 - FARROWING EQUIPMENT FOR SALE SD - STAINLESS STEEL DRY, WET/DRY PIG FEEDERS. WEAN/ FINISH, 50”, 60”, 70” PIG CRATES. G/STALLS, DOUBLE LL 250HD PORTABLE NURSERY, CAST-IRON CENTER FLOORS 5X7’, TRIBAR FLOORS SS NURSERY GATES, FEEDERS., (605) 251-1133 2101 - FEEDER LAMBS FOR SALE SD - CUSTOM SHEEP FEEDLOT: LAMBS & EWES TO FEED, FATTEN & GROW!!! SHIPPY SHEEP FEEDLOT. CALL KYLE AT 605-8420935 OR DALE 605-842-3967. WWW. SHEEPFEEDLOT. COM, (605) 842-3967 2200 - REGISTERED HORSES FOR SALE

Several AQHA Fillies

3 and 4 Years Old. “Sun Frost” breeding • Ranch-Raised One Owner • Some Started

605-491-0715

MO - QUARTER HORSES, QUARTER LINGERS, MULES, PONIES, LOTS OF CHOICE. CALL:, (573) 470-5432 2208 - HORSE TRAINING FOR SALE

Colt Started Colt started on cattle Horse breaking and training Problem solved Cutting and reined cow horses Ranch horses Ranch rope work Arena work Thousands acres to ride out on Clinics and lessons

605-430-0529 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE NE - FREE!!!! COLTS, FILLIES, MARES. SKIPPER W, SHINING SPARK, PEPPY DOC SAM & JET-DECK BLOODLINES PICK-EM UP/ HAULEM AWAY. CALL:, (308) 384-1063 2301 - DOGS FOR SALE $150 to $300, Longmont, CO. Red & Blue Heelers Everett: 720-975-7096 moo101_87@yahoo.com These are going to be great working dogs. Mom & Dad are here for you to look at. Thank you. www.myfarmandranch.com

AT T E N T I O N C AT T L E M E N • 150 HEAD BLACK ANGUS HEIFERS HIGH ALTITUDE, EXTRA FANCY, MODERATE FRAMED, BANGS and PRE-BREEDING VACCINATED START CALVING APRIL 1 FOR 34 DAYS • REYES-RUSSELL LBW BULLS $1450 • DELIVERY BY OCTOBER 15 CURRENTLY ENROLLED IN THE 2012 WYOMING PREMIUM HEIFER PROGRAM HEIFERS WILL NOT DISAPPOINT • GOOD GENETICS PLEASE CALL AND COME SEE, SOUTH PASS, WY

• 307-389-4821 •


September 27, 2012 2301 - DOGS FOR SALE - CONT’D WY - GOOD QUALITY BLUE HEELER AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOGS: BRED IN MICHIGAN. BEST DOGS I HAVE EVER HAD! PUPS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON A REGULAR BASIS. $300.00., (307) 272-1915

PYRENEES GUARD PUPS $150 Each 605/580-8827 MO - HANGING TREE/HEELER X STOCK PUPS, WORKING PARENTS. $200.00 AND UP. CALL, (573) 470-5432

CATAHOULA PUPPIES

Nebraska Farm & Ranch 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES KS - CORN HARVESTING: NEW JD EQUIP. , GRAIN CARTS WITH SCALES, 6 LATE MODEL SEMI TRUCKS, DAILY FIELD PROD DATA AVAILABLE. LET US ASSIST YOU IN GETTING THAT VALUABLE CROP IN THE BIN OR ELEVATOR. REFERENCES. SKINNERHARVESTING. COM/CALL SKINNER HARVESTING LLC, (620) 343-8140 IA - WANTED DAMAGED CORN AND WHEAT:, (402) 350-8187 KS - CORN, MILO, WHEAT HARVESTING WANTED. TWO JD MACHINES & SUPPORTING TRUCKS., (785) 567-8515

CUSTOM SEED CLEANING FOR WHEAT & BARLEY SEED 20 plus years experience! Several references including Cargill, Busch Ag & Coors. On-site cleaning, completely self contained.

208-221-5338 Family/Ranch Raised Pups Registered with Current Vaccines & Worming DELIVERY POSSIBLE. Parents & Siblings are PROVEN CHAMPIONS in WORKING STOCK & HUNTING.

SHIPPING AVAILABLE.

701-391-3340

We travel to you!

SD - SPREAD IT, LLC-CUSTOM FEEDLOT CLEANING & MANURE HAULING. CALL DAN TOLL FREE @ 877-271-9430 OR, (605) 9403275 IA - DISC BLADE SHARPENING. ON-SITE ROLLING, NO TEAR DOWN, NO GRINDING. CALL, (319) 377-0936

Do You Like to Farm?

FULL-TIME POSITION on progressive row-crop corn and soybean farm, modern equipment & non-smoking environment. CDL, mechanical, pivot irrigation, welding, and precision farming/GPS guidance experience helpful. Top wages based on relevant experience. Come join our team! Send resume and cover letter to farmjobapp@gmail.com • Gothenburg

NE - FRAMING CARPENTERS WANTED FOR YEAR ROUND WORK. EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. PLESE CALL MATT:, (308) 5290825 SD - HARVEST HELP WANTED: TRUCK DRIVER, COMBINE OR TRACTOR OPERATOR, PETERBUILT TRUCKS, JD COMBINES, GOOD PAY, MAURER HARVESTING AND TRUCKING. KOREY, CELL:, (605) 380-0002 Straub International, a Case IH complex in central Kansas, needs service technicians in our Great Bend, Larned Hutchinson, Salina, Whichita and Pratt locations. Excellent benefits and an incentive plan that works. Up to a $5,000 signon bonus. Contact Dave at 620-285-1128 or dzecha@straubint.com Progressive Coop near Wichita, KS has an opening for a retail sales Agronomist. Must be self-motivated w/at least 2 yrs experience in sales of agronomy fertilizer, chemical & especially seed. Compensation, benefit package & bonus potential. Send Resume: Andale Farmers Coop, 219 Main, Andale, KS Attn: Greg; or call 316-4442141, ext. 205 for interview.

KS - EXPERIENCED PELLET MILL OPERATOR: SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE. CONTACT JIM OR DAVE AT XTRA FACTORS, PRATT KANSAS AT, (620) 6725616

Knutson

I R R I G AT I O N

Center Pivot Technician We are looking for and hiring all levels of irrigation technicians. Experience with all brands of center pivots is a plus. We are especially interested if you have welding and structural or experience in telemetry and technology equipment. Top of the line wages and opportunities for training and growth. If you are an extremely experienced technician there is opportunity for a sales/service type positron. We are in a midsouth state. Fax a resume to: 405-809-1560 or email to: bigsprinkler1000@yahoo.com or call us at 800-373-9325 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

WIRE, PIPE, WOOD & VINYL

800-783-8437

Serving Western US.

