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POSTAL CUSTOMER

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE

May 13, 2010 Issue 233-14-10

Kansas Seeks Supreme Court Enforcement By Lori Potter, The Kearney Hub Kansas officials are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to require Nebraska to meet terms of a 2003 settlement decree for Republican River Compact compliance. A press release from the Kansas Department of Agriculture says Kansas Attorney General Steve Six asked the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday to enforce the Kansas v. Nebraska lawsuit settlement decree that outlines each state's rights to Republican Basin water.

The filing includes the longstanding argument that Nebraskans have violated the compact and failed to take actions necessary to avoid future violations, especially in inevitable dry periods to come. "Nebraska has failed to live up to the obligations under the compact, despite assurances given to the Supreme Court and our attempts to resolve this conflict through arbitration," Six said. "Kansas farmers and communities have been deprived of the water they rely upon in the past and will again under Nebraska's cur-

rent policies. My office will continue this fight until Nebraska complies with our agreement." In a press statement Tuesday, Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning said, "Thanks to the hard work of Nebraska's irrigators, the state has been in compliance since 2006. We are working with local natural resources districts to ensure we stay in compliance. We are prepared to vigorously defend the state." Continued on page 23

Special Features Beef. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Nebraska Ranch & Home Expo . . . . . . . 9 NEBRASKAland Days . . . . . . . . . . . 10-14 Irrigation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-23

Weather AccuWeather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Country Living House Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Lighter Side Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Markets Grains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Government Report Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Ag Management Smith Advocates Stronger Energy Focus in New Farm Bill. The 2012 Farm Bill was the focus of attention . . 20

Livestock News Heartland Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Production News USDA June Surveys to Provide Vital Data on 2010 Farm Production. USDA’s Nation Agricultural Statistics Service is surveying thousands of farmers . . . . . . 15

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-31

For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 4/30/10

Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$86.29 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .119.89 Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102.66 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . .151.00 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53.90 Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . .65.00 Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . .57.43 Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .112.25 Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244.55

97.12

98.59

131.01 110.61 163.47 73.52 * 73.87 * 283.15

134.61 114.41 170.08 82.69 * 89.97 * 295.78

Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.35 Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.02 Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.78 Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . .6.02 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .2.12

3.62 3.35 9.21 5.29 2.08

3.90 3.60 9.82 5.70 2.05

135.00 87.50 * 98.00 35.00

135.00 92.50 * 107.00 36.00

Hay (per ton) Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . . .190.00 Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . . .77.50 Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . .85.00 Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143.00 Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51.75 * No market.

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Heartland Express - Weather

May 13, 2010

Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Al Dutcher Report How to Survive a Tornado

Southwest clashing in the middle of the country. Tornadoes occur on every continent but Antarctica.

Did you know that the United States has the highest incidence of tornadoes in the world? If you are caught in a storm, be prepared with these safety and survival tips.

Tornado Alley Although tornadoes have occurred in all 50 states, Tornado Alley (an area covAl Dutcher is ering all or parts of Arkansas, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, on vacation and Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, will return in Oklahoma, South Dakota and Texas) our next issue. experiences them most frequently. In fact, Oklahoma City has been hit by more than 100 tornadoes. This is do to the cold polar air from Canada, warm tropical air from Mexico, and dry air from the Allen Dutcher

Farm and Ranch Publishers - Central Nebraska Publications General Manager - Marc Currie Sales Assistant/Circulation LeAnne Killion

Sales Representatives Eric Keeton • Tim Lingg • Tom Meyer Todd Smith • Lola Cornell •Darlene Overleese Production - Chris Frazer • Anne Nau

Signs of Danger • A pale green sky is an indicator that a tornado may occur. No one knows why this is, but because tornadoes usually form in the afternoon, some people theorize that the longer red and yellow wavelengths of afternoon sunlight turn waterheavy, blueish clouds green. • The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) also advises to look out for the following danger signs: large hail, dark, low-lying clouds, and a loud roar, similar to a freight train.

Ways to Stay Safe • A tornado watch indicates possible tornadoes in your area. Stay tuned to the radio or television news.

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Published by: Central Nebraska Publications, Inc. 21 W. 21st Street, Ste. 010 • P.O. Box 415 Kearney, NE 68847 • 1-800-658-3191 • Copyright © 2010 Front cover mast head background photo courtesy of The OWH, Kent Sievers

Source: The Old Farmers Almanac

Nebraska Weather and Crop Report

“The Original”

BROADFOOT

• A tornado warning means that a tornado is on the ground or has been detected by Doppler radar. Seek shelter immediately! • If you are indoors, take cover in the cellar or a small space (a closet or bathroom) in the interior of your home. Stay away from windows! • If you are outdoors, find a field or ditch away from items that can fly through the air and lie down as flat as you can. • Do not stay in a car or try to drive away from a tornado. Cars can be flung about by high winds or crushed by debris. • If you have evacuated, do not return to your home until it is deemed safe to do so by local officials.

Name: __________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________ City, State & Zip: __________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________________ 42436

Agricultural Summary: For the week ending May 9, 2010, favorable conditions allowed producers to progress with planting spring crops, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Significant corn planting occurred during the week with progress ahead of last year and four days ahead of average. Many producers in the east and south have now turned their attention to planting soybeans. Cooler temperatures have slowed growth of emerging crops and forages. Precipitation fell late in the week on the eastern twothirds of the state. High winds dried soils but made herbicide application difficult. Feedlot conditions have improved. Freezing temperatures in western counties resulted in concern for the emerging sugarbeet crop. Other activities included planting of sorghum and moving cattle to spring pastures. Weather Summary: Temperatures averaged 7 degrees below normal for the week with temperatures dipping into the teens in the Panhandle. Highs for the state ranged from the upper 60s to mid 80s. All areas of the state except the Panhandle received precipitation with the Southeast District reporting close to one inch of moisture. Strong winds were prevalent across the state. Continued on page 30


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express - Country Living

Care for Bare Root Plants Can Be Easy By Andrea Nisley, UNL Extension Educator Family Consumer Science, Dawson County During early spring, many gardeners are anxiously awaiting the arrival of the postman or delivery truck bearing carefully packed plant orders from mail-order nurseries. These orders contain highly prized plant material, usually bare-root and dormant. Plants commonly sold bare-root include fruit trees, deciduous trees, small fruits, strawberries and roses. The novice gardener might look at these “sleeping” plants and think they’ve been cheated. “Where are the green leaves? And what’s this hunk of root?,” they might be heard muttering in dismay. Don’t panic and send these plants back. These plants are definitely alive and will soon sprout leaves. Many local nurseries also carry highquality bare-root nursery stock, but unless they’re geared to mail order, they only carry a small amount. Ideally bare root plants should be planted the same day they arrive, but this is not always possible and plants may need to be stored until planting conditions improve. Careful handling before planting occurs will determine success or failure. Bare root plants have had the soil washed or shaken from their roots after digging from the field. Because bare root plants lack a rooting media that supplies water to the plant, they must be stored in a dormant state with temperatures slightly above or below freezing, and high (95 percent) humidity levels. However, do not allow them to freeze. When bare root plants are shipped from a nursery their roots are usually wrapped in damp sphagnum moss or newspaper. The plants are then placed in a plastic bag and packaged in a wax-coated or cardboard box. After receiving the plants, inspect them briefly to ensure they are healthy and undamaged, and that the packing material is still moist. Re-wet

the packing material if necessary, and then store the plants in their packaged state, under cold temperatures until they can be planted. Bare root plants must be planted in early spring, before the buds begin to swell. To minimize stress on the plants, try to plant on a calm or cloudy day, and keep the plants moist during the planting process. It is helpful to re-hydrate the plants by soaking them in a bucket of water for a couple hours before planting, but don’t store the plants with their roots in water overnight. Bare-root plants perform best when their food reserves have not been depleted. You can help them maintain optimum food reserves by making sure the root systems are healthy. A sharp knife or pruning shears should be used to remove any broken or twisted roots. Make clean cuts and don’t remove more root than necessary. Stay in this conservative mode when pruning the top of your bare-root plant material at planting time, too. Remove only broken, dying or dead plant tissue. During planting, it is extremely important to avoid the exposure of roots to air any longer than necessary, so keep the plants in a bucket of water as you take them out to the planting area. Prepare a planting hole for each plant that is wide and shallow. Create a mound of soil in the center of each hole. Place a plant on top of the mound and drape the roots evenly around each side. Don’t bend or force the roots to fit in the planting hole, instead dig the hole wider if necessary. Each plant should have its first roots just below the soil line- not showing above the soil, or several inches below the soil surface. Gently firm the soil around each seedling after planting to remove air pockets. Water each new plant as it is planted- do not wait until the entire planting is finished to begin. Finally, apply a two inch layer of mulch around the base of the new plants to conserve soil moisture, moderate soil temperature fluctuations and provide weed control.

Fire Up the Grill to Enjoy Great Tasting Beef May is Beef Month in Nebraska and it’s a great time to fire up the grill! “Many people grill all year around, but now is the time when we see a real increased amount of grilling being done by families,” said Ann Marie Bosshamer, Nebraska Beef Council Executive Director. There are so many options when cooking with beef whether it is kabobs, steaks, marinated roasts or everyone’s favorite, the burger. With grilling season upon us, the Nebraska Beef Council encourages you to follow these tips for perfect cooking every time. 1. Keep beef refrigerated. Grilling times are based on beef being taken directly from the refrigerator to the grill – not at room temperature. Shape burgers in advance, cover and refrigerate until the grill is ready. 2. Trim, if necessary. Remove visible fat from meat and poultry before grilling to help prevent flare-ups and excess smoke formation. 3. Marinating mantra. Always marinate in the refrigerator. Tender beef cuts can be marinated for 15 minutes to 2 hours for flavor. Less tender beef cuts should be marinated at least 6 hours –but no more than 24 hours– in a mixture containing an acidic ingredient or a natural tenderizing enzyme. Pat beef dry after removing from marinade to promote even browning and prevent steaming. Do not save marinade for reuse. If a marinade has been in contact with uncooked beef, it must be brought to a full rolling boil before it can be eaten as a sauce. 4. Grilling temperature matters. Grilling over medium heat ensures even cooking and flavorful, juicy meat. If beef is grilled over too high heat, the exterior can become overcooked or charred before the interior reaches the desired doneness. Charring meat, poultry or fish is not recommended. 5. Watch the charcoal. Never grill while the coals are still flaming. Wait until the coals are covered with gray ash (approximately 30 min-

utes), spread in single layer. To check cooking temperature, cautiously hold the palm of your hand above the coals at cooking height. Count the number of seconds you can hold your hand in that position before the heat forces you to pull it away; approximately 4 seconds for medium heat. 6. Know your gas grill. Since gas grill brands vary greatly, consult the owner’s manual for information about preparing the grill for medium heat. 7. Turn properly. Use long-handled tongs for turning steaks; spatulas for burgers. A fork will pierce the beef causing loss of flavorful juices. And don’t be tempted to press down on burgers – it only releases the juices and creates flare-ups. 8. Use a thermometer. The best way to determine doneness of burgers and steaks is to use an instant-read meat thermometer, inserted horizontally from the side to penetrate the center of the meat. Allow 10 to 15 seconds for the thermometer to register the internal temperature. 9. Internal temperature matters. Cook burgers to at least 160°F. The color of cooked ground beef is not a reliable indicator of doneness. Cook steaks to at least 145°F (medium rare doneness). The color will be very pink in the center and slightly brown toward the exterior. 10. Practice food safety. Keep raw meat separate from other foods both in the refrigerator and during preparation. Wash hands, all utensils and surfaces in hot soapy water after contact with raw meat. Never place cooked meat on platters that held raw meat. Use clean serving platters and utensils. Serve cooked food promptly and refrigerate immediately after serving (within two hours after cooking). Celebrate the great taste of beef this May and all summer long, and remember what Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers do for our community, state and world. For more grilling tips or questions log on to www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com.

Page 3

Welcome Home!

Plan APS-1207-A Welcome Home! Visit www.houseoftheweek.com

This home's delightful front porch welcomes you home and provides a great spot to enjoy a glass of lemonade on a sunny afternoon while listening to the game. Inside, the vaulted family room is illuminated by a handsome Palladian window. A handy snack bar extending from the kitchen serves the family room. A good-sized pantry and ample counter space make for easy meal preparation, and you'll love serving guests in the nearby dining room, distinguished by a single column. Beyond the kitchen, the bedroom wing includes a master suite with a vaulted ceiling, a private screened porch and a bath with luxurious amenities. Two secondary bedrooms boast walk-in closets and share a full hall bath.

Detailed Specifications

Plan - APS-1207-A Title - Welcome Home! Style(s) / Influences - Country Exterior Wall Framing - 2x4 Available Foundation(s) - Full Basement Exterior Materials - Brick, Cedar Shake Shingles Dwelling Type - Single Family Bedrooms - 3 actual, 3 possible Baths - 2 full Floors - 1 Living Area (Sq. Ft.) Level Finished Unfinished First 1343 132 Basement 1343 Total Living Area 1343 1475 Dimensions - 54' x 61' x 20' (width x depth x height) Laundry Floor - First Master Suite Floor - First Master Suite Features - Dual Sinks, Porch, Private Toilet, Shower, Spa/Whirlpool, Walk-in Closet Kitchen Style - Galley Kitchen Features - Open Layout, Pantry, Snack Extra Features - Porch Roof Style - Gable Roof Construction - Truss Roof Plane Plane Pitch Main 8.00 12.00 Garages Style - Attached 2 Cars 455 (sq. ft.) Room Information Room Floor Ceiling Height Dining Room First 9.0' Family Room First 12.0'

Main Level

A downloadable study plan of this house, including general information on building costs and financing, is available at www.houseoftheweek.com. To receive the study plan for this home, order by phone, online, or by mail. By phone: Call (866) 772-1013. Reference plan #APS 1207-A. Online: Go to www.houseoftheweek.com.


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Heartland Express - The Lighter Side

May 13, 2010

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts •

Don’t Bank On It (Best Of)

by Lee Pitts

With all the consolidating, downsizing and bankrupting going on banks are eliminating all sorts of services such as tellers and interest on savings accounts. But as far as I know, you can’t get your loan approved at the ATM yet. Unfortunately, your banker is still going to want to meet you face to face to check on your fiscal health. I thought I’d pass along my expansive knowledge on this subject by giving you some tips: • Dress for success not excess. If you show up looking too prosperous your banker will assume you are misappropriating his funds and will “vocationally relocate” you. In other words, he’ll put you out of business. It’s best to wear a simple shirt, work boots and your darkest blue pair of jeans, that is if you haven’t already had to sell your ripped Levi 501’s or Wranglers to some fashion conscience teenager to pay overdue bank charges. • Should you be on time or fashionably late? If you are punctual he’ll assume you are “personnel surplused.” But if you are late your banker will be mad for making him late for lunch. Knowing how he likes to eat plan on arriving two hours early. • Avoid the hand off. Sure you are uncomfortable with your banker sitting there as aloof as a mountain goat, but this is better than being handed off to his administrative assistant. That’s a sure sign your “loan package” has been “displaced.” • Body language is critical. If possible,

touch your banker in a non-threatening way. A caress to the elbow or a light hand on the shoulder has a calming effect. But don’t invade his considerable personal space with a choke hold to the neck. • Sharpen your communication skills. Drop important names, mention management books you plan to read and use big words like “transaction” instead of “blackmail. ” Doesn’t “professional fees” sound much better than “extortion?” • Don’t be defensive. Your lending agent is going to bring up your past lending record that probably resembles the bank’s wallpaper: an ugly repetitive pattern. He’ll refer to your “performance indicators” and “past lending practices.” Assure your banker that your performance is for real this time... no more practice. • Don’t talk a lot. You won’t have to explain something you never said. When your banker talks about “break-even ratios” and when you might be able to pay a little on the principle try not to laugh out loud. Do not sweat or cry on the paper work either. • Banker’s love “business plans.” Tell him you are “reallocating resources” and diversifying by selling cow chips as an alternative fuel source. Mention that you will harvest some valuable grain this year. (Don’t tell him your yield will be measured in cereal bowls per acre.) Be optimistic. In projecting a break-even assume your sows will have 30 pigs per litter and mention

that you are developing a cow herd that will calve only every other year so you’ll only lose half as much money on your calf crops. • Tell your “partner in progress” that you are reducing frivolous expenditures such as your wife’s chiropractor and exorbitant hourly interest charges on bank credit cards. He should be glad to hear that you are consolidating all your debt with his bank. • The days when you can satisfy your banker with numbers on a matchbook cover are gone. Instead, buy a computer so when the banker asks for the numbers you can use the same excuse the bank always uses... “Sorry, but my computer is down.” • Don’t drink alcohol before your meeting. Remember, this is a person with the power to force you into early retirement or to “involuntary separate” you from your job at a time when the whole world is in a “work force correction.” • Assume nothing. Just because the banker’s daughter is your wife doesn’t mean he’ll help the two of you realize your full potential by approving your loan.

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Features In Upcoming Issues: • Hay & Forage Nebraska’s Statewide Ag News Publication

Featured Sections In Every Issue: • Ag Management • Classified Advertising • Country News

• • • •

The Lighter Side Livestock News Production News Schedule of Events

• Weather • Weekly Ag-Market Breakdown

Every Issue Features Available News From These Sources: • AccuWeather Forecasting • Ak-Sar-Ben • Associated Press • Commodities

• Department of Ag • Institute on Agriculture & Natural Resources • Nebraska 4-H

• News from All Heartland Coverage Areas • UNL Cooperative Extension • USDA The Only Publication That Features Statewide FFA Chapter News on a Regular Basis!

myfarmandranch.com

• County Fairs • State Fair Preview • Gudmundson • Wheat Results • Husker Harvest Days • Rodeo

Farm & Ranch . . . Where Agriculture Is Always A Business 42435


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 5

Rounding Up Recipes for

Beef Month Buffalo Style Beef Tacos 1 lb. Ground Beef ¼ cup Cayenne Pepper Sauce for Buffalo Wings 8 Taco Shells 1 cup thinly sliced Lettuce ¼ cup Blue Cheese Dressing

½ cup shredded Carrots /3 cup chopped Celery 2 T. chopped fresh Cilantro Carrot & Celery sticks or Cilantro sprigs for garnish 1

Brown ground beef in skillet, breaking into small crumbles and stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and pour off drippings. Return to skillet and pour in pepper sauce. Cook and stir 1 minute or until heated through. Meanwhile, heat taco shells according to package directions. Evenly spoon beef mixture into taco shells. Add lettuce; drizzle with dressing. Top evenly with carrot, celery and cilantro. Garnish with carrot or celery sticks or cilantro springs if desired. Can top with cheese, tomatoes or other taco fixings as you wish. Makes 4.

Best Ever Beef Tenderloin 4½-5 lbs. Filet of Beef or Beef Tenderloin (whole)

MARINADE ½ cup Soy Sauce ½ cup Honey 2 T. chopped Ginger ¼ cup Balsamic Vinegar 1 /3 cup Dry Red Wine

2 T. Black pepper 2 T. chopped Garlic 3 T. Cornstarch 1 Bay Leaf

Combine all marinade ingredients in heavy saucepan; mix well. Bring just to boiling point. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Place beef in a glass, enamel, or stainless steel pan. Pour cooled marinade over beef, and cover. NOTE: Marinade will be like a paste. ALLOW TO MARINATE OVERNIGHT IN FRIDGE. Reserve some marinade for basting. Remove from fridge several hours before roasting. Preheat oven to 450°. Place meat in shallow baking pan, and pour marinade over it. Roast for 20 minutes, basting with marinade from time to time. Reduce heat to 350°. Continue roasting another 20 minutes (or until beef reaches desired doneness). Remove from oven and let cool in marinade. Cut into thin slices and serve at room temperature. Serves 6-8. NOTE: This is best served rare to medium rare. It is most often done after 40 minutes of roasting, so please be careful not to overcook.

Beef Brisket or Short Ribs 1-5 to 7 lb. Beef Brisket 3-4 Onions, chopped 2-3 T. minced fresh Garlic

1-1½ liter bottle Barbecue Sauce 1 cup water

BRISKET RUB 2 T. Paprika 2 T. Chili Powder 2 T. Light Brown Sugar 1 T. Cumin 1 T. Dry Mustard

3 t. Salt 2 t. Black Pepper or ¼ t. Cayenne Pepper (increase or decrease according to how hot you want it)

A day ahead: Grease a large roaster or a roasting pan. Sprinkle the chopped onions in the bottom of the pan. In a small bowl or cup, mix together all rub ingredients. Rinse brisket under cold water, then dry with a paper towel. Rub the brisket lightly with vegetable or Canola oil. Rub the minced garlic and rub spices over both sides of brisket, then place into the roaster pan/dish, fat--side down. Pour the barbecue sauce over the top of the brisket; do NOT rub into the meat, as it will disturb the rub spices, just leave the sauce sitting on top of the brisket. Cover tightly with foil and place in the fridge. The following morning turn the brisket over to fat side up. Add in the 1 cup water and mix with the sauce in the pan. With clean hands, rub the sauce all over the top of the brisket. Cover very tightly (if using foil, make a couple of slits in the top of the foil to let steam escape) return to the fridge until ready to cook (for at least another 2 hours).

Beef Patties in Onion Gravy PATTIES 1 lb. Ground Beef 1 Egg ½ cup Dry Breadcrumbs ½ envelope Dry Onion Soup Mix

1 t. Worcestershire Sauce /8 t. Pepper

1

GRAVY ½ envelope Dry Onion Soup Mix

2 cups Water 2 T. Flour

Combine all patty ingredients; mix thoroughly with your hands and shape into 4 patties. Brown patties in a skillet. Add dry onion soup mix and 1½ cup water. Cover pan tightly and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove patties to a plate. In a gravy shaker or jar, combine ½ cup water with 2 T. flour. Stir flour and water into onion gravy. Stir constantly with a whisk until it comes to a boil. Boil 1 minute. Return patties to pan. Serve with mashed potatoes or hot cooked noodles. Serves 4.

French Dip Roast Beef for the Crock-Pot

Set oven to 325°. Remove roaster from fridge (preferably 1 hour before cooking and leave on the counter). Cook for about 4-5 hours or more depending on the size of your brisket, or until the brisket is tender (check for doneness after about 3 hours cooking, by inserting a fork into the brisket; the meat will be done if the fork goes in very easily).

