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July 8, 2010 Issue 234-14-14

Crops Still Rated in Good Shape By Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent After a relatively dry spell at the end of June, heavy rains again soaked much of Central Nebraska and south central Nebraska over the Fourth of July weekend. Despite the heavy rains, crop conditions throughout Nebraska were rated in mostly good and excellent conditions, according to the weekly Nebraska Weather and Crop report from the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service.

Over the holiday weekend Grand Island received 1.18 inches of rain following about 10 days of a dry spell after heavy June rains that produced nearly 9 inches of rain. Other area rainfall amounts over the Fourth of July weekend were: Aurora, 1.86 inches; Wood River, 1.67 inches; Kearney, 1.56 inches; Ord, 1.37 inches; Loup City, 1.18 inches; Hastings, 0.94 of an inch; Osceola, 0.67 of an inch; and Fullerton, 0.60 of an inch. And rain will continue through the week, according to the National

Weather Service in Hastings. For Grand Island, there's a 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms today with a 30 percent chance for tonight. For Thursday through Saturday, there's no rain in the forecast. On Sunday, there's a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. While much of Nebraska received what seemed like an endless stream of storms in June, more rain is needed in July. Continued on page 25

Special Features Quilt Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Rodeo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 County Fairs . . . . 8-9, 14-16, 18-19, 22-26

Weather AccuWeather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Country Living House Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Lighter Side Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Markets Grains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Government Report Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Ag Management Five-year $5 Million Project Will Offer Incentives to Retire Irrigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Livestock News Heartland Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Production News U.S. Soybean Farmers Define and Measure Sustainability On-Farm and in Livestock/Aquaculture Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-30

For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 6/25/10

Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$80.31 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .125.35 Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .* Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . .140.00 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.53 Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . .31.36 Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . .56.26 Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .111.00 Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261.06

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Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.35 Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.74 Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.75 Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . . .6.14 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .2.06

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Hay (per ton) Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . . . . .* Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . . . . .* Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . . . .* Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130.37 Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47.45 * No market.

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CLAY COUNTY FAIR Spencer, IA September 11-19, 2010 Grandstand Building 44219


Page 2

Heartland Express - Weather

July 8, 2010

Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Al Dutcher Report Several precipitation events moved across the state during the last two weeks, but didn’t result in significant flooding that was almost a daily problem during the first three weeks of June. Corn is rapidly approaching pollination and weather models have been conAllen Dutcher sistently pointing to a drier and warmer pattern developing by mid month. Irrigators should pay special attention to crops for shallow root syndrome as the abundance of moisture may have resulted in a high percentage of root mass confined to upper 3 feet of the soil profile. Rapid water depletion in this zone could occur if warmer and drier conditions do materialize as projected by the weather models even though soil

Farm and Ranch Publishers - Central Nebraska Publications General Manager - Marc Currie Sales Assistant/Circulation LeAnne Killion

Sales Representatives Eric Keeton • Tim Lingg • Tom Meyer Todd Smith • Lola Cornell •Darlene Overleese Production - Chris Frazer • Dixie Sickels

Web Development - news@agnet.net Important Notice: The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertising herein, and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertisers and not the publishers. The publisher is not liable to any advertiser herein for any misprints in advertising not the fault of the publisher, and in such an event the limit of the publisher’s liability shall be the amount of the publisher’s charge for such advertising. In the event of misprints, the publisher must be informed prior to the printing of the next publication

Published by: Central Nebraska Publications, Inc. 21 W. 21st Street, Ste. 010 • P.O. Box 415 Kearney, NE 68847 • 1-800-658-3191 • Copyright © 2010

profiles down to 6 feet are near field capacity. If shallow roots have developed, little moisture extraction would be expected from corn roots below three feet for the remainder of the growing season. Week One Forecast: 7/10-7/16: A trough moving into the Pacific Northwest will bring increasing chances for precipitation during the first half of the forecast period. Mostly dry conditions are expected on 7/10, with highs in the upper 80's southwest to mid 80's northeast. On 7/11, thunderstorms are projected to develop during the afternoon and evening hours across western Nebraska and expand eastward during the overnight hour. Highs are forecasted to range from the low to mid 80's west to upper 80's to low 90's southeast. Rain and thunderstorms are likely across the eastern 2/3 of the state on 7/12 with highs statewide ranging from the low 80's west to upper 80's east. Lingering precipitation during the morning hours is likely across southeastern Nebraska on 7/13, with highs statewide primarily in the 80's. Dry conditions are expect-

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ed for the remainder of the period as high pressure builds into the central Plains region. Highs will range from the mid to upper 80's on 7/14, warming into the low 90's east to upper 90's west by 7/16 Week Two Forecast: 7/17-7/23: Current weather models indicate that no organized precipitation is projected for the entire period across the state. An isolated thunderstorm could pop up over the western half of the state during the late afternoon and evening hours of 7/21 and 7/23 as crop evaporation increases moisture in the lower layers of the atmosphere. High Temperatures are projected to range from the upper 80's northeast to mid 90's southwest on 7/17 and 7/18. The upper level high pressure system is projected to center itself over the central U.S. by 7/19, bringing widespread 90 F to 95 F readings across the entire state for the remainder of the forecast period. An isolated 100 F would not be unexpected, especially across southwestern Nebraska.

Nebraska Weather and Crop Report Agricultural Summary: For the week ending July 4, 2010, a mostly dry week with sunshine allowed producers back into fields to spray herbicides and harvest hay, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. However, statewide rainfall on Sunday again shut down field activities. Wheat harvest was mostly complete in the Southeast and progressing westward. Rainfall has allowed some producers to turn off irrigation wells. Wind and hail this week again caused damage to scattered fields. Previously flooded fields were assessed to see if replanting is necessary. High numbers of grasshoppers were present in some Panhandle counties. Feedlot conditions have improved. Weather Summary: Temperatures for the week averaged 1 degree below normal with highs in the mid 90’s and lows in the mid 50’s. The week was predominately dry until the weekend which saw precipitation across much of the state. Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 2 percent very poor, 4 poor, 11 fair, 64 good, and 19 excellent. Irrigated fields were 83 percent good or excellent and dryland fields rated 84, both near year ago levels. Corn silked was 7 percent, ahead of last Continued on page 15


July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - Country Living

The Farm Is Not A Giant Playground Susan Hansen, Extension Educator, Colfax County The wide open spaces often tempt children to use the farm as a giant playground. However, many potential dangers exist on the farm. Ponds are inviting on a hot summer day. With proper supervision, a pond can provide a fun atmosphere. A child on his own near a pond can mean potential danger. Fencing the pond may help but children usually find a way to get through the fence. Explaining the potential dangers to a child may help in reducing the risk of a tragedy. Bins and silos should be locked or barricaded to avoid the possibility of a child venturing in the structure and becoming trapped. Abandoned buildings arouse the curiosity. Weak floors and unstable support systems may cause a fun game of hide and seek to become a disaster. Broken windows and hidden objects can cause cuts and bruises.

Children also like to investigate the junk pile. What is in your junk pile? Items with sharp edges or wooden boards with splinters and nails are often found. Animals and insects such as wasps, snakes, and rates often infest junk piles. Danger also exists on the rural roads. Walking or riding a bike on such a road should be done with caution. Be aware of the possibility of traffic. When crossing the road to get the mail or shut a gate, be sure to look both ways before crossing. If the dog follows, make sure to keep it off the road as much as possible. Teach your children about the potential dangers that exist around the farm. As a family, take a tour of the farm. Make a list of the places to avoid or use caution when near. The farm is a great place to grow up. Make sure that the children have that chance by making the farm a safer place to live.

Home Vulnerability to Termites Sheryl Fellers, Dawson County Extension Service Termites in Nebraska live in the soil in a colony with hundreds or thousands of individuals. Termites are important decomposers – they recycle dead plant materials and return nutrients to the soil. Termites are rarely seen and are a problem only when they feed on our structures. In Nebraska, termites are not very active during the winter when the soil is cold or frozen. But, when temperatures warm in the springtime, hungry termites aggressively begin searching for food: wood, cardboard, paper or other types of cellulose. Termites have microbes in their gut which helps them turn cellulose into simple sugars, which they can digest. Termite researchers used to think termites wandered randomly through the soil. We know now this isn't really true. Instead, termites move in predictable ways to methodically divide and subdivide the soil to make sure they search every square inch of soil. If there's a colony in your yard, termites eventually will bump into your house. To keep from becoming dehydrated, termite workers travel through the soil in mud tubes which they make with mud, saliva and feces. They keep the humidity in these mud tubes moist. In a perfect termite world, these soft-bodied workers would always stay in the soil, feeding on

dead trees that have fallen to the ground. But, in urban areas, we clean up our landscapes so there are no dead trees lying around for them to eat. So, being the survivors they are, they search above the ground for wood. Any untreated wood that touches the soil is a potential termite conduit into the house. To get into a structure, termites must build a mud tube over the foundation or they must have a crack in the foundation or floor. Termites can squeeze through a 1/64-inch crack. Some foundations are better at resisting termites than others. How vulnerable is your house? -- What type of foundation do you have? -- Do you have an inaccessible crawlspace? -- Do you have wood touching the soil near the house? Researchers say 90% of termite infestations can be traced back to wood in the soil. -- Do you have moisture problems near the house that may draw termites? -- How old is your house? The older the house, the more likely it is to have foundation problems. However, we also see termites in newer homes. If your house is vulnerable to termites, you may be able to prevent termites yourself by eliminating wood-soil contact or moisture problems. But, it is important to be vigilant and watch for signs of termites during the warmer months. For more information on termites and their control, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/pest/termite.shtml.

Page 3

The Perfect Blend

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With its columned porch and stone facade on the exterior and gorgeous blend of comfort and elegance on the interior, this design will both impress and entice you.

Detailed Specifications Plan - HMAFAPW1525 Title - The Perfect Blend House Style - New American Bedroom Extras First Floor Sitting Room Foundation Type - Crawlspace, Slab Built-in China Cabinets Entertainment / Media Center Kitchen Eating Area Fireplace - 1 Windows - Arched, Bay / Box / Bow Key Information 1,429 Square Feet Beds: 3 Baths: 2 ½ Stories: 1 Garage Bays: 2 Width: 56' Depth:42' Room Summary Formal Living Room Laundry Room - First Floor Master / Main Suite Special Features Columns - Outside Porch - Front Porch - Rear Walk-In Closet Main Level

Fun to Play, Ready to Learn Andrea Nisley, Extension Educator University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension Building Nebraska Families Program New research on brain development has demonstrated how important family involvement and positive learning experiences in the home and day care are for infants, toddlers and preschool children. Learning starts immediately. A family is a child’s first teacher and a child’s home is his/her first classroom. Children learn by exploring, questioning, touching, moving and discussing. Children also learn by watching and listening. Studies show that negative or stressful experiences may hinder a child’s learning. The five senses are the gateways to learning so it is important to do activities that promote learning through the senses. Tasting is one of the ways babies find out about things. We all know…everything they pick up goes into their mouth. That means adults need to watch out for poisonous plants, small objects on the floor, etc. When your baby is old enough to eat solid foods you can do simple taste tests with banana slices, crackers, cereal and soft cheese. Introduce foods one at a time to watch for food allergies. A newborns sense of smell is already fully developed, so introduce your newborn to a variety of smells. As your baby grows take walks and

stop, smell and touch things you see along the way. Of the five senses, touch is the basis of emotional and social development. Don’t be afraid to touch newborns. Babies like to be held, snuggled and stroked. Hugging, holding hands, waving goodbye, making friends, sharing – are all part of being social. A baby’s hearing is almost fully developed at birth so talk, sing and read to them. Carry on a conversation with your baby as your go about daily tasks and continue to do so as they grow. Sing simple songs to them and teach nursery rhymes and songs with actions such as “Pat-aCake”, and “Itsy, Bitsy Spider”. Songs with actions also help develop motor skills. A baby’s sight is not as developed as some of their other senses. Talk to a baby while changing their diaper, bathing, feeding them and they will look at you. Newborns see only black and white so create a gallery of black and white pictures by the crib for them to focus on. Toddlers and preschoolers should be given the opportunity to color, paint, play with clay, and be creative. To learn more about parenting young children and child development, ask about the book “Ready to Learn, Fun to Play” EB2 at your local University of Nebraska Extension Office or purchase it from the extension.unl.edu/publications website.

A downloadable study plan of this house, including general information on building costs and financing, is available at www.houseoftheweek.com. To receive the study plan for this home, order by phone, online, or by mail. By phone: Call (866) 772-1013. Reference plan #HMAFAPW1525. Online: Go to www.houseoftheweek.com.

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Page 4

Heartland Express - The Lighter Side

July 8, 2010

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts •

Te r m s o f E n d e a r m e n t

by Lee Pitts

I hate it when people I don’t even know call me terms of endearment such as honey, darling, pet, precious, sugar or angel. The other day at the Dollar Store the clerk referred to me as “love” right in front of my wife. Believe me, that took some explaining! The only time I’ve ever used such terms is when I couldn’t recall a person’s name that I really should have known, and I’m proud to say that in 36 years of marriage I think I’ve only used such words twice in referring to my wife. Having said that, these terms of endearment can serve an important role. Based on years of experience and eavesdropping I’ve found that you can tell just how mad your wife is based on the terms of endearment she uses. And, let’s face it guys, married men spend, on average, at least half of their waking hours being in trouble with their wives. But there are several levels of being in trouble, from the withholding of nourishment and personal favors, to the throw your clothes out the front door and slash your truck’s tires, kind of trouble. So my dears, here are a few hints on how to discern what level of trouble you’re in based on what your wife calls you. For example, let’s say you are eating at a fancy restaurant, where they have tablecloths and more than one fork per place setting, and your wife whispers to you, “Sweetie, it’s not polite to tuck your napkin into the top of your t-shirt, and you have a big dollop of thousand island dressing on

your chin.” When you are referred to as sweetie, sweetie pie, sweetums, or any variation of the word sweet, it’s almost like you are in no trouble at all. It’s almost a compliment. If your wife says to you, “Honey, I know that you are busy this time of year with the upcoming football season and all the nice beer drinking weather we’ve been having, but my parents are coming over for dinner and I’d appreciate it if you’d remove that oily carburetor you’ve been rebuilding from the dining room table. And would it hurt you, Hon, to take a shower and put on a clean sweatshirt?” Be warned Honeybunches, you now have officially moved up a notch in the degree of trouble you’re in. I’d move all automotive maintenance projects to the bedroom if I were you. The war is escalating if your wife says, “Babe, you’re either going to have to buy me a new refrigerator/freezer or remove the fish bait, beer, livestock vaccine, and colostrum from the dinky frig we have now.” The use of the words babe, babycakes, or the dreaded baby doll, are a warning that you are in some serious hot water. My advice? I hear they’re having a great sale down at Sears on extra-large side-by-sides. I don’t know how, or why, wives started using forms of the word pumpkin in referring to us. Frankly, I just don’t see the resemblance. But listen up if your wife says, “Pumpkin cakes, if you throw your oily rags with degreaser, paint thinner or

cow manure on them in the washer with my frilly underwear one more time I swear I’ll shoot you.” My dearest darling dudes, unless you want to see your wife only on visitation day at the state penitentiary I’d start using paper towels exclusively. As much as I detest being called “babe” or “darling,” I hate being called by my real name even more. Remember as a child when you could tell how much trouble you were in based on how many of your given names your mother used in calling you? It’s the same with wives. If your wife calls you by your first name I’d be giving her an apology, some flowers and expensive chocolates. If she uses your first and middle name you’d best be looking in the Yellow Pages for a good divorce attorney. And, my dear honeybun friends, if your wife ever calls you by your first, middle, and last names, prefaced by the word “Mister,” I’d commit a crime so heinous that it will land you in the FBI’s witness protection program so that Mrs. Babycakes can’t get her hands on you.

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Features In Upcoming Issues: • County Fairs Nebraska’s Statewide Ag News Publication

Featured Sections In Every Issue: • Ag Management • Classified Advertising • Country News

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• Weather • Weekly Ag-Market Breakdown

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• State Fair Preview • Gudmundson • Wheat Results • Husker Harvest Days • Rodeo

Farm & Ranch . . . Where Agriculture Is Always A Business 44140


July 8, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 5

Favorite Zucchini Recipes Zucchini Chocolate Cake 1/2 cup butter 1/2 cup vegetable oil 1 3/4 cups sugar 2 large eggs 1/2 cup buttermilk or sour milk 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/4 cup cocoa 2 1/2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 2 cups zucchini, grated 3/4 cup chocolate chips 1/2 cup walnuts Cream butter then add oil and sugar; mix. Add next 8 ingredients; mix well. Fold in the chips and nuts by hand. Put in a greased and floured 9 x 13 pan. Bake at 325° for 1 hour or until done.

Zucchini Bread 2 1/2 cups sugar 3 eggs 3 cups flour 3 tablespoons vanilla 1 cup oil 2 cups zucchini, grated 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1 cup nuts (optional) 3 teaspoons cinnamon Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine all ingredients. Pour into two greased loaf pans. Bake for one hour.

Minestrone Soup 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup minced white onion (about 1 small onion) 1/2 cup chopped zucchini 1/2 cup frozen cut italian green beans 1/4 cup minced celery (about 1/2 stalk) 4 teaspoons minced garlic (about 4 cloves) 4 cups vegetable broth (Swanson is good *note: Do not use chicken broth!*) 2 (15 ounce) cans red kidney beans, drained 2 (15 ounce) cans small white beans or great northern beans, drained 1 (14 ounce) can diced tomatoes 1/2 cup carrot, julienned or shredded 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon dried basil 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme 3 cups hot water 4 cups fresh baby spinach 1/2 cup small shell pasta Heat three tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat in a large soup pot. Saute onion, celery, garlic, green beans, and zucchini in the oil for 5 minutes or until onions begin to turn translucent. Add vegetable broth to pot, plus drained tomatoes, beans, carrot, hot water, and spices. Bring soup to a boil, then reduce heat and allow to simmer for 20 minutes. Add spinach leaves and pasta and cook for an additional 20 minutes or until desired consistency. Makes about eight 1 1/2 cup servings.

Zucchini Lasagna 2 1/2 cups zucchini, sliced 1/4 inch thick (about 2 medium) 1/2 lb lean ground beef 1/4 cup onion, chopped 2 small tomatoes, cut up 1 (6 ounce) can tomato paste 1 garlic clove, minced 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon dried basil 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme 1/4 cup water 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1 egg 3/4 cup low fat cottage cheese (or low fat or fat free ricotta) 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded 1 teaspoon flour Cook zucchini until tender, drain and set aside. Fry meat and onions until meat is brown and onions are tender; drain fat. Add next 8 ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered 10 minutes or until reduced to 2 cups. In small bowl slightly beat egg. Add cottage cheese, half of shredded cheese and flour. In (1 1/2-qt.) baking-roasting pan arrange half of the meat mixture. Top with half of the zucchini and all the cottage cheese mixture. Top with remaining meat and zucchini. Bake uncovered at 375° for 30 minutes. Sprinkle with remaining cheese. Bake 10 minutes longer. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

Zucchini Cobbler 8 cups zucchini 1 cup sugar 3 tablespoons flour 1 dash salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 3/4 teaspoon cream of tartar 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 (10 ounce) can crushed pineapple 1 box yellow cake mix or white cake mix (Jiffy) 1/2-1 cup butter, melted 1/2 cup nuts, chopped (optional) Peel and cut zucchini lengthwise, strip out seeds, cut in 1/2” slices, cook in boiling water until tender. Drain, cool in cold water for 5 minutes. Drain, add sugar, flour, salt, cinamon, cream of tarter and lemon juice. Stir well. Add pineapple and juice. Mix well. Do not beat. Pour into a greased baking dish (13 x 9” pan). Spread dry cake mix over top. Drizzle butter over cake mix. Sprinkle nuts on top. Bake at 350° for 60 minutes. .

Happy Baking

Breaded 'n Baked Chips 2 medium zucchini, cut into 1/4 " slices 1 egg, mixed with 2 tablespoons milk 1 clove smashed garlic 1/2 cup Italian breadcrumbs 2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 1/4 teaspoon black pepper Preheat oven to 450°. Combine egg, milk and garlic in a shallow dish and set aside for about 15 minutes to let flavors combine. Combine breadcrumbs, cheese, parsley and pepper in another shallow dish. Dip zucchini slices into egg mixture, then into crumbs and place on a baking sheet that has been sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Bake for 10 minutes, then turn over and bake for 5 minutes more or until brown and crispy.

Stuffed Zucchini 7 fresh zucchini (4-6 inches long) 1/2 cup onion, chopped 1/4 cup olive oil 1/2 cup fresh mushrooms, coarsely chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 1 (3 ounce) package cream cheese 1 egg, beaten 1/2 cup parmesan cheese 3/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped 1/8 teaspoon pepper parmesan cheese Slice zucchini in half lengthwise. Scoop out insides leaving about 1/4-in shell. Finely chop zucchini pulp; set aside. Saute onion in oil in large heavy skillet. Add mushrooms, garlic and reserved chopped zucchini; cook over medium heat until most of moisture evaporates. Add cream cheese, egg, Parmesan, parsley, and pepper. Mix well; cook for about 10 minutes. Cool filling slightly and fill zucchini shells. Sprinkle with additional Parmesan cheese. Place on jelly roll pans; bake for 30 minutes at 350° until bubbly and golden brown on top.

Zucchini Bites 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 finely chopped onion 3 slices rindless bacon, finely sliced 1 large grated carrot 1 large grated zucchini 3 eggs 1 cup grated cheese 1/4 cup cream 1/2 cup self raising flour Heat the oil in a large pan and sauté onion until translucent. Add the bacon and fry until it starts to colour. Add the carrot and zucchini and cook for about 2 minutes. Transfer mixture to a bowl to cool. Beat the eggs, cream and cheese together; season to taste. Stir the egg mixture into the cooled zucchini mixture. Stir in the flour. Grease and flour little muffin/bun tins. Spoon mixture into the holes. Bake at 350° for 15-20 minutes.


Page 6

Heartland Express - Quilt Nebraska

July 8, 2010

Nebraska State Fair News

CFabrics, alico AnSupplies, nie’s QuClasses ilt Shop 210 Broadway • PO Box 661 • Fullerton, NE 68638

(308) 536-2925 calicoannie@qwestoffice.net Mon-Fri 9:00 to 5:00, Sat 9:00 until noon Anne Wemhoff, Owner www.calicoanniesquiltshop.com 43460

Exciting changes for the 2010 Nebraska State Fair are on tap. The quilt show will be held Aug 27 through Sep 6, 2010 in the NEW Exhibition Building in Grand Island - Fonner Park. There will be some NEW quilt classes – three new art quilt classes (Landscape, Portrait and Art Miniature) and special classes for kit or block-ofthe month quilts of various sizes.

In order to help facilitate the transportation of entries to the new Grand Island location, the NSF will provide two pick-up/return locations: one in Lincoln and one in North Platte. Check the Nebraska State Fair web site www.statefair.org for updates. The Quilt Entry Book should be available on the website.

Quilts Under the Microscope Country Fabrics & Crafts Your Baby Lock Sewing Machine and Serger Dealer

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Featuring Fabric & Notions of All Flavors! Cotton Fabrics, Flannels, Patterns, Books, Notions, Gifts & Classes Owners~Marge Wallace & Bobbi Soukup quilterscandyshoppe@msn.com hours: M-F 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9:30-3:00 420 E. Douglas 402-336-1953

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This combination "whodunit" and antique show gives a close and personal view of the life of a quilt and what may happen when a "good quilt goes bad". Students in the graduate level Care and Conservation of Textiles class assisted in the detective work needed to create this fascinating exhibition.The exhibition will be on display from April 1 through August 1, 2010. Quilts and other heirloom textiles are important artifacts that can represent the history of a person, a family, a community, or a country. Preserving them is a way to maintain an important link to the past. Unfortunately, there are many agents, both natural and human-made, that can slowly (or quickly!) destroy these pieces of our history. The exhibition Quilts Under the

Microscope presents a group of quilts that, after careful study, divulge some of the secrets of their past and help us determine the best to way to safeguard them for the future. Curated by Marin Hanson and Patricia Crews with the curatorial assistance of the students in UNL's graduate-level Care and Conservation of Textiles course, the exhibition introduces museum visitors to the ways in which institutions like the International Quilt Study Center use science and technical analysis to discover the history of objects and to inform the museum's activities of preservation, interpretation, and display. Visitors learn how they can take care of their families' valued quilts and textiles in their own homes, to ensure that these heirlooms survive well into the future.

South Asian Seams: Quilts from India, Pakistan, & Bangladesh The newest exhibition, May 15 - November 7, 2010 features traditional textiles from the South Asian subcontinent. Take a walk through Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh and learn about the textile traditions and the people who make and use them in this culturally rich region. This exhibition presents an international textile tradition that is placed in a rich cultural context that of the lives of women in diverse regions of the Indian subcontinent. The exhibition includes more than 30 examples of ralli and kantha. It also features a rich assortment of large-scale photographs depicting the lives of the women who make

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these quilts. Narrating and illustrating the lives of these women is a vital component of the exhibition's story-line. Patchwork, embroidery, and applique all figure prominently in ralli - a traditional quilted textile of the region. Designs are not customarily drawn or written down on paper, but rather recorded in womens' memories and therefore passed down from generation to generation in the same way that folk tales and songs are transmitted. In the eastern Indian states of Bihar and West Bengal and across the border into Bangladesh, women create kantha and sujuni bedcoverings using quilting stitches as the primary decorative elements. Constructed from layers of old cotton sari and dhoti (women's and men's wrapped garments), kantha provide a way for women to give new life to old cloth. This exhibition is curated by Patricia Stoddard in cooperation with IQSC Curator of Exhibitions Marin Hanson. Stoddard is a leading scholar on Pakistani and Indian quilted textiles. Her book Ralli Quilts: Traditional Textiles of Pakistan and India is the only published work on the topic of quilts from this region.