11R24.5 Gladiator QR99 16P Traction $365

FREE SHIP: 8 TIRES

2602 - PICKUPS FOR SALE

FET/Freight Inc/ALL IN

Exira Auto Sales Hwy. 71, Exira, IA • 712-268-5345 www.exiraauto.com

32-Yr USA Shipper

‘12 Suzu Grand Vitara, 4 WD.................................................$19,900 ‘09 Dodge 3500 Quad Cab Dually 4x4, diesel auto................$22,950

www.trucktirehotline.com 06 Pete 379, C15, 63UC...........$64,900

‘08 Dodge 3500 Reg. Cab Dually 4x4, diesel 6 spd...............$19,950 ‘08 Chevy 1500 Crew Cab 4x4, cloth, 5.3 V8, 53K ................$18,700 ‘08 Chevy Tahoe 4x4, cloth, 75K............................................$19,800 ‘08 Chevy 3500 X Cab Dually 4x4 diesel, utility bed..............$16,900

PH - 1-800-844-4057 3255 West Jones Ave. Garden City, KS 6746

•••••••••••••••

FARM/OTR/TRUCK 11L15 Interco TI 12P Rim Implement I-1...$125

‘08 Honda Ridgeline CR, 8 cyl, auto, 4x4, 73K......................$16,700 ‘08 Chevy 2500 Reg Cab 4x4, 6.0 gas, flatbed, 93K..............$16,400 ‘08 Chevy 2500 Reg Cab 4x4, 6.0 gas, flatbed, 96K..............$15,900

Fisher Truck Sales

‘08 Ford F-250 X Cab, Shortbed, 4x4 auto, 5.4 V8, 90K........$12,900 ‘07 Ford F-250 Reg Cab 4x4, auto, V10.................................$11,900 ‘06 Dodge 3500 Quad Cab 4x4 dually, diesel 6 spd, 125K ....$18,600 ‘06 Dodge 3500 Reg Cab Dually 4x4, flatbed, diesel 6 spd ...$18,400 ‘06 Dodge 3500 Quad Cab Dually 4x4 diesel 6 spd...............$14,900 ‘05 GMC 2500 Crew Cab 4x4 diesel ......................................$18,900 ‘05 GMC Canon Crew Cab 4x4 leather...................................$11,600

2002 - FL 106 grain truck, double frame, new 22’ scottbox LL3000 Hoist. READY FOR HARVEST

‘05 GMC 3500 Reg Cab flatbed, 4x4, auto, diesel .................$15,900 ‘05 Chevy 1500 Reg Cab shortbed, 2WD, 5 spd V6, 76K........$7,900

‘03 Chevy Avalanche LT, 4x4, auto, leather, V8, sunroof........$10,700 ‘01 GMC 2500 Reg Cab 4x4, diesel utility bed, 123K ............$11,750

2000 - FLD120, 10sp AUTO SHIFT, 12.7 Detroit, Single Axle, Paired with 30’ red jet trailer. SHINES LIKE NEW!

‘01 Dodge 1500 Quad Cab 4x4, 5.9 auto.................................$2,950 ‘00 Ford F-350 SRW Crew Cab Lariat 4x4 diesel...................$14,900 ‘99 Ford F550 Crew Cab, flatbed dually 4x4, 7.3 diesel.........$12,900 ‘98 Dodge 3500 Quad Cab dually 4x4, V10 auto .....................$7,900

www.adamsmudjacking.com (402)-770-2566

PETERBILT Of GC

(970) 396-8729

‘03 Ford F-250 Crew Cab XLT shortbed, 4x4 auto, 7.3 diesel$16,400

ADAMS MUDJACKING & FOOTING REPAIR

2616 - TIRES FOR SALE

AUDIT YOUR TIRE PRICES!

‘04 Dodge Durango 4x4, 5.7 Hemi, leather, DVD 124K ...........$8,400

2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK

2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE - CONT’D

CAW FENCING

‘04 Dodge 2500 Reg Cab, Diesel 4x4, auto ...........................$16,300

-see us on facebookwestern skies catahoulas

CO - EXPERIENCED HAYMAN! FAMILY MAN! IRRIGATION AND ROW CROP. DRYLAND ALSO. MECHANICAL SKILLS. DESIRES POSITION ON FARM OR RANCH. WILL RELOCATE. WOULD CONSIDER CARETAKER POSITION. CALL,, (970) 250-4841 KS - LOOKING FOR WORK WITH HORSES: WILLING TO CLEAN STALLS, EXCERCISE, GROOM & ANYTHING TO CARE FOR YOUR HORSES. HAVE EXPERIENCE WITH YEARLINGS, GETTING THEM TO PEOPLE & A PRE-TRAINING ROUTINE. CALL JEFF EVENINGS AT, (785) 697-2264

2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES CONT’D

Page 21

‘98 Dodge 2500 Reg Cab 4x4 auto, 360 V8, snow plow .........$3,900 ‘96 Dodge 2500 X Cab 4x4 auto, diesel, no rust .....................$7,850 ‘95 Jeep Cherokee Sport 4x4 6 cyl auto ..................................$1,400

1994 - 379 Peterbuilt, 48” flat top, 12.7 Detroit, White, Good Rubber, Polished Wheels, SHARP!

2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY IA - LATE MODEL TRLRS & TRUCKS WITH LIGHT DAMAGE OR IN NEED OF ENGINE REPAIRS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - 08 386 PETERBUILT, 13 SP, CAT 585 HP, 580K MILES, 3RD AXLE, BUILT-IN GPS, LEATHER, RED IN COLOR, $65,000.00, (308) 452-4400 MO - 1989 FORD LTL 9000, CUMMINS 855BC, 350 HP, 9 SP, 515K MILES, 16K FRONT, 40K HENDRICKSON 4 SPRING REARS, REITEN 20’ X 72” ALUMINUM BED, TRIPLE CARGO DOORS, SRT-2 TARP. 12’ PUP WITH CENTER DUMP HOPPERS, SRT-2 TARP, APPROX. 425 BUSHEL CAPACITY, (660) 548-3804 MO - 2009 MAURER 40’ HOPPER BOTTOM, REAL NICE, JUST IN., (660) 548-3804 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER FOR SALE