3½-4 lbs. boneless Chuck Roast ½ cup Soy Sauce 1 Beef Bouillon Cube 1 Bay Leaf 3-4 Peppercorns

Remove and let the brisket sit for 15 minutes before slicing, then slice against the grain. Spoon any fat that has accumulated on top of the sauce, and serve the sauce on the side. Serves 10-12.

Place roast in a 5-quart slow cooker. Combine soy sauce and next 6 ingredients. Pour over roast.

Dried Beef Cheese Ball 1-8 oz. pkg. Cream Cheese, softened 1-2 oz. pkg. Dried Beef (or chipped beef) ¼ cup Green Onion

½ t. Garlic Salt 2 t. Worcestershire Sauce 2 T. Lemon Juice 2 T. Mayonnaise

Dice the dried beef into small pieces. Dice/mince the green onions. Add all of the ingredients to the softened cream cheese in a medium-sized bowl. Stir. The ingredients should be consistent throughout the cheese ball. Wrap in plastic wrap. Store in the fridge for a least 6-8 hours. This is one of those recipes that is at its best after sitting overnight. Serve with crackers. Serves 12.

1 t. dried Rosemary, crushed 1 t. dried Thyme 1 t. Garlic Powder 12 French rolls, split

Add water to slow cooker until roast is almost covered. Cook, covered, on LOW for 7 hours or until very tender. Remove roast, reserving broth. Shred roast with a fork and serve on sandwich rolls with the broth on the side for dipping. Serves 12.

Beef & Bean Burritos 1 lb. Ground Beef ¼ cup Tomato Puree 1-16 oz. can Refried Beans 1 small Onion, chopped 1 t. Salt

3

/4 t. Chili Powder ½ t. Garlic Powder 3 /4 t. Cumin ¼ t. Cayenne Pepper ¼ t. Black Pepper 6 Flour Tortillas

Brown ground beef in large skillet. Drain if needed. Add remaining ingredients (except tortilla) and cook together for 10 minutes. Wrap filling into tortilla with your choice of cheddar cheese, sour cream, black olives, avocado and/or salsa. Serves 6.


Page 6

Heartland Express - Government Report

May 13, 2010

Biotech Industry Growing in Nebraska By Governor Dave Heineman Lincoln Office/State Capitol P.O. Box 94848 Lincoln, NE 68509-4848 Phone: 402-471-2244 Fax: 402-471-6031

Dear Fellow Nebraskans: I was joined this week by University of Nebraska President James B. Milliken in a recruitment visit that was part of the 2010 BIO International Convention held in Chicago. A growing segment of our economy consists of specialized companies in the biosciences field. These are the high tech, research-driven fields producing biofuels, pharmaceuticals and vaccines for humans and animals, robotics, and testing equipment used in research labs around the world. This trade show is the world’s largest biotech gathering, highlighting new innovations, emerging biotech companies and the work of leading research institutions from across the United States and around the world. Being part of this event was an opportunity to meet with companies who have investments in our state and highlight Nebraska’s strengths in bioscience to an international audience. A study released at the trade show said employment in Nebraska’s bioscience sector has grown by 19.2 percent, which outpaced national bioscience employment gains of 15.8 percent between 2001 and

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2008. The study noted that Nebraska’s bioscience industry paid wages that were 50 percent higher last year than the average annual wages in the private sector. The BIO International Trade Show event was an opportunity to highlight Nebraska’s investments in biotech and expand our business recruitment efforts in a field where companies are heavily invested in research and the latest innovations. Our delegation was coordinated by the Bio Nebraska Life Sciences Association. Bio Nebraska brings together leaders from private sector companies and the Nebraska Department of Economic Development together with Nebraska’s academic and research institutions. This collaborative relationship is reflected in the recipients honored in recent weeks by Bio Nebraska with the 2010 Governor’s Award for Bioscience. The award is presented in honor of a partnership that brought leaders in research and academia together with the business community for a project that has been remarkably successful in advancing scientific discoveries and creating jobs here in Nebraska. This year’s honorees were two individuals who

lead a joint team of business and university researchers working to develop genetics research tools. The result of the collaboration was among the world’s first automated DNA sequencing systems, which was then licensed and developed as a product for the commercial testing and research market. More than 20 years later, the work of those involved in the project is now a full line of testing and analysis equipment used in DNA research in more than 30,000 labs around the world and has created 130 technology-specific jobs in Lincoln. Strong relationships are essential and the work of the 2010 Governor’s Award for Bioscience recipients embodied both the collaboration and the innovation Bio Nebraska sought to honor in creating this award. As we work to recruit new investments and new companies looking to expand in science-based sectors, the achievements of the scientists and researchers already at work in Nebraska are an excellent example of the potential that exists in our state.

The Budget Process Cannot Be Ignored by Congressman Adrian Smith Scottsbluff Office 416 Valley View Drive, Suite 600 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Phone: (308) 633-6333 Fax: (308) 633-6335

At its most fundamental level, the duty of Congress is to steward the government's revenue. Lately, all it's been doing is spending it. To shoulder this responsibility appropriately, annually Congress drafts a budget, establishing a fiscal blueprint for government to follow on spending decisions. Our nation faces enormous and unheard of financial challenges. Every penny of debt accumulated must be paid by our children and grandchildren, but it is not too late to change the course of our fiscal fate. President Obama’s budget proposed for fiscal year 2011 clocked in at an amazing $3.8 trillion. If passed, this budget would increase spending by record levels, sending our nation’s deficits dangerously high and - if implemented - would still raise taxes. His budget proposal also would add $14 trillion to our nation’s debt over the next ten years. As distressing as those numbers sound, credit should be given to the Administration for at least submitting a budget to Congress. The deadline for the House of Representatives to pass an actual budget has come and passed without even so much as a committee vote. Indeed, there have been indications the House

Grand Island Office 1811 West Second Street, Suite 105 Grand Island, NE68803 Phone: (308) 384-3900 Fax: (308) 384-3902

may not consider a budget resolution this year at all, an unprecedented development. In fact, the House of Representatives always has passed a budget resolution since the current rules which govern the modern congressional budgeting process were put into place in 1974. The budget is then used to set spending parameters for the appropriations process. Without a budget, the only spending rule is there are no rules. Having served on the House Budget Committee, I know the process can be frustrating and arduous for both Republicans and Democrats, but that is no excuse for a lack of leadership. Families, businesses, organizations big and small, even cities and states have had to face the harsh realities of a struggling economy and financially difficult times; Congress must do the same. Regardless of the differences I have with several of my colleagues on spending, taxation, and debt, there can be no doubt this is a debate we need to have. Our nation’s long-term fiscal outlook is unsustainable and our economy continues to face serious challenges on the road to recovery. Small businesses and entrepreneurs need certainty for access to capital and long-range planning. The longer

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Congress waits to deal with the fiscal challenges facing our nation, the greater harm will come to our economy. Small businesses are struggling to comprehend exactly what the impact of the recently-passed health care legislation will be, and several companies have already stated it will hurt their bottom line. Congress is still failing to meet promises of energy independence by not adopting an “all of the above” approach to energy development. Since President Obama signed the stimulus bill into law, more than 2 million Americans have lost their jobs and the unemployment rate has soared to nearly 10 percent. Unless we rein-in the size and scope of the federal government and focus on true economic reform and job growth, our country will face the problems which come with an uncertain economy. I am committed to commonsense approaches to the problems plaguing our nation, but scattered and haphazard gimmicks billed as fixes, such as the stimulus and various bailouts, are not the way to go. We need a practical, workable federal budget which limits spending and puts our fiscal house back in order.

Cutting Spending To Lower Debt is in Our Future by Senator Mike Johanns Kearney Office: 4111 Fourth Avenue, Suite 26 Kearney, NE 68845 Tel: (308) 236-7602 Fax: (308) 236-7473

Lincoln Office: 294 Federal Building 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Tel: (402) 476-1400 Fax: (402) 476-0605

When the topic of the public debt comes up, many are quick to blame the budget deficits on the previous Administration. While there is plenty of shared responsibility, this response fails to acknowledge the true problem of our national debt, nor does it justify our current astronomical and unsustainable rate of federal spending. In 2008, our public debt totaled $5.8 trillion. Another way to consider this: from the birth of our nation until less than two years ago, our government spent $5.8 trillion more than it collected. Astonishingly, President Obama's budgets are projected to more than double that amount - to $12.3 trillion by 2013. In other words, the President in one term is set to more than double the amount of debt accrued by every President from George Washington to George W. Bush. By 2019, the debt is projected to triple. These are truly uncharted waters for our country, and simply blaming others does not hide our serious financial situation that will require tough decisions and bold leadership. Unfortunately, leaders in Congress and the Administration have been

Scottsbluff Office: 115 Railway Street, Suite C102 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Tel: (308) 632-6032 Fax: (308) 632-6295

evading this responsibility and have only enabled the burden to grow heavier. When Congress passed a provision last February requiring all proposed additional non-emergency spending to be paid for up front, there was widespread applause and pats on the back. Yet in the three short months since the passage of PAYGO law (Pay As You Go), Congress has conveniently waived the requirements three times instead of adhering to fiscal discipline. As a result, billions of dollars were added to our national debt. Even small efforts to rein in spending have run into roadblocks. For example, Congress traditionally passes an annual budget resolution as a fiscal roadmap for our country. However, progress is stalled for next year's budget because agreements to cut just $8-10 billion in spending - less than onethird of one percent of the budget - are proving elusive. Our country is literally on an unsustainable spending trajectory and yet even the smallest cuts cannot be agreed upon. It would be foolish to think we can continue accruing debt while escaping consequences. Just

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this week, the European Union, with seemingly no other viable options, was forced to fund a bailout for Greece, whose debt has grown to 115 percent of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Our debt is currently 60 percent of our GDP, and under the President's proposed budget is projected to increase to 90 percent in the next decade. Should our country's circumstances become as dire as Greece's, there would be no bailout. We would be in serious trouble. No one knows the importance of acting now better than our country's leading economic officials. Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner recently told Congress, "We're living with unsustainable deficits;" and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke stressed the solution is "not something that is ten years away" and that it's "very, very important" for the government to "bring itself back to a sustainable position." I agree completely, and will continue looking for ways to work with my colleagues to lower spending and rein in our national debt. Congress must confront our bloated debt, or future generations will face the consequences.


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express - Beef

Beef Quality Assurance Assures Beef Safety Since it was introduced, this nation's beef quality assurance program has measurably improved safety, helped reduce chemical residues in beef and given producers new models for quality production. When the program started in the early '80s, 1 to 2 percent of beef had chemical residues of some kind. The most recent U.S. Department of Agriculture tests conducted in 2008 show chemical residues down to .00007 percent in beef cattle, said Dee Griffin, University of Nebraska-Lincoln feedlot veterinarian. "It is now clear that educational efforts by Cooperative Extension and the beef industry over the last 10 to 15 years has paid off in measurable reductions in chemical residues in meat," said Dave Smith, UNL dairy/beef veterinarian. In the BQA program, federal government agencies supply regulations and data, while Cooperative Extension at land-grant institutions and commodity groups help with dissemination and education. The intended result is that producers lead quality initiatives that benefit their customers. The BQA mission is to maximize consumer confidence in and acceptance of beef by focusing the producer's attention to daily production practices that influence the safety, wholesomeness and quality of beef and beef products through the use of science, research and education initiatives. "Much of the UNL Extension mission of beef education comes from the producer-led educational programs of the beef quality assurance program. These programs are then carried out by producers and also work with the commodity groups," Smith said. For example, as Smith promotes a program to improve the health of cattle or the safety of beef, his work also supports the BQA program. In addition to residues showing up in food, the program also addresses other issues, such as tenderness, biological hazards, food safety and how cattle are handled. Quality assurance programs for all livestock were driven by the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service for residue control. This effort stemmed from a high percentage of vegetables with chemical residues in the 1980s. In addition to beef containing 1 to 2 percent chemical residue, 4 percent of pork also had chemical residues of some kind. With 33 to 35 million head of cattle in the United States, 8 million of those in Nebraska, 1 to 2 percent of beef with chemical residue was unacceptable, Griffin said. The FSIS, with the organization of Cooperative Extension at the nation's universities, along with commodity groups and others led the effort to fix the problem. Within two years, those involved knew where the chemical residues were coming from: antibiotics. Griffin said they found out that producers were giving the correct dose of antibiotics, but at maximum amounts. Amounts were reduced

and producers also started following withdrawal periods that ensure antibiotics are not in the animals' system when they are processed for food. "Once we learned that, we had to teach it to everyone across the world," Griffin said. "The Cooperative Extension service became a way to get it out." In addition, veterinarians, producers and others came up with a very simple six-point system that not only dealt with antibiotics, but anything that could potentially cause a defect. This program is followed in 47 states. These six points: • make sure animals are in perfect health and don't get sick; • make sure feed is clean and not contaminated; • make sure products used on cattle, such as antibiotics or vaccines, are administered properly; • concentrate on animals that need special care, such as those that are sick; • have sick animals evaluated by a nutritionist or veterinarian, following the proper withdrawal time on antibiotics; • keep accurate records. USDA tests all cattle, pigs, chickens, milk, eggs, ducks and other animals randomly for a broad spectrum or environmental contaminants like lead, Griffin said. In other meats, like pork and chicken, the residue percentage is zero. "If you eat a pork chop or eat at KFC, you will never bite into any residue of any kind," Griffin said. "And we aren't done (with the beef industry) as the only acceptable number is all zeroes." Griffin said it is important that the public is educated about agriculture. In 1950, 30 percent of Americans were directly involved in agriculture. Today that number is fewer than 2 percent. Ultimately, the BQA program is based on the ethics, principles and practices of individual producers. "We need to make sure everything we do produces a safe and wholesome product the way Mother Nature intended it to be," Griffin said. 5/2010-SK Sources: Dave Smith, Ph.D., DVM, professor, veterinary and biomedical sciences, (402) 472-2362, dsmith8@unl.edu Dee Griffin, Ph.D., DVM, professor, veterinary and biomedical sciences, (402) 762-4504, dgriffin2@unl.edu; Richard Randle, Ph.D., DVM, associate professor, veterinary and biomedical sciences, (402) 472-0446; Dave Hardin, Ph.D., DVM, department head, veterinary and biomedical sciences, (402) 472-2952, dhardin2@unl.edu; bqa.bp Writer: Sandi Alswager Karstens, IANR News Service, (402) 472-3030, salswager2@unl.edu

Page 7

Beef Scholars Program Gives Students Solid Background in Industry For the first time in its four-year history, the Nebraska Beef Industry Scholars program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has freshmen, sophomore, junior and senior members. The program, which has about 50 members, delivers intensive training about all aspects of the beef industry, said Matt Spangler, assistant professor in the Department of Animal Science in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. The first students to enter the program are now seniors, said Spangler, who coordinates the program. No other university has a similar program, in which students are taught by not only UNL faculty members but by representatives of the beef industry. "The beef industry is extremely important in the state of Nebraska," Spangler said, noting that about 55 percent of the state's agricultural receipts are from beef. "It's just natural an undergraduate program like this exists at UNL." All students entering a degree program in CASNR are eligible to apply for the scholars program. Of those in the program, five are seniors. Not all are animal science majors. Other degree programs represented include agricultural economics and agricultural leadership, education and communication. Students in the program are required to take courses created specifically for the scholars program in addition to their regular degree program coursework, Spangler said. The courses focus on all aspects of the beef industry and provide students opportunities to meet up to 20 experts in the industry each year. Those industry representatives, from agricultural-related companies as well as organizations like the Nebraska Cattlemen, do not get paid for their teaching, Spangler said. They are offered reimbursements for travel expenses, but many decline. "The beef industry sees this as an opportunity to help educate their replacements," Spangler said. "Because of that, we've had tremendous industry support." The goal of the program is to better equip these students for work in the beef industry. Many industry representatives specifically ask for internship applications from participants in the program, Spangler said. The seniors in the program traveled to San Antonio in January for the National Cattlemens Beef Association National meeting, where they participated in discussions on beef policy. One of those seniors was Alex Wolf, an agricultural economics major from Albion who grew up working on his family's ranch and feedlot. Participation in the scholars program has helped him learn a lot about current issues in the industry, he said. "It gives me a greater knowledge and appreciation of the cattle industry and helped me develop a lot of contacts in the beef industry," Wolfe said. 5/2010-LM Source: Matt Spangler, Ph.D., assistant professor, animal science, (402) 472-6362, mspangler2@unl.edu Writer: Lori McGinnis; scholars.bp Editor: Dan Moser, IANR News Service, (402) 472-3030, dmoser3@unl.edu

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Page 8

Heartland Express - Markets

May 13, 2010

By David M. Fiala

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

County Grain Prices as of 5/11/10 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Scottsbluff Sidney St. Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon

New Corn

$3.49 $3.32 $3.52 $3.34 $3.45 $3.51 $3.54 $3.58 $3.24 $3.52 $3.29 $3.58 $3.41 $3.48 $3.59 $3.54 $3.38 $3.56 $3.48 $3.46 $3.33 $3.39 $3.51 $3.50 $3.48 $3.27 $3.56 $3.54

$3.50 $3.40 $3.48 $3.58 $3.43 $3.53 $3.53 $3.60 $3.38 $3.54 $3.56 $3.58 $3.53 $3.49 $3.56 $3.37 $3.62 $3.53 $3.43 $3.51 $3.50 $3.46 $3.51 $3.52 $3.51 $3.48 $3.48 $3.55

$3.35 $3.55 $3.43 $3.42 $3.43 $3.30

$3.58 $3.53 $3.45 $3.43 $3.45 $3.43

671 Northern Above Oil Flowers Above Spring Wheat

Beans

New Beans

$9.12 $8.95 $9.16 $8.87 $9.01 $9.08 $9.38 $9.23

$8.56 $8.48 $8.62 $8.35 $8.51 $8.53 $8.83 $8.67

$9.14 $8.87 $9.11

$8.56 $8.34 $8.67

$9.10 $8.87 $9.11

$8.60 $8.34 $8.62

$8.90 $9.26 $8.92 $8.90 $9.41 $9.01 $9.07

$8.58 $8.82 $8.46 $8.43 $8.29 $8.80 $8.67 $8.58

$9.06 $9.18

$8.58 $8.68

$9.07 $9.07 $9.09 $9.16 $8.93

$8.57 $8.46 $8.57 $8.57 $8.63

$30.00 $4.73

Wheat

New Wheat

$4.13

$4.18

$3.84

$3.91

$4.06

$4.10 $4.71 $4.10 $3.78

$4.06 $3.72 $3.84 $4.09 $3.84 $4.08 $3.84 $3.84 $3.84 $4.05 $4.19 $3.96 $3.84 $3.97

$3.91 $4.09 $3.90 $4.06 $3.91 $3.84 $3.91 $4.05 $4.19 $4.15 $3.93

$4.05 $3.84

$4.15 $4.00

$4.05

$4.06

$3.83

$3.96

$4.18 $4.14

$4.23 $4.19

Pinto $28.00 Oil Flowers (new) $16.15 Spring Wheat(new) $4.80

Corn

New Milo

$3.22

$3.17

$3.05

$3.13

$3.05

$2.98

$3.19

$3.13

$3.09

$3.08

$2.90 $2.96 $2.92

$3.03 $3.08 $3.08

$3.16 $3.12

July 10 356 396

Dec. 10 373 409

July 2010 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .3.830 High . . .3.850 Low . . . .3.750 Close . . .3.782 Change +0.012

customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options. The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

Crop Basis Charts from Reporting Locations as of 5/11/10 Corn Basis

Soybean Basis

Wheat Basis

Sorghum Basis

$3.07 $3.08

N/A

Soybeans

Wheat

Corn trade has been higher in active trade this week following the lightly supportive USDA report and continued rumors of Chinese export activity. After three days of trade, the weekly net change is 6 higher on both the July and December contracts. The USDA supply and demand report has been the focus this week, but the weather and crop development should continue to dictate trade longterm. On the monthly USDA Supply and Demand report, the old crop carryover was only 1.738 versus the average trade guess of 1.853; this was near the low side estimate. The new crop carryover was then smaller than expected at 1.818 versus the 1.884 average trade guess. The new crop yield was actually slightly higher than expected coming in at 163.5 bushels per acre and we used the 88.8 million acre planted number. The trade will talk about half to one million more acres of corn to be planted and a yield that could stretch up to 170. But this will take good weather and time, so for now the report suggests a range bound market. The USDA jumped the export number by 50 million and ethanol usage number by 100 million giving the larger than expected drop in the carryover. The USDA is using about a 2% increase in usage for the new crop balance sheet versus the old. The world balance sheets were negative with old crop carryover up by 3 million tons to 147 million tons and new crop carryover is up to 154.21 million metric tons. The weekly export sales totals were great again coming in at 1.85 million tons of old crop which was well above expectations; new crop sales were minimal at 30,400 tons. China was a listed buyer of two cargoes while Japan was the major buyer of about 12 cargos – nearly 700,000 tons. The weekly progress report listed corn plantings at 81% complete versus 46% last year and the 62% 5-year average. Emergence was listed at 39% versus the 21% 5-year average. Weather will continue to influence the trade but planting conditions remain mostly ideal; temperatures were colder over the weekend but warming temperatures are expected near-term. Hedgers call with questions.

Support: Resistance

Navy

Milo

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience to provide

Wheat trade has been lower this week due to long profit taking. After three days of trade, the weekly net changes are 19 lower in Chicago, KC is down 14, and Minneapolis is down 11 on the July contracts. The USDA report on Tuesday confirmed the bearish fundamentals which have been noted for the weakness. The domestic carryover numbers were steady at 950 million bushels on old crop and new crop 2010-11 was at 997 million bushels versus the average trade guess of 961 million. So the first new crop balance sheet is at a 47% stocks to usage ratio and that is using a usage figure about 70 million greater than 2009-10. The Global wheat carryover was up by about 1 million tons on the old crop balance sheet to 196.7 million tons and the 2010-11 world carryover estimate was at 198 million tons. The weekly winter wheat condition report on Monday showed good to excellent ratings down 2% from last week at 66%. The spring wheat plantings were listed at 67% versus the 66% 5-year average. Winter wheat was listed as 40% headed versus the 43% 5-year average. The weekly export sales were at 150,200 tons of old crop and 134,100 tons of new which combined were at the low end of expectations. Hedgers call with questions, continue to look forward at the carry in the futures for opportunities in 2011 and 2012.