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July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - Quilt Nebraska

Page 7

24 - Strippers Quilt Finished size is 46” x 46” 24 assorted 2 1/2” strips (cut the width of fabric) 1 1/8 yard for sashing and binding Stitch sets of 2 strips together (for variety cut (1) 10 1/2” strip off each of the 12 sets and then cut another 10 1/2” strip off (6) more. You’ll need (18) 10 1/2” strips sets for the blocks. All the other strips sets can be used for the Piano key border. Cutting 4 1/2” strip sets to stitch together. 2 sides take 23 strips each, the other 2 sides take 19 strips each.

Claus’en Paus Quilt Shop

Sashing strips are also cut 2 1/2”. Cut 8 strips the width of the fabric. Cut (12) 10 1/2” pieces for the blocks. The 6 blocks are assembled first and set together in 2 rows of 3 each. Flip as desired! From the sashing strips, cut (4) sashing strips 16 1/2 inches to insert between the blocks to form 2 sections. Row 1 and Row 2. Use (3) sashing strips, top, bottom and between your two rows. Use (2) sashing strips for each side of your quilt. Add the piano key border. Use the remainder of the sashing strips to bind your quilt. 1/4 inch seam allowances are included.

Quilt Supplies, Fabric & Classes

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Country Quilts & Fabric

Large variety of quilting cottons, flannel, fleece, satin. Elna Sewing Machines. Books, patterns, notions, classes, gifts. Hand made quilt hangers 8" to 28" Visit our website at www.countryquiltsnfabric.com for in-store specials, upcoming events & online ordering email: countryquilts@embarqmail.com

15 East 27th St., Scottsbluff, NE (308) 220-33622 Hours: Mon-Fri 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9:30-3

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PC Quilter, Hinterburg Frames, Voyager 17 Custom Quilting, Janome Sewing Machines, Wonderful Fabrics! Notions, Books, Patterns, Classes Owner: Cheryl Trautman

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A Million Pillowcase Challenge Shop Come See All the New Fabric! 511 Main Plattsmouth, NE 68048

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Prairie Point Junction This quilt was designed by Joyce Franklin for Quilts & other Notions. 209 W. Montgomery Street, Creston, Iowa 50801, Phone 641-782-8874, Email: quiltsandothernotions@gmail.com. Copyright August 2009.

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Page 8

Heartland Express - County Fair

July 8, 2010

Grasshopper Management in Wait and See Mode By Sandra Hansen, The Scottsbluff Star-Herald

,

"The weather has been strange, and there is speculation that this has messed up hatching patterns." Brill said there is a 30-day residual effectiveness that could lead to control of additional grasshoppers. "We could pick up the new hatchlings," Brill said. That could be important in determining the outcome of the RAATS project. Reports of new grasshoppers, and more adults, are coming in from around the county, Brill said. "Dean (McLain, of Ag Flyers) is getting calls from all over wanting him to come out and spray for grasshoppers," Brill said. "They're hatching all over, but we're about done with the state project." The cost of spraying done now will be paid by the landowner/lessee. The June 11 USDA announcement is not new or additional money

GAGE COUNTY

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TUES JULY 20

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THURS JULY 22

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an agricultural cooperative Supporters of the Dundy Co. FFA and Dundy Co. Fair Hwys. 34 & 61 • Benkelman 308-423-2452 44351

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AG APPRECIATION BBQ

for controlling grasshoppers. From information he has received, Brill said the $11 million in funding is to pay for what has already been done. It will not aid those who still need to spray their land. Brill said the money would not have helped Goshen County anyway, because the county does its own. Funding for local projects comes from individual landowners, local government entities, some state funds, and, depending on the programs, other sources. The Department of Agriculture money is used only for government programs. He said it will be two to four weeks before they can get a clear picture of how effective this effort was. Brill is still concerned about the 2011 grasshopper population. He said the hatch this year is not normal, and with hatchlings showing up now, as well as adult hoppers, he doesn't know what to expect next year. "The weather has been strange, and there is speculation that this has messed up hatching patterns," Brill said. "Since it's been so cold, it could be that some of them are just now hatching." Brill said the sporadic hatching has been happening in many areas. "I'm wondering what will happen next year. So many are hatching now, how many will there be next year? "I know it's going to take a lot of funding and a lot of patience to deal with it," Brill said.

,

Dundy County Fair July 27-August 1, Benkelman

Phase one of the major push to manage grasshoppers in 2010 has been completed. Now the plan is to monitor rangeland, and then wait and see what kind of results the all-out effort generated. "So far, it's looking pretty good," said Steve Brill, superintendent of the Goshen County Weed & Pest department. "There are a couple of spots that will need retreated, but over all, we're seeing some good results." As part of the Wyoming aerial spraying project, Goshen County landowners signed up 248,728 acres. They are all protected under the program, even though only half were sprayed. Private land accounted for 112,000 of those acres. The rest are state and federal acres. About 6 million Wyoming acres were sprayed during the June effort. According to Brill, evidence of the effectiveness is in the areas where only two to five grasshoppers are found per square yard, a significant reduction from the 15 per square yard prior to the spraying. While early indications are that the program was successful, there are landowners in the county who did not participate earlier, who now want to have their land sprayed with the Dimilin/Canola mixture. They have to go it alone, though. Cost-share money is no longer available, as there was with the earlier program. Brill said he believes costs are higher, now, also. The statewide project cost $3.14 per

sprayed acre. With cost share, landowners paid about $1.25 per protected acre. Under the Reduced Agent Area Treatments (RAATs) program, the area to be sprayed is divided into strips. Every other strip is sprayed, saving time, materials and cost. The movement of grasshoppers between sprayed and unsprayed strips exposes them to the Dimilin, which retards their growth, eventually leading to their death.

7:15 PM

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Gage County Fair

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July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - County Fair

Page 9

Safeguard Animal and Human Health at County Fairs Noel Mues, Extension Educator University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Extension, Furnas County Media attention on livestock diseases, such as foot-and-mouth and mad cow disease is a constant reminder of the serious health and economic consequences of livestock disease for animals and humans. Following some simple regulations and precautions can help control the threat of livestock diseases and ensure a positive county fair experience for all who attend. Livestock disease outbreaks could be economically devastating to a state like Nebraska, which derives a large revenue portion from the industry. Most livestock diseases cannot be transmitted from animals to humans, but there are some that can affect both humans and animals. For the safety of all involved, it is wise to use sanitary practices at county and state fairs, and other livestock events. To prevent the spread of animal disease, exhibitors need to pay attention to the following practices: · Do not exhibit animals with clinical signs of contagious disease. · Have animals checked by a veterinarian and obtain a health certificate prior to the fair. · Do not share equipment among exhibitors unless it’s disinfected between uses. · When handling animals infected with ringworm or club lamb fungus, wear rubber gloves and wash with detergent soap after handling. · Change or wash clothing when returning home from the fair before working with other animals. · Isolate animals that you take home for at least 14 days to allow for clinical signs of infection to appear. · Seriously consider selling the animals to slaughter at the end of the show if that option is available. Fair visitors also can play an important role in preventing economic losses and illness with simple sanitary practices: · Do not touch or pet animals except at designated petting exhibits. · Wash your hands after direct contact with animals. · Avoid eating in animal exhibit areas. · Do not feed human food to animals. History of BSE in the United States and Canada – Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, known as BSE or mad cow disease, continues to

be a concern. BSE receives wide spread publicity because of ongoing surveillance of potential problem areas. Surveillance activities have resulted in several cases of BSE being diagnosed in the United States and Canada since December 23, 2003 when USDA announced the first confirmed case of BSE in the United States. Most recently, on February 26, 2008 the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) confirmed BSE in a six-year-old dairy cow from Alberta. The animal's carcass was placed under CFIA control, and no part of it entered the human food or animal feed systems. As with all BSE cases that have been diagnosed since the first confirmed case in December, 2003 no part of any carcass has ever entered the human food supply or animal feed chain. Canada has taken all necessary measures to achieve the eventual elimination of BSE from the national cattle herd. The enhanced feed ban, which went into effect on July 12, 2007, will prevent more than 99 percent of potential BSE infectivity from entering the Canadian feed system. The CFIA expects to detect a small number of cases over the next 10 years as Canada progresses towards its goal of eliminating the disease from the national cattle heard. 4-H Livestock Program Doing It’s Part – 4-H members need to be aware of these enhanced surveillance activities and do their part to prevent the disease from spreading should it ever show up again in the United States. For many years, 4-H members exhibiting livestock at the fair have signed an ethics statement certifying that they haven’t used any non-

approved drugs on their animals, and that the waiting period had expired on any approved drugs used. Again this year, exhibitors of beef cattle or sheep must also certify that the animals have not been fed ruminant meat or bone meal. The statement was added three years ago to ease potential consumer fears over BSE. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the use of ruminant proteins in feed for ruminant animals in 1997. Ruminant animals include cattle, sheep and goats. 4-H exhibitors may still use some types of animal proteins in ruminant feeds, including gelatin, milk and proteins from swine, poultry and horses. Exhibitors need to check feed labels carefully to determine the types of protein used. When in doubt contact the feed manufacturer. All 4-H members who exhibit livestock at county and state fair and/or the Ak-Sar-Ben Livestock Exposition are required to be certified in Livestock Quality Assurance. The certification training provides instruction on proper feeding, medication, and other livestock management issues. For more information on the regulations and suggestions, consult University of NebraskaLincoln Extension NebFact 01-482, Banned Mammalian Protein - What does it mean?; NebFact 01-484, Biosecurity - Protecting Your Health and the Health of Your Animals; and NebFact 01-483, Attending Fairs Safeguarding Your Health and Nebraska’s Livestock Industry. These publications are available at your local University of NebraskaLincoln extension office.

Webster County Fair July 15-17, Bladen

Pawnee County Fair July 21-24, Pawnee City

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Page 10

Heartland Express - Rodeo

July 8, 2010

Rodeo & Math Mix OFFERING SHORT AND LONG-TERM NURSING AND REHABILITATION CARE

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Kaycee Werdel may be a math nerd, but she’s also a cowgirl. The Chadron, Neb. native competed at the Nebraska State High School Rodeo Finals in Hastings in four events: breakaway roping, barrel racing, pole bending, and team roping. She entered the finals in first place in the breakaway roping with enough of a season lead over the number two cowgirl that even after a bad first run, she was still in first place. Werdel, who graduated from high school this spring, loves to ride and rope, but math is also a favorite. “I like math,” she says, and her grades are evidence. Werdell was on the honor roll for all four years of high school, and is one of 1,000 minority students nationwide who was selected as a Gates Millenium Scholar. The scholarship, named after the computer tycoon, will pay Werdel’s way through her bachelor, master’s, and graduate degrees. She was nominated for the award because of her high grade point average, community service, and leadership talents. She wrote twelve essays over a four month period to earn the award. She plans on attending Chadron State College this fall to major in mechanical engineering. “I like figuring out how things work,” she says. She also plans on continuing her rodeo competition in college with team roping, barrel racing and breakaway roping. She already competes on the amateur level at rodeos in Nebraska and South Dakota. Werdel, whose mother is president of the Nebraska High School Rodeo Association, also enjoys graphic design. She creates a monthly newsletter for a grant program in South Dakota. The cowgirl has qualified for state rodeo finals all four of her high school rodeo career years and has twice been to the National High School Rodeo Finals, once as a sophomore and once as a junior.

NE State Rodeo Association Standings Standings as of June 21 (Unofficial)

Barebacks 1 Corey Evans $1,963.14 2 Ty Kenner $1,543.60 3 Ira McKillip $1,223.80 4 Nick Eichelberger $352.50 5 Logan Glendy $155.20 Saddle Broncs 1 Chase Miller 2 Derek Kenner 3 Wyatt Barstow 4 Jesse Hefner 5 Travis Schmitz 6 Ryan Bestol 7 Matt Elliott 8 Zack Cox 9 Seth Schafer 10 Ty Kenner

$1,735.98 $913.70 $895.85 $872.34 $647.44 $592.49 $456.55 $377.88 $227.35 $26.35

Bull Riding 1 Jesse McDaniel 2 Clint Connelley 3 Kevin Connelley 4 Jason Schwindt 5 Dewey O'Dea 6 Clint Wilson 7 Andrew Soucie 8 Billy Stover 9 Chase Freeman 10 Spud Tharp

$3,372.99 $1,356.70 $1,127.72 $996.58 $799.00 $686.40 $541.72 $343.20 $238.86 $171.60

Calf Roping 1 Garrett Nokes 2 Chip Wilson 3 Jayce Johnson 4 Travis Lymber 5 Matt Elliott 6 Clete Scheer 7 Corey Palmer 8 Ray Brown 9 Chisum Thurston 10 Adam Sawyer 11 Donnell Holeman 12 Terry Graff 13 Dakota Button

$1,643.17 $1,219.73 $912.49 $¦866.22 $818.91 $800.72 $613.76 $391.05 $289.25 $284.40 $280.40 $218.08 $217.53

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Team Roping - Heeler 1 Tee Cee Wills $1,696.86 2 Mark Swanson $1,201.16 3 Warren Horner $1,097.12 4 Chris Sherman $1,073.53 5 Quincy Opela $829.77 6 Todd Pinneo $692.50 7 Monte Jamison $690.18 8 Dalton Pelster $562.31 9 Waide Jewell $483.70 10 Matt Fattig $453.60 11 Jared Bilby $368.41 12 Terry Graff $296.47 13 Todd Hollenbeck $290.23 Break Away 1 Jamie Elwood $1,899.23 2 Ginalee Tierney $1,130.69 3 Lori Tierney $984.84 4 BoDelle Mueller $741.98 5 Amanda Lymber $728.09 6 Chancy Scheer $637.84 7 Jessica Wykert $545.38 8 Kirby Eppert $526.87 9 Hilary Van Gerpen $376.14 10 Jan Brown $360.96 11 Ashley Sherman $284.15 12 Kelsey Boots $182.22 13 Jesse Johnson $157.86 Barrel Racing 1 Rochelle Miller $2,005.30 2 Becky Larson $1,326.07 3 June Holeman $1,291.48 4 Mary Cecelia Tharp $1,074.75 5 Lyndsey Simonton $952.27 6 Roberta Jarvis $829.19 7 Deb Christy $821.28 8 Rachael Reichenberg $624.18 9 Lorie Wendell $583.65 10 Cassi Micheel $553.69 11 Becky Spanel $367.00 12 D'Ann Gehlsen $349.68 13 Dori Hollenbeck $327.12 Steer Roping 1 Wade Pearson 2 AB Cox 3 Andy Wearin 4 Larry Tierney 5 Jeff Kreikemeier 6 Jim Downer 7 Chris Pearson

43533

Ranch Equipment from Rowse

Team Roping - Header 1 Derik Underwood $1,696.86 2 Jeff Johnston $1,272.75 3 Brian Dunning $1,207.68 4 Jerry Buckles $1,201.16 5 Gene Jett $1,073.53 6 Justen Nokes $595.47 7 Travis Warren $562.31 8 Jared Jewkes $483.70 9 Scott Smith $453.60 10 Jered Holloway $368.41 11 Jeff White $366.60 12 Kevin Rossenbach $355.93 13 Chris Cover $323.58

July 16, 17 & 18, 2010 Ainsworth, Nebraska

Saturday, July 17 • 9:00-10:00 am Breakfast on Main St. • 10:00 am Old West Parade • 12:30 pm Meet Buffalo Bill • 1:00 pm Intensive Grazing Panel • 1:00 pm Sandhills Cowboy Hall of Fame Display • 1:00-4:00 pm Petting Zoo & Kids Games • 1:00-4:00 pm Horse Swap/Horse Display • 1:00-4:00 pm Caricature Artists & Western Art Display • 2:00 pm Arch Ferguson-Horsemanship Clinic • 2:00 pm Rick Funston-Using a Breeding Maturity Index • 2:00-7:00 pm Live Music in the Watering Hole • 3:00 pm Julie Runther-Age & Source Verification • 3:00-5:00 pm Mounted Trail Chall. • 7:00 pm Cowboy Poets, Entertainment & Benefit Auction • 8:00 pm Nebraska Sandhills Cowboy Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

$990.00 $980.84 $488.64 $364.24 $220.60 $183.04 $118.80

Steer Wrestling 1 Gabe Taylor $1,243.26 2 Alfred Franzen $870.32 3 Josh Fanning $863.43 4 Adam Sawyer $727.40 5 Tyson Cox $575.28 6 Jarrett Rasmussen $553.86 7 Trevor Haake $511.98 8 Chad Johnston $492.56 9 Linn Churchill $453.45 10 Garrett Nokes $407.11 11 Bryce Stoltenberg $368.00 12 Justen Nokes $366.31 13 Dillon Simonson $356.10 All Around - Men 1 Garrett Nokes 2 Matt Elliott 3 Adam Sawyer

$2,285.38 $1,275.46 $1,266.61

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Sunday, July 18 • 7:30 am Trail Ride with Breakfast • 2:00 pm Ranch Rodeo 44303


July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - Rodeo

Page 11

Mid-States Rodeo Standings As of 7/2/2010

Barebacks 1 Corey Evans $3,159.81 2 Ty Kenner $1,638.79 3 Ira McKillip $1,470.92 4 Nick Eichelberger $190.12 Saddle Broncs 1 Chase Miller 2 Seth Schafer 3 Travis Schmitz 4 Wyatt Barstow 5 Derek Kenner 6 Ty Kenner 7 Tanner Olson 8 Peyton Ramm Bull Riding 1 Kevin Connelly 2 Denver Jochem 3 Dewey O'Dea 4 Clint Connelly 5 Jason Schwindt 6 Adam Wimer 7 Josh Call 8 Brandon Faimon 9 Rod Doffin 10 John Teppert 11 Dusty May Calf Roping 1 Travis Lymber 2 Dustin Schrunk 3 Garrett Nokes 4 Clete Scheer 5 Jay Hollenbeck

$1,713.61 $1,431.94 $1,349.56 $1,019.73 $937.32 $441.65 $157.92 $125.96

$1,673.19 $1,534.08 $1,386.36 $1,038.45 $883.32 $647.70 $490.68 $244.72 $178.97 $99.43 $84.60

$1,312.44 $1,295.21 $1,083.26 $981.13 $828.20

6 Tee Cross 7 Ray Brown 8 Terry Graff 9 Tyler Kimmel 10 Bill Peterson 11 Rocky Tibbs 12 Cody Larson 13 Matt Elliott 14 Donnell Holeman 15 Casey Redman 16 Brent Hurlburt 17 Chip Wilson 18 Corey Palmer 19 Jared Eakins 20 Levi Fisher

$819.36 $803.93 $669.09 $602.85 $552.44 $546.39 $517.33 $378.40 $357.05 $345.04 $286.70 $271.10 $258.66 $131.54 $109.04

Mixed Team Roping 1 Dori Hollenbeck 2 Ginalee Tierney 3 Jamie Martin 4 Hillary Van Gerpen

$622.13 $264.96 $181.18 $120.79

3 Tyson Cox 4 Gabe Taylor 5 Brent Hurlburt 6 Taylor Davis 7 Mike Stephen 8 Garrett Nokes 9 Bump Kraeger 10 Trevor Haake 11 Jeff Richardson 12 Dan Barner 13 Steve McKay

$858.56 $801.66 $669.36 $496.69 $479.78 $375.72 $355.02 $307.84 $288.00 $148.52 $118.34

45 & Over Calf Roping 1 Greg Lanka $1,437.86 2 Bill Peterson $1,101.92 3 Arden Garwood $1,043.41 4 Rex Bridgman $495.18 5 Don Kocis $409.83 6 John Bartlett $394.80 7 Larry Tierney $263.20 8 Joe Kimmel $256.55 9 Carl Martin $137.71 10 Larry Radant $131.92

Team Roping - Header 1 Travis Warren $1,846.78 2 Dustin Chohon $1,402.89 3 Jake Cole $945.47 4 Dusty Forre $908.28 5 Brian Dunning $908.22 6 Jeff White $908.09 7 Andy Miller $901.59 8 Jerry Buckles $863.39 9 Ryan Kucera $724.15 10 Derek Underwood $497.01 11 Jeff Johnston $492.24 12 Scott Smith $453.60 13 Mark Brockmueller $436.23 14 Travis Hermelbract $416.70 15 Jeremy Wagner $411.84 16 Wes Hermelbracht $405.46 17 Travis Lymber $382.13 18 Jered Hallaway $368.41 19 Kendall Reidiger $321.43 20 Troy Whited $298.76

Steer Wrestling 1 Jarrett Rasmussen $1,270.17 2 Josh Fanning $1,057.94

Team Roping - Heeler 1 Levi Tyan $1,523.52 2 JW Beck $1,402.89

3 Dalton Pelster $1,364.09 4 Josh Cole $945.47 5 Dustin Harris $918.92 6 Troy Hermelbracht $908.28 7 Chance Frazier $908.22 8 Bret Trenary $908.09 9 Garrett Nokes $901.59 10 Mark Swanson $863.39 11 Todd Pinneo $724.15 12 Tee Cee Wills $497.01 13 Quincy Opela $492.24 14 Molly Hermelbract $405.46 15 Russ Wubbenhorst $382.13 16 Warren Horner $374.49 17 Jared Bilby $368.41 18 Craig Person $298.76 19 Terry Graff $296.47 20 Monte Jamison $235.86

Break Away 1 Jamie Elwood $1,957.85 2 Lori Tierney $1,726.40 3 Lacy Holeman $1,282.73 4 Kirby Eppert $1,059.73 5 Jan Brown $879.84 6 Dori Hollenbeck $813.83 7 Jordanne Cole $747.46 8 Amanda Lymber $646.22 9 Chancy Scheer $637.84 10 Misti Eklund $483.69 11 BoDelle Mueller $437.66 12 Taylor Holiday $371.83 13 Ginalee Tierney $356.73 14 Courtney Simonton $300.89 15 Darci Tibbs $272.97 16 Hannah Schmitz $248.54 17 Tammie Swanson $208.78

18 Amber Barthel 19 Hillary Van Gerpen 20 Jamie Martin

$194.58 $164.12 $115.15

Barrel Racing 1 June Holeman $1,929.16 2 Chancy Scheer $1,404.40 3 Roberta Jarvis $1,338.48 4 Martee Pruitt $1,279.34 5 Kelly Schrunk $897.76 6 Michelle Deck $732.46 7 D'Ann Gehlsen $692.97 8 Lindsey Simonton $676.94 9 Jessica Leach $636.70 10 Deb Christy $505.34 11 Hilary Van Gerpen $481.63 12 Dori Hollenbeck $421.21 13 Deb Schroetlin $406.18 14 Lori Cline $300.90 15 Marci Bartlett $263.45 16 Rhonda Richardson $250.42 17 Justy Hagan $219.89 18 Samantha Flannery $130.75 19 Rachel Reichenberg $129.15 20 Jan Brown $91.18 All Around - Men 1 Garrett Nokes 2 Ty Kenner 3 Travis Lymber 4 Bill Peterson 5 Jay Hollenbeck 6 Terry Graff 7 Brent Hurlburt

2 3 4 5 6

Dori Hollenbeck $1,315.10 Jan Brown $971.02 Hilary Van Gerpen $766.54 Ginalee Tierney $621.69 Jamie Martin $296.33

Rookie - Men 1 John Teppert 2 Dusty May

$99.43 $84.60

Rookie - Women 1 Jordanne Cole 2 Michelle Deck

$747.46 $732.46

$2,360.57 $2,080.44 $1,694.57 $1,654.36 $1,124.67 $965.56 $956.06

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Rodeo Schedule July 8-11 July 10-11 July 9-10 July 10 July 12-13

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Commercial Feedlot Located 1 mile South of Oconto on Hwy. 21 77920 Highway 21 • Oconto, NE 68860

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• Windmill & Submersible Repair & Service • Submersibles for Domestics & Irrigation • Domestic Stock Service • Tire Tanks • Solar Powered Submersibles • Backhoe & Trenching Drilling Service • Ritchie Fountains • Constant Pressure Water Systems 44217

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July 24 & 25 • 7:30pm • 7 PRCA Rodeo Events • Chuck Wagon Races • Chariot Races • Wild Horse Race • Junior Steer Riding • Dinner Bell Derby •4-H Exhibit Barn • Grand Marshall - Shawn Davis • Professional Rodeo Clown Acts • Midway • Browse Barn • World Famous Rodeo Announcer - Hadley Barrett

Wednesday, July 28

Friday, July 30

MS-NE-OPEN $400 added rough stock $250 timed events

Saturday, July 31

mutton bustin Thursday, July 29

(1:30 p.m. Cheap Seats) & (7:30 p.m. Patriot Night; Red, White & Blue)

concessions

For more information contact: Rodeo Ticket Office, Burwell, NE:

308-346-5010 • www.nebraskasbigrodeo.com Lodging info at: www.burwellchamber.net

44349

44371


Page 12

Heartland Express - Market

July 8, 2010

By David M. Fiala

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

County Grain Prices as of 7/6/10 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Scottsbluff Sidney St. Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon

New Corn

$3.41 $3.16 $3.30 $3.23 $3.28 $3.32 $3.38 $3.29 $3.13 $3.41 $3.17 $3.39 $3.30 $3.33 $3.17 $3.42 $3.26 $3.43 $3.40 $3.31 $3.18 $3.23 $3.35 $3.36 $3.39 $3.15 $3.41 $3.39

$3.45 $3.26 $3.34 $3.41 $3.31 $3.37 $3.39 $3.44 $3.27 $3.45 $3.39 $3.44 $3.44 $3.35 $3.39 $3.39 $3.45 $3.39 $3.32 $3.37 $3.33 $3.29 $3.39 $3.34 $3.37 $3.41 $3.32 $3.41

$3.24 $3.45 $3.38 $3.28 $3.11

671 Northern Above Oil Flowers Above Spring Wheat

Beans

New Beans

$9.00 $8.80 $9.20 $8.75 $8.91 $8.97 $9.00 $9.12

$8.27 $8.10 $8.25 $8.01 $8.18 $8.19 $8.45 $8.33

$8.97 $8.74 $9.12

$8.24 $8.01 $8.33

$8.95 $8.74 $8.92

$8.24 $8.01 $8.31

$8.94 $9.08 $8.97 $8.77 $9.20 $8.75 $9.09

$8.28 $8.50 $8.09 $8.06 $8.05 $8.49 $8.32 $8.21

$8.98 $9.03

$8.33 $8.32

$3.44 $3.37 $3.44 $3.29

$9.01 $8.79

$8.30 $8.33 $8.20

$3.18

$8.70

Wheat

New Wheat

$3.96

New Milo

$3.18

$3.30

$2.91

$2.94

$2.91

$2.94

$3.11

$3.14

$3.00

$2.94

$2.73 $2.86 $2.65

$2.89 $2.94 $2.94

$3.91 $3.65 $3.96 $4.63 $3.96 $3.84 $3.65 $4.14 $3.93 $3.91 $3.65 $3.86 $3.65 $3.96 $4.00 $3.81 $3.65 $3.66

customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options. The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

Crop Basis Charts from Reporting Locations as of 7/6/10 Corn Basis

Soybean Basis

Wheat Basis

Sorghum Basis

$3.86 $3.66 $3.91 $3.68

$28.0030. $15.05 $4.81

$4.06 $4.00

$2.94 $2.99

$3.14 $3.04

$8.35 Pinto $27.00 Oil Flowers (new) $15.05 Spring Wheat(new) $4.65

Corn

Navy

N/A

Soybeans

Wheat

Corn trade has been higher this week due to short covering following the supportive USDA Quarterly stocks and Planted Acreage Report last Wednesday. The weekly net change is 6 higher on the September contract and December is up 5 following the big up move late last week. The outside market influence has been supportive this week; crude is $2.30 higher, the dollar is 58 lower, and the DOW is up 314 points. Follow-through buying and continued short covering have been noted for the strength this week, trade should start to flatten out ahead of The USDA Supply and Demand report on Friday. The average trade guess for the old crop carryover is 1.405 billion with a range of 1.214-1.6 billion versus the 1.603 billion June number. The new crop carryover estimate is at 1.337 versus the June 1.573 numbers, the range of estimate is 833 million to 1.7 billion. We have rallied nearly 50 cents since the June 30th report, so any bullish numbers on Friday’s report should be priced-in. The report on Friday will influence trade this week, but the weather forecasts should continue to dictate trade longer-term. We still need to get this crop though pollination and the dough stage without much stress. Heavy rains fell across the western Corn Belt last weekend which continues to foster concern over flooded areas, but the acres not affected by standing water could have record yields. The East remains warm and dry with the weekend system slowly moving that direction. On the weekly report, crop condition came in at 71% good to excellent, down 2% from the previous week. Silking was listed as 19% complete, up 12% from last week. The weekly export sales will be delayed until Friday due to the holiday on Monday. The momentum is still up, but we are about to reach some upside targets. But any production short falls puts us on the point of demand rationing which will keep the market supported on any breaks near term. Hedgers call with questions.