‘93 Chevy 2500 X Cab shortbed, 4x4, 6’ lift 5.7 V8 5 spd, no rust.$5,900

Adams Mudjacking & Footing Repair Contact Paul: 402-770-2566

adamsmudjacking.com adamspiering.com • Interior Floors Raised • Stabilize Foundations • Raise Concrete • Restorations • Foundation Piers • Most Any Slabs SD - WILL BALE LARGE ROUND BALES WITH MF HESSTON 2856A OR LARGE SQUARE BALES WITH NEW MF HESSTON 2170XD (EXTRA DENSITY) BALER. ALL CROPS. WILL TRAVEL CALL DENNIS AT, (605) 430-1496 NE - ALL STEEL FEEDLOT FENCING. STEEL FEED BUNKS. PORTABLE CALVING SHEDS. FREE ESTIMATES AND WE TRAVEL. MEISTER WELDING., (402) 367-2479 CO - FALL HARVESTING WANTED; CORN, SOYBEAN, MILO, AND SUNFLOWER. NEW CASE IH COMBINE WITH SUPPORTING EQUIPMENT. ANYWHERE!, (719) 342-1091 KS - SILAGE CUTTING AND HAULING: JD 7750, 8 ROW HEAD,, (785) 543-7899

Want to Buy! Buying corn stalks in field $40.00 an acre! Buying bean stubble in field $50.00 an acre! Call Matt at 308-380-8972

‘86 Ford F-250 Reg Cab 351 V8, 4x4 Weston snow plow .......$2,900 ‘77 IH Scout 4x4 V8, auto air, No Rust....................................$5,000

2603 - TRUCKS WANTED TO BUY

COLLECTOR WANTS SALVAGE: Old Pick-ups, Trucks, Cars, Panels, Station Wagons Before 1959, Model A Bodies. PAYING WAY MORE THAN SALVAGE PRICE! Please let me know what you have! In the Dakotas every week! Call, E-mail, or write

FOR SALE KS - WILHITE TRUCK SALES: USED HEAVYDUTY TRUCK PARTS, DIESEL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINES. BURRTON, KS, (800) 2822243 SD - 1952 IH L160 TRUCK, 16’ COMBINATION GRAIN & STOCK BOX & HOIST, GOOD CONDITION. $2000, (605) 386-2131

FOR SALE! (4) International 4700, dt466 Allison Auto, 12 front, 21 rears, Make Great Feed Trucks!

507-294-3387

Call 800-821-5667

www.fishertrucksales.com

IA - 1999 PETE-385, W/48” SLEEPER, 10 SP, 795, 000 MLS 90K ON CAT OVERHAUL, NEW TIRES, SHARP! 1991 379, DAYCAB, 13 SP, LOW MILES, 3406 CAT. CALL:, (712) 420-2683

(785) 214-9532

All work done by Cattlemen for Cattlemen

NE - GEAR DRIVE REPAIR-AMARILLO WARRANTY CENTER. REPAIR ALL MAKES/MODELS. 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE. CALL AURORA CO-OP, HENDERSON., (402) 723-5824

2605 - STOCK TRAILERS FOR SALE

CIRCLE D LIVESTOCK & HORSE TRAILERS FLATBED TRAILERS • 1-800-526-0939 • www.circle-dtrailers.com

BELL FARMS 970-580-0473

Fence building & repair corral building, pasture clearing, bulldozer, back hoe services, livestock care and barn building

2002 - 4400IHC twin screw, cab-chassie, 9sp, DT530, 310hp, Wood 22’ box. 2001 - 4900 twin screw automatic, cab-chassie, DB frame, DT 466, 182” C-T, Would set up nice for a 22’ grain truck.

We Serve: • Northeast Colorado • • Western Nebraska •

Cattleman’s Livestock Service

1993 - 4800IHC, Auto, 4x4, 3 stage knuckle boom truck, 14’ flatbed, ideal for pivot work, low miles.

F&S Truck Parts is buying and selling truck beds in your area. Call Zach at 800-440-0721 pick up and delivery available

MJ’s TRUCK REPAIR, LLC

218.639.2809 ddonley@eot.com • David Donley 36961 State HWY 78 • Ottertail, MN 56571

SILAGE CHOPPING

NE - CUSTOM MANURE HAULING. 3 SPREADERS & A PAYLOADER AVAILABLE. OUR REPUTATION FOLLOWS US. KENT BACKER, (402) 499-8060

2005 - 9400i, Midroof, ISX, 213” wheel base, BOT inspected, HARVEST READY!

2005 Peterbilts & Kenworths, ALLISON AUTOMATICS, tandem axle, cab and chassis, can build to suit, Steve 785-259-6817

To place your classified ad call Jodi @ 800-658-3191

2612 - CAMPERS FOR SALE IA - 1976 HOLIDAY RAMBLER. 22’ SLEEPS FOUR. EXCELLENT CONDITION. NEW TIRES, NEW PLUMBING, NEW GAS REFRIGERATOR, NEW GAS WATER HEATER, AIR CONDIIONING AND HEAT. PLEASE CALL, (712) 2106587 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE NE - MONI MOTOR GLIDER AND TRAILER, LOW HOURS, (402) 364-2592 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

EQUIPMENT COMPANY

NEW & USED TRAILERS MOUNDRIDGE, KS

PH - (800) 835-0069 2802 - DOZERS FOR SALE NE - CAT D6D 4X SERIES, WITH SU HYDRAULIC BLADE, HYDRAULIC TILT, POWER SHIFT, GOOD MACHINE. CALL 402430-0699 OR, (402) 785-7285 OK - 1992 D8N DOZER, NEW UNDERCARRIAGE EXCELLENT CONDITION., (405) 5677139 KS - CAT D6C, $14,000.00, (785) 871-0711 2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 SK - WANTED: CATERPILLER CABLE SCRAPERS, LEVER HOLDINGS INC. CALL, (306) 682-3332 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 NE - PULL BEHIND BOX SCRAPERS, 10’ & 12’; 3PT’S 6’ & 8’, (402) 678-2277 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 MO - TOREQ 40” PTO DITCHER, $7,800.00, (660) 548-3804 MO - BUFFALO 12’ BOX BLADES IN STOCK, (660) 548-3804 ND - SCRAPER: BUY & SELL OLD CABLE SCRAPERS, CAT 60, 70, 80; LETOURNEAU LS, LP, FP; A/C; ALL MAKES AND SIZES, WILL CONVERT OVER TO HYDRAULICS, VERY PROFESSIONALLY DONE, TIRES & PARTS. CONTACT STEVE, WWW. STEVEVOIGHTMAN. COM. CELL 701-6808015 OR BUS., (701) 742-2182 KS - 6 YD PULL TYPE FORCED EJECTION, $2,950.00, (785) 871-0711 KS - (2) BOX SCRAPER/SPEED MOVERS(12’); CONVERTOR/ DOLLY; 1975 IHC TRUCK, TWIN-SCREW: (2) WHO 16’ GRAIN HOPPERS. CALL FOR INFORMATION., (620) 290-3997


Page 22

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

2807 - GENERATORS FOR SALE ND - GENERATORS: 20 KW TO 2000KWDIESEL, PROPANE & NATURAL GAS. ALL LOW-HOUR TAKEOUT GENSETS. CUMMINS /ONAN, KOHLER, CAT, DETROIT DIESEL & MORE. ABRAHAM GENERATOR SALES COOPERSTOWN, ND (INVENTORY ONLINE) WWW. ABRAHAMINDUSTRIAL. COM. WE SHIP NATIONWIDE!, (701) 797-4766 KS - PTO DRIVEN GENERATOR, $1,000.00, (785) 871-0711 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS FOR SALE KS - BOBCAT 963, $20,000.00, (785) 8710711

WINTER SPECIAL ON CONTINUOUS FENCE • 6 Bar 1 1/4" 14 Gauge 20' Section- $85 • 5 Bar 1 1/2" 14 Gauge 20' Section- $91 • 1 3/4" Schedule 40 20' Section- $98

2007 CAT 256C

Fenceline Feedrack Panels

Skid Steer

Excellent condition. 1900 hours Cab and heat. $26,000.