Support: Resistance

Chicago 473 524

K City 493 532

Minneapolis 514 551

July 2010 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .5.010 High . . . .5.080 Low . . . .4.900 Close . . .4.914 Change .-0.016

Soybean trade has been higher this week due to light profit taking by market shorts and spillover support from the corn market. Heading into Thursday, the weekly net change is 5 higher on the July contract and is up 3. Meal is $1.30 higher and oil is steady on the week. The sell-off last week priced in some of the negative items so the reaction to the report was less negative than expected. The USDA old crop carryover was unchanged from the April number at 190 million bushels versus the average trade guess down at 182 million. The new crop carryover was at 365 million versus the 338 average trade guess. The USDA used a 42.9 trend line number versus the 44 bushels per acre seen last year. The trade should be thinking we could see 300k to 750k more acres of beans and the yield number is fair for now. The USDA backed off new crop demand by over 150 million bushels versus 2009-10. Global carryover items grew with the old crop carryover up by just under 1 million tons to 63.8 million tons and the initial 2010-11 carryover is up at 66.1 million tons. Last year the carryover was only at 43 million metric tons. The weekly soybean export sales numbers were at 283,200 tons of old crop and 209,100 tons of new; China was the major buyer of both new and old crop. The recent great demand for nearby trade should start backing off as the South American harvest is nearly complete. China has likely done most of the big buying for the near term; they will keep buying for new crop, but may not get aggressive unless their domestic protein oil production has any problems. Weekly meal sales were good at 137,800 tons of old crop and 300 tons of new. Bean oil sales were within expectations at 10,300 tons. On the weekly progress report Monday afternoon, the soybean plantings were listed at 30% complete versus the 19% 5year average. We do still have a long year ahead, but we may need weather to promote trade above $10.

Support: Resistance

July 942 989

July Meal 272 287

July Oil 3769 3925

July 2010 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .9.704 High . . . .9.760 Low . . . .9.600 Close . . .9.654 Change .-0.004


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express - Nebraska Ranch & Home Expo

Page 9

7

Nebraska Ranch & Home Expo

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The former Nebraska Ranch Expo, located at Bassett, Nebraska, will now be located at the Viaero Events Center in Kearney, Nebraska under the new name of Nebraska Ranch & Home Expo.

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The management continues to be the same as it enters 21 years of providing you with the best promotions possible for your product. This is Nebraska's largest ranch oriented trade show. Prime emphasis of the show is to provide ranchers and farmers with what’s new in the field of haying technology and new innovations in the livestock industry. This is in conjunction with a large array of home and personal products. Admission is FREE! Parking is FREE! Bring the whole family!

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Potential exhibitors are encouraged to consider this trade show. In past years, exhibitors have attended from 21 states and Canada.

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• Over 30 Acres of Exhibits & Demo Area • Over 300 Commercial Exhibits • Hard Surfaced Outdoor Exhibit Area (No Mud!) • Handicap Parking & Carts Available • Air Conditioned Indoor Booths • All Exhibits in One Centralized Area • Livestock Exhibits (Horse & Beef Tent) • Prize Drawings & Giveaways • Several Food Concessions

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• SCHEDULE OF EVENTS •

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Wednesday, June 9 & Thursday, June 10 10:00 a.m. -- Expo Exhibits Open both days at Viaero Events Center. 2:00 p.m. -- Livestock Handling Facilities and Related Health Program Demonstrations with Live Animals (East Exhibit Area). 8:00 p.m. -- (Wednesday) Nebraska Ranch & Home Expo Exhibits Close. 5:30 p.m. -- (Thursday) Nebraska Ranch & Home Expo Exhibits Close.

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Page 10

Heartland Express - Nebraskaland Days

May 13, 2010

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May 13, 2010

Heartland Express - Nebraskaland Days

Page 11

The Story of NEBRASKAland DAYS History NEBRASKAland DAYS was first conceived in 1965 as a statewide celebration with two primary objectives, first to promote tourism and secondly to commemorate our great heritage and pay tribute to the people that paved the way for the Nebraskaland of today. The first celebrations, held in Lincoln, Nebraska, lasted only four days and included only a limited number of events with an annual budget of approximately $50,000. In 1968, NEBRASKAland DAYS came to its permanent home in North Platte and has since

expanded to a major tourist attraction with over 80 events, including four performances of professional rodeo, two or more concerts, a western musical theater production, professional and competitive art shows, parades, feeds, a heritage festival, competitive sporting events and a host of other special events. Many events are targeted to specific audiences like seniors, youth, or families. The annual June celebration now lasts nearly two weeks operating on an annual budget approaching $1,000,000.

As "Nebraska's official celebration," NEBRASKAland DAYS continues to successfully accomplish many of its primary goals. Even as early as the mid-to-late 1960's, the value of tourism as an economic product was recognized. However, as our economy continues to evolve beyond industrial genres of economic output, the value of tourism and specifically NEBRASKAland DAYS assumes a greater significance in the overall role of our economy.

NEBRASKAland DAYS Calendar June 11 Concert & Ice Cream Social - 8:00 PM - Free concert with ice cream social at the Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue

June 12 NLD Adult Tennis Tournament - 8:00 AM At 8:00 a.m. at Cody Park, 1400 North Jeffers. Free admission for spectators - pre-registration & entry fee for contestants - entry forms on www.nebraskalanddays.com Buffalo Bill Girls Softball Tournament - 8:00 AM - Fast pitch annual girls' softball tournament at Dowhower Softball complex, West 16th Street at North Sycamore Street. Contact Geni Karre at rgkarre@q.com or 308-534-5318. Admission is $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for students. Woodcarver Show & Sale - 9:00 AM - Artistry in wood at the Quality Inn & Suites, 2102 South Jeffers - $2.00 admission Antique Tractor & Machinery Show - 10:00 AM - At the Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue - free admission Heritage Festival - 10:00 AM - Celebrate Nebraska's heritage at the Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Free admission, antique tractor and machinery show, crafts and ethnic food for sale. Free concert at 7:00 p.m. Opening Ceremonies - 12:00 PM - Opening ceremonies for NEBRASKAland DAYS at the Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue Free Concert - 7:00 PM - Free concert at the Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, featuring Job, Peter, and Chuck with classic folk and rock from the 1960's and 70's

June 13 NLD Adult Tennis Tournament - 8:00 AM NEBRASKAland DAYS Adult Tennis Tournament at Cody Park, 1400 North Jeffers - free admission for spectators - registration and fee for participants - entry forms at www.nebraskalanddays.com

Buffalo Bill Girls Softball Tournament 8:00 AM - Fast pitch annual girls softball tournament at Dowhower Softball complex, West 16th Street at North Sycamore Street. Contact Geni Karre at rgkarre@q.com or 308-534-5318. Admission is $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for students. Field Mass - 8:15 AM - Catholic Mass in the field east of the north campus of North Platte Community College - 1101 South Halligan Drive Antique Tractor & Machinery Show - 10:00 AM - At Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue - free admission Woodcarver Show & Sale - 10:00 AM Artistry in wood at the Quality Inn & Suites, 2102 South Jeffers - $2.00 admission Heritage Festival - 10:00 AM - Heritage festival continues at the Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Free admission, antique tractor & machinery show, horse carriage driving competition, youth talent competition, antique tractor "rodeo", crafts and ethnic food for sale. Sandhills Chili Cook-Off - 11:00 AM - At the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Cooking begins at 8:00 a.m. with the public served 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Tickets at the gate - $7.00 for adults and $3.00 for children 3 and under. NLD Youth Talent Contest - 1:00 PM - During the Heritage Festival, listen to the talent of the youth in the area at 1:00 p.m. at the Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Admission is free with an entry fee for contestants. Horse Carriage Driving Comp. - 1:00 PM The competition will be held in the northeast corner of the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue Antique Tractor Rodeo - 2:00 PM Competition on the Lincoln County Historical Museum grounds, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue Miss Rodeo NE Horsemanship Comp. - 2:00 PM Miss Rodeo Nebraska and Miss Teen Rodeo Nebraska contestants will compete in horsemanship at the Wild West Arena, 2400 N. Buffalo Bill Avenue - Free admission Information on pageant at www.missrodeonebraska.org

MRNA Horsemanship BBQ - 5:30 PM - The MRNA Horsemanship BBQ will be held at the Wild West Arena, 2400 N. Buffalo Bill Avenue, following the MRNA Horsemanship Competition. Bring your branding irons and add your brand to Miss Rodeo Nebraska Michelle Boeshart's Wall of Brand Fame for $10. Only 12 teams will be accepted for the first ever "Run for the Buckle" competition - contact Janet Mueller 308-539-4221. Other family activities will also be available throughout the evening. Tickets available at the gate or at the North Platte/Lincoln County Convention & Visitors Bureau - 308-532-4729 or 800-955-4528 $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12. Free Concert - 6:30 PM - Free concert at Lincoln County Historical Museum, 2403 North Buffalo Bill Avenue Competitive Art Show Reception - 6:30 PM - At the Platte River Mall, 1000 South Dewey Free admission - sponsored by the North Platte Art Guild

June 14 NLD Junior Tennis Tournament - 8:00 AM At 8:00 a.m. at Cody Park, 1400 North Jeffers Admission is free to spectators - pre-registration & entry fee for contestants - entry forms at www.nebraskalanddays.com Competitive Art Show - 10:00 AM - Art competition at the Platte River Mall - 1000 South Dewey - free admission - some art is for sale Kids Costume Parade - 10:30 AM - Kids Costume Parade presented by North Platte Chamber Hostesses beginning at Westfield Pharmacy, 1485 West A Street - registration is a 10:00 a.m. with the parade beginning at 10:30 a.m. - prizes awarded in age categories Family Night - 5:30 PM - Family fun, entertainment, an incredible children's program - plus free ice-cream at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue - featuring comedian, Dennis Tooley - free admission: accepting food items for local pantries Frontier Revue - 8:00 PM - North Platte's history done in music! At the North Platte Community College Theater, 601 West State Farm Road, watch local people perform Sidney native, Dr. Thayer's original music. Tickets are $7.00 plus fees for adults and $4.00 plus fees for children and are aveailable online, at the NLD office, or at the door.

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Page 12

Heartland Express - Nebraskaland Days

May 13, 2010

NEBRASKAland DAYS Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . Continued June 15 Sweet Saloon Sticky Buns - 7:00 AM Delicious sweet rolls prepared by the North Platte Community College's Lady Knight booster club at McDaid Grade School, 1002 East E Street. Buy one and sit down with a cup of coffee or call 5353701 to order delivery of 2 or more dozen. Other pick up sites are the Do It Center, Sports Shoppe, and Westfield Shopping Center. Cowboy- Businessman's Golf Tourn. - 8:00 AM - At River's Edge Golf Club, 1008 West 18th Street, at 8:00 a.m. Entry form online at www.nebraskalanddays.com Competitive Art Show - 10:00 AM - Art competition at the Platte River Mall - 1000 South Dewey - free admission - some art is for sale Kids Fun Festival - 10:00 AM - First session is 10:00 am - 2:00 p.m. at the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Free admission Prime Rib Sandwich Feed - 4:30 PM - In downtown North Platte at 6th & Bailey Streets, presented by the Lincoln County Cattlemen and North Platte Downtown Association. Tickets are $8.00 plus fees online, at the NLD office, or at the gate. Kids Fun Festival - 5:00 PM - The second session is 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue free admission Mutton Bustin’ - 6:00 PM - 6:00 p.m. is the mandatory weigh-in with competition beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Contestants must weigh under 60 pounds - registration fee is $15.00 sorry, no early registrations! Miss Rodeo Nebraska Style Show - 7:00 PM - At 7:00 p.m. at the Quality Inn & Suites, 2102 South Jeffers. Tickets available at North Platte/Lincoln County Convention & Visitors Bureau (308-532-4729 or 800-955-4528) and at the door. Frontier Revue - 8:00 PM - North Platte's history done in music! At the North Platte Community College Theater, 601 West State Farm Road, watch local people perform Sidney native, Dr. Thayer's original music. Tickets are $7.00 plus fees for adults and $4.00 plus fees for children and are aveailable online, at the NLD office, or at the door.

June 16

Sweet Saloon Sticky Buns - 7:00 AM Delicious sweet rolls prepared by the North Platte Community College's Lady Knight booster club at McDaid Grade School, 1002 East E Street. Buy one and sit down with a cup of coffee or call 5353701 to order delivery of 2 or more dozen. Other pick up sites are the Do It Center, Sports Shoppe, and Westfield Shopping Center.

Rodeo Slack - 8:00 AM - Rodeo slack is at 8:00 a.m. at the Wild West Arena. Free admission

Rodeo Slack - 8:00 AM - Rodeo Slack at 8:00 a.m. at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue - free admission

Competitive Art Show - 10:00 AM - Art competition at the Platte River Mall - 1000 South Dewey - free admission - some art is for sale

Competitive Art Show - 10:00 AM - Art competition at the Platte River Mall - 1000 South Dewey - free admission - some art is for sale

All Male Cake Bake - 11:00 AM - Watch the men decorate cakes at the Eagles Club, 620 N. Chestnut. Free admission

Cowboy Jackpot Bowling - 2:00 PM - Watch the rodeo contestants compete at 2:00 p.m. at the Cedar Bowl, 1100 South Jeffers. Admission is free.

Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - Opening night of a "bigger and better" carnival at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Moore's Greater Shows makes its first appearance at NEBRASKAland DAYS with wristbands for $20.00.

BBQ Pork Sandwich Feed - 4:30 PM - The BBQ Pork Sandwich Feed is back at the Moose Lodge, 1315 East 4th Street. Serving begins at 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $7.00 plus fees online, at the NLD office, or at the gate. Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Rastrelli Cello Quartet - 7:30 PM - North Platte Concert Association presents Rastrelli Cello Quartet at the Neville Center, 301 East 5th Street. Admission is $10.00 at the door or by membership. Frontier Revue - 8:00 PM - North Platte's history done in music! At the North Platte Community College Theater, 601 West State Farm Road, watch local people perform Sidney native, Dr. Thayer's original music. Tickets are $7.00 plus fees for adults and $4.00 plus fees for children and are aveailable online, at the NLD office, or at the door. Buffalo Bill Rodeo - 8:00 PM - The first night of the PRCA Buffalo Bill Rodeo with the crowning of Miss Rodeo Nebraska 2011. The night sponsor is Pioneer Brand Seeds at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. General admission and upper level tickets are $10 plus fees for adults and $5 plus fees for children - lower level tickets are $13 plus fees for children and adults. Pavilion Party - 10:00 PM - Admission is only $5.00 to dance to Taylor's Bayou in the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

June 17

Miss Rodeo Neb Queen Speech - 7:00 AM Miss Rodeo Nebraska Queen Speech & Miss Rodeo Nebraska Teen Queen Coronation at the Quality Inn & Suite, 2102 South Jeffers. For tickets and information, contact the North Platte/Lincoln County Convention & Visitors Bureau at 308-532-4729 or 800-955-4528.

Sweet Saloon Sticky Buns - 7:00 AM Delicious sweet rolls prepared by the North Platte Community College's Lady Knight booster club at McDaid Grade School, 1002 East E Street. Buy one and sit down with a cup of coffee or call 5353701 to order delivery of 2 or more dozen. Other pick up sites are the Do It Center, Sports Shoppe, and Westfield Shopping Center.

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Golden Games - 9:00 AM - Registration is at 9:00 a.m. at the North Platte Recreation Center, 1300 McDonald Road with the Opening Ceremonies at 10:00 a.m. Free admission to participants age 60 and over.

Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Frontier Revue - 8:00 PM - North Platte's history done in music! At the North Platte Community College Theater, 601 West State Farm Road, watch local people perform Sidney native, Dr. Thayer's original music. Tickets are $7.00 plus fees for adults and $4.00 plus fees for children and are aveailable online, at the NLD office, or at the door. Buffalo Bill Rodeo - 8:00 PM - The second night of the PRCA Buffalo Bill Rodeo with the night sponsor of NebraskaLand National Bank at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Presented by Wrangler - "Tough Enough to Wear Pink" and the annual Dale Studley Award presentation. General admission and upper level tickets are $10 plus fees for adults and $5 plus fees for children - lower level tickets are $13 plus fees for children and adults. Pavilion Party - 10:00 PM - Only $5.00 admission to dance to Taylor's Bayou at the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

June 18 Jaycee's Flapjack Feed - 7:00 AM - All you can eat flapjacks at Cody Park, 1400 North Jeffers Street. Tickets are $6.00 plus fees online, at the NLD office, and at the gate. Antique Car Display - 9:00 AM - Check out antique and classic cars at Memorial Park, 1100 East 4th Street from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon.

Competitive Art Show - 10:00 AM The Arts Art competition at the Platte River Mall - 1000 South Dewey - free admission - some art is for sale Sandcastle Building Contest - 10:30 AM Kids age 4 and up demonstrate their skills at the Parkade Plaza, 200 E. 6th Street - Sponsored by the North Platte Downtown Association - free admission

Congratulations To These World-Class Students! Consolidated is again proud to encourage future Nebraska leaders and entrepreneurs. This marks the 12th year we have honored local students with $800 scholarships. During that time we have awarded a total of more than $125,000 in scholarships. Join us in congratulating this year’s winners as they pursue careers in their chosen fields.

Ethann R. Barnes

Jacob Ginkins

Ty Keller

Brady Public Schools

Mullen High School

Thedford High School

Roland Cadwallader

Paige Gurciullo

AnneMarie Little

Sandhills High School

Maxwell Public School

Paxton Consolidated Schools

Mitchell Cornelius

Kayla Halouska

Whitney Messersmith

Perkins County High School

Anselmo-Merna School

Maywood High School

Tell Deatrich

Leah Keller

Colby Myers

Medicine Valley High School

Eustis/Farnam High School

Hyannis High School

Sitka Gardner

Annika Wickizer

Arthur County High School

Wallace Public School

8 0 0 - 7 4 2 - 7 4 6 4 www.neb-sandhills.net www.nebnet.net 43778


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express - Nebraskaland Days

Page 13

NEBRASKAland DAYS Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . Continued Lunch with the Wild Bunch - 11:00 AM At the Eagles Club, 620 North Chestnut sponsored by the North Platte Chamber Hostesses adults only. Tickets are $7.00 each available at the gate. Antique & Classic Car Parade - 12:00 PM At 12:00 noon, the antique and classic cars leave Memorial Park and continue through downtown North Platte. Fun with the Wild Bunch & Cake Auction 1:00 PM - At 1:00 p.m. at the Eagles Club, 620 North Chestnut - admission is free. NLD/Gail Wicks Mem. Girls Softball Tourn. - 5:00 PM - Second weekend of ASA sanctioned softball tournaments begins at 5:00 p.m. at the Wayne Dowhower Softball Complex. Admission is $5.00 for adults, $3.00 for students Governors Art Show Reception - 5:30 PM Reception - Presented by TierOne Bank at the Quality Inn & Suites - by invitation only. Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - A "bigger and better" carnival at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Moore's Greater Shows makes its first appearance at NEBRASKAland DAYS with wristbands for $20.00. Buffalo Bill Rodeo - 8:00 PM - The PRCA Buffalo Bill Rodeo with the night sponsor of First National Bank at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, presented by Coors Distributing. General admission and upper level tickets are $10 plus fees for adults and $5 plus fees for children - lower level tickets are $13 plus fees for children and adults. Pavilion Party - 10:00 PM - Only $5.00 admission to dance to Grass Fire at the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

June 19

Eagles' Pork Breakfast - 7:00 AM - At the Platte River Mall, 1000 South Dewey Street, tickets are $8.00 plus fees and are available online, at the NLD office, or at the gate. NLD/Gail Wicks Mem. Girls Softball Tourn. - 8:00 AM - At 8:00 a.m. at the Wayne Dowhower Softball Complex. $5.00 for adults, $3.00 for students Contact Lonnie Parsons 308-520-3820 Governor's Art Show & Sale - 9:00 AM Presented by TierOne Bank 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. at Quality Inn & Suites - Free admission NLD Youth Road Run - 12:30 PM - New time: Registration at 12:00 p.m., and race begins at 12:30 p.m. from Memorial Park - Taft and East 4th Street by U.P. Train - pre-registration for entrants - entry form is online NEBRASKAland DAYS on Parade - 1:00 PM - New parade starting time is 1:00 p.m. "Blazin' New Trails" - through downtown North Platte starting at Memorial Park, 1100 East 4th Street, west to Jeffers Street then north to 12th Street. Rules, entry form, and waiver are online. Post Parade Gathering at the Platte Bar 3:00 PM - Irish bagpipes will entertain at the Platte Bar after the parade - 119 West 6th Street. Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - A "bigger and better" carnival at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Moore's Greater Shows has wristbands for $20.00. Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Buffalo Bill Rodeo - 8:00 PM - The last night of the PRCA Buffalo Bill Rodeo with the Trail Boss Award presentation. The night sponsor is Wells Fargo Bank at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. General admission and upper level tickets are $10 plus fees for adults and $5 plus fees for children - lower level tickets are $13 plus fees for children and adults.

Live Music - 8:00 PM - Live music at the Platte Bar, 119 West 6th Street.

NLD Road Run - 6:30 AM - Registration is at 6:30 a.m., races begin at 7:30 a.m. at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Preregistration and entry fee required. Competitive Art Show - 7:00 AM - The last day of the art competition at the Platte River Mall - 1000 South Dewey - free admission - some art is for sale

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NLD/Gail Wicks Mem. Girls Softball Tourn. - 8:00 AM - Play begins at 8:00 a.m. at the Wayne Dowhower Softball Complex Admission. $5.00 for adults, $3.00 for students NLD Junior Rodeo - 9:00 AM - At 9:00 a.m at the Wild West Arena. Admission is free. Pre-registration and entry fee required for contestants. Governor's Art Show & Sale - 9:00 AM - At Quality Inn & Suites, 2102 South Jeffers - presented by TierOne Bank - Free admission Food Court - 10:00 AM - Food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - At the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, Moore's Greater Shows is a "bigger and better" carnival with wristbands for $20.00.