Support: Resistance

Milo

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience to provide

Sept 10 363 388

Dec. 10 374 399

September 2010 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .3.740 High . . .3.790 Low . . . .3.726 Close . . .3.782 Change +0.102

Wheat trade has been higher this week due to follow-through buying and short covering. The weekly net changes are 27 higher in Chicago, KC is up 29, and Minneapolis is up 30. On the chart the September Chicago did reach the next upside target at $5.32, which is the 200-day moving average; there should be selling interest in this area, so fresh bullish news may now be needed to keep the market from slipping ahead of the report. The average trade guess for the July USDA carryover is at 968 for the 2009-10, and 1.033 billion for the July 2010-11 carryover; the range of estimates is 855 million to 1.1 billion. This is a huge, huge carryover which should not support a bull market, so many shorts have been caught off guard this past week. So some of the upside market movement has been weak shorts getting out of positions. The June USDA all wheat production estimate was at 2.067 billion bushels, the trade is expecting the number to inch up to 2.15 billion on the report this Friday which is behind the trade expecting the carryover to jump above 1 billion. September Chicago wheat is up nearly 90 cents now over the past month, with most of the gains over the past week. On the weekly report, winter wheat harvest was listed as 54% complete versus 50% a year ago and the 53% 5-year average. Winter wheat condition came in at 64% good to excellent, down 1% from the previous week. Spring wheat was listed as 52% headed versus only 28% a year ago and the 57% 5-year average. Spring wheat condition came in at 83% good to excellent versus 84% a week ago. The weekly export sales will be seen on Friday this week. Hedgers call with questions, continue to look forward at the carry in the futures for opportunities in 2011 and 2012.

Support: Resistance

Chicago 489 553

K City 502 570

Minneapolis 512 586

September 2010 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .5.170 High . . . .5.320 Low . . . .5.150 Close . . .5.304 Change .+0.230

Soybean trade is higher on the week due to short covering on Wednesday due to forecasts and spillover support from corn and beans. The weekly net change is 25 higher on the September contract and November is up 27. We were lower on the week until the strength on Wednesday. Meal is $7 higher and bean oil is up 81 points for the week. On the November chart, the 10-, 20, and 40-day moving averages were all consolidated around $9.14; the close above this level on Wednesday has turned the momentum higher. A second consecutive daily close above the 100-day at $9.30 would likely promote additional chart buying. Beans are now in the middle of our recent trading range and we could test higher levels. The next area of resistance is the 200-day up at $9.51 on the November contract. Position squaring ahead of the report on Friday should still limit upside; the average trade guess for the July USDA old crop 200910 carryover is 171 million bushels with a range of 140 to 195 versus the 185 June number. The new crop 201011 carryover estimate is at 354 million with a range of 250-385 million. On the weekly report, soybean emergence was listed as 95% complete versus the 87% 5-year average. Percent blooming came in at 23 versus 13% a year ago and the 20% 5-year average. The weekly export sales will be seen Friday morning due to the Holiday this week. The updated forecasts should continue to dictate trade, the momentum is now up, so a test of the upper part of our 2-month range should not be a surprise. Hedgers call with questions.

Support: Resistance

Aug 927 994

Aug Meal 279 301

Aug Oil 3553 3783

August 2010 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .9.470 High . . . .9.680 Low . . . .9.460 Close . . .9.672 Change .+0.272


July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - Government

Page 13

Iran Sanction by Congressman Adrian Smith Scottsbluff Office 416 Valley View Drive, Suite 600 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Phone: (308) 633-6333 Fax: (308) 633-6335

They say politics can make strange bedfellows. When it comes to a nuclear Iran, Congress certainly has put aside partisan politics in the interest of international safety. On June 24 the House of Representatives passed the Comprehensive Iran Sanctions, Accountability, and Divestment Act by a vote of 408-8. In a day when party line votes are the norm, not the exception, such an overwhelming vote is truly remarkable – especially on such an important matter. A nuclear-armed Iran would pose a grave threat to the United States and the international community. The legislation I supported would amend the Iran Sanctions Act to impose new economic penalties aimed at forcing Iran to change its conduct, especially to end its nuclear weapons programs. Businesses affected include entities involved in refined petroleum sales to Iran; those providing support for Iran’s domestic refining efforts; and banking institutions involved with Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, Iran’s illicit nuclear program, or its support for terrorism. In addition, the legislation provides a framework by which states, local governments, and other investors can divest their portfolios of foreign companies involved in Iran’s energy sector and establish a mechanism to address concerns about diver-

Grand Island Office 1811 West Second Street, Suite 105 Grand Island, NE68803 Phone: (308) 384-3900 Fax: (308) 384-3902

sion of sensitive technologies to Iran through other countries. On June 16, European Union (EU) lawmakers passed their own round of sanctions targeting assets, visas, and cargo companies owned by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps, in addition to companies investing, assisting, or transferring technology to Iranian oil and gas companies sanctioned by the EU. In late June, Canada also implemented harsher Iran sanctions. By placing crippling sanctions against Iran’s energy and financial sectors, democracies around the world have a chance to derail this rogue nation’s rush toward nuclear weapons. The Iranian regime’s obsession with possessing nuclear weapons is a nightmare scenario for the United States, Israel, and our allies in the Middle East and around the world. A nuclear Iran would cause a destabilizing arms race in the Middle East and could lead to untold conflicts. Iran’s leadership has threatened to wipe Israel off the face of the earth, and it would not hesitate to put nuclear weapons in the hands of terrorists to attack America or any of her allies at will. The rulers of Iran killed their own people for protesting a fraudulent election – imagine what they would do to Tel Aviv or New York City.

Washington Office 503 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6435 Fax: (202) 225-0207

While this bill is a vast improvement from the rather weak resolution passed by the United Nations (which were diluted by Russia and China), the effectiveness of these sanctions depends on President Obama’s willingness to vigorously implement them to the fullest extent. The Act provides a number of waivers granting the Administration some flexibility in implementing sanctions. One such waiver would give the President authorization to put aside sanctions under certain circumstances for persons under the jurisdiction of governments which are closely cooperating with the U.S. in multilateral efforts to prevent Iran from acquiring or developing weapons of mass destruction. It is essential President Obama carries out the clear Congressional intent to cripple Iran’s energy and financial sectors. President Obama should not ignore any part of these sanctions. Now is the time for decisive action by America and our allies. With each passing day, the ruling regime in Iran moves one step closer to acquiring nuclear weapons. This is truly a horrifying prospect. I will continue to stand with my colleagues – Democrats and Republicans – and our allies to head off the growing Iranian threat.

Washington Needs Nebraska Values When It Comes To Spending by Senator Ben Nelson Omaha Office 7502 Pacific St.,Suite 205 Omaha, NE 68114 Phone: (402) 391-3411 Fax: (402) 391-4725

Like many states, Nebraska state government has a requirement when it comes to spending. Locked in the state’s constitution is a provision that requires a balanced budget. There is no borrowing and no deficit spending. It’s not easy to do, but during eight years as governor I balanced the state budgets without raising taxes by making tough choices when it came to spending. Now as a U.S. Senator I’m trying to insert that value into Washington spending, which is why I have insisted the Tax Extenders bill the Senate has been working on be paid for as much as possible. Unfortunately, it has contained a lot of extra new spending that goes right onto the federal deficit. Just Say No I’ve voted no on the bill a number of times because, while each revised proposal lowered the deficit spending, it’s still too much. The latest one would have added $33 billion to the deficit, which this year could hit $1.4 trillion for the second year in a row. In 2008 and 2009, America was on the brink of a depression. We had a genuine emergency that

Lincoln Office Federal Building, Room 287 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Phone: (402) 441-4600 Fax: (402) 476-8753

required immediate action to keep the economy from a complete collapse that could have gone global. Borrowing and deficit spending in a major economic crisis is one thing. But when you're in an economic recovery as we are today, borrowing and deficit spending is another thing. Some say that a flood of new emergency government spending is needed to keep the recovery going. In my view, it could do the opposite and wash away the recovery. It’s risky to keep borrowing in a recovery. We just pile up more debts for our children to pay. Curb Deficit Spending Taxpayers are demanding fiscal responsibility and we need to listen to them. I understand the need to extend unemployment insurance benefits for Nebraskans and other Americans who remain out of work, but prefer we find cuts in federal spending and other ways to pay for those benefits. Some also have said we need this emergency spending to bail out cash-strapped states. The National Governors Association has asked Congress for $24 billion in additional Medicaid

Washington Office 720 Hart Senate Office Building United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6551 Fax: (202) 228-0012

funding to help them through hard times. Stop Unfunded Mandates The real problem is that Washington has got to stop passing unfunded mandates like this one onto the states. I’ve fought unfunded federal mandates for two decades. When I pushed to eliminate the unfunded mandate in the health reform bill last December, I was ridiculed by several governors, and some aspiring governors. Today, though, they want more money. And we all know they will want more later. Like many Americans, I’ve got bailout fatigue. Whether it’s bailing out Wall Street, Detroit, or the states, taxpayers just can’t afford any more. In addition, with hundreds of millions of economic recovery dollars still not spent in Nebraska and other states, it’s irresponsible to raise the deficit in Washington to balance budgets in state capitals. Nebraskans want Washington to stop the spending, cut the deficit and live within a responsible budget, and I’m working to deliver that as their senator.

Updated Financial Regulatory Bill Misses The Mark On Reform by Senator Mike Johanns Kearney Office: 4111 Fourth Avenue, Suite 26 Kearney, NE 68845 Tel: (308) 236-7602 Fax: (308) 236-7473

Lincoln Office: 294 Federal Building 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Tel: (402) 476-1400 Fax: (402) 476-0605

Since the economic meltdown, momentum has been building in Washington to implement a reform bill that, above all else, would prevent our financial system from ever again failing us in the way it did in 2008. Yet amazingly, after two years of debate, the version agreed upon late last week by House and Senate conferees misses that mark by an astounding margin. If this updated bill passes both houses of Congress, American banks and businesses would face a new law that imposes new stifling federal regulations without fixing what went wrong. Small businesses, community banks, and citizens across Nebraska still reeling from the recession and just starting to regain their footing will be met with another punch. Perhaps the most troubling aspect of the bill is that no one truly knows what the impact will be. Just last week, after the final legislation was announced, Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd (whom the bill is named after) stated, "No one will know until this is actually in place how it works." Hearing this was tremendous-

Scottsbluff Office: 115 Railway Street, Suite C102 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Tel: (308) 632-6032 Fax: (308) 632-6295

ly disappointing. If endorsing this bill requires not much more than a wing and a prayer, that's a clear sign to me that we're not close to producing legislation to address the right issues. However, there are some aspects of the bill we do know, and it doesn't look promising for Nebraska, which had little if anything to do with the financial crisis. The bill creates a new federal bureaucracy and empowers it with the authority to arbitrarily regulate any "financial product" it deems "abusive." With such an open-ended definition, there really are no boundaries. If the bill becomes law, this bureaucracy will have an enormous and unchecked ability to regulate almost anything. Just as troubling are the rules and regulations the law itself imposes on small banks that were victims, not the perpetrators, of the crisis. One Nebraska banker recently wrote to me, "Banks like mine lack the internal resources to adhere to a multitude of new laws and regulations and would have to cut back – and in some cases terminate – operations … It will make it dramatically

Omaha Office: 9900 Nicholas St., Suite 325 Omaha, NE 68114 Tel: (402) 758-8981 Fax: (402) 758-9165

Washington, D.C. Office 404 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510

harder for my bank to serve our customers and our local community." Incredibly, the bill also completely ignores two causes of our current financial woes: Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. After contributing to the implosion of the housing market, they received billions of dollars in taxpayer-funded bailouts. Giving Fannie and Freddie a free pass puts Americans at risk of future bailouts. A reform bill that ignores these two mortgage giants is simply unacceptable. The bottom line is that this so-called reform bill is far from true reform: it won't prevent future crises. It will increase the power and number of federal bureaucracies – the very institutions that failed to foresee and prevent the crisis two years ago; and it will impose crippling new regulations on many Nebraskans who played no role in it. I sincerely believe Congress would be better off recycling this 2,300 page monstrosity and starting over with targeted reforms that address the systemic problems that led to the collapse.


Page 14

Heartland Express - Dawson County Fair

Let Us Help You Get Back On The Road Fast!

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Midwest Truck and Trailer Repair Inc. 310 Cottonwood Dr., Gothenburg, NE 69138

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Lindy Elson

July 8, 2010

Darr Feedlot Inc.

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email: jschroeder@darrfeedlot.com website: www.darrfeedlot.com

John J. Schroeder General Manager

Commercial Cattle Feeders of Central Nebraska

42889

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44331

The ONE stop shop for all your car part needs!

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NEBRASKA AG & IRRIGATION, INC.

2010 Dawson County Fair July 14 - July 18

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Dawson County Fairgrounds Lexington, Nebraska

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July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - County Fair

Page 15

Remove Bales Soon After Harvest

NEBRASKA WEATHER AND CROP REPORT Continued from page 2 year’s 5, but equal to average. Soybean conditions rated 3 percent very poor, 4 poor, 19 fair, 60 good, and 14 excellent. Soybeans blooming was 17 percent, ahead of last year’s 11 but behind the 20 average. Wheat conditions rated 3 percent very poor, 6 poor, 22 fair, 57 good, and 12 excellent. Wheat turning color was 90 percent complete, near last year’s 91 but behind 95 average. Wheat ripe at 30 percent was behind 32 last year and five days behind the 50 average. Wheat harvested was 13 percent, two days ahead of last year’s 9, but four days behind the 24 average. Proso Millet planted was 95 percent planted, ahead of last year’s 82 and 90 average. Oats conditions rated 1 percent poor, 12 percent fair, 64 good, and 23 excellent. Oats headed was 96 percent complete, ahead of last year’s 93 and 95 average. Oats harvested was 4 percent complete, equal to last year but behind the 7 average. Dry beans conditions rated 2 percent poor, 23 fair, 66 good, and 9 excellent. Dry beans emerged was 94 percent, equal to last year but behind the 97 average. Alfalfa rated 1 percent very poor, 4 poor, 12 fair, 68 good, and 15 excellent. First cutting of alfalfa was 99 percent complete, ahead of 95 last year and 98 average. Second cutting of alfalfa was 34 percent complete, ahead of last year’s 27 but behind 36 average. Wild Hay conditions rated 2 percent very poor, 1 poor, 8 fair, 71 good, and 18 excellent. Wild Hay harvested was 34 percent complete. Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 2 poor, 8 fair, 74 good, and 16 excellent.

Dr. Bruce Anderson, Professor of Agronomy Agronomy & Horticulture, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, NE Bales and stacks of hay left in the middle of fields have to be removed sometime. After the final cutting for the year, it may not matter too much if they set there for a while. But when more harvests are expected off that field, delaying removal can be harmful. One problem is directly under the bale or stack. Plants underneath often are killed if covered for more than a week or two. This may not hurt yield too much, but makes for a great place for weeds to get started. And you know how they can spread. Most of the damage, though, is due to wheel traffic on the regrowth. Studies have shown that when fields are dry, plants driven on before regrowth occurs yield about 5 to 7 percent less at next cut-

Red Willow County Fair July 28-Aug. 1, McCook

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Sherman County Fair

ting. It gets much worse if you wait to remove bales. Just seven days after cutting, when regrowth shoots had started to grow, yield was reduced over 25 percent and fewer of these plants survived. And worse yet is removing bales when fields are wet. Then wheel traffic causes much more compaction. When this happens, yield loss typically exceeds 30 percent. These studies emphasize the benefits of baling and removing bales from hay fields as quickly as possible after cutting as well as minimizing driving on wet soils. They also suggest that following the same trail when removing bales or stacks from fields can reduce losses from wheel tracks by limiting the total area damaged. Hay fields must be driven on, of course, to remove bales after harvest. But you can lessen damage by controlling where, when and how often you drive.

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Fullerton Cedar Rapids

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44322

Truck: 308-870-1505 Bill Howard General Manager

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Lobby: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Drive-Up: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Lobby & Drive-Up: Sat. 8-11 a.m. 43564

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Fullerton, NE 68638

(308) 536-2492 • (800) 658-4069 Quality Breeding Stock For Sale At All Times See your dealer:

Jerry Dethlefs 78119 S. River Rd. (308) 372-3200 43589

Sherman County Fair July 23-28, 2010 • Loup City, NE Friday, July 23 Summer Theatre • Fashion Revue & King/Queen Coronation Saturday, July 24 Horse Show • Team Sorting & Penning Sunday, July 25 Chicken Dinner • Small Animal Show • Bingo • Goat Show • Sheep Show

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Monday, July 26 Swine Show • Ak-Sar-Ben Award Presentation • Family Fun Night • Baker Family Entertainment Tuesday, July 27 FREE Barbecue • Bull Riding Wednesday, July 28 Turtle & Frog Races • Livestock Auction • Demo Derby

Gary Dethlefs 78009 S. River Rd. (308) 372-3248 44360 xxxxx

Trotter Grain & Fertilizer

43034

Morrill County Fair Bridgeport, Nebraska

Purina Dealer

July 24 - 31, 2010

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Sunday, July 25 Pancake Feed • Church • 4-H Shooting Sports

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Tuesday, July 27 Dog Show • Drag Your Nag Races

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Proud Supporters of the Sherman County Fair 44374

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43588

Wednesday, July 28 Rabbit Show • Poultry Show • Fashion Show

Thursday, July 29 Beef Show • R.P Smith Cowboy Poetry & Morrill County Cattleman Supper Friday, July 30 Swine Show • Goat Show • Sheep Show • 4-H Council 4-H families Hamburger/ Watermelon Feed • Weiner Dog Race • 4-H Dance Saturday, July 31 Parade of Champions • 4-H & FFA Livestock Sale

“Let’s Make it a Family Affair!” go to www.morrillcountyfair.com for more infomation

44375


Page 16

Heartland Express - Adams County Fair

July 8, 2010

U.S. Soybean Farmers Define and Measure Sustainability On-Farm and in Livestock/Aquaculture Operations At a time when sustainability is hotter than ever, what’s often missing is a clear definition of what exactly the trendy term means. U.S. soybean producers are working to change that through a new web platform, www.usbthinkingahead.com, that defines the concept and points to agriculture as the original sustainability success story. “Many people define and measure sustainability differently, and the discussion about what it really means can generate more heat than light,” said David Wilson, USB Sustainability Initiative Chair and soybean farmer from Lincoln, Ala. “Agriculture has been working well for 10,000 years, so it has always been sustainable historically. But soybean producers are doing some innovative work recently to improve on that success and make sure soybean production continually decreases environmental impact and remains sustainable going forward.” According to Wilson, U.S. soybean sustainability also extends beyond the farm. High-quality feed, which represents the primary use for soybeans, helps significantly increase the efficiency of livestock production. With most soy being used for livestock and aquaculture feed, there are sustainability benefits that result from U.S. soy through increased production efficiency, Wilson said. “Soy-based feed ingredients provide excellent nutrition,” Wilson said. “Using soy for animal feed increases the efficiency and decreases impact per unit of output from poultry, beef and pork operations.” For USB, defining soybean sustainability accurately is far more than a marketing goal. Wilson says there’s a lot more at stake than most people realize. “In just 20 years, the amount of grain-producing land per person is projected to drop to one-third of

what it was in 1950,” Wilson said. “At most, there is 12 percent more arable land available that is not presently forested or environmentally marginal. Meanwhile, the World Water Council projects that in just 10 years, the need for fresh water will be 17 percent higher than water availability. These are significant problems that threaten the food supply, yet these issues get little media attention amidst all the green chatter that’s going on.” USB’s efforts to address those challenges are the subject of a blog at www.usbthinkingahead.com, along with a Twitter feed and other social media sites. “We’re trying to proactively define and measure our industry in an effort to showcase what we’re already doing as producers,” said Doug Goehring, a soybean farmer from North Dakota. “We’ve made great strides in production agriculture in this country. We have been practicing sustainability, we are sustainable, and we’ll continue to perfect that.” Those improvements are being measured through studies such as a recent report by Field to Market, a multi-stakeholder group comprised of grower organizations, agribusinesses, food companies and conservation organizations, which documented recent improvements in soybean production. The study found: Soybean production increases since 1987 resulted in soybean land use per bushel decreasing by 26 percent. “Without those yield improvements, we would have needed to add land area about the size of Indiana into production to meet the current demand for soybeans,” Wilson said. Energy use decreased 1.34 million BTUs per acre, or 54 percent from 1987 to 2008. In the same period, energy use per bushel decreased by 61 percent due to more sustainable farming practices.

Soybean growers decreased soil loss by more than one ton per acre, or 37 percent over the study period. In 2008, soil loss per bushel was 46 percent less than in 1987, resulting from shifts in production practices including reduced-tillage adoption. Soybean farmers have reduced carbon emissions by 22 pounds per acre or, 24 percent over the study period. Emissions per bushel decreased 35 percent. Since 2000, the soybean industry has reduced overall carbon emissions by an average of 104 million pounds of carbon each year. Water use efficiency per bushel increased by 20 percent between 1987 and 2008. “There is a misconception that farmers aren’t interested in the environment,” said Mike Thede, a USB farmer-leader and soybean farmer from Palmer, Neb. “Farmers grow their product in the environment, so it’s in our best interest to take care of the environment.” Given that agriculture has kept pace with demand in the past, it has always been sustainable, Wilson said, but continual improvements are needed to keep production in step with demand and natural resources: “Soybean producers are working to make sure soybean production remains sustainable, continuing to deliver more food while decreasing impact at the same time.” USB is made up of 68 farmer-directors who oversee the investments of the soybean checkoff on behalf of all U.S. soybean farmers. Checkoff funds are invested in the areas of animal utilization, human utilization, industrial utilization, industry relations, market access and supply. As stipulated in the Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soybean checkoff.