3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE - CONT’D

3031 - TARPS FOR SALE

3W Livestock EQUIPMENT 1/2 Off Sale on Mesh Covers

50”x16” Start at $225

308.235.8536 308.235.2119

307-630-5410

Volume Discounts on 50 Panels & Over DELIVERY AVAILABLE

2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE NE - 1500-8000# (MOSTLY 4000#), AIR TIRES & NEW FORKS, (402) 678-2277 MO - CAT 8000# 2 STAGE W/PNEUMATIC TIRES, HYDRAULICS ARE EXCELLENT, ENGINE NEEDS WORK. CHEAP!, (660) 5483804 2827 - BUILDING SUPPLIES FOR SALE

3016 - BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES FOR SALE NE - HIGH DENSITY FOAM BOARD INSULATION. $18.56 PER SHEET - 4’ X 8’ X 2” THICK. ELIMINATE FROST HEAVING IN CONCRETE. PERFECT FOR IN-FLOOR HEATING APPLICATIONS. CALL LITEFORM AT, (800) 551-3313

30’x50’x10’..................$8,579 40’x60’x12’ ................$11,999 60’x100’x16’..............$26,706 100’x150’x16’............$58,425

BIG DOOR SPECIALS 60’X100’X18’ ............$37,500 70’X100’X18’ ............$58,000 30’X16’ Overhead Door w/Opener Incl. (Local codes may affect prices) Fx: 940-484-6746 info@rhinobldg.com

Used as Livestock/Nursery Shade, Variety of Sizes. Waterproof Billboard Vinyls for Hay Tarps, Pond Liner and Equipment Covers. Used Conveyor Belting for Fencing and Flooring Rubber Roofing or Pond Liner.

MN - THE BEST RADIANT FLOOR HEAT WATER TUBING. CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE ON A COMPLETE SYSTEM. VOLUME DISCOUNTS, FACTORY OUTLET PRICES. COMPARE & SAVE! GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES. WWW. MIKESHEATING. COM & CALL, (800) 446-4043 3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY SD - MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE ANY OLDER MM, (605) 386-2131 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES WANTED TO BUY SD - IH 6 SPEED SPECIAL TRUCK, (605) 386-2131 SD - OLDER JEEPS, CJ 2A, 1948 OR OLDER, ALSO MILITARY, (605) 386-2131 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE

12 GAUGE USED GUARDRAIL Hot Dip galvanized. 26’ Please call for delivered quote 423-791-4771 • 712-726-3562 620-546-3507

METAL PANELS

5x8 feet, 1/8 in. thick Work great for corral and windbreak materials, or any other project.

$70/Each.

To place your classified ad call Jodi @ 800-658-3191

Ask about bulk discounts

307-660-8563

Engine Machine Specialist High Efficiency & Long Life G855 .........................$19,000 G3406 .......................$21,000

Complete Overhauls G3406 .......................$12,000 G855 .........................$12,000 Complete OH Includes: All new pistons & liners, valves, seats, guides, paint, dress out parts, gauges & run-in

Trades Welcome Nobody Builds A Better Engine Than Us!!

Guymon, OK

580-338-3986

www.enginesatems.com

RURAL PROPERTY: RAPID CITY, S.D. LOG HOME: Two story four bedroom (main floor master) 2.5 bath plus large unfinished basement, large decks, fully renovated & many extra’s on four acres, may add additional land, prime horse property, creek view. 605-391-2205. See website: www.ranchesatcreekmeadows.com

5001 - NON-FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

repurposedmaterialsinc.com Call: 720-808-0873 3032 - GIFT ITEMS FOR SALE MN - GREAT GIFTS FOR YOUNG & OLD! ILLUSTRATED CHILDREN’S BOOKS ABOUT FARM FAMILIES. COLLECTOR SERIES OF STORIES ACCURATELY DEPICT FARM FAMILIES, ANIMALS & CHORES WITH IMAGINATION & HUMOR. PRESERVE YOUR FARM HERITAGE WITH THESE KEEPSAKE, BOOKS. SAMPLE PAGES & REVIEWS BY CHILDREN, FARMERS, PARENTS & GRANDPARENTS AT WWW. GORDONFREDRICKSON. COM. ORDER FROM AUTHOR ONLINE, BY EMAIL OR BY PHONE. FOR MORE INFO OR QUESTIONS: TWOGFSC@INTEGRA. NET *, (952) 461-2111 3034 - WIND GENERATORS WANTED TO BUY SD - JACOBS 32 VOLT WIND GENERATOR, ALSO WINCHARGER USED DURING THE ‘30’S & ‘40’S, WILL PAY ACCORDING TO CONDITION, (605) 386-2131 5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FOR SALE BY OWNER PRICE REDUCED COUNTRY LIVING! 34 ACRES AND LARGE NEWLY REMODELED HOME. 4 MILES NORTHEAST OF BRIDGEPORT, MORRILL COUNTY, NEBRASKA. 24 IRRIGATED ACRES, TREES, HUNTING, GUEST OR RENTAL HOUSE, BARN, EXTRA GARAGE, GRAIN BIN AND MORE.

PHONE 308-262-1370 LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER.

To place your classified ad call Jodi @

5001 - NON-FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE - CONT’D

118 acres Crawford Co., Iowa...$1,003,000 (Goodrich Township) 90 crop acres & pond 96 acres Crawford Co., Iowa .......$675,000 (Milford Township) 60 crop acres

Hunting Country Real Estate LLC www.huntingcountry.net 109 North 4th Ave., Logan, Iowa • 712-644-3955 Mitch Barney (Broker) Private Land Sales and Auction Services Licensed associates throughout IA, NE, KS, MO, OK, TX, CO

5004 - PASTURE RENT WANTED TO RENT CO - PASTURE LEASE WANTED FOR DROUGHTED OUT HERD. UP TO 1500 COWS., (719) 355-9533

Wanted: Pasture to Rent for 200 to 400 cow/calf pairs for 2013 & beyond. Anywhere in Nebraska. Prefer total care. We are located in Smith Center KS. 785-389-5111 5006 - RENTAL PROPERTY FOR SALE

ARENA AND 7 ACRES FOR RENT 80x200 riding arena located in North Platte, NE just off I-80. Approximately 3 miles north of Ford garage. Arena is on 7 acres with pens for sorting livestock and/or keeping horses. $600/month. 541.490.5335 WANTED TO RENT NE - WANT TO RENT! FATHER ALONG WITH SON (WHO IS HOPING TO GET STARTED FARMING) LOOKING FOR FARM GROUND TO RENT. MODERN EQUIPMENT, WILL PAY GOING RENT PRICE. PLEASE CALL 308-2632361 OR, (308) 991-5184

800-658-3191 1055 S. Range - PO Box 508 Colby, KS

Located in SE South Dakota.