June 21 Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows- 6:00 PM - At the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, Moore's Greater Shows is a "bigger and better" carnival with wristbands for $20.00. Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Team Sorting - 7:00 PM - The Lincoln County Sheriff's Posse presents a team sorting competition at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Admission is free.

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Page 14

Heartland Express - Nebraskaland Days

May 13, 2010

NEBRASKAland DAYS Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . Continued June 22 Food Court - 6:00 PM - Food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - At the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, Moore's Greater Shows is a "bigger and better" carnival with wristbands for $20.00. Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

June 23 Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - At the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, Moore's Greater Shows is a "bigger and better" carnival with wristbands for $20.00. KX104 Colgate Country Showdown - 7:00 PM - KX-104 radio station brings the Colgate Country Showdown back to NEBRASKAland DAYS at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Admission is free.

June 24 NEBRASKAland DAYS MicroFest - 5:00 PM - Presented by Johnson Brothers Liquor Company at the Wild West Arena Pavilion. Combination tickets with Comedy Night for only $18.00 plus fees allow for 5 tastings. Must be 21 to enter. Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

Comedy Night - 7:30 PM - NEBRASKAland DAYS' second annual Comedy Night features Greg Warren and opening act Jonny Mogambo. Tickets are in combination with the Wild West microFEST and are $18.00 plus fees and are available online, at the NLD office, or at the gate. Pavilion Party - 8:45 PM - Jonny Mogambo performing at the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - At the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, Moore's Greater Shows is a "bigger and better" carnival with wristbands for $20.00. Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. US Cellular Summer Jam Concert - 8:00 PM - Rock concert featuring Theory of a Deadman with special guest SafetySuit. Gates open at 6:00 p.m., concert begins at 8:00 p.m. at the Wild West Arena. Tickets are $25.00 plus fees until the day of the show when they will be $30.00 plus fees. Golden circle tickets are $45.00 plus fees. Tickets online, at the NLD office or at the gate. Pavilion Party - 10:30 PM - Presented by Bud Light - only $5.00 admission to dance to eMmitts doWn at the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - The final carnival session at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, Moore's Greater Shows has wristbands for $20.00. US Cellular Summer Jam Concert - 8:00 PM - Country concert featuring Darius Rucker and special guest Gloriana. Gates open at 6:00 p.m., concert begins at 8:00 p.m. at the Wild West Arena. Tickets are $30.00 plus fees until the alloted number are sold, then the tickets are $35.00 plus fees until the day of the show when they will be $40.00 plus fees. Golden circle tickets are $60.00 plus fees. Buy tickets online, at the NLD office, or at the gate. Pavilion Party - 10:30 PM - Presented by Bud Light - only $5.00 admission to dance to Chance at the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, on the final day of NEBRASKAland DAYS.

June 26 NLD Foundation Pancake Feed - 8:30 AM The NEBRASKAland DAYS Foundation board will serve pancakes free to anyone with a concert ticket at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

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With 25 years of pivot experience, Frey Pivot Service offers growers in the Stapleton area a complete line of irrigation system sales and service, including: t Customer training

makes of pivots

North Platte High Class of 1985 Reunion 5:30 PM - The North Platte High School Class of 1985 will hold their reunion in the Wild West Arena Pavilion, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue. Beer Garden and Food Court - 6:00 PM Beer and food vendors at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue.

June 25

Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 6:00 PM - At the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, Moore's Greater Shows is a "bigger and better" carnival with wristbands for $20.00.

t Full service for all

Carnival by Moore's Greater Shows - 2:00 PM - An afternoon session at the Wild West Arena, 2400 North Buffalo Bill Avenue, Moore's Greater Shows has wristbands for $15.00.

43078

935 W. 7th Lexington, NE 68850

(308) 325-2100

43712

1997 Ford F150

2002 Nissan Frontier

1996 Ford F250

$4,500

$6,995

$2,995

2000 GMC Sierra

1997 Dodge Ram 1500

1998 Ford Expedition

$5,795

$6,995

$3,995

1992 Chevrolet Suburban

2001 Ford Escape

2000 Ford Explorer

$3,995

$7,500

$4,995

t Convenient financing

t Custom design and

options

installation

For Zimmatic pivots, parts or service, stop by or call:

Frey Pivot Service 77 County Road 40 Stapleton, NE

308-636-2327

2000 Chevrolet Silverado

$9,000

BUY HERE . . . PAY HERE . . . Bad Credit, No Credit, Bankruptcies . . . We Don’t Care If You Work, You Ride. © 2010 Lindsay. All rights reserved. Zimmatic is a registered trademark of the Lindsay Corporation. www.zimmatic.com

302 Rodeo Rd. • Ph. 308.534.6027 • North Platte, NE 69101 Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-6 p.m. • Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 43814

43806


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 15

USDA June Surveys to Provide Vital Data on 2010 Farm Production USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is surveying thousands of farmers across Nebraska to get a clearer indication of the production and supply of major commodities for 2010. “With the 2010 growing season now in full swing, we can start to get a more complete picture of how things are shaping up for the agricultural sector. We?ll be looking at what crops have been planted, what commodities are in storage and how much livestock is in inventory,” said Joe Parsons, Director of the NASS Nebraska Field Office. Parsons explained that NASS will gather this information through two major mid-year surveys: the June Area Survey and the June Agricultural Survey. “For the area survey, we visit randomly selected tracts of land and interview the operators of any farm or ranch on that land. We collect information

on crop acreage – including biotech crops, as well as grain stocks, livestock inventory, cash rents, land values, and value of sales,” he said. “For the agricultural survey, which we also call the crop/stocks survey, we contact producers by mail, phone or personal visit. We ask them to provide information on their total acreage, acres planted to specific commodities – including biotech varieties, and quantities of grains and oilseeds stored on-farm.” This information will be a critical component of several key national reports, including the annual Acreage report and the quarterly Grain Stocks report, both to be released on June 30. Survey data also contribute to NASS’s monthly and annual Crop Production reports and various other crop and livestock-related publications, all of which are available online at www.nass.usda.gov.

“Especially in these uncertain economic times, farmers and the rest of the agricultural industry need timely, accurate data on the current state of U.S. agriculture,” Parsons said. “The information collected through our mid-year surveys can help producers, suppliers, traders, buyers, export customers and others to make sound and informed business decisions.” As is the case with all NASS surveys, information provided by respondents is protected by law. NASS safeguards the confidentiality of all responses, ensuring that no individual producer or operation can be identified. All reports are available on the NASS web site: www.nass.usda.gov. For more information, call the NASS Nebraska Field Office at (800) 582-6443.

Controlling Musk Thistle & Eastern Redcedar in Pastures Noel Mues, Extension Educator University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension, Furnas County Musk Thistle – Favorable rains last fall and again this spring have created the right conditions for lots of thistles this spring. The rosette stage of growth is ideal for controlling musk thistle plants this spring. That means you should apply herbicides soon, while the plants are in the rosette stage, prior to bolting. Several herbicides are effective and recommended for musk thistle control. One of the most effective is Tordon 22K®, but be careful with Tordon since it can also kill woody plants, including trees and shrubs. Milestone® also does an excellent job of controlling musk thistle. Both Milestone and Tordon will help control other weeds that usually appear later in the season. Dow Agrosciences has two relatively new herbicides, ForeFront® R&P and Chaparral®, that do an excellent job of controlling all the thistles and many other broadleaf weeds. Chaparral® will also do an excellent job of controlling buckbrush/snowberry. The active ingredients in ForeFront® R&P are [aminopyralid (0.33 lb/gal) + 2,4-D amine (2.67

lb/gal)]. The active ingredients in Chaparral® are [aminopyralid (52.5% ae) + metsulfuron (9.45%)]. Aminopyralid is the active ingredient in Milestone® and metsulfuron is the active ingredient in Ally® (DuPont). 2,4-D also works very well, but you will get better thistle control by using a combination of 2,4-D and dicamba (Banvel). Other herbicides labeled for controlling musk thistles in pastures include; Redeem®, Grazon®, Cimarron®, Ally® and Curtail®. Always be sure to read and follow label instructions, and treat at the proper time. All these herbicides will work for you this spring if you spray before musk thistles bolt and send up flowering stalks. After flowering, the shovel is about the only method remaining to control thistles this year. Eastern Redcedar Trees – continue to explode in many area pastures. These trees reduce forage production, make animal handling difficult, and encourage pastures to shift from warm-season to cool-season grasses. Cedars can be controlled with herbicides, by cutting, or fire. By far the least expensive, when it can be used safely, is fire. The effectiveness of fire declines, however, as trees get large. Herbicides

We’d like to show you how Companion Hail policies cover the top part of your crop and CRC or RA take care of the bottom. There’s no need to cover the bottom again. Give The Home Agency a call for some rates. We have 4 companies to choose from and depending on your legals, some companies may be $2-$3 cheaper per $100 of coverage.

like Tordon 22K® and Velpar® applied directly to the soil beneath the tree work very well, but they’re time consuming to apply and more expensive. While cutting can be cheaper, it is even more time consuming, especially if cut trees need to be removed. Recent research in Nebraska has shown that a combination of control measures can combine the strengths of each method while overcoming most disadvantages. For best results, a prescribed fire is needed to kill many smaller trees and to weaken or improve accessibility to larger trees. It also can be used periodically, maybe every four to eight years, to eliminate new infestations. After the prescribed burn, it usually is best to wait a year before using herbicides or cutting to complete the job because some trees that appear to survive the fire will eventually die. For more information on cedar control, contact your local extension office or visit the UNL Extension Publications Web site at http://extension.unl.edu/publications. Source: Crop Watch News Service

You don’t have to be a commodities expert to protect yourself against an unpredictable livestock market. Just call The Home Agency for an LRP quote. There is no minimum number of head. This program is for the small and large producer. Ask for Arlyn Rieker, Jim Baldonado or Jeri Schultheiss at the Elwood office, Dan Tinlin or Steve Johnson at the Gothenburg office, or Chip Bullock at the Cozad office.

Also ask us about our Production Hail. Elwood: 800-245-4241 Gothenburg: 888-537-3511 Cozad: 866-928-5856 www.thehomeagency.com

210 Smith Avenue • PO Box 326 • Elwood, NE 68937 515 10th Street • Gothenburg, NE 69138 131 West 8th Street • Suite A • Cozad, NE 69130 43674


Page 16

Heartland Express

May 13, 2010

DDM Land Management LLC North Platte, NE ‘10 Cadillac DTS

was $43,995

$40,395 was $31,995

Sedan, Northstar V8, FWD, Side Airbags.

‘09 Pontiac G6 GT

was $25,480

‘09 Chevy Impala

$29,495 was $37,995

‘09 GMC Yukon Denali

was $14,995

$23,995 was $37,995

‘08 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD

$11,995 was $36,995

‘08 Chevy Silverado 1500

$37,995

LT3, 4x4, Vortec V8, Auto, Back Up Camera, Htd. Leather.

‘08 Chevy Silverado 1500 ‘09 Chevy Silverado 1500

$15,995 was $25,995

1LT, CD, 30K, Over 30 MPG, Lots of Fun!

$35,495

‘09 Chevy Suburban

$48,995 was $41,995

AWD, Navigation, DVD, 15K, Loaded, Htd. Leather.

LT Sedan, 3.5L V6, Auto, Pwr. LT, Ext. Cab, 4x4, Pwr. Seat, Seat, Chrome Wheels. Nerf Bars, Steering Wheel Control.

‘08 Chevy HHR

‘09 Cadillac CTS

AWD, V6, Auto, 3rd Row Seat, V6, Auto, AWD, Heated/Cooled OnStar, Cloth, 13K. Seats, OnStar, XM, Company Car.

$14,995 was $58,965

V6, Auto, Side Air Bags, OnStar, Power Seat, 38K.

was $17,995

‘10 Chevy Traverse LT

HELPING AG PRODUCERS GET THE EXTRA EDGE WITH:

‘08 Chrysler 300

• AG SENSE PRODUCTS • PRECISION PLANTING The Yield is in the Details • AGRI INJECT CHEMIGATION EQUIPMENT • CHANNEL BIO SEEDS

$35,495

1LT, 4x4, CD, Tow Pkg., Bedliner, Local 1-Owner, 700 Miles.

‘08 Cadillac Escalade

$32,495 was $53,995

4x4, Crew, 1LT, Duramax Diesel, Allison Auto, 12K.

• PIVOT IRRIGATION MONITORING EQUIPMENT

$46,495

ESV, AWD, Sunroof, Navigation, Ctr. Buckets, DVD, BOSE, 27K.

Teaming Up With Producers To Be More Profitable! (308) 530-1462 cell P.O. Box 708, North Platte, NE 69103

‘08 Mercedes Benz EClass

43852

was $26,995

$24,695 was $17,995

$16,495 was $34,995

$31,995

LT1, Crew Cab, 4x4, Driver Info LX Sedan, V6, Auto, Power 6 Cyl., Auto, AWD, Htd. Center, 50K, Power Seat. Seat, CD, 20" Custom Wheels. Leather, Sunroof, Only 40K!

‘08 Chevy Malibu

was $17,495

$16,295

‘07 Chevy Avalanche

MSRP $25,480

$15,495 was $16,995

2LT Sedan, V6, Auto, Htd. V6, Auto, Side Air Bags, Leather, OnStar, Pwr. Seat, CD. OnStar.

‘07 Chevy Cobalt Coupe

was $12,995

$9,995

2Dr., 4 Cyl., Auto, 3LT Pkg., Sport Pkg., p/Sunroof, 43K.

‘07 Honda Accord

was $15,995

‘07 Buick Lucerne

was $21,995

Egbers Flighting Company

‘07 GMC Envoy

800-462-2588 www.eflighting.com

$13,495

SLT, 4x2, 6-Cyl., Auto, Pwr. Seat, CD, Roof Rails, Only 39K.

‘07 Chevy Impala

$20,995 was $15,495

Over 1,000 sizes of Auger Flighting On Hand! 90% of our stock is Super Edge! Carry flighting for combines, grain carts,grain bins, u-trough, spreaders, mixers, seed tenders, stirrater, post hole, sand augers, brush, plastic and more

$13,795

CXL Sedan, V6, Auto, 6-Pass., LT Sedan, V6, Auto, FlexFuel, Htd. Leather, Chrome Wheels. Power Seat, OnStar.

‘07 Jeep Liberty

$14,795 was $16,995

‘07 Chevy Trailblazer

$15,695 was $19,495

LX Sedan, 4 Cyl., Auto, CD, Ltd. 4x4, V6, Auto, Cloth, Air, Pwr. Windows, Locks, Cruise. Cruise, Economy Size, 52K.

$15,995

Left Hand

4x2, 6 Cyl., Auto, Pwr. Seat, Trailer Tow Pkg., 33K.

1111 PLUM CREEK PARKWAY • LEXINGTON

(308) 324-2306 • (866) 324-5455 Right Hand

Central Nebraska’s Largest Full-Line General Motors Dealer! Luis, Chanse, Kyle, Troy, Vic or Tom Se habla Español! 43785

43844


May 13, 2010

Page 17

Heartland Express

WHOLESALE AG. CHEMICALS

Upcoming Special Sections May 27 ....................Sandhills Ranch Expo, Hay & Forage June 10 ............................................County Fairs, Rodeo June 24 ............................................County Fairs, Rodeo July 7 ......................County Fairs, Rodeo, Quilt Nebraska

Call Now to Reserve Your Space!

Delivered to your door!

Ostermeyer Hay Equipment Shelton, NE 308.467.2341

Morris Grain

42419

1121 Atlantic Ave. • Morris, MN 56267

(308) 236-5024 or Toll Free: 1-800-658-3191

www.morrisgrain.com (320) 589-4050 • 1-800-872-2501

Send your stories to news@agnet.net 42434

43295

www.myfarmandranch.com • www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com • www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com • www.myfarmandranch.com • • • • •

TireTown Inc. 800/70R38 Factory Irregular . . . .$2,000

480/80R50 100% Tread . . . . . . .$1,500

600/65R28 Irregulars 100% . . . . .$925

18.4-38 6-Ply New USA . . . . . . . . .$625

600/70R30 Full Tread . . . . . . . . . . .$950

19L-16.1 Rib 10-Ply . . . . . . . . . . . .$185

14.9R34 Fwd. 80% Tread . . . . . . . .$400

14.9R46 New 7,150 lbs. . . . . . . .$1,100

31/13.50-15 Rib . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$100

710/70R38 80% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$850

20.8-38 New 10-Ply . . . . . . . . . . . .$798

520/85R46 Irregular . . . . . . . . . .$1,500

480/70R28 (16.9) Full Tread . . . . .$700

21.5L16.1 Bar Tread 8-Ply . . . . . . .$450

• Nationwide Shipping • Special Prices • • New & Used • All Sizes • Major Brands • We Deal •

800-444-7209 • 800-451-9864

43795

All types of diesel fuel injection pumps, turbos & injectors Diesel pickup diagnostics Now servicing most common rail systems Chassis dyno testing Light duty diesel truck fuel injection & engine repair

Ag & Auto Diesel Service, Inc. 43818

43815

Steel Buildings For Less Than You Would Expect! Total Welded Fabrication with Choice of Sheeting Colors & Trim. Call Now for More Info & a Spot in Our Schedule! ‘07 Ford Focus SE 4DR Hatchback #239324. Cloth Seats, Auto, PW/PL, 36k.

$10,900

$152/mo.*

‘08 Chrysler Sebring Touring #201857. V6, Leather, Sunroof, only 17K. NICE CAR!

$14,800

$220/mo.*

‘07 Toyota Camry LE

‘08 Dodge Nitro SLT 4x4

#677887. 4-Cylinder, Power Seat, #207017. 4.0L V6, Heated Leather, only 27K, 32 mpg. GPS Nav., Rear DVD & More, 28K.

$15,500

$231/mo.*

$22,900

$357/mo.*

‘08 Mercury Grand Marquis LS ‘08 Chrysler 300 LX 4DR #629609. 4 Dr., Leather, Power

#172969. V6, Cloth, Sirius Radio,

Pedals, only 19K.

only 3K Miles.

$15,800

$236/mo.*

$21,400

$331/mo.*

‘08 Dodge Grand Caravan ‘09 Mercury Sable Premier ‘09 Dodge Journey SXT AWD #219298. V6, GPS Nav., Backup SXT 4DR #629838. 4 Dr., 3.5L, Leather,

Other products available: Fencing, Open Front Sheds, Double Wide Barns, Storage Sheds, Continuous Fencing & Single & Double Car Garages.

#144544. 4.0L V6, P/Doors, Rear Camera, Rear DVD, only 20K.

$24,800

$389/mo.*

Expanding to Minden, Nebraska!

$19,800

$307/mo.*

Camera & Much More, 13K & Sharp!

$24,800

$389/mo.*

USED PICKUPS 2009 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW XLT 4X4

(308) 832-1287

CROSSROADS WELDING, L.L.C. Miller, Nebraska • www.crossroadswelding.com

1-800-807-5002 • 308-457-2355

Moonroof and More, 30K.

‘09 Dodge 1500 Quad Cab SLT SB 4x4 #784291. V8 Gas, Power Everything, Only 17K.

$25,940 43821

White, 5.4 V8, 24K, #C52400

2009 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW XLT 4X4 Silver, 5.4 V8, 22K, #C52402

2009 TOYOTA TUNDRA SR5 CREW MAX 4X4 Loaded, only 13K, #014622

2009 DODGE 1500 CREW 4X4 Black, 5.7 Hemi, SLT, 5K, #817747

$409/mo.*

* PAYMENT IS BASED ON ASKING PRICE, LESS $2000 CASH OR TRADE DOWN, 72 MO. @ 6.9% APR, W.A.C. DISCOUNT FOR OUTRIGHT DEALS. TRADES ACCEPTED AT APP.

43817


Page 18

Heartland Express

May 13, 2010

Checkoff Salutes U.S. Soy’s No. 1 Customer During Beef and Egg Month

May Declared Egg Month in NE

USB-Funded Analysis Shows Animal Ag Benefits Extend Far Beyond U.S. Soybean Industry The farmer-leaders of the United Soybean Board (USB) and soybean checkoff take pride in supporting their partners in the U.S. poultry and livestock industries, particularly during the month of May for Beef and Egg Month. This partnership not only helps provide the world with a safe, affordable and abundant food supply but also generates benefits for our economy, including creating jobs throughout the country. U.S. animal agriculture represents the single largest user of U.S. soybeans, consuming nearly 98 percent of the domestic supply of U.S. soybean meal. The checkoff supports the long-term interests of U.S. poultry and livestock producers in order to improve the stability and success of the U.S. soybean industry. The checkoff-funded Nationwide Economic Impact of Animal Agriculture study shows the economic value of animal agriculture to communities. Figures from the most recent analysis show the U.S. animal agriculture industry directly employs nearly 230,000 Americans. Other key findings of the recently completed study include: • U.S. poultry and livestock producers spent over $100 billion on supplies and services that support local jobs. • Every animal agriculture job supports more than 11 jobs somewhere else in our economy. • The overwhelming majority of animal agriculture jobs cannot be easily exported overseas. • Finally, U.S. animal agriculture paid over $10 billion in income and sales taxes and more than $6 billion in property taxes. “Small-town communities rely heavily on local poultry and livestock operations,” said Chuck Myers, a checkoff farmer-leader from Lyons, Neb., and a member of the USB Domestic

Marketing program. “Animal producers support other local producers, manufacturers and service providers, whether it’s soybean and corn farmers or the local markets that sell the meat, to transportation companies to veterinarians. It all feeds off itself and creates a lot of opportunities throughout the community.” According to checkoff-funded research contained in the latest edition of the USB Market View Database, poultry alone consumed over 15 million tons of soybean meal, or the equivalent of more than 500 million bushels of soybeans. Beef cattle consumed over 3.9 million tons of soybean meal, which equates to over 130 million bushels of soybeans, according to the most recent data. “With all of the pressures animal producers currently face, it is now more important than ever to support them,” Myers said. “As a U.S. soybean farmer, I would much rather feed our product to animals here at home and then export the meat, which contributes to the world food supply and adds value to our soybeans. We definitely want to help make sure the U.S. animal ag industry can stay here. The closer our animal operations are to our farms, the more profitable we are as soybean producers.” USB is made up of 68 farmer-directors who oversee the investments of the soybean checkoff on behalf of all U.S. soybean farmers. Checkoff funds are invested in the areas of animal utilization, human utilization, industrial utilization, industry relations, market access and supply. As stipulated in the Soybean Promotion, Research and Consumer Information Act, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service has oversight responsibilities for USB and the soybean checkoff.