Adams County Fair - July 21-25, Hastings State Farm® Providing Insurance and Financial Services

& Cattle KRABEL Land Company

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43301

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44269


July 8, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 17

Entomology Research Evolution Nurtured By Gary L. Hein Director of UNL Doctor of Plant Health Program Former Extension Entomologist Panhandle Research and Extension Center Entomology was established early in the history of the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, with numerous insect studies occurring during the first 50 years. These efforts encompassed numerous insects, but focused on potato insect pests. Studies were undertaken by entomologists who primarily spent summers or shorter periods working in the Panhandle. Their work had a significant impact on the potato industry, but also impacted other agricultural commodities through the development of cultural and chemical recommendations for managing numerous pests. Full-time entomologist In the late 1950s, the importance of entomology research was recognized and an entomologist became one of the few disciplines to warrant a fulltime position. Art Hagan began at the Panhandle Station in 1957, and his responsibilities at first were predominantly research. However, the demand from clientele for information resulted in his becoming more involved in Extension, and his efforts eventually developed into a split assignment in both research and extension. Hagan provided support for all aspects of entomological expertise. He became the expert on western bean cutworm on corn and dry beans in the 1960s, as this insect became established as an important pest on these two crops in the region. Hagan also made an impact through his work on the identification, feeding and management of grasshoppers, one of the most important insect problems in western Nebraska. He generated information on the management of numerous other insect pests of sugarbeet, dry beans, and other crops. Hagan provided consistent entomological expertise for the Panhandle until 1987, when he moved to North Platte to become survey entomologist. Changing pest issues Through the years insect pest issues in the Panhandle have constantly evolved. The Russian wheat aphid was introduced into Nebraska in 1987, and the rapid occurrence of this devastating pest was an important stimulus for the hiring of the next entomologist in 1988. Gary Hein began as entomologist at the Panhandle Center in 1988 with a 50 percent research and 50 percent extension appointment. Wheat The severity of the Russian wheat aphid in the late 1980s required a rapid response. Research and extension efforts were targeted at establishing threshold, sampling, and control recommendations to manage this serious threat. Later efforts have

also documented the importance of natural enemies in limiting the continued seriousness of this pest. In 1993, serious wheat streak mosaic infections in Cheyenne County brought about efforts to investigate the virus's vector, the wheat curl mite. Extensive research efforts have provided better understanding of the mite's ecology and movement and have resulted in improved recommendations for managing the mite and virus. In addition, efforts to screen resistant varieties have resulted in the release of Mace, a variety with much improved virus resistance. Another new pest of wheat was found in the Panhandle in the mid 1990s. The wheat stem sawfly became a serious issue in fields along the Wyoming border. Investigations into the timing of emergence of the insect led to recommendations for managing this insect. However, this insect slowly continues to spread into additional wheat growing areas in western Nebraska. Dry bean insects Beginning in the mid-1990s, mild winter conditions led to the Mexican bean beetle becoming a more serious pest of dry beans in the North Platte Valley. Research has established an egg mass sampling plan, improved thresholds, and better understanding of the insect's biology and management. Western bean cutworm has been an important pest across the region in both dry beans and corn. Efforts in the 1960s began to uncover important aspects of the biology of the insect. Research through the last 15 years has increased our knowledge and helped to improve the efficiency of management of this insect in both crops. Recent movement of this insect into the central and eastern Corn Belt has increased the importance of this insect and increased the impact of the work done on the western Nebraska pest. Sugar beet insects A serious insect problem in sugar beets was first observed in the North Platte Valley with the introduction of the sugar beet root maggot in the late 1970s. Research efforts in the 1980s and 90s identified the extent of the spread of the maggot and management options. Further understanding of the biology of the maggot has explained the recent reductions of this insect since 2000 due to drought conditions and the potential for the return of the problem with adequate spring rains. Serious infestations of sugar beet root aphid in 1997 brought about extensive effort to establish the value of resistant varieties and develop better aphid screening procedures. The result was an increased emphasis on the use of varieties resistant to the aphid and better management recommendations.

Insect diversity Numerous other insect pests have been studied through the years in an effort to maintain effective and up-to-date recommendations on their management. These efforts have targeted insect pests that affect both commonly grown crops as well as some of the specialty crops being developed and grown in the region. In addition, the Center entomologist deals with the public in identifying and explaining often dramatic occurrences of insect issues in the Panhandle. Many of these insect issues are unique to the region, and they can often be spectacular. Perhaps the most impressive insect invasions that occur in western Nebraska are the cyclical infestations of grasshopper hoards. But one of the more troublesome insect events in the Panhandle is the annual migration of "millers" to the mountains. The migration is often preceded by invasions of crops, gardens and/or buildings by the millers' immature form, the army cutworm. Amazing entomological invasions have occurred from time to time, including the carabid beetle invasion of downtown Sidney, mayflies that descended on Scottsbluff, or the almost regular infestations of houses by a series of nuisance invaders. The often spectacular flights of dispersing winged ants in late summer after a significant rain stirs questions of potential invasions, but more practically, the cleaning of greasy windshields. The diversity of insect occurrences in the panhandle keeps the entomologist's job interesting with no lack of problems to pursue. The torch of entomological research and extension work has recently been passed (January 2010) to Jeff Bradshaw, who became only the third entomologist to work in the Panhandle in the last 50 years. Through the years, the efforts of the entomologist have been supported by numerous technicians and summer students. These individual have contributed greatly to these accomplishments. During the last 22 years, a trio of technicians (Rick Patrick, John Thomas, and Susan Harvey) has combined for over 50 years of service to the entomological efforts in the Panhandle.

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Upcoming Special Sections July 22................................................County Fairs, Rodeo August 5 ..State Fair Preview, Gudmundson, Wheat Results August 19 ..............................Husker Harvest Days, Rodeo September 2 ........Car Care, Farm Safety, Rodeo, Rail Fest

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(308) 236-5024 or Toll Free: 1-800-658-3191 Send your stories to news@agnet.net 44142

44203


Page 18

Heartland Express - Kearney County Fair

Minden Exchange Bank & Trust Co.

MILLER BODY SHOP JEFF MILLER, Owner

July 8, 2010

• Spray On Bedlining • Uni-Cure Spraybake Booth

Community People You Know

PHONE: 308-832-1600 WATTS: 800-652-1006

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(In State)

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44321

PO Box 11 • 73049 L Road Holdrege, NE 68949-0011 308-995-6511 • 800-652-9360 Fax 308-995-5475

PO Box 177 • 1190 33 Road Minden, NE 68959-0177 308-832-2180 • 800-652-1988 Fax 308-832-0356 44376

OLSON IRRIGATION Replacement irrigation gates, gaskets, aluminum fittings and socks and wires. Surge valves, water meters, PVC and aluminum pipe.

Insurance • Investments Argentina • Thailand • United Kingdom • Ukraine • United States

Randy Myers Farm Bureau agent for 6 years

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Weaver Farm Service 308-832-1051

Max 308-233-4308 • Bret 308-233-9309 44343

1997 Walker MCGHS 16 HP 42"

Grasshopper 14HP w/catcher, 44" tilt up deck $2,795

44346

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42693

D.C. Lynch Carnival on the Midway, Mon.Wed., 6 p.m.

The Kearney County Agricultural Society is NOT RESPONSIBLE for Loss, Injury or Accident

Merchant Displays Open at 5 p.m.

TUESDAY, July 13 1 p.m. - 4-H Presentation Contest 8 p.m. - 4-H Talent Showcase SATURDAY, July 17 8-10:00 a.m. - Enter all 4-H Exhibits 9-12:00 noon - Enter Open Class Exhibits SUNDAY, July 18 12:30 p.m. - 4-H

43318

Horse Show 4 p.m. - 4-H Small Animal Quiz Bowl 5 p.m. - Kiddie Tractor Pull 5 p.m. - 4-H Bake Sale 5:30 p.m. - Pig Wrestling

Around the World TUESDAY, July 20 9 a.m.-Noon - 4-H Beef Showmanship 7:00 p.m. - Wild Encounters, Animals Around the World

MONDAY, July 19 6 p.m. - Pee Wee Sheep Showmanship 6:30 p.m. - Wild Encounters, Animals

WEDNESDAY, July 21 9 a.m. - 4-H Dog Show 11 a.m. - Bicycle Rodeo 1 p.m. - Livestock Skill-A-Thon

2 p.m. - Horticulture Contest 6-7:30 p.m. - FREE Barbecue 8 p.m. - Pioneer Farm Family Awards & Open Class Awards 8 p.m. - Gregg Claassen, Ventriloquist THURSDAY, July 22 9 a.m. - Auction of 4-H Market Animals 44211

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New Krause 7400-24W w/24" Blades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call (1) New Hiniker 1740 Flail Shredders, 20' . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call (12) Hiniker Ridge Cleaner Sweeps . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$100 ea. Hiniker Shredders Ar 2000 Flail Shredders 18', 22' & 25' . . . . .Call Krause Rear Frame & Stabilizer Blade, 26' . . . . . . . . . . .$350 8x8, 5x20 Storage Container . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,775 1998 Club Car Electric Golf Cart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,595 Used Strobel 836 Seed Bed Finisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call New & Used Golf Karts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call 1978 GMC ½-Ton Pick-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,700

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July 8, 2010

Page 19

Heartland Express - County Fair

Wheat Scab a Problem in Southern Nebraska Noel Mues, Extension Educator University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension. Furnas County The unusually wet weather has caused scab, or Fusarium head blight, to show up in several southern Nebraska wheat fields, University of Nebraska-Lincoln specialists say. However, it is too late in the growing season for wheat growers to combat the problem this year, said Stephen Wegulo, UNL plant pathologist in the university's Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources. The only way scab can be managed is by planting tolerant cultivars, crop rotation out of cereal grains or grasses, fungicide seed treatments and foliar fungicide applications which should be timed to prevent infection, which occurs mainly during flowering. In addition to lowering yields and grain quality, the scab fungus also can produce mycotoxins, said Michael Carlson, UNL diagnostic toxicologist. "Most likely the fungus will produce deoxynivalenol, or DON, commonly referred to as vomitoxin, and zearalenone, but not fumonisins, other common, but more toxic mycotoxins," Carlson said. Vomitoxin was found to be more prevalent during the wheat scab epidemic of 1982 and zearalenone also was found at a much lower incidence. "Fumonisins have not been found in scabby wheat because the species of Fusarium mold that produces fumonisins is not the same as that which causes wheat scab," Carlson said. "In addition, the weather conditions favorable to wheat scab do not favor fumonisin production and fumonisins are usually found in corn, not wheat." Symptoms of scab, or Fusarium head blight, include premature bleaching of one or more wheat's spikelets or the entire immature head. Bleaching can start anywhere on the head and spread until the entire head is bleached, Wegulo said. Bleached spikelets are sterile and contain shriveled and/or discolored seed. During humid conditions, white or pink fungal growth with

orange spore masses may be seen on the bleached spikelets. Blue-black fruiting structures also can form, giving the head a scabbed appearance, hence the name scab. The disease is caused by several species of the fungus Fusarium and is favored by wet weather during the growing season. The fungus also causes stalk and ear rots in corn and seedling blights in cereal grains. It can survive in soil or corn, wheat and grass stubble. Scab also is more severe in reduced or no-till fields, especially if wheat follows corn. Spores of the scab fungus are carried to wheat heads by air currents. Most infections occur during flowering because anthers and pollen serve as a food source for the fungus. Infected seed can transmit the fungus to emerging seedlings, Wegulo said. "This can cause severe seedling blight under favorable conditions for disease development," he said. "During warm temperatures (between 77 and 86 degrees), blight symptoms on heads appear within three days following infections. Therefore, a crop that appeared healthy a few days ago can suddenly show widespread symptoms." The disease can take over an entire field in severe cases. The disease can result in significant yield loss – potentially 100 percent if grain is rejected because of the toxins the fungus can produce, Wegulo said. Carlson said the presence of zearalenone would be of greater concern than the presence of vomitoxin. Zearalenone acts like estrogen, the female sex hormone, and can affect the reproductive cycle of breeding females, especially pigs. Ruminant animals are not as sensitive as non-ruminants to the effects of zearalenone. Vomitoxin is not very toxic, Carlson said, but it can affect feeder pig performance. "It is associated with feed refusal in pigs," he said. "Feeder steers and heifers are not adversely affected by vomitoxin in the diet." For information about using feed contaminated with zearalenone or vomitoxin and Food and Drug Administration recommendations, consult Crop Watch, UNL's crop production newsletter.

For over 50 years, we have been providing the best crop production programs available. For your chemical, fertilizer, rental equipment and custom applications needs, stop into one of our 8 locations today.

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Source: Crop Watch News Service

Dakota/Thurston County Fair

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Howard County Fair

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Howard County Fair 25, 2010 July 22-2 Thursday, July 22nd

Sunday, July 25th

7:00 p.m. - Team Sorting

8:00 a.m. - Junior Rodeo 7:00 p.m. - Mario Manzini, Escape Artist & Magician

Friday, July 23rd

Wednesday - 21st

Saturday - 24th

7:00 p.m. - Demo Derby

Polka Night with Studio Trio

Figure 8 • Semi-Truck Show & Shine with the Chrome Shop Mafia in attendance • Sweetwater Band

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D.C. Lynch Carnival All 4 Days Howard County Fairgrounds 1 mile North of St. Paul, Nebraska on Hwy. 281 Contact Kevin Jorgensen @ 308-336-3234 for more information.

44357

44239


Page 20

Heartland Express

July 8, 2010

Farm and Ranch’s

HEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Dedicated to the Livestock Industry

Water Requirements for the Cow Herd Dr. Glenn Selk, ProfessorAnimal Reproduction Specialist Animal Science - Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK During hot summer months, the water needed for a cow herd often determines several other management decisions. To best assess the adequacy of water quantities in surface water or from wells or "rural water" supplies, it first is necessary to have an idea of the amount

needed for cattle of different sizes and stages of production that you may have during the summer on the ranch. A University of Georgia publication lists the estimated water requirements for cattle in different production stages if the daily high temperature is 90 degrees F. They suggest that amount of water required can be estimated by the production stage and the weight of the cattle. For instance, a growing animal or a lactating cow needs 2 gallons of water per 100 pounds

of body weight. A non-lactating cow or bull needs just 1 gallon of water per 100 pounds of body weight. If you are estimating water needs for your cattle, be honest about the weight of the cows in the herd. Many cows today weigh 1200 pounds or more (some a lot more). Therefore expect that most spring calving cows will need at least 24 gallons per day for themselves and another 5 to 10 gallons of water for their calf. On days with extreme heat, expect the water usage to go up even further.

NCBA Statement on FDA Draft Guidance on “The Judicious Use of Medically Important Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals” and working with veterinarians to select and use antibiotics carefully when needed. Ranchers work with their veterinarians to provide comprehensive herd-health plans to prevent problems and treat issues when they arise. "NCBA will carefully review this draft guidance and the reports cited as the basis of their reasoning for their framework for policy on this issue. NCBA supports actions based only on sound, peer-reviewed science and risk assessment relative to the use of antibiotics. More clarity is needed in definitions related to many of the concepts in this document, and we look forward to continuing to provide input to FDA. "As FDA officials seek stakeholder input, we encourage them to go out and visit farms and ranches to see firsthand how our producers are utilizing antimicrobials and working with their veterinarians to keep cattle healthy and ensure safe and wholesome beef."

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"Antimicrobial resistance is a multi-faceted and extremely complex issue that cannot be adequately addressed by solely focusing on the use of these medications in animal agriculture. Only by carefully evaluating antimicrobial resistance in a comprehensive manner that evaluates all of the peer-reviewed science related to all animal use, human use and industrial use will we effectively address this important issue. "The industry actively monitors the international science on livestock antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance to ensure our policies and guidelines remain consistent with current knowledge on this complex issue. Ranchers have an obligation to protect cattle health and welfare. We also have an obligation to protect human health by promoting food safety and providing a safe and wholesome beef supply. The prudent and appropriate use of antibiotics

and other modern compounds is an essential tool for beef producers to prevent, control and treat disease in cattle. Preventative medicine is the cornerstone of maintaining a healthy U.S. cattle herd. "The industry’s Beef Quality Assurance program (BQA) has been training cattle ranchers about the safe and appropriate use of antibiotics for more than two decades. Beef ranchers are expected to follow the Producer Guidelines for Judicious Use of Antimicrobials, which have been in place since 1987. The guidelines are based on the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP) and the Academy of Veterinary Consultant’s (AVC) judicious use guidelines and strengthened to include beef producer’s commitment to the importance of human use antimicrobials "Foundations of our Judicious Use Guidelines include preventing problems by appropriate husbandry, nutrition and cattle management;

Call Tim or Eric to advertise in the Heartland Express!

Dr. Elizabeth Parker, Chief Veterinarian

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July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - Market

Page 21

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report

Week Ending: 7/3/2010 MARKET: Ogallala Livestock Auction Market - Ogallala, NE; Tri-State Livestock Auction - McCook, NE Receipts: 1,600 Last Week: 6,750 Last Year: Due to limited receipts there were not enough sales for a good market comparison. Feeder Steers accounted for 50 percent of total receipts, heifers 50 percent. Weights over 600 pounds made up 89 percent of total offerings.

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown experience to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global marFuturesOne President ket analysis, news and advice. and Chief FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located Analyst/Advisor in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des David M. Fiala’s compaMoines and at the Chicago Board of ny, FuturesOne, is a full Trade. You may contact David via email service risk management at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1and futures brokerage 800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to the web at www.futuresone.com. provide useful agricultural marketing Everyone should always understand the advice via daily, weekly, and monthly risk of loss and margin needed when analysis of the domestic and global martrading futures or futures options. kets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricThe information contained herein is ing decisions for ag producers. gathered from sources we believe to be FuturesOne also provides advice and reliable but cannot be guaranteed. management services for speculative Opinions expressed are subject to change accounts. David and his staff at without notice. There is significant risk in FuturesOne draw on decades of markettrading futures. ing, brokerage, farming and ranching

By David M. Fiala

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 7/2/2010 Eastern Nebraska: Compared to last week, reports of confirmed sales sold steady. Many producers have started their second cutting of alfalfa with a few reports of second harvest done. Some reports of grass/prairie hay getting started this week. Some grass hay meadows in the state continue to be soft and wet with some hay being left in the field. Many producers hope that good old Mother Nature keeps the water spigot shut off for another week so, they can get high quality hay in their barns. Ground and delivered hay steady with light to moderate movement. Dehy pellets (17%) sold steady. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Horse hay in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales. Northeast Nebraska: Alfalfa: Premium large squares 140.00-160.00. Good large rounds 80.0085.00 delivered. Ground and Delivered to feedlots 105.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 185.00. Platte Valley of Nebraska: Premium large squares 140.00-160.00. Good small squares 135.00 delivered. Good round bales 70.00-80.00 delivered. Fair round bales 50.00 delivered. Ground and delivered to feedlots mostly 105.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 185.00.

Western Nebraska: Trade and movement slow. Hay prices mostly steady. First cutting production well underway in eastern Wyoming and western Nebraska with some first cutting completed. A lot of hay damage reported due to wet conditions and May and early June. Drier weather this past week helping production. Production in central and western Wyoming along with South Dakota just starting this week. Mustard weed reported to be a problem in some areas. Supplies remain good as it appears there will be some carry over this spring. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Horse hay in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales.

Detailed Quotations

Western Nebraska Alfalfa Mixed Grass Premium 108.0090.00-125.00 Sm. Sqrs. 4.00/bale Wheat Straw Good 75.00-80.00 Fair 65.00-70.00 Utility 50.00-55.00 Ground & Deliv. New Crop 90.00-110.00

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, July 5, 2010 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 12,160; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 6,513 Head; Carcass Wt: 48-99 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 77.4; Wtd avg. Dressing: 49.7; choice or better; 91.% YG 62.9% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 31 . . . .under 55 lbs . . . . . .40.4 . . . . . . .263.21 - 267.80 . . . . . . . .266.91 1,267 . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .59.7 . . . . . . . .224.24 - 246.52 . . . . . . . .237.82 8,519 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .72.4 . . . . . . .220.00 - 253.64 . . . . . . . .250.20 1,730 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .78.9 . . . . . . .230.00 - 260.00 . . . . . . . .249.72 338 . . . .over 85 lbs . . . . . .89.4 . . . . . . .242.00 - 242.00 . . . . . . . .242.00

Lean hog trade has been higher this week due to profit taking by market shorts and spillover support from the stock market. The weekly net changes are $.77 higher on the August contract and October is up $1.22. Cash is still in the mid $70 area versus the August $81 area, so there is cash optimism priced-in. The cutout has been lower this week, but processing margins still remain adequate. Over the last six weeks, weekly sow slaughter has declined by 10% versus this time a year ago. Fewer slaughter sows is likely a sign of increased sows kept for breeding which suggests expanding herds. On the chart, support is down at the June low of $78.20 and resistance is up at $82.20 which is the 20-day. Hedgers call with questions; the above statistic is one that suggests you look to lock in forward margins on the board – and best that you did it prior to this recent grain/feed cost run up.

July 10 7832 7932

Aug 10 7977 8167

July 2010 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .78.800 High . . .79.050 Low . . .78.600 Close . .78.875 Change .+0.100

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1

Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price

Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price

27 . . . . . . .324 . . . . . .324 . . . . . .161.00 . . . . . .161.00 9 . . . . . . . .411 . . . . . . 411 . . . . .150.00 . . . . . .150.00 5 . . . . . . . .506 . . . . . .506 . . . . . .135.00 . . . . . .135.00 15 . . . . .558-568 . . . .564 . . .130.00-131.00 . . .130.60 65 . . . . .615-638 . . . .619 . . .117.00-124.50 . . .122.66 7 . . . . . . . .717 . . . . . .717 . . . . . .117.00 . . . . . .117.00 64 . . . . . . .843 . . . . . .843 . . . . . .111.75 . . . . . .111.75 299 . . . .881-888 . . . .884 . . .112.25-113.50 . . .113.00 166 . . . . . .900 . . . . . .900 . . .109.00-111.75 . . .109.99

22 . . . . .257-296 . . . .289 10 . . . . .386-390 . . . .388 5 . . . . . . . .524 . . . . . .524 53 . . . . .553-585 . . . .569 79 . . . . .608-648 . . . .626 135 . . . .718-744 . . . .739 101 . . . .776-788 . . . .784 169 . . . .802-804 . . . .802 88 . . . . .860-896 . . . .883 56 . . . . . . .949 . . . . . .949

. . .130.00-133.00 . . .132.51 . . .129.00-130.50 . . .129.75 . . . . . .116.50 . . . . . .116.50 . . .118.50-123.00 . . .120.86 . . .114.50-121.50 . . .119.45 . . .107.00-112.50 . . .107.37 . . .105.85-107.75 . . .106.54 . . .104.00-105.85 . . .105.75 . . .100.00-102.50 . . .100.91 . . . . . .97.50 . . . . . . .97.50

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2 Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1-2

10 16 31 13

Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price

. . . . . . .368 . . . . . .368 . . . . . .142.00 . . . . . .142.00 . . . . .750-763 . . . .755 . . .110.00-115.00 . . .113.10 . . . . . . .877 . . . . . .877 . . . . . .106.50 . . . . . .106.50 . . . . . . .986 . . . . . .986 . . . . . .100.00 . . . . . .100.00

9 . . . . . . . .409 . . . . . .409 . . . . . .121.00 . . . . . .121.00 5 . . . . . . . .487 . . . . . .487 . . . . . .121.00 . . . . . .121.00 5 . . . . . . . .668 . . . . . .668 . . . . . .111.00 . . . . . .111.00

Check Us Out On The Web @ www.myfarmandranch.com

5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 7/4/10

Confirmed: 140,408 Week Ago: 158,339

Year Ago: 148,119

Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,850 . . . . . . . .1,280-1,400 . . . . . . . . . . .90.75-92.00 1,354 . . . . . . . . . .91.44 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,864 . . . . . . .1,140-1,430 . . . . . . . . . . .90.00-92.00 1,329 . . . . . . . . . .90.99 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18,776 . . . . . . .1,155-1,433 . . . . . . . . . . .90.00-92.00 1,314 . . . . . . . . . .91.02 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,206 . . . . . . . .1,165-1,300 . . . . . . . . . . .90.25-92.00 1,251 . . . . . . . . . .91.43 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,625 . . . . . . . .1,070-1,300 . . . . . . . . . . .90.00-92.00 1,217 . . . . . . . . . .91.08 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,467 . . . . . . .1,020-1,350 . . . . . . . . . . .88.00-92.00 1,156 . . . . . . . . . .90.85 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 . . . . . . . .1,115-1,210 . . . . . . . . . . .91.00-91.00 1,145 . . . . . . . . . .91.00 ======================================================================================================= Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head Count . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (Paid on Hot Weights) (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,136 . . . . . . . . .756-897 . . . . . . . . . . .145.00-146.00 848 . . . . . . . . . . .145.71 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,784 . . . . . . . . .750-950 . . . . . . . . . . .143.00-147.00 853 . . . . . . . . . . .145.66 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,686 . . . . . . . . .756-950 . . . . . . . . . . .143.00-147.00 865 . . . . . . . . . . .145.36 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head Count . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,126 . . . . . . . . .719-864 . . . . . . . . . . .145.00-146.00 790 . . . . . . . . . . .145.74 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,905 . . . . . . . . .697-950 . . . . . . . . . . .143.00-147.00 762 . . . . . . . . . . .145.68 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,151 . . . . . . . . .690-950 . . . . . . . . . . .141.00-147.00 785 . . . . . . . . . . .144.20 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188 . . . . . . . . . .740-740 . . . . . . . . . . .143.00-143.00 740 . . . . . . . . . . .143.00

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .33,490 . . . . . . .1,323 . . . . . . . .91.04 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .30,427 . . . . . . .1,178 . . . . . . . .90.95 Dressed Del Steer . . .27,606 . . . . . . .856 . . . . . . . .145.58 Dressed Del Heifer . . .13,370 . . . . . . .775 . . . . . . . .145.08

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Year Ago Averages:

Week Ago Averages:

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .39,339 . . . . . . .1,308 . . . . . . . .90.99 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .38,078 . . . . . . .1,184 . . . . . . . .90.98 Dressed Del Steer . . .35,406 . . . . . . .862 . . . . . . . .146.08 Dressed Del Heifer . . .14,926 . . . . . . .788 . . . . . . . .145.77

Cattle

Hogs

Support: Resistance

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1

Live FOB Steer . . . . . .39,691 . . . . . . .1,325 . . . . . . . .82.81 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .27,607 . . . . . . .1,187 . . . . . . . .83.03 Dressed Del Steer . . .34,385 . . . . . . .872 . . . . . . . .131.00 Dressed Del Heifer . . .21,807 . . . . . . .782 . . . . . . . .130.86

Support: Resistance

Aug 10 8930 9147

Aug 10 Feeder 11370 11370

Live cattle trade has been higher this week due to chart buying and spillover support from the stock market. The weekly net changes are 102 higher on the August contract and October is up 95. Light cash trade has been seen at $91 this week which is steady versus the previous week. There is still some cash optimism for the remainder of the week with additional cash trade called steady to $2 higher. Packer margins remain comfortable and the holiday on Monday has packers short bought. Demand does typically decline following the July 4th holiday, which may limit cash upside. Hedgers call with questions.

The cutout values were lower Wednesday with choice down 32 at 155.62 and select down 19 at 146.28. Early estimates are suggesting that the June placements will increase sharply and possibly exceed June 2009 numbers by 15%; this along with the big May placements will limit upside on the August forward futures.