(785) 462-8255 www.HomeLandRE.com 6403 Old Hwy 40, Park, KS Farmstead with 41 Acres, three bedroom house with full basement, two car garage, workshop, other out-buildings & established windbreak. Many recent upgrades to the home. $159,000 480 Acres Rawlins Cty., KS Dryland. 15 miles North and 3 miles West of Levant. Immediate possession - All of the Seller’s minerals to Buyer. $3,00/Acre8QGHU&RQWUDFW Rock L. Bedore (785) 443-1653 WANTED - YOUR LISTING

RURAL PROPERTY: RAPID CITY, S.D. HORSE PROPERTY 12 +/ACRES: Buyer may add additional acres as desired. Large machine building, indoor arena, 35’ X 6’ steel building with large corral, large outdoor arena. Perfect home site by creek, “two wells, plus central water, gas and electric. Prime hay producing valley with incredible views of the Black Hills only eight miles North of Rapid City, SD on paved roads. $351,000. 605-391-2205. See website: www.ranchesatcreekmeadows.com

80 ACRES

NEED A PLACE TO WINTER? The best times in the cattle industry are ahead of us! LOWEST FEED PRICES IN THE COUNTRY! Facility has silage, hay, water and windbreaks for 500 head of cattle 30 Years Experience... Contact Charles: 605.261.5343

of Ag Land in NE Nebraska

Feedlot

402-992-2021

This 25,000 head capacity lot is located in the heart of Montana’s cattle and farming country.

Row crop, pasture, wetland, wildlife and stock well.

Prime South Dakota Ground 471 Acres (+/-) Hand Co, SD

www.myfarmandranch.com

5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE - CONT’D OR - FARMLAND IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA FOR SALE: 1, 360 CONTINUOUS ACRES. IN KITTSON COUNTY, HALLOCK MN. 1, 000+ ACRES IN CRP TILL 2018. GOOD ROAD ACCESS. CORN, SOYBEANS, SMALL GRAINS. NO BUILDINGS. WE DON’T KNOW WHAT DROUGHT IS. CALL:, (701) 570-5600

Sweeper Brushes as Livestock Scratchers.

Visit Our Website: http://www.RHINOBLDG.COM Toll Free 1-888-320-7466

3018 - LUMBER FOR SALE NE - CEDAR LUMBER, GREEN OR KILN DRIED, PINE, BLACK WALNUT, COTTONWOOD & OAK AVAILABLE. CEDAR MULCH CHIPS. PEELED TREATED CEDAR FENCE POST. DRY KILN CEDAR OR PINE SHAVINGS. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. SPRINGVIEW, NE. WE ALSO BUY LOGS. CALL, (402) 497-3571 3030 - OTHER FOR SALE WY - FOR SALE: NEW AND USED COAL STOKER STOVES. ALSO MAGIC HEAT, RECLAIMERS, PARTS, SERVICE AND ADVICE FOR MOST MAKES. THANK YOU!, (307) 7543757 NE - FOR SALE: STIHL 041 CHAINSAW WITH 20” BAR AND CHAIN. POWERFUL RUNNER! IF NO ANSWER LEAVE MESSAGE AT, (308) 458-2678

September 27, 2012

Excellent soil ratings. Land like this is rarely available. Nearly all tillable.

633 Acres (+/-) Aurora Co, SD Ideally situated and suited for prime hunting property. 125.3 acres CRP.

Call me today #605-350-0413 Dick Shelton - Broker/Owner The Real Estate Connection, Inc. Huron, SD

FOR SALE

The Sale Includes... • 877 total acres w/187 irrigated. • 2 homes. • Office, shop, grain storage, feed mill, office complex and a complete processing facility. This feedlot has been in continuous operation since 1974. The present owners are wanting to retire after successfully running the feedlot for over 30 years. Price:$4.7 M

The Ranch Mart, Inc. Jack McGuinness

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

406-671-7078

www.ranchmartinc.com


September 27, 2012

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

Page 23

7001 - SPECIAL EVENTS

6th Annual Cowboy Reunion

MT - NEED TICKETS OR PACKAGES FOR THE NFR? DECEMBER 6TH THROUGH THE 15TH. BALCONY SEATS AVAILABLE! BEARTOOTH TRAVEL; CALL BONNIE AT 800-554-2303 OR, (406) 445-2303

October 20th, 2012 First Gold Hotel & Casino Deadwood, S.D.

To place your classified ad call Jodi @

Social hour at 5:00 Meal at 6:00 Entertainment after meal

• Quilter’s Demonstrations • Children’s Activities • Pedal Power Tractor Pull • Antique Farm Show • Antique Tractor Pull • Western Music • Living History Performances & Demonstrations • Antique Car Show • C.W. Parker Carousel Rides • Steam Engine Train Rides • Old Abilene Town

For reservations call 800-274-1876 For more info cal John or Sharon Halloway 605-964-3088 • 605-365-6490 email: hwyranch@yahoo.com