During a luncheon this week with egg producers, Governor Dave Heineman presented a proclamation to William Claybaugh, President of the Nebraska Egg Council, declaring “May Is Egg Month” in Nebraska. “The egg industry continues to play an essential role in Nebraska’s economy,” said Governor Heineman. “I’m pleased to proclaim “May as Egg Month” in Nebraska as a way to recognize the importance of the egg industry to our state.” Nebraska’s commercial laying hen population of approximately 9.5 million birds produces over 2 billion eggs annually. Nebraska currently ranks ninth nationally in total egg production, and is also a national leader in the production of further processed egg products. Additional information on Nebraska’s egg industry is available through the Nebraska Department of Agriculture, Poultry and Egg Division by calling (402) 472-2051, or visiting www.nebraskapoultry.org.

ANTIQUE TRACTORS FOR SALE

Atkinson Flannery Hay Equipment Inc. 402-925-5488 888-FLANHAY (325-6429) ••• Benkelman Bob & Dee Stamm 308-423-2892 (Dee) 308-423-2441 (Bob) ••• Burwell Thoene Farm Service 308-346-5250 •••

Loup City Eldon Kieborz 308-745-0293 ••• Maxwell Miller Repair 308-582-4303 ••• Prague Prague Hay Equipment & Supply 402-663-6333 •••

• M-M R • (2) Allis-Chalmers • M-M U WC’s • Also, Stationary Gas Engines

Shelton Ostermeyer Hay Equipment 308-467-2341 ••• Valentine Cherry County Implement 402-376-3490 877-BALE-HAY •••

2008 Vermeer Corporation. All rights reserved. Vermeer and Vermeer logo are registered trademarks of Vermeer Manufacturing Company in the U.S. and/or other countries.

Lyle Wacker 54129 862 Road, Osmond, NE 68765 or call: (402)

582-4874

43851

Stock Your Lake or Pond With • Channel Cat • Bluegill • • Hybrid Bluegill • Largemouth Bass • • Crappie • Walleye • Minnows • • Perch • Grass Carp • Wipers • We Do Pond Consultant Work

WILLOW LAKE FISH HATCHERY 7580 N. Highland Rd. • Hastings, NE 68901

402-463-8022 Gaylord • 402-460-8200 Scott

©

43496

Delivery Available • Since 1956

43574


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 19

Fortenberry Looks to Future of Ag Industry By Sandra Hansen, The Scottsbluff Star-Herald Tuesday's field hearing for the U.S. House of Representatives Agriculture Committee followed a familiar formula, until near the end, when Nebraska Rep. Jeff Fortenberry (Dist. 1), asked about the ag industry's future. "The average age of Nebraska farmers is 58 years," said Fortenberry. He noted that this could be an emerging opportunity for young farmers and entrepreneurs to get involved. Fortenberry, who is also the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Forestry, asked members of the panel testifying on ag issues what they believe lies ahead for their industry. Dennis Sun, Wyoming rancher and publisher of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup, said there will always be opportunities in this world with millions of people who need to be fed. He noted that small things, such as winning legal battles with environmentalists, add up to opportunities, and that the rich and famous buy ranches in Colorado, Montana and Wyoming. "We have what they want," he concluded. "It's a tough go, but there are opportunities." John Snyder, president of the Washakie Beet Growers Association at Worland, Wyo., said his 23-year-old son has joined the family operation,

making three generations to live on the land. He cited the sustainability of farm life as one reason for his son's return to the farm after receiving a college education and turning down other jobs. Jeff Fortenberry According to Snyder, the sugar policy and existing farm bill have strengthened the outlook for production agriculture, which helped draw his son back. "They have a love for the land, and they do see an opportunity," Snyder said. He also stressed the value of advanced technology in making agriculture a more attractive way of living. He said larger equipment, GPS systems, and new plant varieties are among the reasons young people come back to their roots. Other issues discussed during the hearing included brucellosis, pine bark beetle infestation, biomass economics, USDA farm programs, foreign trade, and dairy issues. The Cheyenne Field Hearing was held Tuesday morning at Laramie County Community College. It was one of several scheduled for the House Ag Committee this spring. Other area committee

"The average age of Nebraska farmers is 58 years."

members participating in the hearing were Adrian Smith, of Nebraska's 3rd District, and Cynthia Lummis, Wyoming. Upon the conclusion of the hearing, Smith said, "Our nation faces unprecedented economic challenges, and rural communities across the country offer innovative solutions. We should be working to create policies, which will strengthen American agriculture and provide long-term stability for our nation's producers, and to promote economic policies that will foster sustained growth in rural communities. The rural way of life is forever changing, and I believe we have a good story to tell." Committee Chairman Colin Peterson of Minnesota told the large audience that his goal is to have the 2012 Farm Bill ready to go when the 2008 bill expires on Sept. 30, 2012.

6th Annual October 1 & 2, 2010 Midtown Holiday Inn 2503 S. Locust St. Grand Island, NE Hours: 9-6 Fri., 9-4 Sat. Quilts From Across Nebraska • Vendors • Demos For more information call: LeAnne Killion, (308) 440-8867 or llkillion@gmail.com

43523


Page 20

Heartland Express

May 13, 2010

Smith Advocates Stronger Energy Focus in New Farm Bill By Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent The 2012 Farm Bill was the focus of attention on Tuesday in Cheyenne, Wyo., as members of the House Agriculture Committee, including U.S. Rep. Adrian Smith, R-Neb., heard from farmers and ranchers on a variety of issues. Smith, who represents Nebraska's 3rd Congressional District, said energy is an important component of the new Farm Bill, and the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico shouldn't scare the United States away from continuing to look at all resources in achieving energy independence. In a recent New York Times column, Thomas Friedman said America now imports about 11 million barrels of oil a day " about 57 percent of its total needs " mostly from Canada, Mexico, Venezuela, Saudi Arabia and Nigeria. Quoting T. Boone Pickens, Friedman said the U.S. trade deficit for January 2010 was $37.3 billion " and $27.5 billion of that went to import oil. The Farm Bill hearing was the fourth in a series being held throughout the country. Upcoming hearings will be held in Morrow, Ga.; Troy, Ala.; Lubbock, Texas; and Sioux Falls, S.D. In framing the importance of the Farm Bill hearings, Smith said the U.S. faces "unprecedented' economic challenges. But he believes "rural communities across the country offer innovative solutions." "We should be working to create policies which will strengthen American agriculture and provide long-term stability for our nation's producers and to promote economic policies which will foster sustained growth in rural communities," Smith said. The hearings are allowing Smith and other ag committee members to review U.S. agriculture policy prior to writing the 2012 Farm Bill. Issues raised at the hearing in Cheyenne includ-

ed resource devastation of the western pine beetle, cattle, sheep, wheat, sugar beets, trade and farm payments. "There was a pretty good broad perspective," Smith said about the testimony heard at Tuesday's hearing. By starting the hearings early, Smith said, the committee hopes to get "ahead of the curve" when it comes to getting a Farm Bill completed on time. With the U.S. deficit at more than $12 trillion, spending limitations are going to be a hot Farm

"We should be working to create policies which will s t r e n g t h e n American agriculture and provide long-term stability for our nation's producers and to promote economic policies which will foster sustained growth in rural communities," Bill topic. Because of good commodity prices during the term of the 2005 Farm Bill, not a lot of government money was needed for crop support. Smith said that could "affect numbers into the future." "That is something we need to keep it in mind," Smith said. "We heard from a wheat grower about the stability of direct payments, for example." Direct payments are fixed, regardless of year-toyear variations in acres, yields and prices, while counter-cyclical payments depend on the national season average price for each crop.

ONLINE TRUCK, TRAILER, FERTILIZER & CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT AUCTION Go to www.delpeterson.com for a complete list of equipment and descriptions BIDDING CLOSES WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010

AUCTIONEERS NOTE: The following line of equipment will be sold online with the bidding ending on May 19. Bidding within the last 5 minutes before the closing of a lot will extend the bidding time by an additional 5 minutes. Be prepared to bid accordingly. SPRAYERS: ‘09 John Deere 4930; ‘07 John Deere 4830; ‘06 Apache AS 1010; ‘06 John Deere 4920; ‘05 John Deere 4920; ‘05 John Deere 4720; ‘06 Apache AS 710; ‘99 Nitro 2200T. DOZERS: ‘83 Cat D7Gr; ‘54 IHC TD-9. SCRAPERS: CAT 621B; CAT 613B Elevating scraper. TRUCKS: ‘07 Peterbilt 379 EXHD Ultra Cab; ‘05 Kenworth T600; ‘04 Freightliner CL12064 ST; ‘03 Kenworth T600; ‘03 Kenworth T600; ‘02 Kenworth T600; ‘00 Freightliner FLD; ‘00 Peterbilt 379; ‘98 Peterbilt 377; ‘85 Kenworth W900 20-ton; ‘97 Freightliner FLD 120 day cab conventional; ‘98 Volvo day cab conventional; ‘89 Freightliner COE day cab; ‘04 Kenworth T-800 conventional; ‘95 Ford F350 service truck; ‘94 Isuzu rollback truck; ‘87 Ford F600; ‘85 Ford; ‘72 Ford; IHC 1600; Ford 900; ‘90 IHC cab & chassis; ‘95 GMC TopKick; ‘00 International 4700 ext. cab; ‘95 International 4900; ‘00 Peterbilt 378; ‘87 International S2500. AGGREGATE EQUIPMENT: Universal 30x18 roller crusher on stand; (2) 8 Yard surge bins on 4 wheel gear. HAMMER: Arrow tamper drop hammer. PICKUPS: ‘02 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD quad cab 4x4. TRAILERS: ‘09 Utility 48'X102" flatbed; ‘07 Utility 48'X102" flatbed; ‘07 Side Dump Ind. 42' tri axle side dump trailer; ‘94 Trail King belly dump trailer; ‘79 Polar 4,700 gal. stainless steel transport trailer; ‘69 Arrow stretch flatbed trailer; 34' Triple axle gooseneck trailer; ‘97 Fruehauf dry van, 53x102; ‘97 Fruehauf dry van; ‘97 Fruehauf dry van, 53x102; ‘97 Fruehauf dry van; ‘97 Transcraft Eagle aluminum flatbed; ‘07 Starlite tag-a-long; ‘06 Universal Exiss aluminum gooseneck stock trailer; ‘99 Felling FT20E, 24' overall length, 26' steel flatbed, 14’ utility bed, tool boxes. TRACTORS: ‘07 John Deere 6330 premium; Ford 2120. ANTIQUE TRACTORS: (2) John Deere 620; Farmall M; Farmall H; Allis Chalmer WD. FORKLIFTS: ‘04 Toyota 7FGCU25; ‘92 Toyota 5FGCU25; CAT GC25K; CAT 6,000 lb. 3pt. forklift attachment. MISC. EQUIPMENT: Toro 150 snow blower attachment; 2,000 Gallon mild steel fuel tank, pump and meter; 1,000 Gallon mild steel fuel tank, new, never used; John Deere 48" skid loader bucket; Laser plane 125 level, w/remote detector; Dyna Glow Delux lp gas heater; Lot of 5 Firestone 16.5-16.1 x 10 ply tires with wheels. FARM IMPLEMENTS: ‘08 Landoll 7130-32 To the Max; Brillion SS10 seeder; ‘90 Stolzfuz 5-ton mild steel dry spreader; Yetter 12 row 30' sidedress bar, hydraulic fold.; MOTORCYCLE AND BOAT: ‘00 America Quantem custom motorcycle; ‘92 Bayliner 2452. EXCAVATOR, CRAWLER LOADER & TRENCHER: ‘98 RobexHyundai 130 LC3; CAT 941B crawler loader; ‘98 Vermeer V5800 backhoe trencher.

Closing times vary! Be sure to review the closing times of items you are interested in purchasing. 5% Buyer’s Premium applies to all items. All items will sell at or above the opening bid amount. No fictitious bidding by sellers will be allowed. Go to www.delpeterson.com for terms and conditions!

For further information please contact Del Peterson & Assoc., 419 West Judy Dr., Fremont, NE 68025, (800) 492-9090 or (402) 721-4388 Fax: (402) 721-4583, Email: auction@delpeterson.com, Website: www.delpeterson.com 43807

Making those necessary cuts to the Farm Bill because of the government's deteriorating financial problems will be difficult, Smith said. Production agriculture is just a small portion of the Farm Bill. Nutrition programs make up more than 70 percent of Farm Bill spending. "The issues of spending are pretty broad, and those folks who think we can gather up all this money out of the Farm Bill have to keep it in perspective that there are a lot of other things that need to be looked at," Smith said. With agriculture a key component of the nation's economic vitality and national security, an inadequately funded Farm Bill could put America's agricultural industry in jeopardy. Smith said there's no talk amongst committee members about extending the current Farm Bill instead of writing a new piece of legislation. The current Farm Bill will expire in September 2012. "That's why we are starting early to get a new bill passed in time rather than delaying it or extending it," Smith said. "That's what we are trying to prevent, but we will see how it goes." Smith said one of his main priorities with a new Farm Bill will be the energy component. Smith represents the nation's leading ethanolproducing congressional district. Nebraska is the nation's second-leading ethanol producer and the fourth-leading state in wind energy potential. "Agriculture plays an important part of our nation's energy mixture," he said. "Whether it's renewable fuels and leading this country to energy independence, it's going take a lot of different types of fuels, and agriculture plays a role not only in the production of energy but in terms of consumption." Extreme volatility in energy like the nation saw in 2008, when oil prices hit nearly $150 per barrel, can play havoc on the highly energy-dependent agricultural industry, not only from fuel but from the fertilizer and chemicals that are derived from fossil fuels. Smith advocates an "all-of-the-above" approach to energy production that calls for a mixture of energy sources, whether it be fossil fuels or nuclear energy or renewable fuels. He is also involved in new energy research, such as biofuel production from algae. In light of the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that threatens the U.S. Gulf Coast, Smith said there should be additional emphasis on renewable fuels. "We don't want to be so dependent on one source of energy, and this is a good reason," Smith said. "I'm not saying we should shut off off-shore drilling because I think this is an isolated situation, but it does point to the fact that we need other options. Biofuels and other alternative energy, such as wind, hydro and solar, are all important as well."

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May 13, 2010

Heartland Express - Irrigation

Page 21

Agriculture Secretary Vilsack Announces Availability of Funds to Improve the Nation's Natural Resources Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is seeking proposals from eligible partners for projects to help owners and operators of agricultural and nonindustrial private forest lands improve their natural resources through the Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative (CCPI) in fiscal year 2010. Producers can use CCPI to achieve conservation benefits such as clean air and water, productive soils and abundant wildlife. "Partnerships with America's producers are an effective way to address environmental concerns related to agriculture," said Vilsack. "Through CCPI, we are employing a voluntary approach with landowners and operators to help reduce sediments and nutrients, increase carbon sequestration and build a healthier environment across the country." About $5 million will be made available through CCPI in fiscal year 2010. USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will use this initiative to enter into agreements for up to five years with eligible partners interested in enhancing conservation on agricultural and nonindustrial private forest lands in specific areas. CCPI helps agricultural producers and forest landowners address conservation priorities at the local, state, multi-state, or regional levels; meet federal, state, and local regulatory requirements related to production; cooperate in installing and maintaining conservation practices; and develop and demonstrate innovative conservation practices and delivery methods, including practices associated with specialty crop and organic production as well as precision agriculture. Potential partners include federally recognized tribes, state and local units of government, farmer cooperatives, producer associations, institutions of higher education, and nongovernmental organizations with a history of working cooperatively with agricultural producers. The Request for Proposals can be found at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010 /pdf/2010-8244.pdf. Individual landowners and operators cannot submit a partner proposal. An agricultural producer or nonindustrial private forest landowner can receive financial and technical assistance for soil, water, plant, air and animal-related concerns if their land is located within an approved CCPI partnership project area.

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Individuals with a background in range management, natural resources, or agriculture have an opportunity to increase their knowledge at the Nebraska Range Shortcourse set for June 21-25, 2010, at Chadron State College, Chadron. The week-long course taught through a series of classroom and field sessions focuses on underlying principles of range management for efficient, sustainable use of rangeland for multiple purposes. The diversity of course topics include plant identification, plant growth and development, rangeland soils, assessing range condition and health, prescribed burning, ecosystem services, wildlife management, grazing management, and range livestock production. The shortcourse can be taken for credit through the University of Nebraska-Lincoln or Chadron State College. Sixteen continuing education credits are available for the Society for Range Management’s (SRM) “Certified Professional in Rangeland Management” program. Applications are due May 21, 2010, and enrollment is limited to 50 participants. The registration fee of $225 includes educational materials, transportation associated with field trips during the week, and breaks. Food and lodging can be arranged with Chadron State College. The shortcourse is sponsored by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Chadron State College, and the Nebraska Section of the Society for Range Management. It is held every other year. For more information, contact Walt Schacht (wschacht1@unl.edu; 402-472-0205) if you have questions. The shortcourse website is at http://agronomy.unl.edu/rangeshortcourse/index.htm.

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CCPI will be funded through three existing NRCS programs this fiscal year—the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) and the Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP). NRCS will provide financial and technical assistance directly to agricultural producers using the rules and procedures of these three programs. Potential partners are not required to contribute matching funding but it increases their prospects for selection if they provide financial, technical, or other resources. To participate in CCPI, potential partners must submit their proposals by close of business (Eastern Time) on May 27, 2010 to Financial Assistance Division, NRCS's National Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Proposals should identify the project area, conservation priorities in the area, the conservation objectives of the project, the number of producers likely to participate, the capabilities and resources offered by the applicant, and a monitoring and reporting plan, among other factors. Detailed partnership proposal requirements are located at www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs.ccip. Once a partnership proposal is selected, interested eligible agricultural producers and nonindustrial private forest landowners within the project area should apply directly to NRCS for funding under the appropriate conservation program— EQIP, CSP, or WHIP. Applicants must meet the eligibility requirements of the program for which they are applying. Please visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs for more information on each program, including eligibility requirements. Applicants may also contact Brad Soncksen, NRCS assistant state conservationist for programs at (402) 437-4111 for additional guidance. NRCS is celebrating 75 years helping people help the land in 2010. Since 1935, the NRCS conservation delivery system has advanced a unique partnership with state and local governments and private landowners delivering conservation based on specific, local conservation needs, while accommodating state and national interests.

NE Range Shortcourse Scheduled for June 21-25, 2010

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39844 43012


Page 22

Heartland Express - Irrigation

May 13, 2010

Ag Land Values Keep Climbing, But State Looks for Consistency By Mark Coddington, The Grand Island Independent It may look like simple fields and pastures, but Nebraska's agricultural land is steadily becoming more valuable " and more costly to its owners. For the third straight year, the assessed value of the state's ag land has increased by double-digit percentages, according to figures released in April by the Nebraska Department of Revenue. Ag land values went up by 11.85 percent from 2009 to 2010, dwarfing the 3.59 percent increase in commercial and industrial property and 0.88 percent increase in residential and recreational property. The most fundamental reason for such a big jump is a simple one, said Jay Rempe, vice president of governmental affairs for the Nebraska Farm Bureau. Ag land values are primarily driven by the profitability of the land, and as yields and commodity prices rise, the value of the land rises with them, he said. Nebraska's increase is particularly sharp because the state uses a three-year sample of ag land sale prices, dating back to July 2006 for this year's totals. That means this year's valuation increases are being driven largely by the ag economy's boom a few years ago. "We're playing a little bit of catch-up for the really good years that row crop farmers in particular had in '07 and '08," Rempe said. He expects those increases to slow down somewhat over the next couple of years as those prime years drop out of the sample. But Hamilton County Assessor Patricia Sandberg said that, in her county, sale prices are only going up. Another contributing factor to increasing land valuations is basic supply and demand, said Ruth Sorensen, a property tax administrator for the state Department of Revenue.

The supply of agricultural land in the state is limited, and when demand increases for a relatively scarce supply, prices shoot up, Sorensen said. Rempe said that, while those increasing values can be lucrative for sellers, they often hurt beginning farmers who are buying land and other farmers who are paying taxes on it.

Ag land assessed valuation increases from 2009 to 2010, by county: Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18.48% Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.60% Boone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.55% Buffalo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.85% Custer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.37% Garfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.72% Greeley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.52% Hamilton . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.68% Howard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14.92% Loup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.80% Merrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17.15% Nance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.78% Polk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12.62% Sherman . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.02% Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.23% Wheeler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.46% This year was the first, though, that the state used a new methodology to encourage consistency between various counties, encouraging counties to use "borrowed sales" from adjacent counties in determining their assessments. Sorensen said the sales' effect on counties' assessed ag land values won't be clear until values are equalized statewide later this year.

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But she said the new practice is intended to help lessen valuation disparities between bordering land in different counties. "When you have land on one side of the road and land on the other side of the road, you can't have a huge difference, because that doesn't even make sense," Howard County Assessor Deloris Heminger said. Both Howard and Hamilton counties used a handful of sales prices from adjacent counties after they had determined their own counties' prices as a way to verify that their prices were in a reasonable range. Heminger said the nearby sales can be used to fill out small sample sizes in a county, but not many were necessary in her county because of a high number of sales there. The borrowed sales are determined by Department of Revenue regional officials along with assessors based on proximity and similarity of soil type and land use. Howard County used sales from five different counties " Hall, Merrick, Greeley, Sherman and Valley " but Hamilton County only used sales from Clay and Polk counties. Sandberg said sales from Hall and Merrick counties wouldn't be used because the markets there are so different from those in Hamilton County. Sandberg said the new practice "could be a double-edged sword" " fostering more uniformity between counties but possibly making it difficult to explain to farmers why another county's sales helped determine their land's value. "If they don't own any land in Polk County, they only care about Hamilton County," Sandberg said. Heminger said it's always healthy to look outside of just one county, and she appreciates the reassurance of knowing her valuations are in line with her neighbors'. "That gives you something to kind of know that you're correct in what your assumptions are," she said.