August 2010 Feeder Cattle (CBOT)

August 2010 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open .113.600 High .113.775 Low . .113.050 Close .113.550 Change +0.025

Open . .90.350 High . .90.800 Low . . .90.025 Close . .90.500 Change +0.700


Page 22

Heartland Express - County Fair

July 8, 2010

Less Corn in Ground Nebraska farmers have planted fewer acres of corn, winter wheat and hay for 2010, but more acres of soybeans, dry edible beans, and sunflowers, according to a report issued this morning by the Nebraska field office of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Statistics Service. The summary is based on acres planted as of June 1. The 8.8 million acres of corn are down 4 percent from 2009, with biotechnology varieties still accounting for 91 percent of the acres. Meanwhile, soybean acres increased 13 percent to a record 5.4 million acres. Biotech varieties resistant

to herbicides accounted for 94 percent of the planted acres, down from 96 percent last year. The 2010 acres for other crops include: Winter wheat - 1.52 million acres for harvest, down 5 percent. Sorghum - 145,000 acres, down 38 percent from 2009 and the fewest since 1930. Alfalfa hay - 920,000 acres for harvest, down 3 percent. Other hay - 1.75 million acres, unchanged. Dry edible beans - 160,000 acres, up 23 percent. Oat seedings - 95,000 acres, down 5 percent.

Proso millet - 95,000 acres, unchanged. Sunflowers - 65,000 acres, up 25 percent. Sugar beets - 50,000 acres, down 6 percent. Grain on hand Nebraska grain stocks held in all positions on June 1 were: Corn - 521 million bushels, up 7 percent and the most since 1989. Soybeans - 41.5 million bushels, down 7 percent. Wheat - 36.6 million bushels, more than double last year. Sorghum - 4.9 million bushels, down 32 percent.

Five-year, $5 Million Project Will Offer Incentives to Retire Irrigation By Lori Potter, The Kearney Hub The Lower Republican Natural Resources District has been awarded nearly $1 million in federal funds to invest in water conservation measures, including incentives to retire irrigated acres. U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Friday that 28 projects across the nation, including three in Nebraska, will receive $19.7 million in USDA funds this fiscal year through the Agricultural Water Enhancement Program administered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Fillmore County Fair July 17-21, Geneva

"That's good. That's fantastic," LRNRD General Manager Mike Clements said, explaining that the $999,240 approved for his district is the exact amount requested this year as part of an application for nearly $4 million in AWEP funds over five years. "That probably means we'll get the whole thing." Funds for the next four years likely will be allocated year to year, he added. The LRNRD will provide $1 million in matching funds, boosting the project to $5 million over five years. Clements said the project's three options are for 77,000 acres in the district - Furnas, Harlan and Franklin counties and parts of Webster and Nuckolls counties - that are closest to the Republican River. The options are: - Retire irrigation for five years on up to 4,300 acres. Payments will be based on the irrigation effects on the river, up to $173 per acre per year.

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- Permanently retire irrigation on 2,496 acres with a one-time payment of $1,400 per acre. - Pay half the cost (estimated at about $300 per pivot) to install soil moisture sensors as an irrigation water management tool. "We would like to get started by the end of the month," Clements said, but he's not sure all the details can be in place to take applications by then. The AWEP grants list also includes $2 million for the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources for another incentive program to retire irrigated acres in the Platte Basin. The goal is to reduce water consumption in the critical habitat area, the Central Platte Basin. The third Nebraska project approved was for groundwater conservation and groundwater quality improvements in the York-based Upper Big Blue NRD. That project received $1,012,530. For more information about AWEP and a full list of U.S. projects funded for fiscal year 2010, visit the website at www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/awep.

Pierce County Fair Quality Building Materials

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July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - Pierce County Fair

Rain Not Only Problem for Farmers By Chabella Guzman, The Scottsbluff Star-Herald Weeds, to the untrained eye, may appear to make the landscape and fields green, but they can be a real problem if left unchecked. With the cool wet weather from last year and heavy rainfall so far this year, weeds are posing something of a problem for crops in the Panhandle and in Goshen County, Wyo. Weeds can easily take 30 percent of the yield in a year like this where moisture and cool temperatures dominate the weather, according to Will Eitzman, business development manager-agronomist for Panhandle Coop. "Weeds are growing vigorously and can even take more than 30 percent in crops including in wheat, which is another crop showing a lot of weeds this year," he said. The situation started last fall during harvest season according to Eitzman. The area received a lot of moisture in October and November creating good conditions for winter weeds, like mustard, dandelions and thistle. "Cool temps are causing the crops to struggle with their growth, but is good for the weeds that are outgrowing the crops," he said. In early crops, such as corn and sugar beets, there is plenty of overgrowth with weeds. "The corn and sugar beets are competing with the weeds for nutrients and moisture," Eitzman said. "They are suffering, as they are planted early, but we are beginning to see the beans and sunflowers also coming up with a lot of weeds." Eitzman added that there has been a shift in weeds this year that they haven't seen in a while. Weeds such as mares tail, wild buckwheat and kochia are coming up and it is hard for farmers who just use Roundup to control them. "Farmers should be using a tank mix with other herbicides before planting, to give the crops residual control," he said. Many of the chemicals that have been used for pre-emergence of the crops, and controlling the weeds, have lost some of their effectiveness, as they have been dissipated by the moisture. "Its important to get into the corn before the crops begin to canopy and lay a herbicide along with Roundup to help control the weeds through the summer," Eitzman said. Farmers should also look towards the fall and watch what weeds are coming up so they can be controlled and don't go to seed, to provide a seed bank for next year. Weeds can lie viable in the soil for seven years or longer and when they receive excess moisture the seeds reactivate.

Page 23

Enrollment Open for NE Wheat Stubble Program

Some of the weeds such as mares tail, lambs quarters and kochia are important to watch as some studies show they are becoming more resilient to Roundup. "The weeds are not tolerant to glyphosate, but can be difficult to control with just Roundup," Eitzman said. He suggests that farmers do some crop scouting, and contact their herbicide dealer if necessary. Taking an inventory of the weeds in the fields, and making an early application while they are still in their early stages, is the best course of action. Once the weeds get to two inches or more they are harder to control. "We are definitely at the mercy of Mother Nature with the rash of weed problems this spring," Eitzman said. "But it's not too late to get a good tank mix and control a number of weeds."

Landowners in parts of southwest Nebraska can enroll acres in a new incentive program to enhance pheasant hunting in the area. The Wheat Stubble Management Program is offered in portions of northwest Hitchcock, southeast Hayes and northwest Red Willow counties. Landowners receive payments for tall wheat stubble and pheasant friendly managed wheat stubble, and they receive an additional payment if those acres allow public walk-in hunting access. Each landowner may enroll up to 320 acres for two years. The goals of the program are to increase and improve pheasant habitat and provide additional public hunting access on private land. Landowners can contact T.J. Walker or Justin Haahr at 308-535-8025.

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www.agnet.net Also featuring news and information from: Farm and Ranch’s Equipment & Livestock Handbook, Buying & Selling Guide & Heartland Express.

For more information, contact Central Nebraska Publications at (800) 658-3191

Other Fair Events & Schedules Wednesday July 21st 9:00 am - Noon: Enter 4-H Horticulture Exhibits and any exhibit not interview judged 9:00 am - 7:00 pm: Enter all 4-H Livestock 10:00 am - 7:00 pm: Enter all Open Class Entries 1:00 pm: 4-H Horticulture Judging 3:30 pm: 4-H Dog Show 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm: Weigh 4-H Beef Animals 7:15 pm: Posting of Colors, Pierce American Legion Post #72 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm: Carnival $1.00 Rides 6:00 pm: Youth Team Penning 7:00 pm: Team Penning and Sorting

Thursday July 22nd 7:00 am: 4-H Swine Weigh In & Ultrasound 8:30 am: 4-H Cat Show 11:00 am: 4-H Beef Showmanship Contest, followed by 4-H Breeding Beef Show (Stocker Feeder, Etc) Open Class to follow 1:00 pm: NNPAI Tractor Pull 6:00 pm to 11:00 pm: Carnival Armband 7:00 pm: Nebraska Bush Pullers

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Friday July 23rd 6:30 am - 9:00 am: FREE Pancake Breakfast Sponsored by Farmers' Pride 8:00 am: 4-H Sheep & Goat Show 9:00 am: 4-H Swine Show 8:30 am: 4-H Saddle Horse Judging 1:00 pm: 4-H Market Beef Show 4:00 pm: Open Class FFA Beef

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7:00 pm: 4-H Livestock Sale 7:00 pm: Hall of Fame, Pioneer, & Outstanding Individual awards 8:30 pm: Bull-A-Rama, Last Go-around Calcutta 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm: Carnival Armband

Saturday July 24th 9:00 am: 4-H Dairy Show 9:00 am: 4-H Rabbit & Poultry Show Judging 9:00 am: 4-H Horse Game Activities 11:30 am: 4-H Bucket Calf Judging 1:00 pm: Team Roping 1:00 pm: Allen Eastern Cow Chip Contest 1:30 pm: Kid's Pedal Pull 6:00 pm: 4-H Style Revue in Fair Center 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm: Carnival Armband 8:30pm: Side Step Opens & Follows with Dance 9:00pm: Joe Nichols 8:00 pm to 12:00 am: Carnival Armband

Sunday July 25th 8:45 am: 4-H Inspirational Service 9:00 am: Sand Volleyball Tournament 10:00 am: 4-H Livestock Judging Contest 12:00 Noon Nebraska Garden Tractor Pull 1:00 pm: Ranch Rodeo 3:00 pm: Hypnotists – Mike Prochnow 4:30 pm: All Exhibits Released 5:00 pm -9:00 pm: Carnival Armband 5:30 pm: Demolition Derby 8:15 pm: Retiring the Colors, Pierce American Legion Post #72

44228


Page 24

Heartland Express - County Fair

July 8, 2010

Nebraska State Climatologist: Will July be Wet or Dry? While much of Nebraska received what seemed like an endless stream of storms in June, more rain still is needed in July. Although most soils across the state are soggy and saturated, crops will need some timely precipitation events to offset the risk of stress development during corn pollination, said Al Dutcher, state climatologist in the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. An upper air trough expected to slide across the state this weekend could sink far enough south to bring a return to heavy thunderstorm activity, especially over northern Nebraska; however, mod-

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els switch between keeping the moisture across the Dakotas or shifting it further south across Nebraska and Kansas, Dutcher said. This makes predicting July precipitation difficult. A shift south certainly would create additional concerns as river basins likely will still have above normal flows and soils will not have dried out sufficiently to absorb intense rainfall, he said. "June rainfall reports from volunteer observers were most likely record breaking," he said. "I fully expect that many of these locations will show June 2010 precipitation totals that exceed the records set in June 1993." A broad area of central and eastern Nebraska received 8 inches of moisture, with an area extending from Broken Bow southeast through Omaha receiving 9.5 to 12 inches. A couple of isolated locations reported rainfall over 15 inches. An analysis of June moisture levels through June 23 showed no reporting site with below normal precipitation. Surpluses of 3-5 inches are common over the eastern two-thirds of the state, with the hardest hit areas indicating surpluses of 8-12 inches. Dutcher said what the state needs is normal precipitation once a week. Excess rain will cause

more flooding to already stressed rivers and streams, while dry weather could mean the potential for shallow corn root syndrome. Irrigators should closely monitor their growing corn crop, Dutcher said. "It is not clear how well roots have developed with all of the June moisture that fell on soils that were already near or at field capacity," he said. Poor rooting structure (shallow root syndrome) concerns are being raised in portions of Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. "There have been isolated reports of corn plants falling over because their anchor roots were in saturated soil and hadn't gone deep enough to support the plant," he said. "It is possible that the same conditions may develop in Nebraska, but so far I haven't been aware of any reported instances." If roots have not developed deep into the soil profile, stress likely will occur with a couple of weeks of dry weather. Periodic field scouting should be conducted to monitor plant health so that irrigators can keep ahead of crop water demands, instead of trying to play catch-up during the mid-July through August period. For dryland Continued on page 31

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Phelps County Fair 44215

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Colfax County Fair July 22-25, 2010 • Leigh, NE • It’s All Free! THURSDAY, JULY 22 7 pm - Steps at Tiffany’s 7:30 pm - Lip Sync Contest 7:30 pm - Open 4-D Barrel Race & Pole Bending FRIDAY, JULY 23 7 pm - Bush Pullers Association Tractor Pull 7:30 pm - Ranch Rodeo SATURDAY, JULY 24 8 am - Open Class Horse Show 12 pm - Antique and Out of Field Tractor Pull 3 pm - Semi Truck Show & Shine 5 pm - Pedal Tractor Pull 6 pm - Semi Truck Pull 7 pm - Dennis Svehla Trio 9 pm - Tate Stevens SUNDAY, JULY 25 12:30 pm - Antique Tractor Agility Contest 2:30 pm - Cheer and Drill Team Contest 4:30 pm - Parade 6:30 pm - “Barbra & Frank,” Tribute Artists Direct from Vegas! Antique Tractor & Equipment Show, Friday-Sunday, July 23-25 Visit the Mountain Men Rendezvous Camp! Much more and it’s all FREE! • www.colfaxcountyfair.com 402-892-3520 or 402-487-3383 Fairgrounds 402-487-2254 44373

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Tuesday, July 27 Junior Swine & Goat Shows Lions Screening Bus Bull-Riding

Monday, July 26 4-H Rabbit, Cat & Pet Show Junior Beef & Dairy Show FREE Beef Barbecue

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44344


July 8, 2010

Heartland Express - County Fair

Page 25

CROPS STILL RATED IN GOOD SHAPE Continued from page 1 The weekend rains are timely as the corn pollination starts. According to the weekly crop and weather report, seven percent of the crop has silked, ahead of last year, but equal to the five year average. Al Dutcher, state climatologist in the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, said the crops will need some timely precipitation events to offset the risk of stress development during corn pollination. During June, Dutcher said a broad area of central and eastern Nebraska received eight inches of moisture, with an area extending from Broken Bow southeast through Omaha receiving 9.5 to 12 inches. A couple of isolated locations reported rainfall over 15 inches. Dutcher said what the state needs is normal precipitation once a week. Excess rain, he said, will cause more flooding to already stressed rivers

Saunders County Fair

and streams, while dry weather could mean the potential for shallow corn root syndrome. Irrigators should closely monitor their growing corn crop, Dutcher said. "It is not clear how well roots have developed with all of the June moisture that fell on soils that were already near or at field capacity," he said. Poor rooting structure (shallow root syndrome) concerns are being raised in portions of Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, Dutcher said. The weekly crop report said that corn conditions, statewide, were 83 percent good or excellent for irrigated corn and 84 percent good or excellent for dryland, both near levels a year ago. While the crop report was positive, Dutcher said that aside from the threat of shallow root syndrome, crops generally are not as healthy now as in past years, according to the vegetative health index, which is a satellite image of vegetation. Of particular concern, he said, is much of east-

ern Nebraska, especially near the Platte River Valley system northward to southeast South Dakota and extending to the Platte River system to Lexington to the Loup River Valley to the Ord and Broken Bow areas. "Vegetation in the Sandhills is phenomenal, but areas with extensive flooding are showing yellowing corn," Dutcher said. "That leads to the question, what impact has all this rain had on nitrogen applications?" The weekly crop report said pasture and range conditions were 90 percent good or excellent. Soybean conditions were 74 percent good or excellent with soybean blooming at 17 percent. State wheat conditions 79 percent good or excellent and alfalfa was 83 percent good or excellent with the second cutting of hay at 34 percent complete. Wild hay conditions 89 percent good or excellent.

Jefferson County Fair PHONE 402-446-7233

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July 15-18, 2010 Photography Contest featuring Barns • Horse Events in Area Each Day • Team Driving Contest • Team Sorting • Progressive Team Roping • FREE Open Fun Horse Show • Mechanical Bull Rides • Pam & Sherwin Linton Show • Car Races • Local Talent Show • Strolling Clown, Sean Carlock • Hypnotist, Mike Prochnow • Full Line up of 4-H & FFA Showings, Judging & Events

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Saunders County Fair

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44301

Nemaha County Fair Auburn, NE • July 26-28, 2010

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43987

Salsa Contest, Monday, 7 p.m. Farm Family Awards, Monday “Cori Jo & the Outlaw Junkies,” Grandstand Show, Monday, 8 p.m. Parades, Monday & Tuesday, 6 p.m. Little Tuggers Pedal Tractor Pull, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Hay Stacking Contest, Tuesday, 7 p.m.

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“Sum Guise,” local bluegrass band, Tuesday, 8 p.m. Log Hoggers, Wood Carvers, Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday, 11 a.m., 2 p.m., 4 p.m. & 7 p.m. Log Hoggers Auction, Wednesday, 8 p.m. Thomas D Thomas Shows on the Midway, MondayWednesday - Kids Day Tuesday afternoon

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44361


Page 26

Heartland Express - County Fair

July 8, 2010

Schedule of Events July 14-18 - Grand Island (Hall County) Hall County Fair; Fonner Park, 700 E. Stolley Park Rd. Concerts, rides, 4-H events and more. Corby Flagle (308) 379-1653 www.hallcountyfair.com July 14-18 - Lexington (Dawson County) Dawson County Fair; Fairgrounds, 1000 Plum Creek Pkwy. 8am-midnight. Ann Johnson (308) 324-3600 www.dawsoncountyfair.com July 15-16 - Alliance (Box Butte County) Heritage Days Rodeo; Rodeo grounds. Featuring some of the best rough stock in the business. 7pm, $4-$8 Dave Timmens (308) 487-1553 www.alliance chamber.com July 15-18 - Gering (Scotts Bluff County) Oregon Trail Days. City-wide. Nebraska's oldest continuous celebration featuring parades, entertainment, chili cook-off, international food fair, regional art shows, craft fairs, and a bike race up Scotts Bluff National Monument. Free Chuck Cowan (308) 631-9976 www.oregontraildays.com July 15-18 - Kearney (Buffalo County) Cruise Nite Weekend 2010; City-wide Four days of funfilled activities including show and shines, BBQs, parade, car stereo competition, grudge drag races, collectible car auction and more. Show and shine at the Archway July 16, 5-8pm. Brad Kernick (308) 440-2941 www.cruisenitekearney.com July 16-17 - Doniphan (Hall County) O'Reilly NCRA Late Model Nationals; Mid-Nebraska Speedway, 9551 S. Locust St. Two days of super late model racing with drivers from across the Midwest. Fri, 7:30pm; Sat, 7pm Doug Stange (308) 381-0088 www.midnebraskaspeedway.com July 16-18 - Ainsworth (Brown County) National Country Music Festival and Nebraska Sandhills Day of the Cowboy; City park. Live music, vendors, arts and crafts, food and an Old West parade. Lesley Holmes (402) 3872740 www.ainsworthchamber.com July 16-18 - Dwight (Butler County) Czech Festival; American Legion & Dwight Assumption Church. Polka dancing, road rally, parade, games for all ages and delicious food. Free. John Lavicky (402) 566-2365

July 16-18 - Greeley (Greeley County) Greeley Days Rodeo; 100 S. Claire. Three nights of rodeo, softball games, children's games, parade and street dances. Travis Johnson (308) 750-9222 www.cnbgreeley.com July 17 - Ord (Valley County) No ORDinary Adventure Race; Race begins and ends in Bussell Park Long and short course endurance race includes biking, running, canoeing and hiking as well as other fitness challenges. 7am-6pm, Registration fee for participants Mike Blaha (308) 728-5922 www.ordnebraska.com July 17-18 - Waverly (Lancaster County) Camp Creek Antique Machinery and Threshing Show; 17550 Bluff Rd. Experience the way life used to be. Steam engines, antique tractors, steam crane, summer kitchen and country store. Demonstrations of corn shelling, buttermaking, plowing and more. Daily, 6am-6pm, $6 Heidi Cheney (402) 217-9090 www.ccthreshers.org July 17-22 - Minden (Kearney County) Kearney County Fair; Kearney County Fairgrounds, N. NE Hwy 10. Free. (308) 832-0645 www.mindenne.org July 18 - Grand Island (Hall County) Art in the Park; Stolley Park. Live entertainment, food vendors and artists displaying and selling their work. 9am-5pm, Free. Alan Lienert (308) 3828589 July 18 - York (York County) Model A's on the Farm; Wessels Living History Farm, 1 mi. S. of I80 Exit 353 on Hwy 81. Model A drivers compete in the Model A Road-e-o, music of the 20s and 30s, tours, games and much more. 1-4pm, $2-$5 Dale Clark (402) 710-0682 www.livinghistoryfarm.org July 18-23 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Special Olympics 2010 USA National Games; City-wide. More than 3,000 athletes will be competing in 14 competitive events. Preceded by the world's largest civilian airlift. Free Sarah Leeth (402) 467-0031 www.2010specialolympics.org

July 20-25 - Alliance (Box Butte County) Heritage Days 2010; Box Butte Ave. A fantastic Frazier Shows carnival, vendors, sports tournaments, entertainment, beer gardens, family night, Sunday in the Park, parade and more. (308) 7621520 www.alliancechamber.com July 21-25 - Beatrice (Gage County) Gage County Fair; Fairgrounds, 1115 W. Scott St. Livestock judging, crafts, carnival and big-name entertainment. Roxie Richter (402) 223-3247 www.beatricene.com July 22-25 - Leigh (Colfax County) Colfax County Fair; Fairgrounds Livestock shows, exhibits, live entertainment, tractor pulls, parade and more. Free. Penny Janousek (402) 892-3520 www.colfaxcountyfair.com July 22-Aug 1 - North Platte (Lincoln County) Lincoln County Fair; Fairgrounds, 5015 W. US Hwy 30. A showcase of Lincoln County along with accomplishments in agriculture, 4-H and youth activities. (308) 534-8191 www.linco fair.com July 23-28 - Loup City (Sherman County) Sherman County Fair; Fairgrounds, NE Hwy 92. Exhibits, demolition derby, BBQ and more. (308) 745-1513 www.loupcity.com July 24-25 - Naper (Boyd County) Dakota Indian Powwow; N. of town. Powwow activities, crowning of the princess, softball games and plenty of good food. Free Velda Stahlecker (402) 8325356 July 25-29 - Holdrege (Phelps County) Phelps County Fair; Fairgrounds, 1308 2nd St. Bullriding, mutton busting, demolition derby, carnival and more. Free. Jeff Carlson (308) 995-4724 www.holdrege.org July 26-31 - Burwell (Garfield County) Nebraska's 89th Annual Big Rodeo and Garfield County Frontier Fair; Rodeo grounds, S. NE Hwys 11 & 19. Homemaking and livestock exhibits, agricultural machinery, commercial vendors and more. Big Rodeo features professional rodeo clowns, riders and cowboys. Rodeo July 2931, 7:30pm nightly (308) 346-4200 www.nebraskas bigrodeo.com

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July 8, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 27

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, July 15th. The next Heartland Express will be printed on Thursday, July 22nd. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, simply fill out the form below and mail it to us with a check. This will eliminate any errors and help keep the classified cost to a minimum. 1001 - MOWERS WANTED TO BUY NE - IHC #24 MOWER & PARTS, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE NE - REBUILT KOSCH HAYVESTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - IHC H W/WO MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - KOSCH SIDE MOUNT MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - EMERSON DOUBLE VICON DISC, (308) 544-6421 NE - VICON 3 PT DISC MOWER, (308) 5446421 NE - 10 BOLT SPACERS, 36" ROW FOR JD, (308) 390-0642 NE - REBUILT KOSCH TRAILVESTER MOWERS, 14', WITH WARRANTY, $5,000.00, (308) 544-6421 IA - SICKLE MOWERS 7', $275 TO $775, (712) 299-6608 1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE KS - 1996 NEW HOLLAND 2550, 16 FT HEAD, $26,000.00, (620) 340-3358 KS - NEW HOLLAND 2218 HEAD W/2300 ADAPTER TO FIT 9030 BI-DIRECTIONAL, $9,000.00, (620) 340-3358 OK - NH SWATHER HDR FOR 9030 BI-DIRECTIONAL, 1116 BF, EXCELLENT, $4,500.00, (580) 829-2543 KS - '89 HONEY BEE 36' CANVAS SWATHER. GOOD COND. DUAL 18' UNITS. PTO DRIVEN DUAL HYDRAULIC PUMPS POWER PICKUP REELS, CANVASES & SICKLE DRIVES. GOES FROM ROAD TO FIELD AND BACK AGAIN LESS THAN 2 MINUTES. CURRENTLY MOUNTED ON IH 5488 TRACTOR, HAYS, KS., $12,000.00, (785) 628-8003 www.myfarmandranch.com

1005 - RAKES WANTED TO BUY NE - LH CHANNEL IRON FRAME ON NH56 OVER 56B SIDE RAKE, AND A WHEEL, (308) 587-2344 NE - 12 WHEEL V RAKE, (402) 482-5491 FOR SALE IA - WWW. RAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 3662114 NE - '02 VERMEER R23A TWINRAKE CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - 10 WHEEL V RAKE, (402) 482-5491 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE NE - BALER BELTS AND CHAINS; BEARINGS & FLANGES, (308) 587-2344 NE - BELTS FOR MOST BALERS & SWATHERS, (308) 587-2344 AL - ROUND BALER BELTING: LRGST DEALER IN US. ORIGINAL BELTING FOR ALL ROUND BALERS INCLUDING NEW JD IN STOCK! SAVE HUNDRED$! FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE! NO 800#, JUST BEST PRICES. SINCE 1973. HAMMOND EQUIP. MC/VISA/DISC/AMEX OR COD, BALERBELTS.COM, (334) 627-3348 TX - BALER BELTS- ALL BRANDS. MADE IN THE U. S. A. ! JD WITH GENUINE JD PLATE FASTENERS. FREE SHIPPING ON SETS. WWW. BALERBELTSANDHAYBEDS. COM, (800) 223-1312 NE - USED BELTS FOR VERMEER 605XL BALER CELL 308-962- 6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - JD 530 BALER, (308) 882-4588 NE - VERMEER 605K BALER, GOOD CONDITION, '07 NHBR780A; 2003 BR780 ALSO GOOD CONDITION, (402) 433-5016 OK - VERMEER 605L, 4591 BALES, TWINE & NET, EXCELLENT, $8,000.00, (580) 8292543