800-658-3191

Midlands Classified Ad Network WORK FOR DEPT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES. VIEW CURRENT JOB OPENINGS AT WWW.DHHS.NE.GOV TRUCK DRIVERS/ OWNER OPERATORS & AUTHORITY HOLDERS!! WE HAVE NEWER TRACTORS & HOPPER TRAILERS. LOTS OF MILES & GREAT RATES! HOME AT LEAST EVERY OTHER WEEKEND USUALLY MORE OFTEN. WE HAVE TRAILERS AVAILABLE FOR LESSONS & AUTHORITY HOLDERS. CALL 402-369-2324 & ASK FOR JOHN @ SONLITE EXPRESS, LAUREL NEBRASKA. EXPERIENCED DIRECTIONAL DRILL & BACKHOE OPERATOR NEEDED. MUST HAVE VALID DRIVER'S LICENSE WITH NO SUSPENSIONS OR DUI'S. COMPENSATION FOR CDL. PAID BASED ON EXPERIENCE. APPLY IN PERSON AT 802 SOUTH BELTLINE HWY. E, SCOTTSBLUFF. WANTED: AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN; EXCEPTIONAL PAY PLAN!!! MUST BE: AN EXPERIENCED AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN PREFER TO BE GM CERTIFIED. WE OFFER: COMPETITIVE WAGES , GROUP INSURANCE, 401K, AND PAID VACATION. SEND RESUME ATTN: DAVE CRAIG OR STEVE MOORE PO BOX 1343 NORTH PLATTE, NE 69103 JERRY REMUS CHEVROLET PHONE: (308) 5327400 FAX: (308) 532-5959 CHADRON COMMUNITY HOSPITAL & HEALTH SERVICES RESPIRATORY THERAPY. NE LICENSED RCP-CRT OR RRT PART TIME, APPROX 1-3 DAYS A WEEK. ON CALL EVERY 3RD WEEKEND WITH 12 ADDITIONAL DAYS PER PAY PERIOD. EMPLOYEE POSSESSES SUFFICIENT TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE TO PERFORM RESPIRATORY CARE PROCEDURES, AS PRESCRIBED, WITHOUT SUPERVISION IN ACCORDANCE WITH DEPARTMENT POLICIES AND APPROVED PROCEDURES. THE EMPLOYEE MAY ALSO BE CALLED UPON FOR MAKING SUGGESTIONS IN MATTERS OF PULMONARY CARE. WILL SHARE IN THE CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CARE INCLUDING THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THERAPEUTIC OBJECTIVES AND REVIEW OF CARE. EXPERIENCE PREFERRED, NEW GRADS CONSIDERED APPLY AT CHADRON COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 825 CENTENNIAL DR, CHADRON, NE 69337 OR CONTACT JEAN MARTIN AT 308.432.5586 MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST/MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST. PERFORM COMPLEX CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, HEMATOLOGICAL, IMMUNOLOGIC, MICROSCOPIC AND BACTERIOLOGICAL TESTS; FOLLOWS ALL LABORATORY PROCEDURES AND POLICIES (QUALITY CONTROL, PRECISION, ACCURACY AND CORRELATION STUDIES, MAINTENANCE AND CORRECTIVE ACTIONS, PREPARING AND EVALUATION OF REAGENTS, MEDIA AND STANDARDS) TO MAXIMIZE EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF LABORATORY SERVICES. RESPONSIBLE FOR THE COMMUNICATION OF TEST RESULTS TO ALL CLINICAL PERSONNEL THAT MAY BE INVOLVED IN CARE OF THE PATIENT. ANALYZE LABORATORY FINDINGS TO CHECK ACCURACY OF RESULTS; ESTABLISH AND MONITOR PROGRAMS TO ENSURE THE ACCURACY OF LABORATORY RESULTS; OPERATES, CALIBRATES, CONDUCTS PERFORMANCE CHECKS, AND MAINTAINS CLINICAL LAB INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT; RECOGNIZES AND CORRECTS ALL BASIC INSTRUMENT MALFUNCTIONS; REFERS SERIOUS PROBLEMS TO LAB MANAGER/DIRECTOR. POSITION REQUIRES A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE OR MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY; MLS/MT NATIONAL CERTIFICATION (ASCP OR AMT); AND FIVE (5) YEARS OF LABORATORY EXPERIENCE. BENEFITS

INCLUDE COMPETITIVE SALARY; PAID VACATION AND SICK LEAVE; HEALTH, VISION AND DENTAL INSURANCE; MEDICAL EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT; 401(K); PAID HOLIDAYS; AND LIFE INSURANCE. QUALIFIED CANDIDATES PLEASE SEND RESUMES TO HR; LIRASA@MORRILLCOUNTYHOSPITAL.ORG OR SEND RESUME TO: MORRILL COUNTY HOSPITAL, PO BOX 579, 1313 S STREET; BRIDGEPORT, NE 69336. MORRILL COUNTY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL IS AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. EXPERIENCED SERVICE TECHNICIAN. PEERLESS TYRE CO. GERING, NE. CLEAN-CUT, HARDWORKING, MOTIVATED INDIVIDUALS NEED APPLY. EXPERIENCE IN ALIGNMENTS/FRONT END/BRAKE SERVICE REQUIRED. HOURLY PAY + BONUS ON PARTS & LABOR. DRIVER'S LICENSE REQUIRED. ***$500 SNAP-ON TOOLS SIGN-ON BONUS*** PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TEST. APPLY AT 3410 N. 10TH STREET, GERING, NE OR CALL JOHN AT 307-315-2544 GERING PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING QUALIFIED CANDIDATES FOR THE 2012-2013 SCHOOL YEAR: FULL TIME DISTRICT WIDE SPEECH PATHOLOGIST; PART TIME SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSISTANT. INTERESTED CANDIDATES ARE REQUESTED TO APPLY VIA OUR WEBSITE WWW.GERINGSCHOOLS.NET CURRENT OPEN POSITIONS ARE LISTED ON OUR WEBSITE. EOE ST. JOSEPH'S CHILDREN'S HOME TORRINGTON WYOMING SERVING CHILDREN & FAMILIES FOR OVER 80 YEARS. EDUCATION ASSISTANT. FULLTIME, 12 MONTH POSITION, TO ASSIST SCHOOL TEACHERS WITH THE CARE, HEALTH, SAFETY AND EDUCATION EXPERIENCE OF EACH CHILD ASSIGNED, CO-FACILITATE DIDACTIC GROUPS AND WRITE PROGRESS NOTES, WORK ON LIVING UNITS DURING SCHOOL VACATIONS REQUIRES: HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR EQUIVALENT AND WYOMING SUBSTITUTE TEACHER CERTIFICATE, OR ABILITY AND WILLINGNESS TO OBTAIN; MINIMUM OF 21 YEARS OF AGE AND THE ABILITY TO LIFT 50 POUNDS. FULL BENEFIT PACKAGE INCLUDED. FOR APPLICATION OR TO VIEW OTHER CAREER OPPORTUNITIES, VISIT US ON-LINE AT WWW.STJOSEPH-WY.ORG, OR IN PERSON AT 1419 MAIN STREET, TORRINGTON, WY. SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATIONS TO: HR DIRECTOR, PO BOX 1117, TORRINGTON, WY 82240, E-MAIL: SLOWER@STJOSEPH-WY.ORG, OR, FAX TO 307532-8405 REGANIS AUTO CENTER IS LOOKING FOR A DEPENDABLE AND RELIABLE FULL TIME AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN. PAY IS BASED ON EXPERIENCE. PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TEST AND A VALID DRIVERS LICENSE ARE REQUIRED. PLEASE SEND OR EMAIL RESUME TO: REGANIS AUTO CENTER. ATTN: SHAWN SCOTT, 2006 E OVERLAND, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361 GION@REGANIS.COM ALLO COMMUNICATIONS IS LOOKING FOR A MOTIVATED SALES ASSOCIATE TO PERFORM DIRECT SALES IN SCOTTSBLUFF. SELL A SUPERIOR PRODUCT. ALLO HAS EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE, NO CONTRACTS, & SAVINGS. SALARY + COMMISSION. FULL-TIME, BENEFITS AVAILABLE. MINIMAL TRAVEL. STRONG CUSTOMER SERVICE SKILLS REQUIRED. REQUEST AN APPLICATION AT 1710 E 20TH ST, HR@ALLOPHONE.NET, 866-4812556 REGISTERED NURSE IN ICU/PCU. RECEIVE UP TO $15,000 IN SIGN ON BONUSES FOR ICU/PCU NURSES. RELOCATION, STUDENT LOAN REPAYMENT AND CONTINUING EDUCATION ASSIS-