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NEW ARIENS MOWERS ON HAND 1-1334 ZOOM ZEROTURN MOWER • 4-1642 ZOOM ZEROTURN MOWERS 1- 21" WALK BEHIND MOWER • 2-622 ROLL AROUND STRING TRIMMERS

USED PIVOTS 1978 10-TOWER CIRCLE MASTER PIVOT (Good Condition) 1978 10-TOWER 410 ZIMMATIC (Excellent Condition)

USED TRACTORS JOHN DEERE 4650 WITH DUALS AND WEIGHTS ALLIS CHALMERS 190 TRACTOR WITH DUAL 340 LOADER FORD 2N WITH FACTORY DEARBORN LOADER

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May 13, 2010

Heartland Express - Irrigation

Page 23

KANSAS SEEKS SUPREME COURT ENFORCEMENT Continued from page 1

"Thanks to the hard work of Nebraska's irrigators, the state has been in compliance since 2006."

NE Attorney General Jon Bruning The Kansas pleading says Nebraska should be held in contempt of court for not obeying the Supreme Court's 2003 decree. It says the court should take action against Nebraska to ensure it won't violate the compact again and that Nebraska should pay unspecified damages to Kansas for violations of the decree. Lower Republican Natural Resources District General Manager Mike Clements of Alma said he was somewhat surprised by the timing of the petition. "The (Harlan County) lake is full and in its flood pool," he said. "Nebraska is in compliance for its most recent five-year running average." "Our state's actions in this matter are and always have been to ensure that we get the water we are due under the compact and settlement," said David Barfield, chief engineer of the Kansas Department of Agriculture's Division of Water Resources, which manages Kansas' interests in interstate water issues. "We're not trying to be litigious; we just want Nebraska to be fair," he said. Barfield told the Hub Tuesday that no significance should be attached to the timing of the petition. "It was when we were ready to go," he said, adding that Kansas officials have been "very deliberate" in going forward. They couldn't take action until an arbitration

process concluded last summer. In June 2009, an arbitrator found that Nebraska has not adhered to the compact and must take additional action to comply with obligations. The Hub reported then that there were pluses and minuses for both states in arbitrator Karl J. Dreher's nonbinding arbitration report. Bruning had said he was pleased that Dreher rejected the Kansas argument that monetary damages should be based on Nebraska's gains from overuse of water in 2005 and 2006. The arbitrator recommended that Nebraska make a nominal damage payment of $10,000 until Kansas could correct its estimates of water that should have been available to the Kansas Bostwick Irrigation District. Kansas officials had wanted $9 million in damages, while Nebraska replied it owed no more than $1.23 million. Kansas' original bill was $72 million, but Dreher had ruled in December 2008 that Kansas could seek payment only for actual damages. "I think Nebraskans understand that we're gonna have to do more in water-short years. ... We can live with that," Bruning said in June. Barfield had described the arbitrator's report as "a very positive decision for Kansas" in part because it said Nebraska's current water use plans for compact compliance were inadequate. Dreher's report said the integrated water management plans written by the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources and Upper, Middle and Lower Republican NRDs wouldn't ensure compli-

ance during prolonged dry periods. He wrote that further reductions in consumptive groundwater withdrawals should be made beyond what was required in the initial plans and there should be permanent, interruptible supply contracts with surface water irrigators. Clements agrees that Mother Nature will change and there will be dry years in the future, but he said the Republican Basin NRDs are working "vigorously" with state officials on plans to address water-short years as defined by the amount of water stored in Harlan Lake. He said the main goal is to maintain water supplies above the water-short definition. "There is no silver bullet," he added, and multiple actions are required to maintain compact compliance. An ongoing project is enhancing streamflows to Kansas by removing invasive plants and debris from the river channel. "We are in a lot better shape now than we were three years ago," Clements said.

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43793


Page 24

Heartland Express

May 13, 2010

Farm and Ranch’s

HEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Dedicated to the Livestock Industry

UNL Research Finds Feeding Corn Coproducts to Reproducing Cows Positive mentation period compared to the cows fed the diet containing dried distillers grains plus solubles. In addition, researchers observed a 24 percent increase in cyclicity before synchronization which resulted in a 9 percent greater artificial insemination conception rate in heifers fed the diet containing dried distillers grains. "You can feed relatively small amounts of this inexpensive coproduct in a cow diet, and balance with moderate to low quality hay," Funston said. "In these challenging economic times, producers should evaluate a diet containing coproducts if they are readily available and reasonable priced." Researchers also found that male and female calf weaning body weight were similar between treatments, but female calves from dried distillers grains plus solubles-fed cows had a greater age-adjusted body weight than those from cows fed the diet containing wet corn gluten feed. Overall, they found that wet corn gluten feed improved cow average daily gain before breeding and dried distillers grains plus solubles increased reproductive response of the first calf heifers and adjusted weaning body weight of female offspring. Further research will identify the appropriate level and duration of supplementation. This will look at additional mechanisms to decrease production costs and further enhance reproduction. This UNL Agricultural Research Division research is supported by funds provided through the Hatch Act. 5/2010-SK Source: Rick Funston, Ph.D., associate professor, animal science, (308) 696-6703, rfunston2@unl.edu coproducts.bp Writer: Sandi Alswager Karstens, IANR News Service, (402) 472-3030, salswager2@unl.edu

Research demonstrates estrous synchronization in cows can improve calving distribution and progeny value. Synchronizing estrous is a tool that can be used to concentrate when animals exhibit estrus and potentially calving distribution. Calving records collected between 2000 and 2008 at the Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory near Whitman were used to determine the effect of estrous synchronization on calving distribution and the impact of time of calving on steer weaning, feedlot and carcass characteristics. A major goal in estrous synchronization is to increase the percentage of calves born early in the calving season. University of Nebraska-Lincoln research found that calves born in the first 21 days of the calving season are heavier and more uniform at weaning and have greater carcass weights and quality grades. Data were compared from 60-day, non-synchronized and 45-day, synchronized breeding seasons, both using natural breeding. Compared to the 60day non-synchronized season, 12 percent more calves were born in the first 21 days of the calving season, and the average weaning weight was 20 pounds greater for the 45-day synchronized breeding season. The benefits don't stop with weight at weaning, said Rick Funston, beef cattle reproductive physiologist at the West Central Research and Extension Center at North Platte. "There are significant benefits to the cow," Funston said. "It benefits the cow because she has a longer time to breed back. It gives the cow a longer period of time from calving to breeding, so the postpartum interval is lengthened. This will potentially increase longevity and decrease replacement needs." Shortened calving periods result in more efficient use of labor inputs for calving and vaccinations and increased returns on feed inputs. Cow nutrition can be optimized by grouping cows according to stage of gestation and feeding each group accordingly. Continued on page 30

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University of Nebraska-Lincoln research finds feeding reproducing cows corn coproducts is beneficial to their post calving gain, reproduction and may improve beef production sustainability. Dried distillers grains plus solubles or wet corn gluten feed are co-produced during the fermentation process of ethanol or corn sweetener, so they are a readily available, economical feed choice for Nebraska cattle producers. Little information is available when it comes to feeding coproducts to reproducing cows, said Rick Funston, beef cattle reproductive physiologist at the West Central Research and Extension Center at North Platte. "There's been a lot of research on feeding coproducts from the corn ethanol and corn sweetener industries, but most of that has been in feedlot cattle, not in breeding females," Funston said. "We wanted to look at the impact of feeding coproducts to first-calf heifers." UNL animal scientists conducted feeding trials on 134 first-calf heifers between calving and artificial insemination. The experiment was replicated over two years to determine the effect of additional bypass protein and dietary fat from feeding dried distillers grains plus solubles or wet corn gluten feed. The first-calf heifers were fed diets equal in energy and crude protein with varying levels of by-pass protein and dietary fat. Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources researchers found that feeding first-calf heifers dried distillers grains plus solubles or wet corn gluten feed in amounts that do not exceed protein needs do not have any negative effects on reproduction. In fact, they are beneficial. Funston said the various diets did not affect pre-breeding body weight of the cows. However, scientists did find that the first-calf heifers consuming the wet corn gluten feed diet had a greater average daily gain during the supple-

Estrous Synchronization Can Boost Cattle Producers' Profits

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May 13, 2010

Heartland Express - Markets

Page 25

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report Week Ending: 5/08/2010 MARKET: Valentine Livestock Auction - Valentine, NE

Receipts: 1,150 Last Week: 12,045 Last Year: 3,275 Due to limited receipts, not enough sales this week for an accurate price comparison. Feeder steers made up 42 percent of total receipts, heifers 58 percent. Weights over 600 pounds were 84 percent of total offerings.

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown experience to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global marFuturesOne President ket analysis, news and advice. and Chief FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located Analyst/Advisor in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des David M. Fiala’s compaMoines and at the Chicago Board of ny, FuturesOne, is a full Trade. You may contact David via email service risk management at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1and futures brokerage 800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to the web at www.futuresone.com. provide useful agricultural marketing Everyone should always understand the advice via daily, weekly, and monthly risk of loss and margin needed when analysis of the domestic and global martrading futures or futures options. kets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricThe information contained herein is ing decisions for ag producers. gathered from sources we believe to be FuturesOne also provides advice and reliable but cannot be guaranteed. management services for speculative Opinions expressed are subject to change accounts. David and his staff at without notice. There is significant risk in FuturesOne draw on decades of markettrading futures. ing, brokerage, farming and ranching

By David M. Fiala

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 5/07/2010 Eastern Nebraska: Compared with last week, very little new sales are occurring, trades that are being made are trending fully steady. Demand and trade activity was light to moderate. Ground and delivered hay and pellet sales trading fully steady. Ideal growing conditions have prevailed all spring long and some producers have started to knock down hay. Northeast Nebraska: Large Squares Premium: 120.00-150.00 Ground and Delivered to feedlots 85.00-95.00. Grass hay: small squares 95.00-100.00, Round Bales 65.00-70.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 190.00. Platte Valley of Nebraska: Alfalfa: Large Squares Premium: 120.00-150.00; Good Round Bales 85.00-100.00. Ground and Delivered to feedlots 95.00-110.00. Corn Stalks: Large Round Bales 50.00-60.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent: 180.00-185.00. Western Nebraska: Trade and movement slow. Hay prices mostly steady. Demand moderate to good for dairy quality hay, moderate to light

for cow hay. Supply of dairy quality hay extremely limited. Some contracting of new crop hay being reported. Supplies remain good and it appears there will be some carry over this spring. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Horse hay in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales.

Detailed Quotations Western Nebraska Alfalfa Premium 90.00-125.00 Sm. Sqrs. 5.00-5.50/bale Good 75.00-90.00 Fair 60.00-75.00 Utility 50.00-55.00 Ground & Deliv. New Crop 90.00-110.00 Mixed Grass 70.00-75.00 Wheat Straw 50.00

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, May 3, 2010 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 12,219; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 6,165 Head; Carcass Wt: 48 - 98 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 83.0; Wtd avg. Dressing: 49.9; choice or better; 95.5% YG 87.8% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 239 . . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .61.1 . . . . . . . .240.00 - 246.00 . . . . . . . .241.58 4,452 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .72.9 . . . . . . . .214.41 - 246.00 . . . . . . . .236.93 1,907 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .81.9 . . . . . . . .208.00 - 237.68 . . . . . . . .228.10 4,676 . . .over 85 lbs . . . . . .89.4 . . . . . . . .231.00 - 252.67 . . . . . . . .236.92

Lean hog trade is light higher this week due to light chart buying. After three days of trade, the weekly net changes are 12 higher on the June contract and July is up 5. Cash trade was steady early this week, but prices fell more than $2 on Wednesday due to slipping packer margins. Seasonally, we do expect a decrease in hog weights this time of year so cash should find support. The chart turned lightly negative last week, but there is support at $83.85-$84 on the July contract. This market is still at historically very high levels and there is additional room to correct to the downside. Hedgers should be / should have been fairly aggressive over the past month. We do not believe the market needs to go back to the February lows, but the profit margin on paper can be greatly reduced. June 10 8392 8682

July 10 8390 8730

June 2010 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .85.700 High . . .85.950 Low . . .85.300 Close . .85.650 Change .+0.325

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2

Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price

Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price

9 . . . . . .473-493 49 . . . . .511-549 51 . . . . .558-586 23 . . . . .630-632 121 . . . .677-693 38 . . . . .713-732 126 . . . .758-799 67 . . . . .872-882

27 . . . . .518-534 . . . .533 51 . . . . .560-590 . . . .570 28 . . . . .600-643 . . . .616 18 . . . . . . .692 . . . . . .692 43 . . . . .707-747 . . . .730 100 . . . .775-786 . . . .780 159 . . . .753-756 . . . .755 81 . . . . .802-836 . . . .805 26 . . . . . . .831 . . . . . .831 73 . . . . .875-897 . . . .896 61 . . . . .870-893 . . . .881 3 . . . . . .950-965 . . . .955

. . . .484 . . .138.00-138.50 . . . .540 . . .135.00-140.00 . . . .580 . . .125.75-134.00 . . . .631 . . .121.50-129.00 . . . .682 . . .123.75-130.00 . . . .731 . . .116.00-118.00 . . . .779 . . .116.75-124.00 . . . .881 . . .103.00-111.50

. . .138.22 . . .137.91 . . .127.13 . . .123.45 . . .127.93 . . .116.10 . . .120.22 . . .110.24

. . .122.00-128.00 . . .127.57 . . .119.00-126.25 . . .122.89 . . .117.75-122.25 . . .119.31 . . . . . .104.25 . . . . . .104.25 . . .109.00-109.75 . . .109.70 . . .106.00-112.00 . . .111.14 . . . . . .121.85 . . . . . .121.85 . . .100.00-103.25 . . .100.33 . . . . . .109.30 . . . . . .109.30 . . .95.00-100.25 . . . .96.71 . . . . . .115.00 . . . . . .115.00 . . . . . .89.00 . . . . . . .89.00

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1 Head . . . . . .Wt . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . .Price 116 . . . .300-348 . . . .333 197 . . . .352-398 . . . .386 11 . . . . . . .335 . . . . . .335 58 . . . . .351-398 . . . .367 74 . . . . .439-449 . . . .447 15 . . . . . .715 . . . . . .715

. . .120.00-155.00 . . .142.08 . . .125.00-149.00 . . .138.85 . . . . . .140.00 . . . . . .140.00 . . .121.00-132.00 . . .129.57 . . .115.00-126.50 . . .121.85 . . . . . .109.10 . . . . . .109.10

Check Us Out On The Web @ www.myfarmandranch.com

5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 5/02/10

Confirmed: 150,874 Week Ago: 163,118

Year Ago: 122,257

Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,494 . . . . . . . .1,195-1,450 . . . . . . . . . .98.00-101.50 1,333 . . . . . . . . . .99.04 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,753 . . . . . . . .1,150-1,400 . . . . . . . . . . .95.00-99.50 1,305 . . . . . . . . . .98.38 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30,920 . . . . . . .1,085-1,383 . . . . . . . . . . .97.00-99.50 1,259 . . . . . . . . . .98.23 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .310 . . . . . . . .1,070-1,278 . . . . . . . . . . .97.50-98.50 1,180 . . . . . . . . . .97.92 Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,461 . . . . . . . .1,090-1,275 . . . . . . . . . . .97.00-99.50 1,163 . . . . . . . . . .99.14 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,222 . . . . . . .1,025-1,311 . . . . . . . . . .96.00-100.00 1,173 . . . . . . . . . .98.72 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24,654 . . . . . . .1,000-1,300 . . . . . . . . . . .97.00-99.50 1,145 . . . . . . . . . .98.37 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .======================================================================================================= Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (Paid on Hot Weights) (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .859 . . . . . . . .1,300-1,450 . . . . . . . . . .97.25-101.00 1,379 . . . . . . . . .100.04 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 . . . . . . . .1,350-1,450 . . . . . . . . . . .98.00-99.00 1,381 . . . . . . . . . .98.31 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .378 . . . . . . . .1,275-1,375 . . . . . . . . . . .98.00-98.50 1,312 . . . . . . . . . .98.11 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head Count . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . Price Range ($) Weighted Averages (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304 . . . . . . . .1,175-1,275 . . . . . . . . . .98.00-100.00 1,221 . . . . . . . . . .99.16 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 . . . . . . . . .1,165-1,165 . . . . . . . . . . .97.00-97.00 1,165 . . . . . . . . . .97.00 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .42,477 . . . . . . .1,273 . . . . . . . .98.30 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .41,337 . . . . . . .1,155 . . . . . . . .98.55 Dressed Del Steer . . .22,826 . . . . . . .844 . . . . . . . .157.78 Dressed Del Heifer . . .15,288 . . . . . . .773 . . . . . . . .157.69

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Year Ago Averages:

Week Ago Averages:

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .47,484 . . . . . . .1,282 . . . . . . . .99.32 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .38,171 . . . . . . .1,172 . . . . . . . .99.46 Dressed Del Steer . . .26,693 . . . . . . .851 . . . . . . . .160.33 Dressed Del Heifer . . .15,910 . . . . . . .786 . . . . . . . .159.76

Cattle

Hogs

Support: Resistance

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1

Live FOB Steer . . . . . .34,845 . . . . . . .1,298 . . . . . . . .85.69 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .22,393 . . . . . . .1,184 . . . . . . . .85.79 Dressed Del Steer . . .27,445 . . . . . . .869 . . . . . . . .137.54 Dressed Del Heifer . . .16,716 . . . . . . .776 . . . . . . . .136.70

Support: Resistance

June 10 9470 9760

Aug 10 Feeder 11345 11700

Live cattle trade is mixed in active trade. Heading into Thursday, the weekly net changes are 20 lower on the June contract, and August is up 50. A combination of light profit taking by market longs and chart buying has controlled trade. Cash trade has been slow to develop this week, but some light sales were reported at $100 which was steady with last week. The cutout finished mixed on Wednesday with choice down 35 at 171.05 and select was 4 higher at 166.95. The trend is still higher on the chart and futures will remain sup-

ported as long as cash maintains the firm tone. Hedgers call with questions, feeders should be locking in positive margins, or at least getting some option protection in place.

August 2010 Feeder Cattle (CBOT)

June 2010 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open .115.250 High .115.400 Low . .114.575 Close .114.775 Change .-0.825

Open . .96.600 High . .96.800 Low . . .95.650 Close . .95.700 Change .-1.100


Page 26

Heartland Express

May 13, 2010

Schedule of Events May 21- Grand Island (Hall County) Stuhr Under the Stars; Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer, 3133 W. Hwy 34; The outdoor movie night returns for a second year. Games, great food and historical activities before the film. 7:30-10pm, $8$10 Martha Paulsen (308) 385-5316 www.stuhrmuseum.org May 21-23 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Lincoln Quiltfest 2010 - Inspired by Nature; Weary Center at Nebraska Wesleyan University, 53rd & Huntington Sts; More than 300 quilts on display, vendor mall, children's activities, demonstrations and more. Fri-Sat, 9am-5pm; Sun, 11am5pm, $5-$6 (402) 483-6533 www.lincolnquiltersguild.org May 22 - Alexandria (Thayer County) - Kids Free Fishing Clinic at Alexandria State Recreation Area; 560 Ave & 718 Rd; For youth ages 16 and under. Fishing poles, bait and tackle is provided. Free hot dog cookout and prizes. 9:30am-3pm, Park entry permit required Rick Ball (402) 729-5777 www.outdoornebraska.org May 22 - Omaha (Douglas County) Hubbard Street Dance; Chicago Orpheum Theater, 409 S. 16th St; One of the top modern dance companies in the world. 8pm (402) 345-0606 www.omahaperformingarts.org May 22 - Panama (Lancaster County) Pig Iron Days; Main St; Antique tractor pull, show and shine, bounce house, barrel train rides, quilt display, concessions and more. Events begin at 10am, Free. Jay Nutter (402) 788-2789 www.lincoln.ne.gov/towns/panama/index.htm May 28 - Humboldt (Richardson County) Memorial Day Celebration; City-wide Celebrate with a BBQ, ice cream social and Happy Cheks Polka band. (402) 862-2821 May 28 - Springview (Keya Paha County) Keya Paha Fiddlers Jamboree; Springview grade school gym Enjoy an evening of music! Fiddles, guitars, drums, banjos, singing, yodeling and poetry. 7pm, Donation. Bob Keneston (402) 497-2157

May 28-30 - Superior (Nuckolls County) Victorian Festival; Downtown Celebrate the heritage of Superior. Parade, children's activities, food, Victorian tea honoring Lady Vestey, craft fair, dances and more. Free (402) 879-3419 www.victorianfestival.info

May 29-31 - Wisner (Cuming County) Elkhorn Valley Arts Unlimited Art Fest; Rainbow Dance Studio, 909 Ave E Enjoy artwork of all kinds displayed by area artists. Sat, 9am-5pm; Sun, 1-5pm; Mon, 9am-noon, Free Peggy Liermann (402) 5293338 www.wisnerareachamberofcommerce.com

May 29 Beatrice (Gage County) Monumental Fiddling Contest; Homestead National Monument of America, 852 W. NE Hwy 4; A day of music and competition with fiddlers and musicians of all ages. 2-9pm, Free. Susan Cook (402) 223-3514 www.nps.gov/home

May 30 - Plattsmouth (Cass County) Art in the Yard; Parmele House B&B, 520 Ave F Artists from the Midwest region come for this one-of-akind art show. Musical entertainment, food and more than 40 artists. 10am-4pm, Free Carroll Hudson (402) 296-0525 www.artintheyard.com

May 29 - Maywood (Frontier County) Old Glory Days; Community hall; A hometown celebration including a parade, children's activities, waterslide, fun and food. 8am-4pm, Free Harold Brummer (308) 530-2434

May 30 - Red Cloud (Webster County) Kerry Grombacher; Red Cloud Opera House; Kerry Grombacher returns to the Red Cloud Opera House stage for his Highway 281 tour. 2pm (402) 746-2641 www.willacather.org