1006 - BALERS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - VERMEER 2008 605M RAMP, NET, FLOATS, LIGHTS, MOISTURE SENSOR, FIRE EXTINGUISHER. APPROX. 4200 BALES ON MONITOR. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $26,950.00, (402) 433-5016 NE - NH 858 ROUND BALER FOR PARTS, (402) 482-5491 1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - NEW EMERSON BALE MOVER-FEEDERS, (308) 544-6421 KS - E-Z HAUL INLINE SELF DUMPING HAY TRAILER, 32' 6 BALE, GOOSENECK, BUMPER HITCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 KS - HAY ELEVATORS, 2 ON WHEELS, 36' & 32'; 1 24' FLAT WITH 24' EXTENSION. ALL FOR SMALL SQ BALES. EXCELLENT., (785) 255-4579 1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS WANTED TO BUY IA - HESSTON 60-B STACKER, SHEDDED, IN EXCELLENT CONDITION, (319) 480-1673 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 NE - NEW FARMHAND CHAIN & SPROCKETS, (308) 467-2335 NE - EMERSON 13X24 STACK MOVER, ELECTRONIC SCALES, W/ OR WITHOUT HYDRAFORK, (308) 544-6421

Classified Advertisement Order Category of your Ad (from above):

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_____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ __________________________________________________________________________________________$6.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________________$6.40_____________$6.80 ____________$7.20 _____________$7.60 ____________$8.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ________$8.40 ________$8.80 ________$9.20 ________$9.60 _______$10.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ $10.40____________$10.80 ___________$11.20 ____________$11.60 ___________$12.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ _______$12.40 _______$12.80 _______$13.20 _______$13.60 _______$14.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ _______$14.40 _______$14.80 _______$15.20 _______$15.60 _______$16.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________

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_______$16.40

_______$16.80

_______$17.20

_______$17.60

Number of Issues to Run Advertisement

_____________

Price per Issue (From Above, $6.00 Minimum)

$____________

TOTAL AMOUNT DUE

============ $____________

_______$18.00

Complete this form and mail with payment to: Farm and Ranch • PO Box 415 • Kearney, NE 68848 A $2.50 billing charge will be added if payment is not enclosed. Complete the following Information (Please Print):

Name:_________________________________Phone: ________________________ Address: _____________________________________________________________ City, State, & Zip: ______________________________________________________

1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - JD 200 STACKMAKER, $900.00, (308) 876-2515 IA - HESSTON 30-A STACKER, 2-30 MOVER, SHEDDED, WELL MAINTAINED, EXCELLENT CONDITION, (319) 480-1673 1010 - FORAGE HARVESTORS WANTED TO BUY KS - JOHN DEERE CHOPPERS & HEADS, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, KS, (785) 336-6103 FOR SALE NE - KNIFE BAR & RECUT SCREEN FOR JD 35, (308) 995-5515 NE - RECUT SCREEN & AXLE EXTENSION FOR IHC 730, (308) 995-5515 1013 - DUMP WAGON WANTED TO BUY KS - JD SILAGE WAGONS & HIGH DUMPS, ROEDER IMPLEMENT, (785) 336-6103 1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY KS - NH SELF PROPELLED & PULL-TYPE, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, (785) 336-6103 ID - NEW HOLLAND 2 & 3-WIDE, SELF-PROPELLED, PULL-TYPE MODELS. JIM,, (208) 880-2889 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND'S-ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/ TRADE. WWW. BALEWAGON. COM, (208) 880-2889 NE - NH 1044, 119 BALES, GOOD, $3,500.00, (402) 545-2255 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE WANTED TO BUY NE - HAYBUSTER GEAR BOX FOR 1600 STACKER, BEDROLLERS, PUSH OFF ASSEMBLY, A FEW OTHER PARTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - HAY PROBE FOR TESTING, (308) 5872344 IA - JD HAYLOADER, (712) 299-6608 IA - ROTARY CUTTERS, 5', 6'& 7', $375 TO $1475, (712) 299-6608 1101 - TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - MF 35, 50, 65, 135, 235, 245, OR 255 TRACTOR, (402) 678-2277 NE - BUYING TRACTORS FOR SALVAGE MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (800) 5824303 MO - AC D17'S & UP, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - IH 560 TO 1566, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - LINDSAY BRO WAGON, NEED PARTS: 6 BOLT HUB #Q563, (816) 378-2015 NE - LATE MODEL JD 4020, ANY CONDITION., (402) 369-0212 NE - FRONT WEIGHTS FOR JD 8000 OR 60 SERIES, (402) 726-2488 NE - CASE IH OR STEIGER 9240 OR 9260 RIGID FRAME 4 WHEEL DRIVE, (402) 3723009 FOR SALE IA - JD B'S 1937 TO 1950, (712) 299-6608 IA - IH NICE SUPER C W/LOADER, (712) 2996608 NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885 NE - NEW, USED AND REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (800) 582-4303 IA - IH, NICE SUPER C W/WF, 2PT, (712) 2996608 IA - OLIVER SUPER 88D, WF, PS, (712) 2996608 IA - OLIVER SUPER 77G, WF PS, (712) 2996608 IA - IH 300U, W/HYD BUCKET, $4,500.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - JD A, 1935, (712) 299-6608 NE - 8 HOLE 15" TRACTOR FRONT WHEELS, FITS IHC, (308) 587-2344

1101 - TRACTORS FOR SALE - CONT’D IA - AC WC ROAD PATROL, 12' BLADE, (712) 299-6608 NE - JD 4020 W/ NEW TIRES, NEW DIESEL INJECTOR PUMP, (308) 478-5451 IA - AC WD45, WF, PS, LOADER, (712) 2996608 IA - IH-B WITH WOODS 60"PT, $2,550.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - AC-WC 1938 ELECTRIC START, $1,850.00, (712) 299-6608 NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, (308) 436-4369 IA - SUP A, H, M, MTA, 350, 460, 560 TRACTORS, (712) 299-6608 NE - 2 JD DR WH & LIFT ASSIT 7300, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 IA - C-AC W/BELLY MOWERS, $1850 TO $2850, (712) 299-6608 KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS BELLY MOWER, $3,500.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - 1971 JD DIESEL 4020, SYNCHRO SHIFT, DUAL SIDE CONSOLE HYD. , WF, 3PT, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (402) 369-0212 NE - 4430 POWERSHIFT, NEW 18. 4-38 DUAL TIRES, 3 HYD, W/11' JOHN DEERE BLADE, (308) 348-2234 KS - '84 IH 5488, 190 HP, 5378 HRS, EXC. COND. NEAR NEW GY 18. 4-38 DUAL TIRES, HEAVY DUTY FRONT AXLE, NEAR NEW GY FRONT TIRES, 3 PT. HITCH, TRIPLE HYD. YOU WILL LIKE IT. HAYS, KS., $26,000.00, (785) 628-8003 SD - 1968 930 CASE CK $2800. PTO, 3 PT, 600 HRS OVER- HAUL. POWER STEERING PUMP BAD, LOCATED WINNER, SD, (605) 431-8179 NE - IHC 504, 3 PT, (308) 544-6421 1102 - LOADERS FOR SALE IA - SEVERAL LOADERS OFF JD 3010-4020, (712) 299-6608 NE - 640 CLASSIC JD SELF LOADING LOADER WILL FIT 6400 JD TRACTOR, ALSO FITS 3020, 4020, 4450. WILL FIT ANY TRACTOR THAT HAS 20" FRAME, 6'BUCKET & 4 TINE GRAPPLE FORK & MOUNTINGS; LIKE NEW, $7,500.00, (308) 390-0642 NE - HEAVY DUTY BALE SPEAR FOR F11 LOADER, $600.00, (308) 348-2065 NE - DUAL LOADER MOUNTS TO FIT JD 4520 OR 4620. CUSTOM BUILT, VERY HEAVYM VERY NEAT, WITH CUSTOM GRILL GUARD BUILT IN. DUAL LOADER 325 OR 345, (402) 482-5491 NE - 75B MICHIGAN 3 CYL FRONT END LOADER, 50% RUBBER, SERVICE RECORDS AVAILABLE. $10,000 OVERLAND SAND AND GRAVEL CO. CALL BRYCE @, (402) 7642371 1103 - LOADER ATTACHMENTS WANTED TO BUY NE - DIRT OR MANURE BUCKET HEAD FOR F10 LOADER, NEEDS TO HAVE ORANGE FRAMEWORK W/GRAPPLE, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE IA - 3 PT 90" GNUSE BUCKET, $1,250.00, (712) 299-6608 1104 - CHISELS WANTED TO BUY NE - 20' CHISEL, (402) 726-2488 1105 - DISKS WANTED TO BUY NE - 25' OR SMALLER DISK, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE NE - DISK BLADES AND BEARINGS, (308) 587-2344 IA - 3 PT OR PULL TANDEM DISKS, 6'-18', (712) 299-6608 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE KS - FLEX KING 4X5' SWEEP PLOW, GOOD CONDITION, $1,250.00, (620) 865-2541 IA - OLIVER PLOWS, 2 & 3 BOTTOM, PULL/3PT, (712) 299-6608 IA - 25 PLOWS, 2, 3 & 4 BOTTOM, 2/3PT, (712) 299-6608 NE - NEW FLEX KING PICKER WHEELS, (308) 995-5515


Page 28 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - CASE 308, 4-18'S WITH CONCAVE CUSHION COULTERS, LIKE NEW, $1,100.00, (308) 874-4562 1109 - PLANTERS WANTED TO BUY NE - LIFT ASSIST WHEELS FOR A JD 7300 12RN, (402) 545-2255 NE - JD 7000 CORN PLANTER ROW UNITS, (402) 372-3009 IA - JD OR DB 16-36W PLANTER, EXCELLENT CONDITION & SHARP, (319) 480-1673 FOR SALE NE - NEW #92 IHC COVERING DISK ASSEMBLY, (308) 995-5515 NE - LIFT ASSIST AND/OR TRANSPORT KIT FOR IHC LISTER/ PLANTER, ALSO GAUGE STRIPE WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 IA - NEW & USED KINZES, SORENSEN EQUIPMENT, HARLAN, IA, (712) 755-2455 KS - INSECTICIDE BOXES FOR JD 7200, 16 ROWS, $900 OBO. DISK FURROWERS, $1600., (620) 865-2541 NE - IHC SEED DRUMS, (308) 995-5515 NE - MOORE BUILT 16 ROW PLANTER MARKERS, $2,750.00, (308) 485-4486 1111 - DRILLS WANTED TO BUY NE - TYE DRILL FOR PARTS, (402) 482-5491 FOR SALE NE - !! ROUND CAPS !! THE ULTIMATE GRAIN DRILL PRESS WHEEL CAP! COVERS COMPLETE FACE OF WHEEL. CONVERTS V FACED WHEELS TO ROUND FACE FOR BETTER FLOTATION & DEPTH CONTROL. PERFECT FIT! EASY TO INSTALL! DON YUNG DISTRIBUTING, KIMBALL, NE., (308) 2352718 NE - JD 520 SOYBEAN DRILL, 10X18 DOUBLE DISK W/DEPTH BANDS, V PRESS WHEELS. LIKE NEW., (308) 894-6743 NE - KRAUSE 3PT DRILL, MODEL 5215, DOUBLE DISC, (402) 683-5395 KS - 30" HOE AIR SEEDER DRILL $3500. 40' DISC AIR SEEDER DRILL, $19,500, (785) 871-0711 NE - 150 & 7100 DRILLS, FERT. BOXES, BLACK HEAVY DUTY WHEELS, DBL HITCH, TRANSPORTS & PARTS, (308) 995-5515 1112 - ROTARY HOE FOR SALE NE - 30 FOOT JD ROTARY HOE CALL FOR DETAILS, (308) 882-4588 1113 - CULTIVATORS FOR SALE SD - 3-PT 8R FLAT FOLD, $1,500.00, (605) 386-2131 NE - IHC GO-DIG PARTS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 4 ROW ORTHMAN TOOL BAR, CAN BE USED TO CULTIVATE OR RIDGE, (308) 3900642 NE - HAWKINS 12 ROW HILLER (DITCHER), (308) 882-4588 NE - 12 ROW CULTIVATOR, (308) 882-4588 1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE KS - 1600 GAL. FLOATER. 3000 WET BOOM SPRAYER, $6,500.00, (785) 871-0711 NE - 2-200 GALLON SADDLE TANKS, FITS 4450, (308) 478-5451 NE - 1984 MERTZ 3250 FLOATER, 1600 GAL TANK, (402) 683-5395 NE - IHC TRUCK FLOATER W/8 TON DRY BOX, (402) 683-5395 KS - JD 600 HI-CYCLE W/40' WICK BOOM. REBUILT MOTOR, $2,500.00, (620) 8652541 NE - JD 25A, 3 PT. HITCH, 150 GAL, 20" BOOM, (308) 587-2344 1115 - MULCHERS/SHREDDERS FOR SALE NE - 20' BESLER STALK CHOPPER, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1116 - BUSH HOGS FOR SALE IA - 7' 3PT, BUSH HOG CUTTERS; $1,050 TO $2,250, (712) 299-6608 1117 - FIELD CULTIVATORS WANTED TO BUY NE - MULCH FINISHER NO LARGER THAN 25 FOOT, (402) 726-2488 1119 - ROD WEEDER FOR SALE KS - 45' OF MILLER ROD WEEDER USED PARTS, DRIVES, TEETH, RODS, ETC. ALL FOR $500, (620) 865-2541 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - CDS SQUEEZE & INJ PUMP, 24 ROW, $600.00, (402) 726-2488

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Heartland Express 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - ANHY. TRAILER CHASSIS, (402) 7262488 1125 - AG CHEMICALS FOR SALE NE - GLYPHOSATE PLUS $9.00, GENERIC GRAZON $24, 24D LV6 $18 QUALITY AG SALES, LINCOLN, CALL 877-985- 6100 OR, (402) 466-6100 1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - MULCH FINISHER NO LARGER THAN 25 FOOT, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE NE - FRONT WEIGHTS FOR CASE IH MAGNUM, (308) 995-5515 NE - HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS, HOSES & PTO PUMPS, (308) 587-2344 IA - TRACTOR CHAINS 28" TO 38", (712) 299-6608 IA - 3 PT CARRIERS, $175 TO $575, (712) 299-6608 TX - NEW & USED FARM EQUIPMENT, SALVAGE YARD FOR TRACTORS & FARM EQUIPMENT. KADDATZ AUCTIONEERING & FARM EQUIPMENT SALES KADDATZEQUIPMENT. COM, (254) 582-3000 MO - PAIR OF 18. 4-38 BF GOODRICH TIRES WITH 90% TREAD (LIKE NEW), WILL FIT JD 7000 SERIES, MOUNTED ON SOME JD RIMS, ALSO FOR SALE. CALL SCOTT @ 816304- 0371 OR JOHN @, (816) 262-2607 1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 413 CHRYSLER FOR SALVAGE, (308) 995-5515 NE - OIL COOLER FOR 354 PERKINS, (308) 467-2335 NE - USED VEE BELTS: 3-IHC C176" $15 EA; 4 GATES C240" $20 EA; 3 DAYCO C240" $15 EA; 4 DAYCO C270" $15 EA 1 DAYCO C116 $10 EA; 1 DAYCO 94" X 1 1/4" WIDE $10, (402) 564-5064 NE - USED 460 CU IN ENGINE WITH NEW HIGH PRESSURE BERKELEY PUMP, (800) 554-8715 1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE NE - 10" WLR BOWLS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 5 NEW PTO PUMPS IN STOCK, (800) 284-7066 NE - 3X4 BERKELEY PUMPS, PRIMING VALVES AVAILABLE, (402) 364-2592 NE - USED MANURE PUMP, BETTER BUILT, (800) 554-8715 NE - USED BERKELEY PTO PUMPS & SUCTION EQUIPMENT, (800) 554-8715 NE - 8 USED BERKELEY PTO PUMPS IN STOCK, (800) 284-7066 NE - BERKELEY FLOATER PUMP, (800) 2847066 1203 - PIPE FOR SALE NE - 8" TEXFLO 20" GATES, ALL KINDS OF FITTINGS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6" BAND & LATCH MAIN LINE, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6" PLAIN PIPE, ALUM AND PLASTIC, (308) 946-3396 NE - 10" X 20" PVC, (308) 946-3396 NE - USED 6" AND 10" PVC, CALL FOR LENGTHS, (308) 946-3396 NE - 6" ALUM MAIN LINE PIPE, HOOK & BAND, (308) 946-3396 NE - 6" X 20" GATED ALUMINUM, (308) 9463396 NE - 8" X 20" ALUMINUM GATED, (308) 9463396 NE - 10" X 20" ALUMINUM GATED PIPE, (308) 946-3396 NE - 8"X 30' PLAIN ALUMINUM PIPE, (308) 946-3396 NE - USED 8"X20" PVC PIPE, (308) 9463396 NE - 60 LINKS OF GATED, 20" X 30', (308) 478-5451 NE - 8" MAIN LINE HASTINGS, (308) 9955515 NE - 9" MAIN LINE RING LOCK, (308) 9955515 NE - 9" MAIN LINE HIGH PRESS, (308) 9955515 NE - 5000' 6" HP RINGLOCK PIPE, (800) 284-7066 NE - 10" & 8" IRRIGATION PIPE, (402) 7262488 1205 - GENERATOR WANTED TO BUY NE - USED WINPOWER PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 FOR SALE NE - WINPOWER - NEW & USED PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 IA - WINCO PTO GENERATORS, CALL US FOR PRICE BEFORE YOU BUY! HARVEY AT EDEN SUPPLY 8AM - 10PM., (515) 679-4081 1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE NE - 150 HP GEARHEAD, 6 RATIO, (308) 995-5515

1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - AMARILLO GEARHEADS: 110HP 4:3 $700, 80 HP 6:5 $700, 70 HP 4:5 $650, 50 HP 1:1 $700, 50 HP 4:5 $600, (402) 5645064 NE - GEAR DRIVE REPAIR- AMARILLO WARRANTY CENTER. REPAIR ALL MAKES/MODELS. 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES. CENTRAL IRRIGATION, (402) 723-5824 NE - US MOTORS GEARHEADS 90HP 4:3 $450, 70HP 2:3 $400, 30HP 4:3 $300, (402) 564-5064 NE - DERAN/RANDOLPH GEARHEAD 100HP 4:3 $500, PEERLESS GEARHEAD 2:3 $300, (402) 564-5064 1207 - PIVOTS FOR SALE NE - 1998 4 TOWER T-L PIVOT, (308) 9463396 NE - 10 TOWER REINKE PIVOT, (800) 2847066 1208 - TRAVELER SYSTEMS FOR SALE NE - NEW OCMIS HH: 4" X 1312', (800) 2847066 NE - NEW GREENFIELDS, 6 NEW CADMAN HARD HOSE, 5 USED HARD HOSE TRAVELERS, 9 USED SOFT HOSE, (800) 284-7066 NE - HEINZMAN TRAVELER WITH HOSE, (308) 390-0642 NE - IRRECO SIDE ROLL 5" 1200' STANDING FOB, OLDER MODEL $1200. LEAVE MESSAGE ON MACHINE, (308) 278-2728 1209 - PUMPS WITH MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 3/4 BERKELEY PUMPS WITH PRIMING VALVES, ATTACHED TO YOUR CHOICE OF INDUSTRIAL 300 FORD OR 262 ALLIS W/RADIATORS, AND CARTS, (402) 3642592 1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. WANTED TO BUY NE - "MULE", WHICH IS A SMALL, SLOW, GASOLINE POWERED VEHICLE USED TO CARRY GEAR BOXES, TOOLS, PIVOT REPAIRS DOWN BETWEEN SUNFLWOER & CORN CROP., (308) 436-4369 FOR SALE WI - SERVING THE MIDWEST WITH COMPLETE IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. CONTACT ROBERTS IRRIGATION COMPANY AT 1500 POST ROAD, PLOVER, WI 54467, (800) 434-5224 NE - 8" SURGE VALVE, (308) 946-3396 NE - ORTHMAN 3-PT PIVOT TRACK CLOSER, EXCELLENT COND, (308) 390-0642 NE - PIVOTS, HARD & SOFT HOSE TRAVELERS, PUMPS, WHEEL ROLLS, FITTINGS, PVC UNDERGROUND FITTINGS, NEW AND USED, "YOUR COMPLETE IRRIGATION HEADQUARTERS" NORTHERN AGRI-SERVICES INC, HENDERSON, NEBRASKA 68371, (402) 723-4501, (800) 554-8715 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE OK - REBUILT COMBINE SIEVES. NEW REEL BATS, GALVANIZED AND BLACK, (580) 3612265 OK - '86 C-IH 1660, 25' 1010 HEADER, $19,000.00, (580) 361-2265 KS - LARGE BISH BIN EXT OFF 9610 W/HYD. PUSH UP AUGER. $750 OBO, (620) 8652541 KS - NH TR98, 1905 SEP HRS, 30' 973 FLEX HEAD, $72,000.00, (620) 340-3358 OK - '82 GLEANER N6, 24' HEADER, $8,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - C-IH 1480, 810 24' HEAD, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - TR85 NEW HOLLAND, 3208 CAT, 24' HEADER, $5,000.00, (580) 361-2265 CO - 22'AIR REEL AND ACCESSORIES. RECENTLY TAKEN OFF JD 105 COMBINE. $450 OBO. PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER., (719) 643-5267 NE - JD, 1981 7720, 4300 HRS, JD DEALER SERVICED YEARLY, $9,500.00, (402) 5452255 OK - SEED CLEANER, CLIPPER, 92DB TRAVELER ON TRAILER, GOOD CONDITION, LOTS OF SCREENS, (580) 829-2543 KS - SALVAGING SEVERAL 6620, 7720 & 8820 JD COMBINES. LOTS OF GOODPARTS AT DISCOUNT PRICES. CALL 785-564 0511 OR, (785) 382-6848 1302 - COMBINE HEADS WANTED TO BUY MO - GLEANOR 318 OR 320 L OR M BEAN HEAD (816) 378-2015 NE - JD ROW CROP HEAD 8R 30", (402) 3723009 FOR SALE SD - WE REBUILD COMBINE & WINDROWER HEADER AUGERS TO LIKE NEW CONDITION. PONCELET'S WELDING, RAMONA, SD. (605) 480-4860 OR, (605) 482-8405 OK - MACDON 960 25' DRAPER W/IHC ADAPTER & PICK UP REEL, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265

July 8, 2010 1302 - COMBINE HEADS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - JD 925 FLEX HEAD, SEE THRU REEL, GOOD, $4,500.00, (402) 545-2255 NE - JD, 643 CORN HEAD, OIL DRIVE, $4,950.00, (402) 545-2255 1303 - CORN PICKERS FOR SALE IA - NI 311 CORNPICKER 2 R WIDE, $950.00, (712) 299-6608 1305 - WAGONS/GRAVITY WAGONS FOR SALE IA - FLARE, BARGE & GRAVITY WAGONS $150 TO $1850, (712) 299-6608 IA - WAGON GEARS, STEEL, WOOD OR RUBBER TIRES, (712) 299-6608 1306 - GRAIN CARTS FOR SALE IA - BRENT 1194 AVALANCHE GRAIN CART, '07, 1100BU. , 900-60-32 TIRES, TARP & SCALE, EXC., $48,000.00, (319) 631-1282 1307 - GRAIN DRYERS FOR SALE NE - 1995 MC 1175, 1992 MC 1175, 1995 MC 970, 1989 MC 973, MC 975, MC 675, 3 FARM FANS, M&W 650, (800) 284-7066 NE - USED 2009 BROCK SQ20D, USED '05 SUPERB SE1000C, USED '05 SUPERB SE750C, 3 NEW BROCK DRYERS., (800) 284-7066 NE - USED FARM FANS 4" AIR SYSTEM, (800) 284-7066 1310 - AUGERS FOR SALE NE - SPEED KING 52' 8" WITH ELECTRIC MOTOR, (308) 478-5451 NE - MAYRATH 55' GRAIN AUGER, 8" W/ ELECETIR MOTOR, (308) 478-5451 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE NE - 8" AERATION TUBING AND AERATION FANS, (308) 995-5515 NE - BULK HEAD FOR 51' CURVET, (308) 995-5515 NE - SINGLE PHASE MOTORS, (308) 9955515 NE - BROCK BINS & GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, EPS & BEHLEN BLDG SYSTEMS, BUCKLEY STEEL, AINSWORTH, NE, (402) 387-0347

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1315 - COMBINE TRAILERS FOR SALE SK - COMBINE TRAILERS: TRAILTECH OR JANTZ, SINGLE & DOUBLE. HYDRAULIC FOLD HEAD TRANSPORTS. FLAMAN SALES, BOX 280, SOUTHEY, SK, CANADA S0G 4P0, ASK FOR AL. EVES 306-949-8458. DAYS, (306) 726-4403 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - CHICAGO FANS, (308) 995-5515 FOR SALE NE - 8" AERATION TUBES, FANS, TUNNELS FOR CONCRETE FLOORS, (308) 995-5515 NE - GSI GRAIN BINS, GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, ALL KINDS, GSI FANS & HEATERS, PORTABLE GRAIN DRYERS, (800) 554-8715 NE - NEW & RECONDITIONED KONGSKILDE AIR GRAIN VAC EQUIPMENT, (800) 554-8715 IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LEASE OR LOAN AT 7. 1%. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487 NE - NEW ORTHMAN DRY BEAN CUTTERS, (308) 995-5515 NE - DMC MODEL 44 GRAIN CLEANER, (800) 284-7066 IL - ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A MOISTURE TESTER THAT WILL GIVE YOU FAST & ACCURATE RESULTS? THEN CALL US NOW & ASK ABOUT OUR MODEL 920 & 930. SHORE SALES. MOISTURETESTERS. COM, (800) 837-0863 KS - ROTARY GRAIN CLEANER, GOOD CONDITION, $300.00, (785) 221-8173 1401 - 3 POINT BLADES FOR SALE IA - 2 OR 3 PT BLADES 6', 7', 8' OR 9' AC, IH, JD & OTHERS, (712) 299-6608 1404 - SNOW BLOWER/PLOWS FOR SALE IA - 3 PT SNOWBLOWERS, $1550 TO $2850, (712) 299-6608 NE - V-SNOW PLOW ORIGINALLY FOR COUNTY MAINTAINER, COULD ADAPT TO FIT LOADER TRACTOR OR WHATEVER, $375.00, (308) 894-6965