TANCE ARE AVAILABLE. NE RN LICENSE, BLS, ACLS, AND PALS REQUIRED & TNCC PREFERRED. THREE TO FIVE YEARS OF NURSING EXPERIENCE REQUIRED AND CURRENT CRITICAL CARE EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. CALL: JOHN AT (800) 5436629, EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM , APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS NEEDED. $2,000 SIGNON BONUS! JBC NEEDS SEVERAL TANKER DRIVERS TO BE BASED IN SCOTTSBLUFF, NORTH PLATTE AND KEARNEY. JBC OFFERS ABOVE AVERAGE PAY AND BENEFITS TO ATTRACT AND RETAIN TOP-NOTCH DRIVERS. A CDL WITH HAZMAT AND TANKER ENDORSEMENTS, 2 YEARS EXPERIENCE AND MINIMUM AGE OF 24 ARE REQUIRED. APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.JBC1.COM OR PHONE 800-658-3106. THE NEBRASKA DEPARTMENT OF ROADS IS CURRENTLY ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR AN AUTOMOTIVE/DIESEL MECHANIC IN ALLIANCE, NE. FOR A FULL JOB DESCRIPTION OR TO APPLY, VISIT WWW.STATEJOBS.NEBRASKA.GOV. AN ONLINE STATE APPLICATION MUST BE COMPLETED ON OR BEFORE THE CLOSING DATE OF SEPTEMBER 26, 2012. NOTIFY THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AT 402-471-2075 IF YOU NEED ACCOMMODATION IN THE SELECTION PROCESS. (TDD CALLS ONLY: 402-4714693). THE STATE OF NEBRASKA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. LOOKING FOR A FRESH START? LOOKING FOR A NEW CAREER? LOOK AT CAREERS IN CORRECTIONS! WYOMING DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS. NOW HIRING FOR CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS STARTING SALARY OF $32,820 PER YEAR PLUS EXCELLENT BENEFITS INCLUDING A 20-YEAR RETIREMENT PACKAGE. REQUIRES A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR GED, US CITIZENSHIP, AND NO FELONY CONVICTIONS. POSITIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN TORRINGTON, RAWLINS AND LUSK, WYOMING. APPLY ON-LINE AT HTTPS://STATEJOBS.STATE.WY.US/JOBSEARCH DETAIL.ASPX?ID=19404 NEED MORE INFORMATION, CALL 1-307-532-6613 ROUTE TRUCK DRIVER SCOTTSBLUFF, NE. DESCRIPTION: CDL WITH TANKER/HAZMAT ENDORSEMENT; VERY CLEAN; MVR; TWO YEARS EXPERIENCE; 200 MILE RADIUS ONLY 2-3 NIGHTS/WEEK. PERKS: HOME ON THE WEEKENDS; TOP WAGES & BENEFITS; SIGN ON BONUS; STEADY YEAR ROUND EMPLOYMENT; FULL-TIME OR PART-TIME. CALL 308-436-5754 DIVISION MANAGER. KURT MANUFACTURING COMPANY IS PROUD TO BE 100% EMPLOYEE OWNED! KURT IS A NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED MANUFACTURER OF QUALITY CLOSE TOLERANCE PRECISION-MACHINED PARTS. SINCE WE OPENED IN 1946, WE HAVE EXPANDED OUR OPERATION TO THREE STATES. WE HAVE AN IMMEDIATE NEED FOR A DIVISION MANAGER IN OUR LYMAN, NEBRASKA FACILITY. THIS POSITION DIRECTS AND COORDINATES ACTIVITIES OF THE DIVISION TO OBTAIN OPTIMUM EFFICIENCY AND ECONOMY OF OPERATIONS AND MAXIMIZE PROFITS. PLANS AND DEVELOPS DIVISIONAL POLICIES AND GOALS, IMPLEMENTS GOALS THROUGH SUBORDINATE PERSONNEL. COORDINATES ACTIVITIES OF THE DIVISION'S DEPARTMENTS SUCH AS OPERATIONS, QUALITY, ENGINEERING, PLANNING, CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SALES, MAINTENANCE AND R & D TO ENSURE OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY AND ECONOMY. DIRECTS AND COORDINATES PROMOTION OF PRODUCTS MANUFACTURED AND SERVICES PERFORMED TO DEVELOP NEW MARKETS, INCREASE