May 29 - Odell (Gage County) 5th Annual Run for Fun; City park; Take part in a 1 mile walk, 5K run or 10K run through the scenic countryside. Prizes and drawings following the event. 7am Jill Scheele (402) 766-4377 www.odellnebraska.us

May 30 - Wolbach (Greeley County) Bull Riding Event; 301 Center St Bull riding and street dance. Vicki Vang (308) 246-5296 www.wolbach.com

May 29 - Omaha (Douglas County) Divertimento; University of NE - Omaha Strauss Performing Arts Center, 6001 Dodge St; Enjoy this musical smorgasbord that has something for everyone. 7pm, $30 (402) 342-3560 www.omahasymphony.org May 29-30 - Ogallala (Keith County) 11th Annual Shut Up & Fish Tournament; Lake McConaughy. Darrell Marrow (308) 778-5879 May 29-31 - Bridgeport (Morrill County) Camp Clarke Raiders Spring Rendezvous; Shooting Range & Campgrounds, 5 mi. S. of town on Hwy 88; Blackpowder rifle, shotgun & pistol shoots for adults & children, hawk and knife throws, games, raffles, food and more. 8am-6pm, $30/camp includes all events Nancy Eichthaler (308) 262-1080 www.campclarkeraiders.com May 29-31 - Brownville (Nemaha County) 53rd Annual Spring Flea Market; Main St; More than 200 vendors from across the United States. Antiques, flowers, jewelry, collectibles and food. 8am-6pm, Free. Jim Doty (402) 825-3731 www.brownville-ne.com

May 31 - Grand Island (Hall County) Memorial Day Celebration; Stuhr Museum, 3133 W. US Hwy 34; A flag-led procession to the rural cemetery, remembrance ceremony, live music, military salutes and more. 9am-5pm, $8$10 Martha Paulsen (308) 385-5316 www.stuhrmuseum.org May 31 - Kimball (Kimball County) Memorial Day Celebration & High Point Car Show; City-wide (308) 235-3782 www.ci.kimball.ne.us May 31 - Omaha (Douglas County) Family Fun Day Cruise; River City Star, 151 Freedom Park Rd; Half price sightseeing cruises from 12pm. Bring the entire family for a 1 hour cruise along the Omaha riverfront. 1-2pm, $4-$6 Tami Bader (402) 342-7827 www.rivercitystar.com May 31 - Papillion (Sarpy County) Memorial Day Celebration; Shadow Lake Towne Center, Hwy 370 & 72nd St; A celebration for the entire family. Free. Alicia Peters (402) 537-0046 www.shadowlakeshopping.com

Horticulture Has Long History in the Panhandle By Jim Schild, Extension Educator and Bob Hawley, Research Technician UNL Extension Many people associated the work of the Scottsbluff Station with the production of grains, but the early work of the Scottsbluff station was also to investigate the possibility of horticultural production in the Panhandle region. The first station manager, Fritz Knorr, planted an orchard in 1911. The station's charge was to evaluate varieties for adaptation to the region. Jules Sandoz was growing fruit trees in his orchard in Sheridan County at the turn of the century, but the unpredictable weather challenged him and others trying to grow fruit and vegetables. Weather has been and continues to be the biggest challenge for growers trying to produce quality fruits and vegetables, as evidenced by this report for the station from 1916: "The garden and orchard work were a total failure this year, due to sand storms, late snow and the hail at a later date. On June 20 the garden was practically as bare of vegetation as in January. All that we were able to get out of the garden was a few string beans and a few tomatoes, the first of which ripened about a week before the first frost. All of the fruit was destroyed by the weather this fall. The hail did perhaps most of the damage to the young fruit. The trees were considerably damaged by the hail, most of the scars, however, healed very nicely during the summer and no winter damage should result from these wounds." Gardeners today can relate to those same weather challenges. The second superintendent, James Holden, planted 100 fruit trees (apples, pears, cherries and plums) and 250 small fruits (currants, gooseberries, grapes, raspberries, and strawberries) in 1923. Some of the trees lived and produced fruit periodically during the next 30 years. In 1949 the apple crop contributed to the cash revenue of the station, the only year the orchard did so. The third superintendent, Lionel Harris, continued looking at fruit production. He worked in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Cheyenne Horticultural Station and

planted an experimental orchard in 1939. Out of that collaboration many fruit trees and small fruits were identified as being hardy, and some are still planted in this region today. Harris also conducted vegetable variety tests in the early to mid 1930s. Vegetables tried were asparagus, bush beans, table beets, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, chard, sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant, peppers, endive, kohlrabi, lettuce, muskmelons, watermelons, okra, onions, parsnips, peas, radishes, salsify, spinach, squash, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, and turnips. The work was mostly concerned with varieties and other factors from the standpoint of the home garden. However, Harris also goes on to say that commercial production of cabbage and onions is feasible in the area and that certain varieties of tomatoes, peas, beans, sweet corn, and red beets have canning possibilities. In March 1937, a meeting was held for local growers to discuss growing vegetables for canning purposes. The following is the report in Harris's weekly log: "The Otoe Food Products Co. is building a canning factory near Scottsbluff at the present time. This company will can only tomatoes and sweet corn this year, but eventually expects also to process asparagus, spinach, red beets, carrots, beans and peas. Approximately 200 growers attended the meeting, which indicates the interest that is being shown in the new industry." Otoe Foods, latter called Morton House, canned vegetables from 1939 to 1946, when it was sold to Consumer's Cooperative of Kansas City. Commercial vegetable production interest was renewed in the 1960s, when David Nuland evaluated vegetable varieties in 19 counties in Nebraska. The specific purpose was to generate information for the vegetable processing industry regarding the potential for vegetable production in Nebraska. Information was compiled on asparagus, lima beans, dry beans, snapbeans, red beets, carrots, broccoli, cabbage, cucumbers, onions, peas, potatoes, pumpkins, sweet corn, and tomatoes. Campbell Soups in Omaha was looking for local sources of vegetables, but as the interstate road

system developed it brought with it the ability to bring in fresh produce from the traditional vegetable growing regions. Nuland began looking at turf and landscape issues in the early 1970s, conducting trials on bluegrass varieties and looking at warm season grasses suited to the high plains landscapes. Nuland teamed up with Stan Haas, who was the communication specialist at the center, and started the D.A. Murphy Arboretum. The arboretum is part of the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum System and is still in existence. Nuland, along with county agents in the Panhandle region, started and recruited Master Gardeners for a new state program in 1986. In return for classroom instruction, the Master Gardener volunteers donate back to their communities 40 hours of their time working on various horticultural projects. An attempt at vegetable production was again made in the mid 1980s, when the UNL Food Processing Center established a presence at the Lionel Harris building at the Mitchell Unit. Carrots, onions, and peppers were all grown at the center. Onions started in paper pots in greenhouses and later transplanted to the field were also evaluated. Some local businessmen were at this time trying to set up a freeze dry operation in Gering to package the vegetable products. Unfortunately, the local bank that was helping with the project failed, and with the bank failure the project also failed. Nuland retired in 2000 and in the budget-cutting process for that year the horticultural position at the Panhandle Center was lost. Extension Educator Jim Schild and other educators picked up pieces of Nuland's work. Schild's horticultural work has been looking at different varieties of grapes that can be grown in western Nebraska. Currently, three commercial wineries are in operation. The D.A. Murphy Arboretum continues and the focus of the work has been to reduce the amount of water used in the landscape. Native shrubs and trees have been planted in landscape beds, bluegrass turf areas have been converted to buffalograss turf, and mulched landscape plantings of trees and shrubs are included.


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 27

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, May 20th. The next Heartland Express will be printed on Thursday, May 27th. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, simply fill out the form below and mail it to us with a check. This will eliminate any errors and help keep the classified cost to a minimum. 1001 - MOWERS WANTED TO BUY NE - IHC #24 MOWER & PARTS, (308) 5872344 NE - IH 9' MOWER, (402) 336-2755 FOR SALE NE - REBUILT KOSCH HAYVESTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - IHC H W/WO MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - KOSCH SIDE MOUNT MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - EMERSON DOUBLE VICON DISC, (308) 544-6421 NE - VICON 3 PT DISC MOWER, (308) 5446421 NE - 10 BOLT SPACERS, 36" ROW FOR JD, (308) 390-0642 NE - REBUILT KOSCH TRAILVESTER MOWERS, 14', WITH WARRANTY, $5,000.00, (308) 544-6421 IA - SICKLE MOWERS 7', $275 TO $775, (712) 299-6608 NE - IHC SUPER H, WIDE FRONT END, LIVE HYDRAULIC, HAS MOUNTED KOSCH MOWER W/2 7' BARS, (308) 348-2234 1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE KS - NEW HOLLAND 2218 HEAD W/2300 ADAPTER TO FIT 9030 BI-DIRECTIONAL, $9,000.00, (620) 340-3358 OK - NH SWATHER HDR FOR 9030 BI-DIRECTIONAL, 1116 BF, EXCELLENT, $4,500.00, (580) 829-2543 KS - '89 HONEY BEE 36' CANVAS SWATHER. GOOD COND. DUAL 18' UNITS. PTO DRIVEN DUAL HYDRAULIC PUMPS POWER PICKUP REELS, CANVASES & SICKLE DRIVES. GOES FROM ROAD TO FIELD AND BACK AGAIN LESS THAN 2 MINUTES. CURRENTLY MOUNTED ON IH 5488 TRACTOR, HAYS, KS., $12,000.00, (785) 628-8003

1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE - CONT’D KS - 1996 NEW HOLLAND 2550, 16 FT HEAD, $26,000.00, (620) 340-3358 1005 - RAKES WANTED TO BUY NE - LH CHANNEL IRON FRAME ON NH56 OVER 56B SIDE RAKE, AND A WHEEL, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE IA - WWW. RAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 3662114 NE - '02 VERMEER R23A TWINRAKE CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE NE - BALER BELTS AND CHAINS; BEARINGS & FLANGES, (308) 587-2344 NE - BELTS FOR MOST BALERS & SWATHERS, (308) 587-2344 AL - ROUND BALER BELTING: LRGST DEALER IN US. ORIGINAL BELTING FOR ALL ROUND BALERS INCLUDING NEW JD IN STOCK! SAVE HUNDRED$! FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE! NO 800#, JUST BEST PRICES. SINCE 1973. HAMMOND EQUIP. MC/VISA/DISC/AMEX OR COD, BALERBELTS.COM, (334) 627-3348 TX - BALER BELTS- ALL BRANDS. MADE IN THE U. S. A. ! JD WITH GENUINE JD PLATE FASTENERS. FREE SHIPPING ON SETS. WWW. BALERBELTSANDHAYBEDS. COM, (800) 223-1312 NE - USED BELTS FOR VERMEER 605XL BALER CELL 308-962- 6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - JD 530 BALER, (308) 882-4588 NE - VERMEER 605K BALER, GOOD CONDITION, '07 NHBR780A; 2003 BR780 ALSO GOOD CONDITION, (402) 433-5016

1006 - BALERS FOR SALE - CONT’D OK - VERMEER 605L, 4591 BALES, TWINE & NET, EXCELLENT, $8,000.00, (580) 8292543 NE - VERMEER 2008 605M RAMP, NET, FLOATS, LIGHTS, MOISTURE SENSOR, FIRE EXTINGUISHER. APPROX. 4200 BALES ON MONITOR. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $26,950.00, (402) 433-5016 1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - NEW EMERSON BALE MOVER-FEEDERS, (308) 544-6421 KS - E-Z HAUL INLINE SELF DUMPING HAY TRAILER, 32' 6 BALE, GOOSENECK, BUMPER HITCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 KS - HAY ELEVATORS, 2 ON WHEELS, 36' & 32'; 1 24' FLAT WITH 24' EXTENSION. ALL FOR SMALL SQ BALES. EXCELLENT., (785) 255-4579 1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 NE - NEW FARMHAND CHAIN & SPROCKETS, (308) 467-2335 NE - JD 200 STACKMAKER, $900.00, (308) 876-2515 NE - EMERSON 13X24 STACK MOVER, ELECTRONIC SCALES, W/ OR WITHOUT HYDRAFORK, (308) 544-6421 www.myfarmandranch.com

Classified Advertisement Order Category of your Ad (from above):

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_____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ __________________________________________________________________________________________$6.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ____________________$6.40_____________$6.80 ____________$7.20 _____________$7.60 ____________$8.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ ________$8.40 ________$8.80 ________$9.20 ________$9.60 _______$10.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ $10.40____________$10.80 ___________$11.20 ____________$11.60 ___________$12.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ _______$12.40 _______$12.80 _______$13.20 _______$13.60 _______$14.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________ _______$14.40 _______$14.80 _______$15.20 _______$15.60 _______$16.00 _____________ _____________ ____________ _____________ ____________

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_______$17.20

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Number of Issues to Run Advertisement

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Price per Issue (From Above, $6.00 Minimum)

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TOTAL AMOUNT DUE

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Complete this form and mail with payment to: Farm and Ranch • PO Box 415 • Kearney, NE 68848 A $2.50 billing charge will be added if payment is not enclosed. Complete the following Information (Please Print):

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1010 - FORAGE HARVESTORS WANTED TO BUY KS - JOHN DEERE CHOPPERS & HEADS, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, KS, (785) 336-6103 FOR SALE NE - KNIFE BAR & RECUT SCREEN FOR JD 35, (308) 995-5515 NE - RECUT SCREEN & AXLE EXTENSION FOR IHC 730, (308) 995-5515 1013 - DUMP WAGON WANTED TO BUY KS - JD SILAGE WAGONS & HIGH DUMPS, ROEDER IMPLEMENT, (785) 336-6103 1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY KS - NH SELF PROPELLED & PULL-TYPE, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, (785) 336-6103 ID - NEW HOLLAND 2 & 3-WIDE, SELF-PROPELLED, PULL-TYPE MODELS. JIM,, (208) 880-2889 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND'S-ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/ TRADE. WWW. BALEWAGON. COM, (208) 880-2889 NE - NH 1044, 119 BALES, GOOD, $3,500.00, (402) 545-2255 1016 - SILAGE EQUIPMENT FOR SALE ND - NH B27P SILAGE BALER WRAPPING MACHINE, PULL TYPE, (701) 839-4968 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE WANTED TO BUY NE - HAYBUSTER GEAR BOX FOR 1600 STACKER, BEDROLLERS, PUSH OFF ASSEMBLY, A FEW OTHER PARTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - HAY PROBE FOR TESTING, (308) 5872344 IA - JD HAYLOADER, (712) 299-6608 IA - ROTARY CUTTERS, 5', 6'& 7', $375 TO $1475, (712) 299-6608 1101 - TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - IH 560 DIESEL, (402) 336-2755 NE - MF 35, 50, 65, 135, 235, 245, OR 255 TRACTOR, (402) 678-2277 NE - BUYING TRACTORS FOR SALVAGE MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (800) 5824303 MO - AC D17'S & UP, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - IH 560 TO 1566, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - LINDSAY BRO WAGON, NEED PARTS: 6 BOLT HUB #Q563, (816) 378-2015 NE - NEW OR USED 24. 5 X 32 REAR TRACTOR TIRES TO FIT JD COMBINE OR STEIGER TRACTOR, (402) 256-3696 NE - LATE MODEL JD 4020, ANY CONDITION., (402) 369-0212 NE - FRONT WEIGHTS FOR JD 8000 OR 60 SERIES, (402) 726-2488 NE - CASE IH OR STEIGER 9240 OR 9260 RIGID FRAME 4 WHEEL DRIVE, (402) 3723009 FOR SALE IA - JD B'S 1937 TO 1950, (712) 299-6608 IA - IH NICE SUPER C W/LOADER, (712) 2996608 NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885 NE - NEW, USED AND REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (800) 582-4303 IA - IH, NICE SUPER C W/WF, 2PT, (712) 2996608 IA - OLIVER SUPER 88D, WF, PS, (712) 2996608 IA - OLIVER SUPER 77G, WF PS, (712) 2996608 IA - IH 300U, W/HYD BUCKET, $4,500.00, (712) 299-6608 NE - 8 HOLE 15" TRACTOR FRONT WHEELS, FITS IHC, (308) 587-2344

1101 - TRACTORS FOR SALE - CONT’D IA - JD A, 1935, (712) 299-6608 IA - AC WC ROAD PATROL, 12' BLADE, (712) 299-6608 NE - JD 4020 W/ NEW TIRES, NEW DIESEL INJECTOR PUMP, (308) 478-5451 CO - PARTING OUT 4386 IH, ENGINE SOLD, (303) 536-0124 IA - AC WD45, WF, PS, LOADER, (712) 2996608 IA - IH-B WITH WOODS 60"PT, $2,550.00, (712) 299-6608 IA - AC-WC 1938 ELECTRIC START, $1,850.00, (712) 299-6608 NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, (308) 436-4369 IA - SUP A, H, M, MTA, 350, 460, 560 TRACTORS, (712) 299-6608 NE - 2 JD DR WH & LIFT ASSIT 7300, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 IA - C-AC W/BELLY MOWERS, $1850 TO $2850, (712) 299-6608 KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS BELLY MOWER, $3,500.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - 1971 JD DIESEL 4020, SYNCHRO SHIFT, DUAL SIDE CONSOLE HYD. , WF, 3PT, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (402) 369-0212 NE - 4430 POWERSHIFT, NEW 18. 4-38 DUAL TIRES, 3 HYD, W/11' JOHN DEERE BLADE, (308) 348-2234 KS - '84 IH 5488, 190 HP, 5378 HRS, EXC. COND. NEAR NEW GY 18. 4-38 DUAL TIRES, HEAVY DUTY FRONT AXLE, NEAR NEW GY FRONT TIRES, 3 PT. HITCH, TRIPLE HYD. YOU WILL LIKE IT. HAYS, KS., $26,000.00, (785) 628-8003 SD - 1968 930 CASE CK $2800. PTO, 3 PT, 600 HRS OVER- HAUL. POWER STEERING PUMP BAD, LOCATED WINNER, SD, (605) 431-8179 NE - IHC SUPER H W/WIDE FRONT, LIVE HYDRAULICS, (308) 348-2234 1102 - LOADERS FOR SALE IA - SEVERAL LOADERS OFF JD 3010-4020, (712) 299-6608 NE - 640 CLASSIC JD SELF LOADING LOADER WILL FIT 6400 JD TRACTOR, ALSO FITS 3020, 4020, 4450. WILL FIT ANY TRACTOR THAT HAS 20" FRAME, 6'BUCKET & 4 TINE GRAPPLE FORK & MOUNTINGS; LIKE NEW, $7,500.00, (308) 390-0642 NE - HEAVY DUTY BALE SPEAR FOR F11 LOADER, $600.00, (308) 348-2065 NE - DUALL LOADER MOUNTS TO FIT JD 4520 OR 4620. CUSTOM BUILT, VERY HEAVYM VERY NEAT, WITH CUSTOM GRILL GUARD BUILT IN. DUALL LOADER 325 OR 345, (402) 482-5491 NE - 75B MICHIGAN 3 CYL FRONT END LOADER, 50% RUBBER, SERVICE RECORDS AVAILABLE. $10,000 OVERLAND SAND AND GRAVEL CO. CALL BRYCE @, (402) 7642371 1103 - LOADER ATTACHMENTS WANTED TO BUY NE - DIRT OR MANURE BUCKET HEAD FOR F10 LOADER, NEEDS TO HAVE ORANGE FRAMEWORK W/GRAPPLE, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE IA - 3 PT 90" GNUSE BUCKET, $1,250.00, (712) 299-6608 1104 - CHISELS WANTED TO BUY NE - 20' CHISEL, (402) 726-2488 1105 - DISKS FOR SALE NE - DISK BLADES AND BEARINGS, (308) 587-2344 IA - 3 PT OR PULL TANDEM DISKS, 6'-18', (712) 299-6608 NE - DISC ROLLING & DISC BLADES JESS PUTNAM, OVERTON, NE, (800) 987-6612 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE KS - FLEX KING 4X5' SWEEP PLOW, GOOD CONDITION, $1,250.00, (620) 865-2541 IA - OLIVER PLOWS, 2 & 3 BOTTOM, PULL/3PT, (712) 299-6608 IA - 25 PLOWS, 2, 3 & 4 BOTTOM, 2/3PT, (712) 299-6608