1406 - LAWN MOWERS FOR SALE NE - HIS & HERS MOWERS, MADE BY DEINES CORP, BOTH HAVE 48" FRONT DECKS, 1 W/BAGGER, 1 W/DUMP BOX, BOTH W/BRAND NEW 14 HP TECUMSEH ENGINES, HEAVY DUTY MOWERS, EXCELLENT. ALSO LOTS OF SPARE PARTS, (308) 390-0642 NE - WORKHORSE LAWN TRACTOR W/SIDE PULL TYPE MOWER W/ BRIGGS & STRATTON ENGINE, WILL MOW TALL GRASS, PRACTICALLY NEW. REEL TYPE MOWER FOR SHORT GRASS, 10' WIDE SWATH. CAN BE PULLED BEHIND 4 WHEELER OR WORKHORSE TRACTOR, (308) 390-0642 1407 - ELECTRIC MOTORS FOR SALE NE - COMPLETE LINE OF SHEAVES, BEARINGS, DRIVES, & MOTORS, (402) 387-0347 1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY WI - USED BULK MILK TANKS, ALL SIZES, (800) 558-0112 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC WANTED TO BUY NE - 110V WELDING ROD DRYING OVEN, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - METAL BENCH LATHE 3 JAW CHUCK, 5 1/2" SWING, $200.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - BRAKE DRUM/ROTOR TURNING LATHE, $110.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - ARMITURE TURNING LATHE, $70.00, (785) 778-2962 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - ELSTON GOPHER MACHINE, (308) 5872344 IA - WWW. WHEELRAKE. COM, (712) 3662114 IA - AGE CATCHING UP WITH YOUR NEED TO CLIMB? WE CAN HELP WITH A HAND OPERATED SINGLE PERSON ELEVATOR 140' MAXIMUM CALL, (800) 462-3460 KS - ORTHMAN & BUCKEYE FRONT 3 PT HITCHES, $1500 EACH., (620) 865-2541 NE - AMERICAN LIFT FOR PICKUP NICE! ALSO TRACTOR CHAINS, NEW 15X5X38, (402) 750-3548 1500 - GROUND HAY FOR SALE KS - GROUND HAY AVAILABLE YEAR ROUND, DELIVERY AVAILABLE, (785) 389-5111 1501 - ALFALFA HAY WANTED TO BUY KS - GRINDING ALFALFA WANTED, (785) 389-5111 IA - QUALITY SML OR LG SQ ALFALFA OR MIXED IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - ALFALFA, 4X4X8 BALES, DAIRY QUALITY, SHEDDED & TARPED, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - 1ST, 2ND, & 3RD CUTTING OF ALFALFA HAY, (308) 882-4588 NE - GRINDING QUALITY ALFALFA IN LG RD BALES, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-9626399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - HORSE QUALITY IN SM SQ BALES, SHEDDED & TARPED HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - CUSTOM GRINDING, GROUND HAY DELIVERIES, HAZARD, NE., (308) 452-4400 NE - HIGH QUALITY BIG ROUND & BIG SQUARE BALES. KORTY HAY. HAY ANALYSIS AVAILABLE., (888) 708-2800 OR - TEST MOISTURE. HAY, GRAIN, SILAGE, SOIL, WOOD, WINDROW TESTER. BALE STROKE COUNTER. MOISTURE READ OUT AS YOU BALE! WWW. LEHMANFARMS. NET, (503) 434-1705 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE IA - LARGE RD & BIG SQ BALES GOOD QUALITY GRASS HAY, DELIVERED IN SEMI LOADS ONLY, (641) 658-2738 NE - LARGE ROUND & SMALL SQUARE BALES PRAIRIE HAY, CALL EARLY AM OR LATE PM, (308) 894-6743 KS - TOP QUALITY SM SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - TOP QUALITY 4X4X8 SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - BALED 4X8, SM SQ OR BIG ROUNDS, (620) 625-2402 KS - 2008 BROME BIG ROUND BALES, (785) 935-2480 NE - HOLT COUNTY NEBRASKA PRAIRIE HAY, CERTIFIED WEED FREE OF ALL NOXIOUS WEEDS, BIG ROUND BALES, CALL CELL: 402-394-8495 OR, (402) 336-3292 NE - CERTIFIED MEADOW HAY, BIG ROUND BALES, HORSES, CATTLE, MULCH, (308) 587-2344 KS - BIG BLUE STEM PRAIRIE HAY. 4X4X8 BALES. $55/T. BARNED, ROUND BALES OUTSIDE $5/T. CONCORDIA, KS. CALL 386871-0561,, (703) 713-0174 NE - 117 BG ROUNDS, MAINLY GRASS MIX, (308) 436-5491


July 8, 2010

Heartland Express

1503 - BROME HAY FOR SALE KS - HORSE QUALITY:3X3, WEED/MOLD FREE. APPROX 750LBS, NO SUNDAY CALLS, (785) 255-4579 1504 - OAT/WHEAT/RYE HAY FOR SALE NE - 150 LARGE ROUND WHEAT STRAW BALES, (308) 882-4588 1505 - STRAW WANTED TO BUY IA - GOOD CLEAN, BRIGHT SM SQ IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - 96 BG RDS CERT WHEAT STRAW, 1000#/BL. 308-641-1240,, (308) 436-5491 1512 - SEED FOR SALE TX - FORAGE-TYPE TRITICALE SEED, CALL GAYLAND WARD SEEDS, (800) 299-9273 IA - BUYER & SELLER OF PRAIRIE GRASS & WILDFLOWER SEED, OSENBAUGH SEEDS, LUCAS, IA., (800) 582-2788 KS - TRITICALE SEED, A+ QUALITY, VOLUME DISCOUNT. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. CALL BROCK BAKER @, (800) 344-2144 NE - PASTURE & HAY MIXES, OATS, TURNIP, COVER CROPS, TEFF, MILLET, WILDLIFE, ALFALFA, ETC. , PRAIRIE STATES SEED 866373-2514 TOLL FREE, (866) 373-2514 NE - NATIVE GRASS SEED, WILDFLOWER, LEAD PLANT, SMART WEED & OTHERS. SOUTH FORK SEED COMPANY, (402) 4825491

1820 - LIVESTOCK BEDDING FOR SALE NE - CORRUGATED WINDBREAK STEEL, 8 GAUGE THROUGH 20 GAUGE, (402) 3870347 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - 20' BULL WHIP, (308) 587-2344 KS - USED HOG OR SHEEP PANELS & GATES, (785) 778-2962 FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", FOR FENCING CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - WE ARE YOUR STAMPEDE LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT DEALER. EMERSON EQUIPMENT. WHITMAN, NE, (308) 544-6421 KS - TIRE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS: WATER TANKS, MINERAL FEEDERS, SILAGE COVER WEIGHTS. WWW. GEETIRE. COM, (785) 231-8397 NE - GOPHER CONTROL MACHINE, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - 20, 6FT. X 10 FT. HORSE PANELS @ $35.00 EA. ROUND BALE FEEDER $170.00, (402) 380-4500 1901 - FEEDER STEERS FOR SALE MO - WE SPECIALIZE IN LOCATING "QUALITY" FEEDER CATTLE, (816) 688-7887

SEED CLEANERS

Stockers & Feeders available nationwide!

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Agent: John Harms (515) 368-3676

EUGENE BARBER & SONS Lexington, Kentucky

515-994-2890 1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER FOR SALE IA - WWW. REPLACEMENTRAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 366-2114 1806 - GRINDER MIXERS FOR SALE IA - IH 950, $950.00, (712) 299-6608 NE - 420 ART'S-WAY GRINDER MIXER, VERY GOOD, HAMMERS NEVER TURNED, SHEDDED, (402) 482-5491 1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471 NE - PARTED OUT JD 400 GRINDER/MIXER, IN & OUT AUGERS, GRINDER MILL W/PTO SHAFT, ALL W/SCREENS, (308) 467-2335 CO - TUB GRINDERS, NEW & USED (W/WARRANTY). OPERATE WELL W/70-175 HP TRACTORS, GRINDS WET HAY, TOUGH HAY & ALL GRAINS. HIGH CAPACITY. LOW PRICE. WWW. ROTOGRIND. COM, (800) 724-5498, (970) 353-3769 1808 - ROLLERS WANTED TO BUY CO - PTO OR ELECTRIC HIGH MOISTURE CORN ROLLER WITH 2-4 ROLLS. CALL BRUCE @ 719-340-7773 OR, (719) 346-8532 1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - BULK CAKE & GRAIN FEEDERS, (308) 587-2344 1815 - WATERERS/TANKS FOR SALE NE - BULL TOUGH BOTTOMLESS HEAVY GAUGE STOCK TANKS, (402) 387-0347 NE - LIFETIME WATER TANKS, LIFETIME WARRANTY, TIRE TANKS ARE 20 PLY & UP. AUTOMATIC WATERERS, HAY BALE FEEDERS, 6' & 7' SNOW & MANURE YARD SCRAPERS, USA TIRE MANAGEMENT, WWW. USATIREPRODUCTS. COM, (800) 755-8473 MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471 1818 - HAMMER MILL FOR SALE KS - 18" SCROUT WALDRON HAMMERMILL W/75HP MOTOR, $400.00, (785) 778-2962 1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE NE - REBUILT AIR MOTORS OR REPAIRS, (308) 587-2344 TX - VIRDEN PERMA-BILT CO. FARM & RANCH PRODUCTS: ROOF & TANK COATINGS, WINDMILL PARTS. SEND OR CALL FOR FREE CATALOG. 2821 MAYS AVE. BOX7160FR AMARILLO, TX 79114-7160 WWW. VIRDENPRODUCTS. COM, (806) 3522761 NE - MONITOR PUMP JACK-CHOICE OF GAS & ELECTRIC MOTOR, $650.00, (308) 4364369 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - GELBVIEH AND BALANCER OPEN HEIFERS, (402) 879-4976 MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT CATTLE LOCATORS - MAX HARGROVE, (816) 6887887 NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD VIRGIN REG ANGUS HEIFERS, (308) 569-2458 1904 - BRED HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - YOUNG COWS & BRED HEIFERS, AI'D TO ABS BULLS, AND CLEANED UP WITH SUMMITCREST BULLS, (308) 569-2458 MO - 12 RED & BLK SIM SPRING YRLG BRED HFRS, AI'D ONCE EXPOSED TO BULL. 8 BLK SIM COW/CALF PAIRS 3-8 YRS. RS & T SIMMENTALS, SAVANNAH, MO. CALL MANAGER ANDREW LAUTT @620-767-2156, SCOTT COWGER @816-304- 3071 OR JOHN COWGER @, (816) 262-2607 1906 - BRED COWS FOR SALE NE - I'M DEALING ON COWS COMING OUT OF DROUGHT AREAS EVERY DAY. WWW. BREDCOWSWRIGHTLIVESTOCK. COM OR CALL, (308) 534-0939 20 FIRST CALF HEIFER AI sired Black/Baldy Pairs. Big calves. Also 18 AI sired Fall Calvers, 2-7 Years. More information on both groups at www.apexcattle.com, 308-750-0200. 1908 - COW CALF PAIRS FOR SALE NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD REG ANGUS COW/CALF PAIRS, (308) 569-2458 1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - REGISTERED ANGUS, CELL: 308-8701119, (308) 732-3356 NE - 25 PB CHAROLAIS BULLS COMING 2S ALL RECORDS 40 YRS, (308) 995-5515 NE - GELBVIEH BULLS, RED & BLACK, 1 & 2 YR OLDS, (402) 879-4976 NE - (25) COMING 2 YR OLD CHAROLAIS BULLS(308) 567-2288, (308) 995-5515 NE - EASY CALVING, REG POLLED CHAROLAIS BULLS, (402) 395-2178 NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, 2 YEAR OLDS AND YEARLINGS, SONS OF 878, BLUEPRINT 202 AND TRAVELOR 722, (308) 569-2458 NE - PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS, YEARLINGS & 2 YR OLDS. TC TOTAL, OBJECTIVE, & ONE WAY BLOODLINES. SCHULTE ANGUS RANCH. KEARNEY, NE. 308-708-1839 OR, (308) 236-0761 OK - PB CHAROLAIS BULLS, 2 YRS OLD, RANCH RAISED. SCHUPBACH CHAROLAIS RANCH, (580) 829-2543 MN - SOUTH DEVON/ANGUS BULLS-VERY MODERATE, MATERNAL, GAIN & EFFICIENCY TESTED. NO CORN. BULLS WORK GREAT FOR CONVENTIONAL OR GRASS PROGRAMS. GREAT MATERNAL BREEDS W/LOTS OF PUNCH FOR GROWTH IN ONE PKG. WWW. THOMPSONCATTLE. COM CALL 320-266-3098 OR, (801) 391-8989

1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, (402) 395-2178

ANGUS HYBRID BULLS, several by the great Copyright sire! Easy calving, top performance and gentle. Pictures, videos and data at www.apexcattle.com. APEX Cattle, Dannebrog, NE, 308-750-0200.

BRAD Z RANCH ANGUS • SIMANGUS • COMPOSITE Complete Performance Data

All Business Bulls JIM BRADFORD Ph: 641-747-2578 C: 641-757-0796 Erin: 515-494-8619 Dan: 515-681-4619 1454 Hwy. 44 • Guthrie Center, IA www.bradzranch.com

1910 - SHOW STOCK FOR SALE NE - CLUB CALVES, "THE WINNING KIND", STEERS/HEIFERS, (402) 395-2178 1915 - SEMEN/EMBRYO/AI SERVICE FOR SALE NE - DBL BLACK DBL POLLED CALVING EASE GELBVIEH BULLS, (402) 879-4976 1916 - DAIRY HEIFERS FOR SALE WI - DAIRY EQUIP- STALLS, GATES, HEADLOCKS, TMR MIXERS, BARN CLEANERS, MANURE AUGERS/PUMPS, VENTILATION, ALLEY SCRAPERS. REASONABLY PRICE LONG LASTING EQUIP EQUALS VALUE. MEETING ALL DAIRYMEN'S NEEDS SINCE 1919. BERG EQUIPMENT CORP. WWW. BERGEQUIPMENT. COM, (800) 494-1738 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT & BREEDING CATTLE LOCATORS, (816) 688-7887 CO - IT'S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292 2011 - HOG EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - CHORE TIME FEED SYSTEM WITH BULK TANK, 100 FT. OF TUBING AND SCREW. CELL 402-920-3612, (402) 9231196 2130 - SHEEP- OTHER FOR SALE TX - ROYAL WHITE SHEEP, BREEDING STOCK AVAILABLE. REED FARMS, COMMANCHE, TX WWW. REEDFARMS. COM CALL TODAY, (254) 842-5275 2200 - REGISTERED HORSES FOR SALE NE - 2003 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, MORGAN BROOD MARE, 2004 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, 1995 MORGAN STALLION, (308) 587-2344 NE - AQHA, YEARLINGS, MARES AND COLTS, (308) 569-2458 NE - PEPPY DOC SAN, SHINING SPARK, JET DECK, THREE BAR & SKIPPER W BRED, STALLIONS, MARES, FILLEYS, & GELDINGS, MOSTLY SORREL & PALOMINO, GREAT STOCK, GOOD DISPOSITIONS, CALL 1-888689-8924 OR, (308) 384-1063 NE - TOP QUALITY GELDINGS-DOC O'LENA, HOLIDOC, DOC BAR, COYS BONANZA, DOCS JACK SPRAT BLOODLINES- NATURAL COW SENSE-RIVER ROAD QUARTER HORSES 308452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - ONLY TWO REPLACEMENT MARES LEFT-REGISTERED QUARTERHORSESDON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY! RIVER ROAD QUARTERHORSES 308-452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - IT COSTS NO MORE TO FEED A GREAT HORSE THAN A POOR ONE. RIVER ROAD QUARTERHORSES ARE WELL FED, DON'T HAVE BAD HABITS AND ARE GOOD LOOKING. MUST CUT HERD SIZE. 308-452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - AQHA HORSES, BLUE ROAN STUD AND MARES. OLDER GREY MARE, WELL BROKE, GRANDDAUGHTERS HORSE, (308) 5692458 2202 - STUD SERVICE FOR SALE NE - MORGAN STALLION STANDING AT STUD, (308) 587-2344

Page 29 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE NE - SELL-TRADE MORGAN STALLIONS: BESSIA'S, BON, ACCORD 135969; T-BONE, LAD, CLASSY, 149831; T-BONE, B, CONGO, 164062, (308) 587-2344 2301 - DOGS FOR SALE KS - AKC FARM RAISED GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES, FIRST SHOTS, DEW CLAWS. 785398-2231, 785-731-5174,, (785) 731-5190 2311 - FISH FOR SALE KS - POND STOCKING, WWW. CULVERFISHFARM. COM, (800) 241-5205 2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK KS - NEED RESPONSIBLE HARD WORKING INDIVIDUALS FOR 2010 HARVEST CREW. TX TO MT & FALL CORN HARVEST. GUARANTEED MONTHLY WAGE PLUS ROOM & BOARD. NEW JD COMBINES, PETERBILT/KW TRUCKS. SKINNER HARVESTING LLC, CALL DAN OR LEAVE MESSAGE AT (620) 340-2843, (620) 343-8140 OK - EXPERIENCED FARM FAMILY, MECHANICAL ABILITY A MUST, NORTHWEST OKLAHOMA, HOUSING PROVIDED, (580) 8292543 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES

JD COMBINES FOR RENT From Kansas to North Dakota Finnicum’s Custom Combining combiner@midrivers.com PH: (406) 480-2119 PH: (406) 480-2510 PH: (406) 489-0837

KS - CORN, MILO, WHEAT HARVESTING WANTED. TWO JD MACHINES & SUPPORTING TRUCKS., (785) 567-8515 2601 - CARS FOR SALE CO - 1964 FORD GALAXIE 4 DR, 390 V8 THUNDERBIRD ENGINE, FACTORY OPTION. BODY FAIRLY STRAIGHT, NEEDS PAINT. INTERIOR ROUGH. ENGINE & DRIVETRAIN ARE GOOD. 86K MILES $1500 OR BEST CLOSE OFFER. PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER, (719) 643-5267 2602 - PICKUPS WANTED TO BUY NE - HD COIL SPRINGS FOR 1971 3/4 TON CHEVY PICKUP, END GATE FOR 1980 GMC 3/4 TON, (308) 587-2344 KS - GOOD LONG WIDE FACTORY BED FOR '73-'79 FORD, (620) 865-2541 FOR SALE KS - 88 CHEVY 1 TON, 4WD, 6. 2 DIESEL, 4 SP, FLATBED, (785) 935-2480 NE - THIRD SEAT FOR 95-99 SUBURBAN, TAUPE LEATHER, $100.00, (402) 564-5064 KS - 1993 F-350 CREWCAB XLT DIESEL, AUTO, 4X4, FACTORY TURBO AVAILABLE, $5,900.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - FRONT BUMPER FOR 2005 CHEVY SILVERADO, (308) 587-2344 CO - 1961 FORD F250, 292 V-8, 4 SP TRAN. 2 WH DRIVE, LONG STEP SIDE BOX, GOOD CONDITION, OLDER RESTORA TION $6500, PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER., (719) 643-5267

NEW ENGINE Long Block GM 6.5 Diesel

515-994-2890 2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE SD - 1951 CHEVY FIRETRUCK, LIGHTS & SIREN WORK, 10K, DRIVES GREAT, REAL NICE, $4,500.00, (605) 386-2131 KS - '59 CHEVY 60, V8, 4&2 SP, 15' B&H, 2 NEW TIRES, TUNED UP, ETC, $999.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - 60 FORD F700, 24' STEEL FLATBED, CHEATER AXLES, 5&2, W/ 2-1000 GAL FLAT BOTTOM VERTICAL FERTILIZER TANKS, USE TO HAUL BIG ROUND OR LITTLE SQUARE HAY BALES, (308) 390-0642 KS - 1976 FORD 3500 CAB & CHASSIS, $500.00, (785) 778-2962 NE - IH ENGINES, 304'S & 345'S, (308) 4672335 NE - OMAHA STANDARD 16' GRAIN BOX WITH HOIST, (308) 467-2335 CO - 1979 GMC 1 TON TOW TRUCK, 2WD, 350 V8, 4 SP, HOLMES 440 BED & WINCH, TOLLE TX-3000 WHEEL LIFT. 3300 MILES SINCE REPAINT & REFURBISH IN '97. NEW SEAT, INTERIOR & GOOD TIRES. $7500 OR BEST CLOSE OFFER. GOOD CONDITION LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER, (719) 6435267

2605 - STOCK TRAILERS FOR SALE

B&B BARRETT TRAILER SALES Cadillac of Aluminum Trailers “The Toughest Aluminum Gooseneck Built!” NEW Barretts: (3) 7x24’s; 53' floor trailer USED: ‘02 Barrett 8x32 double deck; 8x30 Barrett; ‘98 50' Wilson pot w/SP & AL; 7x24 Double deck G.N. Barrett

Steve Best 712-549-2249 • 712-249-3611 (C) 2607 - UTILITY TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY NE - FLATBED W/HEAVY DUTY AXLES, METAL FLOOR AND WIDE ENOUGH TO HOLD A PICKUP, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - 1979 TRAIL MOBILE ALUMINUM 9000 GAL. TANKER, (402) 369-0212 2613 - MOBILE HOMES & RV'S FOR SALE NE - AVION SILVER R, 30FT, TRAVEL TRAILER, VERY CLEAN, EXCELLENT SNOWBIRD TRAILER, NEW BATTERIES, $7400/OBO, (402) 564-5064 2614 - BOATS & WATER CRAFTS FOR SALE KS - 16' HOBIECAT, $600.00, (785) 7782962 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE NE - MONI MOTOR GLIDER AND TRAILER, LOW HOURS, (402) 364-2592 2616 - TIRES WANTED TO BUY NE - HOT PATCH VULCANIZING PATCHES, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - 15" SPLIT RIMS, 8 HOLE, 750 MUD/SNOW, (308) 587-2344 NE - 10 BOLT RIMS W/18. 4 X 38" TIRES, (402) 336-2755 2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY IA - LATE MODEL TRLRS & TRUCKS WITH LIGHT DAMAGE OR IN NEED OF ENGINE REPAIRS, (641) 658-2738 NE - 18' STEEL TRUCK GRAIN BOX, 52" OR 60" SIDES HOIST AND ROLL TARP, (308) 436-4369 FOR SALE KS - 66 IH 2000, DETROIT, 15 SP W/HENDERSON TWINSCREW, TULSA WINCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 NE - 1975 24' SEMI LOWBOY TRLR. $1950, $2,250.00, (402) 545-2255 MO - '99 IH 4900, TS, 18K FRONT, 40K LB HENDRICKSON, $26,000.00, (660) 5483804 NE - 1978 BRENNER 6500 GAL STAINLESS STEEL INSULATED TANKER, GOOD CONDITION, (402) 369-0212 NE - '69 FREAUHF ALUMINUM TANKER, INSULATED 7200 GAL. , GOOD CONDITION, (402) 369-0212 OK - 1998 FREIGHTLINER MID ROOF, DETROIT MOTOR, 10 SP, AIR RIDE, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - 1998 FREIGHTLINER, MID ROOF, C12 CAT, SUPER 10SP AIR RIDE, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - 2000 VOLVO, 60 SERIES DETROIT, 10 SP, AIR RIDE, CONDO, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - 1997 KW900B, N14 CUMMINS, 13 SPD, (308) 995-8329

2001 Freightliner Day Cab, Cummins, Multiple Available

1996 Freightliner Day Cab, $8500

Call 608-574-1083 KS - 8000 GALLON ALUMINUM TANKER TRAILER, (785) 871-0711


2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS FOR SALE - CONT’D

1994 Ford L9000 Cummins Power Low Miles

1997 Peterbuilt 377 1O SP Detroit 12.7

Call 608-574-1083 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER FOR SALE NE - TRANSMISSION, GENERATOR, STARTER, REAR AXLE REMOVABLE CARRIER DIFFERENTIAL UNIT. FITS 1946 CHEVY 2 TON TRUCK, (308) 587-2344 R & R AUTO SALVAGE Bob Townsend We pay cash for junk vehicles. We buy unwanted farm machinery. Don’t pay someone to haul it away. Call for quote anytime. Lincoln and surrounding area. 402-570-2619 • http://randrautosalvage.com