AG NEWS COMMODITIES myfarmandranch.com

SHARE OF MARKET AND OBTAIN COMPETITIVE POSITION IN THE INDUSTRY. OVERSEES THE DIVISIONAL BUDGET AND MANAGES DIVISIONAL P & L, AS WELL AS THE ISO 9001:2000 QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM. THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE WILL POSSESS AN ENGINEERING DEGREE WITH 10+ YEARS OF RELATED EXPERIENCE OR EQUIVALENT COMBINATION OF EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE MANAGING A CONTRACT SCREW MACHINING OPERATION, AUTOMATION, AND PROVEN P & L RESPONSIBILITY REQUIRED, AS WELL AS A TECHNICAL BACKGROUND IN THE HYDRAULIC HOSE AND COUPLING INDUSTRY. KURT MANUFACTURING OFFERS A COMPETITIVE COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS PACKAGE! VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.KURT.COM. QUALIFIED CANDIDATES MAY FAX A RESUME TO: (763) 574-8344, EMAIL TO EMPLOYMENT@KURT.COM, OR MAIL TO HUMAN RESOURCES AT: KURT MANUFACTURING, 5280 MAIN STREET NE, MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55421 EOE REGIONAL TRUCK DRIVERS. CNS TRANS PRO SCOTTSBLUFF, NE. TANKER ENDORSEMENT AND 2 YEARS EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. HAZMAT PREFERRED. EXCELLENT WEEKLY PAY BASED ON EXPERIENCE. CALL 308-633-1590 FULL-TIME SPORTS REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED AT THE LEXINGTON CLIPPER-HERALD. DUTIES INCLUDE: *COVERING 5 LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS TEAMS. *PHOTOGRAPHY *OTHER LOCAL STORIES OF INTEREST. *EXPERIENCE IN JOURNALISM WRITING/QUARK/PHOTOSHOP HELPFUL. *COMPETETIVE WAGE/ 401K/INSURANCE BENEFITS. SEND RESUME TO DAVID PENNER, EDITOR, LEXINGTON CLIPPER-HERALD, P O BOX 599, LEXINGTON, NE 68850. STAFF ACCOUNTANT, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE. TAX PREPARATION EXPERIENCE REQUIRED ACCOUNTING DEGREE PREFERRED, INDIVIDUAL/CORPORATE TAXES. STAR-HERALD, DEPT. 1839, P.O. BOX 1709, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69363. SUBJECT: DEPT. 1839 FARM/RANCH HAND. HAYSPRINGS, NE. HOUSE/ELECTRICITY PROVIDED. ROW CROP, WHEAT, HAY, COW-CALF OPERATION, MUST BE SELF-STARTER. WAGES BASED UPON EXPERIENCE. NEEDED BY OCT. 15TH. SEND RESUMES: SANDBERG@PLANTPIONEER.COM OR 4473 470TH LN., HAY SPRINGS, NE 69347 THE WESTERN SUGAR COOPERATIVE IS NOW HIRING! THE WESTERN SUGAR COOPERATIVE'S SCOTTSBLUFF NEBRASKA AND TORRINGTON WYOMING OPERATIONS ARE ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR GENERAL LABOR, WAREHOUSE, AND LAB POSITIONS FOR THE CURRENT CAMPAIGN SEASON. JOB REQUIREMENTS INCLUDE A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR EQUIVALENT AND THE ABILITY TO READ, WRITE AND COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY. APPLICANTS MUST BE WILLING TO WORK ROTATING SHIFTS AND BE ABLE TO LIFT UP TO 50 POUNDS. THE WESTERN SUGAR COOPERATIVE IS AN ALCOHOL-FREE, DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE REQUIRING PRE-EMPLOYMENT AND RANDOM SCREENINGS. PLEASE APPLY AT THE MAIN OFFICES IN SCOTTSBLUFF OR TORRINGTON THE WESTERN SUGAR COOPERATIVE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYEE. M/F/D/V IMMEDIATE OPENING OFFICE MANAGER. CHICORY USA, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE. PREFER QUICK BOOKS PRO 2011 EXPERIENCE. WILL HANDLE PAYROLL, A/R, A/P, INVENTORY AND BANK RECONCILIATION GREAT OPPORTUNITY WITH GROWING LOCAL COMPANY IN BUSINESS OVER

30 YEARS. COMPETITIVE SALARY AND BENEFITS COMMISERATE WITH EXPERIENCE. SEND RESUMES TO:HM@HERGERTMILLING.COM NURSING MANAGER. SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS. 15 BED RETIREMENT HOME. ALLIANCE, NE REQUIRES LICENSE IN NURSING, BACKGROUND IN GERONTOLOGY, PROVEN EXPERIENCE IN MANAGEMENT, EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION, INTERPERSONAL SKILLS. POTENTIAL FOR EXPANDED ROLE IN FUTURE. COVER LETTER AND RESUME BY OCTOBER 12: EMPLOYMENT@FRANCIS CANWAY.ORG, 303-477-4105 (FAX) NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE. SEEKING ENTHUSIASTIC, SKILLED PHARMACIST FOR FULL-TIME STAFF PHARMACIST POSITION. HIGHLY COMPETITIVE BENEFITS AND SALARY. REQUESTING THAT THOSE APPLYING ARE ALREADY LICENSED OR IN PROCESS OF OBTAINING NEBRASKA LICENSURE. PLEASE CONTACT TINA AT (308(432-6995, OPTION 0 OR KURT AT (479) 295-1405 MEDICAL SOCIAL WORK OPPORTUNITY. REGIONAL WEST MEDICAL CENTER INVITES YOU TO JOIN OUR SOCIAL WORK TEAM. WE ARE CURRENTLY SEEKING A CERTIFIED SOCIAL WORKER FOR OUR ACUTE REHAB UNIT. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES WILL FOCUS ON PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT, ADVOCACY AND DISCHARGE PLANNING WITHIN A STRONG INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM ENVIRONMENT. QUALIFIED CANDIDATES MUST POSSESS A BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN SOCIAL WORK AND NE SOCIAL WORK CERTIFICATION. THOSE PERSONS NOT CERTIFIED BUT ELIGIBLE FOR CERTIFICATION ALSO ENCOURAGED TO APPLY. PREVIOUS MEDICAL SOCIAL EXPERIENCE PREFERRED BUT NOT REQUIRED. PLEASE APPLY ON LINE AT WWW.RWMC.NET EXPERIENCED LIVESTOCK DRIVERS WITH LEADERSHIP ABILITIES WANTED: CLEAN CLASS A CDL, PAY BASED ON EXPERIENCE. CALL 308-3408389. EXPERIENCED HELP WANTED! ON FARM AND RANCH OPERATION IN THE WESTERN NEBRASKA PANHANDLE. DEPENDABLE PERSON FOR LONGTERM EMPLOYMENT. GOOD HOUSING PROVIDED 308-247-2662 OR 308-641-2871. AGRICULTURAL OPENING WINNER CIRCLE FEED YARD, MINATARE, NE. EXPERIENCE IN A MILL IS PREFERRED, BUT WE WILL TRAIN THE RIGHT PERSON. BENEFITS INCLUDE BCBS HEALTH INSURANCE AND PAID VACATION. APPLICANT MUST HAVE A VALID DRIVER'S LICENSE. CALL RON 308-631-5392 OR 308-783-2131 EXPERIENCED CONCRETE LABORERS WANTED. PAUL REED CONSTRUCTION, 2970 N. 10TH ST., GERING. PAYROLL SPECIALIST. DUTIES WILL INCLUDE ADMINISTERING AND PERFORMING OPERATIONS OF PAYROLL NECESSARY TO ENSURE THE ACCURATE AND TIMELY PROCESSING OF TIME AND EARNINGS RECORDS OF ALL EMPLOYEES, RESULTING IN THE BI-WEEKLY DISTRIBUTION OF PAYROLL CHECKS. PREPARES VARIOUS REPORTS AND PAYMENTS FOR FILING/TRANSMITTAL TO VENDORS AND VARIOUS AGENCIES AND MANAGES. REPORTS TO THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES. ASSOCIATES DEGREE. BACHELOR'S WITH EMPHASIS IN ACCOUNTING PREFERRED. INDIVIDUAL MUST HAVE A MINIMUM OF 5-7 YEARS' SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE IN ALL RELEVANT PAYROL FUNCTIONS, INCLUDING MAINTENANCE, PREPARATION, BALANCING, INTERNAL CONTROL, AND PAYROLL TAXES. IF INTERESTED APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.RWHS.ORG EEO


Page 24

Nebraska Farm & Ranch

September 27, 2012

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HE_092712  

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