2802 - DOZERS FOR SALE KS - TEREX 8220A DOZER, PS, TILT, GOOD RUNNING MACHINE, (785) 935-2480 KS - CAT SINGLE SHANK, DEEP PENETRATION RIPPER, FITS D8-K, WITH VALVE AND ALL, EXCELLENT CONDITION, (785) 4485893 2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 NE - PULL BEHIND BOX SCRAPERS, 10' & 12'; 3PT'S 6' & 8', (402) 678-2277 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 MO - USED TOREQ 10 YD DIRECT MOUNT, EXCELLENT, (660) 548-3804 MO - USED 12' BOX BLADE, 1 YEAR OLD, (660) 548-3804 2804 - MOTOR GRADERS FOR SALE KS - CAT 120 ROAD GRADER. $15,500, (785) 871-0711 KS - CAT 12F-13K, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (785) 448-5893 2805 - BACKHOE FOR SALE KS - CAT 235-32K, VERY GOOD CONDITION, ONE OWNER, (785) 448-5893 2806 - CRANES & DRAGLINES FOR RENT NE - 28 TON NATIONAL CRANE, 152 FT. REACH, (402) 387-0347 FOR SALE KS - LORAINE 25 TON TRUCK CRANE, LOTS OF BOOM, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (785) 448-5893 2807 - GENERATORS FOR SALE MN - AUTOMATIC GENERATOR SETS 15KW500KW, NEW & USED, LOW TIME GEN SETS. REMOTE WELL GENERATORS. SERVING FARMERS SINCE 1975. STANDBY POWER SYSTEMS, WINDOM MN, MON-SAT 9-5., (800) 419-9806 ND - 20KW TO 2000KW; DIESEL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS. ALL LOW-HOUR TAKEOUT GENSETS. CUMMINS/ONAN, KOHLER, CAT, DETROIT DIESEL & MORE. ABRAHAM GENERATOR SALES COOPERSTOWN, ND (COMPLETE INVENTORY ONLINE) WWW. ABRAHAMINDUSTRIAL. COM WE SHIP NATIONWIDE!, (701) 797-4766 2809 - CONSTRUCTION TRUCKS FOR SALE KS - 1997 LOADKING, 55 TON, 3 AXLE, LAY DOWN NECK, W/BEAVERTAILS. CALL 785817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 KS - 15 TON TANDEM AXLE TRAILER, DUALS, TILT TOP, WENCH, EXCELLENT CONDITION, TIRES 70%, (785) 448-5893 2813 - WHEEL LOADERS FOR SALE NE - CASE 621 PAYLOADER, MODEL 6T 590 CUMMINS MOTOR, MOTOR NEEDS WORK. $21,000, $21,000.00, (402) 545-2255 2821 - CRAWLERS FOR SALE WI - UNDERCARRIAGE REPAIR. NEW, USED & REBUILT PARTS. ALSO TRACK PRESS SERVICE. M & R TRACK SERVICE., (800) 564-0383

Heartland Express 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS WANTED TO BUY NE - 66" BUCKET FOR 1835C CASE SKID STEER, 10. 00X16. 5 TIRE-WHEEL, PLUS OTHER ATTACHMENTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - COMPLETE SET OF BOOKS (REPAIR MANUALS) T-200 BOBCAT SKID LOADER, $100.00, (785) 778-2962 2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE NE - 1500-8000# (MOSTLY 4000#), AIR TIRES & NEW FORKS, (402) 678-2277 OK - PETTIBONE, 30' LIFT, $3,500.00, (580) 361-2265 2827 - BUILDING SUPPLIES FOR SALE NE - NEW 2' X 24' CULVERT, $650.00, (308) 894-6965 2840 - OTHER CONST EQUIP FOR SALE NE - 12-20'LONG 12"I BEAMS, 1/4"THICK W/ 1/2" THICK TOP & BOTTOM, 4 3/4" WIDE $180 EA OR ALL 12 FOR $2000. 12-7' LONG 10", 6" H BEAMS, 1/4" THICK, $35 EA OR ALL 12 FOR $400., (308) 894-6965 NE - 1991 BLUEBIRD BUS, 5. 9 CUMMINS, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - ALLIS CHALMERS FORK LIFT 5500LB. RUNS GOOD CELL 402-920-3612, (402) 923-1196

3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - PIPE 2 3/8", 2 7/8", 3 1/2", 4 1/2", 5 1/2", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 KS - HIGHWAY GUARDRAIL, OILFIELD PIPE, SUCKER RODS, FENCING CABLE. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. BUTTERFLY SUPPLY, WWW. BUTTERFLYSUPPLYINC. COM, (800) 249-7473 KS - CATTLE & HORSE PANELS, 5'3" X 10', 8-BAR, 60 LBS, GREEN OR SILVER, STARTING AT $66.00 CELL: 620-546-5155, (620) 549-6604 KS - LOTS OF USED GUARDRAIL, USED CORRUGATED METAL PIPE, LARGE & SMALL, 30' STEEL I-BEAMS, (785) 448-5893 NE - CONTINUOUS FENCE: 1 1/4", 1 1/2", 1 3/4", EXCELLENT FOR FEEDLOT, LIVESTOCK & HORSE FENCE, WEST POINT, NE. CALL, (402) 380-1107

WHITE VINYL

FENCE

Vo discoluume nts

THREE RAIL • FOUR RAIL

Hoback Fence

888.458.4610 •660.489.2328

3001 - ANTIQUES FOR SALE NE - STATIONARY GAS ENGINES, (402) 5824874 3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY SD - MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE ANY OLDER MM, (605) 386-2131 FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTORS! BIEWER'S TRACTOR & MACH. SALV. SPECIALIZES IN 1920-85 TRACTOR PARTS. FREE NATIONWIDE LOCATING. BARNESVILLE, MN. SEARCH PARTS & SEE OVER 100 ANTIQUE TRACTORS PICTURED AT SALVAGETRACTORS. COM, (218) 493-4696 NE - TRACTOR PARTS FOR SALE. NEW AFTERMARKET PARTS FOR MOST MAKES OF TRACTORS. FRONT END PARTS, 3 PT HITCH PARTS, RADIATORS, SEATS, STEERING WHEELS, BATTERY BOXES, PTO PARTS, DRAWBARS, WATER PUMPS, DECALS & MORE. CLASSIC AG, AINSWORTH, NE., (800) 286-2171 NE - A-C B, A-C C, 2 A-C WD'S, M-M R. OSMOND, NE., (402) 582-4874 NE - 1952 JD B, RECONDITIONED, PULLED IN DIV 1 4500LBS, $3,500.00, (402) 5452255 NE - 1938 JD B, UNSTYLED, RECONDITIONED, $3,100.00, (402) 545-2255 NE - 1941 JD A, ELECTRIC START, 4 SP, BEHLEN OVERDRIVE,, $2,500.00, (402) 545-2255 OK - ALLIS-CHALMERS WC56821, MASSEYHARRIS LP 55BISH, SERIAL #11062, (580) 829-2543 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES WANTED TO BUY SD - IH 6 SPEED SPECIAL TRUCK, (605) 386-2131 SD - OLDER JEEPS, CJ 2A, 1948 OR OLDER, ALSO MILITARY, (605) 386-2131 NE - TEENS, 20'S, EARLY 30'S IHC TRUCKS, PARTS, LITERATURE, (308) 894-6965 NE - 1950 FORD CRESTLINER & 1951 VICTORIA, (308) 876-2515

3007 - PIPE FOR SALE MO - GOOD USED RR TANK CAR SHELLS FOR CULVERTS (7-10' DIAMETER)(30'-55' LONG), ALSO GOOD USED STEEL PIPE, 8 5/8" DIAMETER THRU 48" DIAMETER, 20', 30', 40' & 50' LENGTHS. CALL GARY AT GATEWAY PIPE & SUPPLY, (800) 489-4321 3009 - FUEL TANKS FOR SALE NE - 300 GAL FUEL TANK ON STAND, $50.00, (308) 894-6965 KS - '76 FORD 2000 GAL TANK WAGON FUEL TRUCK, 2 HOSE REELS, 5 COMPARTMENTS, READY TO GO, (785) 448-5893 3011 - HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS WANTED TO BUY NE - REAR TINE ROTO TILLER, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE MO - OUTSIDE WOOD FURNACE $1595. CHEAP SHIPPING. EASY INSTALL. FORCED AIR. 100,000 BTU. HOUSES, MOBILES. WWW.HEATBYWOOD.COM, (417) 581-7755 3016 - BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES FOR SALE KY - KENTUCKY BUILDINGS, LLC. ALL STEEL STRUCTURE. PACKAGES FROM 24' TO 75' WIDE. WE SELL COMPONENTS, SLIDING AND ROLL-UP DOORS, INSULATION, WINDOWS, SHEET METAL, TRIM, AND STEEL FRAMING. KYBUILDINGSLLC. COM, (606) 668-3446 3024 - FINANCIAL SERVICES MO - PUT OUR MONEY & 45 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE TO WORK FOR YOU. ALL TYPES OF AG LOANS AVAILABLE AT LOWEST RATES. FREE CONSULTATIONS. MIDWEST LOAN BROKERS. JAM@LYN. NET OR CALL, (660) 339-7410 3030 - OTHER WANTED TO BUY SD - JACOBS 32 VOLT WIND GENERATOR, ALSO WINCHARGER USED DURING THE '30'S & '40'S, WILL PAY ACCORDING TO CONDITION, (605) 386-2131 NE - SCRAP BATTERIES- WE WANT 'EM! WE ALSO BUY STEEL CASE & GLASS PACK. CALL FOR DETAILS! ALLEN'S NEW & USED BATTERIES. BUY/SELL, NEW/USED. WE CARRY ALL KINDS!! ALLEN FELTON, OWNER. LINCOLN, NE., (402) 467-2455 FOR SALE NE - REASONABLY PRICE MECHANICS GLOVES, WARM GLOVES, MITTENS & OTHER GLOVES., (308) 587-2344 NE - PROPANE REFRIGERATOR FOR REMOTE CABIN, COMBINA TION WOOD-PROPANE, COOKING-HEATING RANGE; WATER COMPARTMENT, (308) 587-2344 DE - BIG BUD BOOK-THE INCREDIBLE STORY OF THE BIGGEST, MOST POWERFUL TRACTOR EVER BUILT. BOOK IS 12"X9" - PACKED WITH PICTURES, SIGNED BY AUTHOR, ONLY $37.47 PLUS $5 S&H. CLASSIC TRACTOR FEVER, BOX 437, ROCKLAND, DE 19732. CLASSICTRACTORS.COM OR CALL US, (800) 888-8979

July 8, 2010 5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE IA - NATIONWIDE - 1031FEC - PAY NO TAX WHEN SELLING-EXCHANGING REAL ESTATE, EQUIPMENT, LIVESTOCK. FREE BROCHURE/CONSULTATION. VIEW EXCHANGE PROPERTIES AT WWW. 1031FEC. COM OR CALL, (800) 333-0801 NE - 9-CENTER PIVOTS SO OF SUTHERLAND, NE. NEWER EQUIP 75 HP ELECTRIC MOTORS, NO WATER RESTRICTIONS, 3156 ACRE SANDHILL RANCH, ON NORTH LOOP RIVER, NEAR PURDUM, NE. LAND BROKERS, INC. WWW. LANDBROKERSNE. COM, (308) 534-5514 CO - 12 IRRIGATED CIRCLES W/2 SMALL WIPERS, 8 IRRIGATI ON WELLS, YUMA & KIT CARSON COUNTIES. 6% RETURN ON PURCHASE PRICE FOR 5 YRS. DELMER ZIEGLER, BROKER, EASTERN PLAINS REAL ESTATE, BURLINGTON, CO. PHONE 719-346-5005, CELL, (970) 214-1411 5001 - NON-FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE NE - BED & BREAKFAST FOR SALE IN RED CLOUD, NE:LOCATED AT 541 N SEWARD, A 6 BEDROOM B & B THAT INCLUDES SOME PERSONAL PROPERTY. THIS IS A BEAUTIFUL HISTORIC HOME THAT HAS BEED UPDATED & WAS ONE OF WILLA CATHER'S HOMES, WWW. GTAI. BIZ, $115.00, (402) 746-2242

5004 - PASTURE RENT FOR SALE NE - FALL & WINTER RANGE & HAY FOR CATTLE, NO BULLS, (308) 587-2344 6004 - BED & BREAKFAST NE - SANDHILLS HIDE-A-WAY "WONDERFUL PLACE TO RELAX, READ A BOOK, WRITING, STAR GAZING AND BIRD WATCHING. " BOOK FOR ALL FAMILY OCCASIONS. WWW. SANDHILLSHIDEAWAY. COM CALL TODAY, (402) 843-2245 7001 - SPECIAL EVENTS NE - MID-AMERICA ALFALFA EXPO, FEATURING THE NEWEST HAY EQUIPMENT & PRODUCTS, ALSO AN EXHIBITOR AUCTION. EXPO IS FEB 1 & FEB 2, 2011, 8 AM-5 PM AUCTION IS FEB 1, 3:45PM; ALL OF THIS TAKES PLACE AT BUFFALO COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, KEARNEY, NE, (800) 743-1649 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Midlands Classified Ad Network NOW HIRING ESTIMATORS. MUST BE HONEST AND DEPENDABLE. CALL 308 765 1293 OR EMAIL JEGGERS@MILLARDROOFING.NET SEEKING FULL TIME LICENSED OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST OR COTA FOR BUSY CLINIC IN THE THERMOPOLIS, WY AREA. POSITION CONSISTS OF OUTPATIENT, INPATIENT, SKILLED NURSING AND SCHOOLS. GREAT BENEFITS AND EXCELLENT PAY. NEW GRADS WELCOME TO APPLY. CALL 800-743-0736 FOR MORE INFO. THEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING APPLICATIONS FOR A K-12 SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER. PLEASE SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME AND TRANSCRIPTS TO: HENRY EGGERT, SUPT., THEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS, PO. BOX 248, THEDFORD, NE 69166. GM WANTED FOR A NATIONALLY FRANCHISED LTD SERV. MOTEL IN CENTRAL NE. LOOKING FOR SALES ORIENTED SELF-STARTER W/ PREVIOUS HOTEL EXP. COMP. SALARY W/ INCENTIVE PLAN, HEALTH INS. E-MAIL RESUME TO: SWANSON1953A@GMAIL.COM GERING PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING QUALIFIED CANDIDATES FOR: EARLY CHILDHOOD COORDINATOR/ SOCIAL WORKER; MATH TEACHER (SECONDARY); GUIDANCE COUNSELOR (SECONDARY). INTERESTED CANDIDATES ARE REQUESTED TO APPLY VIA OUR WEBSITE WWW.GERINGSCHOOLS.NET CURRENT OPEN POSITIONS ARE LISTED ON OUR WEBSITE. EOE COMPANY DRIVERS & O/O NEEDED. SMALL PERSONAL COMPANY, NICE EQUIPMENT, INSURANCE, GOOD PAY, HOME TIME. 2 YRS OTR, FLATBED EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. ORTHMAN LOGISTICS, LEXINGTON, NE 888- 454-5766. DOUBLE WIDE FOR SALE! - 28'X60', 2 OPEN ROOMS, 2 BATHS, 2 HVAC UNITS. 5 AXLES, WHEELS AND HITCH. RAMP AND DECK INCLUD-

www.myfarmandranch.com

Page 30

ED! CALL PAUL, 308-364-2607, LOCATED IN BARTLEY, NE. ALLIANCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS FOR THE 2010-11 SCHOOL YEAR: HIGH SCHOOL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC; ELEMENTARY ELL; SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST; MIDDLE SCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION RESOUCE TEACHER. PLEASE SUBMIT LETTER OF APPLICATION, APPLICATION FORM, RESUME, TRANSCRIPTS AND CREDENTIALS TO DR. DAN HOESING, SUPERINTENDENT, ALLIANCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1604 SWEETWATER, ALLIANCE, NE 69301; OR EMAIL TO JBOTTGER@APS.K12.NE.US. APPLICATION CAN BE DOWNLOADED AT W W W.APSCHOOLS.SCHOOLFUSION.US. POSITIONS ARE OPEN UNTIL FILLED. IT SUPERVISOR NETWORK/COMPUTER SUPPORT EXPERIENCE IN SUPERVISION, PROJECT MGMT. & EHR SOFTWARE PREFERRED. DEGREE IN IS OR APPLICABLE FIELD. MUST HAVE TECHNICAL EXPERIENCE PROVIDING NETWORK, COMPUTER & DATE COMMUNICATION SUPPORT/SERVICES. SEND COVER LETTER, RESUME & REFERENCES TO: HUMAN RESOURCES, RAPID CITY MEDICAL CENTER, PO BOX 6020, RAPID CITY, SD 57709 WORK FOR DEPT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES VIEW CURRENT JOB OPENINGS AT WWW.DHHS.NE.GOV CITY OF MCCOOK, NEBRASKA IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS AND RESUMES (BOTH REQUIRED) FOR ONE POLICE OFFICER. DETAILS AND APPLICATIONS CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE: HTTP:// WWW.CITYOFMCCOOK.COM/EMPLOYMENT.HTM . SEND APPLICATIONS/ RESUMES TO MCCOOK CITY OFFICE, PO BOX 1059, MCCOOK, NE 690011059. EOE/AAE.

45,864 ft. of 1-3/8” galvanized fence pipe. Brand new, never used. Comes in 21'-0” lengths in bundles of 91. This is overstock direct mill pricing. $14.00 per 21'-0” length. $995.00 per bundle of 91. $21,900.00 OBO takes it all! Delivery can be arranged for purchases of 12 bundles or more. Tubing is stored inside our warehouse in Omaha. Call Jim (402-510-1550) or Curt (402-510-3574). 44328

MEYERS TRACTOR SALVAGE Aberdeen, So. Dak.

1000+ Tractors & Combines 400+ Reground Crankshafts 500+ Tractor Tires 300+ Radiators Large line of Swather, Baler & Cutter Parts

GOOD BUYS AND SERVICE WANT TO BUY TRACTORS & COMBINES & SWATHERS FOR SALVAGE

Phone (605) 225-0185 5 Miles North & 1 Mile West of CASE IH Mon. - Fri. 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM & Sat. 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM 44353


July 8, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 31

Nebraska Soybean Board Ballots due July 30, 2010 Election ballots for Districts 2, 4 and 8 of the Nebraska Soybean Board will be mailed on July 13, 2010, to soybean producers in those districts. To be eligible to vote in the election voters must be: •Engaged in the growing of soybeans •Be a resident in the District •Pay the soybean checkoff •One Producer – One Vote Only On the District Ballot the voting producer must write in the county they reside in; sign and print their name on the ballot envelope. The ballot must be postmarked by July 30, 2010. Eligible producers who do not receive a ballot by July 20, 2010, can call the Nebraska Soybean Board to request one at 402-441-3240. Ballots will be mailed to the counties in the following districts: District 2 (Burt, Cuming, Dakota, Dixon, Stanton, Thurston and Wayne Counties)

Candidates •Wayne Heerman – Pilger, NE – Stanton County •Lisa Lunz – Wakefield, NE – Dixon County District 4 (Boone, Hamilton, Merrick, Nance, Platte, Polk and York Counties) Candidates •Eugene Goering – Platte Center, NE - Platte County •Greg Greving – Chapman, NE – Merrick County •Michael Thede – Palmer, NE – Merrick County District 8 (Arthur, Banner, Blaine, Box Butte, Brown, Chase, Cherry, Cheyenne, Custer, Dawes, Dawson, Deuel, Dundy, Frontier, Furnas, Garden, Garfield, Gosper, Grant, Greeley, Harlan, Hayes, Hitchcock, Hooker, Howard, Keith, Keya Paha, Kimball, Lincoln, Logan, Loup, McPherson, Morrill, Perkins, Phelps, Red Willow, Rock, Scotts Bluff, Sheridan, Sherman, Sioux, Thomas, Valley and Wheeler Counties) Candidates

•Britt Anderson – Gothenburg, NE – Custer County •Terry Beans – Lexington, NE – Dawson County •Terry Horky – Sargent, NE – Custer County •Blake Johnson - Holdrege, NE – Phelps County The elected directors will serve a three-year term for these seats beginning October 1, 2010 and ending September 30, 2013. Results will be announced in August. The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

NEBRASKA STATE CLIMATOLOGIST: WILL JULY BE WET OR DRY? Continued from page 24 producers, the crop will be at the mercy of Mother Nature. Aside from the threat of shallow root syndrome, crops generally are not as healthy now as in past years, according to the vegetative health index, which is a satellite image of vegetation. Of particular concern is much of eastern Nebraska, especially near the Platte River Valley system northward to southeast South Dakota and extending to the Platte River system to Lexington to the Loup River Valley to the Ord and Broken Bow areas. "Vegetation in the Sandhills is phenomenal, but areas with extensive flooding are showing yellowing corn," Dutcher said. "That leads to the question, what impact has all this rain had on nitrogen applications?" On a positive note, the abundance of late season snows and heavy spring moisture have resulted in full pools for all Wyoming Platte River reservoirs. "In fact, there is currently 200,000 acre feet of water being stored in their flood pools to mitigate

flooding upstream from Lake McConaughy," Dutcher said. Lake McConaughy had 1.5 million acre feet (full is 1.7 million acre feet) in storage as of June 30, nearly 550,000 acre feet more than at this time last year. Inflows have been running close to 6,000 cubic feet per second, about four times the normal flow for this time of year. The latest projections indicate that high flows will likely continue well into July, with an outside chance that Big Mac will reach capacity before the end of the summer. Even if it doesn't fill completely, it is likely to reach at least 90 percent of capacity, barring the development of an intense drought. The latest Climate Predication Center forecast suggests there will be additional inflows into McConaughy. The two-week lead forecast for July indicates above normal moisture in the eastern two-thirds of the state, coupled with below normal temperatures. CPC currently anticipates that

June conditions will continue during July, although recent temperature trends would suggest that their forecast is too cool. Much of the area south and southeast of Nebraska has been experiencing a prolonged period of temperatures in the 90s to low 100s coupled with high dew point temperatures. "We have been on the northern fringe of this region," Dutcher said. "With the abundance of June rainfall and full to saturated soil profiles, evaporation and plant transpiration will be adding additional moisture to the lower atmosphere, increasing the risk for heat stress for livestock producers." An absence of wind could easily produce a scenario similar to last June when temperatures soared into the 90s and, coupled with dew points in the low 70s, produced consecutive days of heat indices in the 105 to 120 degree range.

Auctioneers — Don’t miss your opportunity to get your auction bills in front of this audience across the Midwest!

43374


Page 32

Heartland Express

July 8, 2010

PLUM CREEK MOTORS

WWW.DRIVEPLUMCREEK.COM 1111 Plum Creek Parkway • Lexington

(308) 324-2306 • 1 (888) 324-2306

ACTION

BREAK

Central Nebraska’s Nebraska’s Largest Largest Full-Line General Motors Dealer!

Luis, Chanse, Kyle, Rick, Troy, Vic or Tom THE SPIRIT OF AMERICAN STYLE

Se habla Español!

THROUGH

www.driveplumcreek.com

www.driveplumcreek.com

www.driveplumcreek.com

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‘10 Cadillac SRX FWD

‘10 Chevy HHR LT

‘10 Chevy Cobalt

‘09 GMC Yukon Denali

#9583

was $33,995

#9559

$31,495

#9526

#9595

was $17,995

$15,995

was $15,495

$13,995

www.driveplumcreek.com ‘06 Pontiac Grand Prix #9464

$48,995

MSRP $49,995

was $12,995

$11,695

V6, auto, pwr seat, dual zone AC, OnStar, only 14K

2LT pkg, 4 cyl, auto, pwr seat, CD, over $23K new

LT sedan, 4 cyl, auto, pwr windows, locks, CD, 8,000 miles

AWD, nav, roof, DVD, 13K, loaded, htd leather, chrome wheels

SE sedan, award winning 3800, auto, pwr seat, 48K

www.driveplumcreek.com ‘09 Chevy K1500 4x4

www.driveplumcreek.com

www.driveplumcreek.com ‘08 Chevy Malibu

www.driveplumcreek.com

www.driveplumcreek.com

#9570

#95781

#9479

#9550

was $32,995

$31,495

‘08 Honda Civic

was $16,995

$15,495

was $17,995

$16,495

‘05 Ford F150 FX4

‘07 Jeep Liberty

#27411

$14,995

was $15,995

was $18,995

$17,495

Ext cab, Silverado LTZ, Z71, over $40,000 new!

EX-L coupe, 4 cyl, auto, pwr seat, leather, CD, roof

1LT sedan, 4 cyl, auto, pwr seat, CD, chorme wheels

Ltd 4x4, V6, auto, cloth, air, cruise, economy size, 52K

Supercrew, 4x4, CD, trailer tow pkg, Tanneau cover, 93K

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‘07 Cadillac Escalade EXT

‘07 VW New Beetle 2.5

‘07 Chevy Suburban 1500

#9566

was $39,995

#27103

$36,995

was $15,995

#65971

$13,995

was $30,995

#65951

#47571

$29,495

‘05 Cadillac STS

‘07 GMC Yukon XL

$32,495

was $34,995

was $14,995

$13,495

2 dr coupe, htd leather, roof, CD, pwr everything, 34K

LTZ, 4x4, V8, auto, htd leather, roof, 20” wheels, 71K, Nav

4x4, SLT, V8, auto, DVD, htd leather, 20” wheels 51K, Nav

Lux sedan, V6, auto, htd leather, pwr seats, pwr sunrf

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‘07 Pontiac G6 Sedan

‘07 Chevy Tahoe LT

‘06 Buick LaCrosse

‘06 Chevy Trailblazer LT

AWD, V8, auto, 22” wheels, navigation, DVD, htd/cooled seats

was $12,995

#47621

#26921

#9571

$12,495

2.4L, 4 cyl, auto, chrome wheels, traction control, CD

was $30,995

$29,495

4x4, LT3 pkg, V8, auto, DVD entert, htd leather, 61K

was $15,995

#9552

$14,295

CXL sedan, V6, auto, htd leather, CD, 5 passenger

‘99 GMC Sierra #95451

$15,495

was $16,995

4x4, 6 cyl, auto, pwr seat, CD, cloth interior, 52K

was $12,495

$9,995

1500, ext cab, 3 dr, sport side, V8, auto, SLE pkg, 125K, 4x4

41238

WHAT IF YOUR LOCAL ANIMAL AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY DISAPPEARED?

What else would disappear with it? Well, to start, the millions of dollars that livestock and poultry producers generate to help build and restore your local schools and parks. Then there’s the locally produced meat that we trust to be part of the safe and healthy meals we feed our families.

© 2010 United Soybean Board. (38420-NE-FRN-5/10)

And of course saying goodbye to your local poultry and livestock industries would also mean saying goodbye to the number one customer for U.S. soybean meal. Animal agriculture helps our community thrive. That’s why it’s important that we continue to give them our support. Because a safe and secure food supply and a safe and secure rural community both come from the same place – inside the barns and out in the fields of America’s farmers and producers. Soybean farmers helping livestock and poultry producers just makes sense.

www.animalag.org www animalag org 43080


http://www.agnet.net/pub_pages/HE_070810