Page 28 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - NEW FLEX KING PICKER WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 NE - CASE 308, 4-18'S WITH CONCAVE CUSHION COULTERS, LIKE NEW, $1,100.00, (308) 874-4562 ND - IH 6 BOTTOM 735 VARI-WIDTH SEMI MOUNTED PLOW, DWAINE KAUFFMAN, (701) 839-4968 1109 - PLANTERS WANTED TO BUY NE - LIFT ASSIST WHEELS FOR A JD 7300 12RN, (402) 545-2255 NE - JD 7000 CORN PLANTER ROW UNITS, (402) 372-3009 FOR SALE NE - NEW #92 IHC COVERING DISK ASSEMBLY, (308) 995-5515 NE - LIFT ASSIST AND/OR TRANSPORT KIT FOR IHC LISTER/ PLANTER, ALSO GAUGE STRIPE WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 IA - NEW & USED KINZES, SORENSEN EQUIPMENT, HARLAN, IA, (712) 755-2455 KS - INSECTICIDE BOXES FOR JD 7200, 16 ROWS, $900 OBO. DISK FURROWERS, $1600., (620) 865-2541 NE - IHC SEED DRUMS, (308) 995-5515 NE - MOORE BUILT 16 ROW PLANTER MARKERS, $2,750.00, (308) 485-4486 CO - IH 500 6 ROW CYCLE, W/CORN & SUNFLOWER DRUMS, $500.00, (303) 536-0124 1111 - DRILLS WANTED TO BUY NE - TYE DRILL FOR PARTS, (402) 482-5491 FOR SALE NE - !! ROUND CAPS !! THE ULTIMATE GRAIN DRILL PRESS WHEEL CAP! COVERS COMPLETE FACE OF WHEEL. CONVERTS V FACED WHEELS TO ROUND FACE FOR BETTER FLOTATION & DEPTH CONTROL. PERFECT FIT! EASY TO INSTALL! DON YUNG DISTRIBUTING, KIMBALL, NE., (308) 2352718 NE - JD 520 SOYBEAN DRILL, 10X18 DOUBLE DISK W/DEPTH BANDS, V PRESS WHEELS. LIKE NEW., (308) 894-6743 KS - 30" HOE AIR SEEDER DRILL $3500. 40' DISC AIR SEEDER DRILL, $19,500, (785) 871-0711 NE - 150 & 7100 DRILLS, FERT. BOXES, BLACK HEAVY DUTY WHEELS, DBL HITCH, TRANSPORTS & PARTS, (308) 995-5515 KS - 2 SECT. GREAT PLAINS FOLDING DRILL, SOLID STAND, 3010 NT NO-TILL DRILL, GOOD CONDITION, FIELD READY $29,750/OBO, (316) 204-4505 1112 - ROTARY HOE FOR SALE NE - 30 FOOT JD ROTARY HOE CALL FOR DETAILS, (308) 882-4588 1113 - CULTIVATORS FOR SALE SD - 3-PT 8R FLAT FOLD, $1,500.00, (605) 386-2131 NE - IHC GO-DIG PARTS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 4 ROW ORTHMAN TOOL BAR, CAN BE USED TO CULTIVATE OR RIDGE, (308) 3900642 NE - HAWKINS 12 ROW HILLER (DITCHER), (308) 882-4588 NE - 12 ROW CULTIVATOR, (308) 882-4588 1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE KS - 1600 GAL. FLOATER. 3000 WET BOOM SPRAYER, $6,500.00, (785) 871-0711 NE - 2-200 GALLON SADDLE TANKS, FITS 4450, (308) 478-5451 KS - JD 600 HI-CYCLE W/40' WICK BOOM. REBUILT MOTOR, $2,500.00, (620) 8652541 NE - JD 25A, 3 PT. HITCH, 150 GAL, 20" BOOM, (308) 587-2344 1115 - MULCHERS/SHREDDERS FOR SALE NE - 20' BESLER STALK CHOPPER, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1116 - BUSH HOGS FOR SALE IA - 7' 3PT, BUSH HOG CUTTERS; $1,050 TO $2,250, (712) 299-6608 1119 - ROD WEEDER FOR SALE KS - 45' OF MILLER ROD WEEDER USED PARTS, DRIVES, TEETH, RODS, ETC. ALL FOR $500, (620) 865-2541 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - CDS SQUEEZE & INJ PUMP, 24 ROW, $600.00, (402) 726-2488 NE - ANHY. TRAILER CHASSIS, (402) 7262488

Speidel Weed Wiper #1 Herbicide applicator for weed control. Kill rye in winter wheat, all sizes available. Recovers in stk. ATV mounting brackets & Quality Carts. 580-886-2396 • 800-544-1546 www.acrsales.com

Heartland Express 1123 - INSECTICIDE APPLICATORS FOR SALE NE - GLYPHOSATE PLUS $9.00, GENERIC GRAZON $24, 24D LV6 $18 QUALITY AG SALES, LINCOLN, CALL 877-985- 6100 OR, (402) 466-6100 1125 - AG CHEMICALS FOR SALE NE - NEBRASKALAND AVIATION, HOLDREGE, NE-HALEX GT $30.75 GAL, LUMAX $39.90 GAL, TOUCHDOWN HT $3.66 ACRE. CALL FOR PRICES ON ALL GENETICS., (308) 995-6573 ATTENTION FARMERS! Bigger and Better Yields! Better Plant Health! Stronger Plant Resistance to Drought, Frost, Hail Type Shock! Increased Herbicide Absorption! Increased Microbial Activity! Give Your Plants the Boost They Need Today! CALL CRUMM FARM’S & FERTILIZER, Handing Nutra-Flow & U.S. Ag Products. PH: (405) 933-0608 or email: crummtray@yahoo.com.

1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER FOR SALE NE - FRONT WEIGHTS FOR CASE IH MAGNUM, (308) 995-5515 NE - HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS, HOSES & PTO PUMPS, (308) 587-2344 IA - TRACTOR CHAINS 28" TO 38", (712) 299-6608 IA - 3 PT CARRIERS, $175 TO $575, (712) 299-6608 NE - 18. 4 34 TRACTOR CHAINS, (308) 3482234

SEED CLEANERS Clipper Super X 298 & More

515-994-2890 1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 413 CHRYSLER FOR SALVAGE, (308) 995-5515 NE - OIL COOLER FOR 354 PERKINS, (308) 467-2335 NE - USED VEE BELTS: 3-IHC C176" $15 EA; 4 GATES C240" $20 EA; 3 DAYCO C240" $15 EA; 4 DAYCO C270" $15 EA 1 DAYCO C116 $10 EA; 1 DAYCO 94" X 1 1/4" WIDE $10, (402) 564-5064 NE - USED 460 CU IN ENGINE WITH NEW HIGH PRESSURE BERKELEY PUMP, (800) 554-8715 NE - CUMMINS 6BT IRRIGATION MOTOR. 10 HP ELECTRIC MOTOR W/SELF-PRIMING PUMP. JD 4045D IRRIGATION MOTOR. 4 CYLINDER MOTOR W/BERKELEY PUMP, SUCTION PIPE & 500 GAL PROPANE TANK. 500 GALLON DIESEL W/CHASSIS., (402) 726-2488 NE - 08 496 CHEVY NG POWER UNIT, 786 HRS, RADIATOR, GEN PULLEY, GEN STAND, SHORT CLUTCH EXCELLANT CONDITION., (308) 467-2335 1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE NE - 10" WLR BOWLS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 5 NEW PTO PUMPS IN STOCK, (800) 284-7066 NE - 3X4 BERKELEY PUMPS, PRIMING VALVES AVAILABLE, (402) 364-2592 NE - USED MANURE PUMP, BETTER BUILT, (800) 554-8715 NE - USED BERKELEY PTO PUMPS & SUCTION EQUIPMENT, (800) 554-8715 NE - 8 USED BERKELEY PTO PUMPS IN STOCK, (800) 284-7066 NE - BERKELEY FLOATER PUMP, (800) 2847066 1203 - PIPE FOR SALE NE - 8" TEXFLO 20" GATES, ALL KINDS OF FITTINGS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6" BAND & LATCH MAIN LINE, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6" PLAIN PIPE, ALUM AND PLASTIC, (308) 946-3396 NE - 10" X 20" PVC, (308) 946-3396 NE - USED 6" AND 10" PVC, CALL FOR LENGTHS, (308) 946-3396 NE - 6" ALUM MAIN LINE PIPE, HOOK & BAND, (308) 946-3396 NE - 6" X 20" GATED ALUMINUM, (308) 9463396 NE - 8" X 20" ALUMINUM GATED, (308) 9463396 NE - 10" X 20" ALUMINUM GATED PIPE, (308) 946-3396 NE - 8"X 30' PLAIN ALUMINUM PIPE, (308) 946-3396 NE - USED 8"X20" PVC PIPE, (308) 9463396 NE - 60 LINKS OF GATED, 20" X 30', (308) 478-5451 NE - 8" MAIN LINE HASTINGS, (308) 9955515 NE - 9" MAIN LINE RING LOCK, (308) 9955515

1203 - PIPE FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 9" MAIN LINE HIGH PRESS, (308) 9955515 NE - 5000' 6" HP RINGLOCK PIPE, (800) 284-7066 NE - 10" & 8" IRRIGATION PIPE, (402) 7262488 1205 - GENERATOR WANTED TO BUY NE - USED WINPOWER PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 FOR SALE NE - WINPOWER - NEW & USED PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 IA - WINCO PTO GENERATORS, CALL US FOR PRICE BEFORE YOU BUY! HARVEY AT EDEN SUPPLY 8AM - 10PM., (515) 679-4081 1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE NE - 150 HP GEARHEAD, 6 RATIO, (308) 995-5515 NE - AMARILLO GEARHEADS: 110HP 4:3 $700, 80 HP 6:5 $700, 70 HP 4:5 $650, 50 HP 1:1 $700, 50 HP 4:5 $600, (402) 5645064 NE - GEAR DRIVE REPAIR- AMARILLO WARRANTY CENTER. REPAIR ALL MAKES/MODELS. 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES. CENTRAL IRRIGATION, (402) 723-5824 NE - US MOTORS GEARHEADS 90HP 4:3 $450, 70HP 2:3 $400, 30HP 4:3 $300, (402) 564-5064 NE - DERAN/RANDOLPH GEARHEAD 100HP 4:3 $500, PEERLESS GEARHEAD 2:3 $300, (402) 564-5064 1207 - PIVOTS FOR SALE NE - 1998 4 TOWER T-L PIVOT, (308) 9463396 CO - 10 TOWER LOCKWOOD, 1450', ALL GALVANIZED, SINGLE LEG TOWERS, NONWIRE ADJ. , DRIPS, ROTATORS, REGULATORS, NO RUST, GOOD COND. , EXC. WATER AREA, $11,500.00, (970) 332-4114 NE - 10 TOWER REINKE PIVOT, (800) 2847066 1208 - TRAVELER SYSTEMS FOR SALE NE - NEW OCMIS HH: 4" X 1312', (800) 2847066 NE - NEW GREENFIELDS, 6 NEW CADMAN HARD HOSE, 5 USED HARD HOSE TRAVELERS, 9 USED SOFT HOSE, (800) 284-7066 NE - HEINZMAN TRAVELER WITH HOSE, (308) 390-0642 1209 - PUMPS WITH MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 3/4 BERKELEY PUMPS WITH PRIMING VALVES, ATTACHED TO YOUR CHOICE OF INDUSTRIAL 200 FORD, 300 FORD, OR 262 ALLIS, W/RADIATORS, AND CARTS, (402) 364-2592 1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. WANTED TO BUY NE - "MULE", WHICH IS A SMALL, SLOW, GASOLINE POWERED VEHICLE USED TO CARRY GEAR BOXES, TOOLS, PIVOT REPAIRS DOWN BETWEEN SUNFLWOER & CORN CROP., (308) 436-4369 FOR SALE WI - SERVING THE MIDWEST WITH COMPLETE IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. CONTACT ROBERTS IRRIGATION COMPANY AT 1500 POST ROAD, PLOVER, WI 54467, (800) 434-5224 NE - 8" SURGE VALVE, (308) 946-3396 NE - ORTHMAN 3-PT PIVOT TRACK CLOSER, EXCELLENT COND, (308) 390-0642 NE - PIVOTS, HARD & SOFT HOSE TRAVELERS, PUMPS, WHEEL ROLLS, FITTINGS, PVC UNDERGROUND FITTINGS, NEW AND USED, "YOUR COMPLETE IRRIGATION HEADQUARTERS" NORTHERN AGRI-SERVICES INC, HENDERSON, NEBRASKA 68371, (402) 723-4501, (800) 554-8715 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE OK - REBUILT COMBINE SIEVES. NEW REEL BATS, GALVANIZED AND BLACK, (580) 3612265 OK - '86 C-IH 1660, 25' 1010 HEADER, $19,000.00, (580) 361-2265 KS - LARGE BISH BIN EXT OFF 9610 W/HYD. PUSH UP AUGER. $750 OBO, (620) 8652541 KS - NH TR98, 1905 SEP HRS, 30' 973 FLEX HEAD, $72,000.00, (620) 340-3358 OK - '82 GLEANER N6, 24' HEADER, $8,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - C-IH 1480, 810 24' HEAD, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - TR85 NEW HOLLAND, 3208 CAT, 24' HEADER, $5,000.00, (580) 361-2265 CO - 22'AIR REEL AND ACCESSORIES. RECENTLY TAKEN OFF JD 105 COMBINE. $450 OBO. PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER., (719) 643-5267 NE - JD, 1981 7720, 4300 HRS, JD DEALER SERVICED YEARLY, $9,500.00, (402) 5452255

May 13, 2010 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE - CONT’D CO - PARTING OUT 2 MF 760 COMBINES, 1 W/6 CYLINDER PERKINS, 1 W/8 CYLINDER PERKINS, (303) 536-0124 IA - 1-2007 9760, 4X4, 1004 SEPARATOR HRS, $175,000; 2-2005 9760'S 1254/1187 SEPARATOR HRS, $145,000/EA ALL HAVE DUALS, CM, HID, GREENSTAR, EXTENDED WEAR, HIGH RATE UNLOADS;3-635 HYDRA FLEX HEADS, NEW HIGH SPEED TRAILERS, $29,000 EACH. CALL 515-295-7947 OR, (515) 341-3188 KS - 2-1990 IHC 1680 COMBINES, 4WD, CHOPPER, TILT, FEEDER REVERSER, BIN EXTENSIONS, GOOD CONDITION; 25' IHC 1020 FLEX HEAD, (913) 370-3002 OK - SEED CLEANER, CLIPPER, 92DB TRAVELER ON TRAILER, GOOD CONDITION, LOTS OF SCREENS, (580) 829-2543 KS - 1999-2388 IH 4WD COMBINE, 3200 HRS, CM, YM, RT, AND CHOPPER, (913) 4260984 1302 - COMBINE HEADS WANTED TO BUY MO - JD 920F BEAN PLATFORM, (816) 3782015 IA - MF 1163 CORN HEAD, (402) 651-5811 NE - JD ROW CROP HEAD 8R 30", (402) 3723009 FOR SALE SD - WE REBUILD COMBINE & WINDROWER HEADER AUGERS TO LIKE NEW CONDITION. PONCELET'S WELDING, RAMONA, SD. (605) 480-4860 OR, (605) 482-8405 OK - MACDON 960 25' DRAPER W/IHC ADAPTER & PICK UP REEL, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - JD 925 FLEX HEAD, SEE THRU REEL, GOOD, $4,500.00, (402) 545-2255 NE - JD, 643 CORN HEAD, OIL DRIVE, $4,950.00, (402) 545-2255 CO - MF 1163 CORN HEAD, $700.00, (303) 536-0124 1303 - CORN PICKERS FOR SALE IA - NI 311 CORNPICKER 2 R WIDE, $950.00, (712) 299-6608 1305 - WAGONS/GRAVITY WAGONS FOR SALE IA - FLARE, BARGE & GRAVITY WAGONS $150 TO $1850, (712) 299-6608 IA - WAGON GEARS, STEEL, WOOD OR RUBBER TIRES, (712) 299-6608 1307 - GRAIN DRYERS FOR SALE NE - 1995 MC 1175, 1992 MC 1175, 1995 MC 970, 1989 MC 973, MC 975, MC 675, 3 FARM FANS, M&W 650, (800) 284-7066 NE - USED 2009 BROCK SQ20D, USED '05 SUPERB SE1000C, USED '05 SUPERB SE750C, 3 NEW BROCK DRYERS., (800) 284-7066 NE - USED FARM FANS 4" AIR SYSTEM, (800) 284-7066 1310 - AUGERS FOR SALE NE - SPEED KING 52' 8" WITH ELECTRIC MOTOR, (308) 478-5451 NE - MAYRATH 55' GRAIN AUGER, 8" W/ ELECETIR MOTOR, (308) 478-5451 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE NE - 8" AERATION TUBING AND AERATION FANS, (308) 995-5515 NE - BULK HEAD FOR 51' CURVET, (308) 995-5515 NE - SINGLE PHASE MOTORS, (308) 9955515 NE - BROCK BINS & GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, EPS & BEHLEN BLDG SYSTEMS, BUCKLEY STEEL, AINSWORTH, NE, (402) 387-0347 NE - SUKUP GRAIN BINS-WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF GRAIN STORAGE, DRYING & CONVEYING EQUIPMENT. NORTH CENTRAL AUTOMATION-O'NEILL, NE, (402) 336-1900 1315 - COMBINE TRAILERS FOR SALE SK - COMBINE TRAILERS: TRAILTECH OR JANTZ, SINGLE & DOUBLE. HYDRAULIC FOLD HEAD TRANSPORTS. FLAMAN SALES, BOX 280, SOUTHEY, SK, CANADA S0G 4P0, ASK FOR AL. EVES 306-949-8458. DAYS, (306) 726-4403 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - CHICAGO FANS, (308) 995-5515 FOR SALE NE - GSI GRAIN BINS, GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, ALL KINDS, GSI FANS & HEATERS, PORTABLE GRAIN DRYERS, (800) 554-8715 IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LEASE OR LOAN AT 7. 1%. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487

1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 8" AERATION TUBES, FANS, TUNNELS FOR CONCRETE FLOORS, (308) 995-5515 NE - NEW & RECONDITIONED KONGSKILDE AIR GRAIN VAC EQUIPMENT, (800) 554-8715 NE - NEW ORTHMAN DRY BEAN CUTTERS, (308) 995-5515 NE - DMC MODEL 44 GRAIN CLEANER, (800) 284-7066 IL - ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A MOISTURE TESTER THAT WILL GIVE YOU FAST & ACCURATE RESULTS? THEN CALL US NOW & ASK ABOUT OUR MODEL 920 & 930. SHORE SALES. MOISTURETESTERS. COM, (800) 837-0863 KS - ROTARY GRAIN CLEANER, GOOD CONDITION, $300.00, (785) 221-8173 1401 - 3 POINT BLADES FOR SALE IA - 2 OR 3 PT BLADES 6', 7', 8' OR 9' AC, IH, JD & OTHERS, (712) 299-6608 1404 - SNOW BLOWER/PLOWS FOR SALE IA - 3 PT SNOWBLOWERS, $1550 TO $2850, (712) 299-6608 NE - V-SNOW PLOW ORIGINALLY FOR COUNTY MAINTAINER, COULD ADAPT TO FIT LOADER TRACTOR OR WHATEVER, $375.00, (308) 894-6965 1406 - LAWN MOWERS FOR SALE NE - HIS & HERS MOWERS, MADE BY DEINES CORP, BOTH HAVE 48" FRONT DECKS, 1 W/BAGGER, 1 W/DUMP BOX, BOTH W/BRAND NEW 14 HP TECUMSEH ENGINES, HEAVY DUTY MOWERS, EXCELLENT. ALSO LOTS OF SPARE PARTS, (308) 390-0642 NE - WORKHORSE LAWN TRACTOR W/SIDE PULL TYPE MOWER W/ BRIGGS & STRATTON ENGINE, WILL MOW TALL GRASS, PRACTICALLY NEW. REEL TYPE MOWER FOR SHORT GRASS, 10' WIDE SWATH. CAN BE PULLED BEHIND 4 WHEELER OR WORKHORSE TRACTOR, (308) 390-0642 1407 - ELECTRIC MOTORS FOR SALE NE - COMPLETE LINE OF SHEAVES, BEARINGS, DRIVES, & MOTORS, (402) 387-0347 1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY WI - USED BULK MILK TANKS, 300 GALLON & LARGER, (800) 558-0112 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC WANTED TO BUY NE - 110V WELDING ROD DRYING OVEN, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - METAL BENCH LATHE 3 JAW CHUCK, 5 1/2" SWING, $200.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - BRAKE DRUM/ROTOR TURNING LATHE, $110.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - ARMITURE TURNING LATHE, $70.00, (785) 778-2962 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - ELSTON GOPHER MACHINE, (308) 5872344 IA - WWW. WHEELRAKE. COM, (712) 3662114 IA - AGE CATCHING UP WITH YOUR NEED TO CLIMB? WE CAN HELP WITH A HAND OPERATED SINGLE PERSON ELEVATOR 140' MAXIMUM CALL, (800) 462-3460 KS - ORTHMAN & BUCKEYE FRONT 3 PT HITCHES, $1500 EACH., (620) 865-2541 1500 - GROUND HAY FOR SALE KS - GROUND HAY AVAILABLE YEAR ROUND, DELIVERY AVAILABLE, (785) 389-5111 1501 - ALFALFA HAY WANTED TO BUY KS - GRINDING ALFALFA WANTED, (785) 389-5111 IA - QUALITY SML OR LG SQ ALFALFA OR MIXED IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - ALFALFA, 4X4X8 BALES, DAIRY QUALITY, SHEDDED & TARPED, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - 1ST, 2ND, & 3RD CUTTING OF ALFALFA HAY, (308) 882-4588 NE - GRINDING QUALITY ALFALFA IN LG RD BALES, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-9626399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - HORSE QUALITY IN SM SQ BALES, SHEDDED & TARPED HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - CUSTOM GRINDING, GROUND HAY DELIVERIES, HAZARD, NE., (308) 452-4400 NE - HIGH QUALITY BIG ROUND & BIG SQUARE BALES. KORTY HAY. HAY ANALYSIS AVAILABLE., (888) 708-2800 OR - TEST MOISTURE. HAY, GRAIN, SILAGE, SOIL, WOOD, WINDROW TESTER. BALE STROKE COUNTER. MOISTURE READ OUT AS YOU BALE! WWW. LEHMANFARMS. NET, (503) 434-1705 www.myfarmandranch.com


May 13, 2010 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE IA - LARGE RD & BIG SQ BALES GOOD QUALITY GRASS HAY, DELIVERED IN SEMI LOADS ONLY, (641) 658-2738 NE - LARGE ROUND & SMALL SQUARE BALES PRAIRIE HAY, CALL EARLY AM OR LATE PM, (308) 894-6743 KS - TOP QUALITY SM SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - TOP QUALITY 4X4X8 SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - BALED 4X8, SM SQ OR BIG ROUNDS, (620) 625-2402 KS - 2008 BROME BIG ROUND BALES, (785) 935-2480 NE - HOLT COUNTY NEBRASKA PRAIRIE HAY, CERTIFIED WEED FREE OF ALL NOXIOUS WEEDS, BIG ROUND BALES, CALL CELL: 402-394-8495 OR, (402) 336-3292 NE - CERTIFIED MEADOW HAY, BIG ROUND BALES, HORSES, CATTLE, MULCH, (308) 587-2344 KS - BIG BLUE STEM PRAIRIE HAY. 4X4X8 BALES. $55/T. BARNED, ROUND BALES OUTSIDE $5/T. CONCORDIA, KS. CALL 386871-0561,, (703) 713-0174 NE - 117 BG ROUNDS, MAINLY GRASS MIX, (308) 436-5491 1503 - BROME HAY FOR SALE KS - HORSE QUALITY:3X3, WEED/MOLD FREE. APPROX 750LBS, NO SUNDAY CALLS, (785) 255-4579 1504 - OAT/WHEAT/RYE HAY FOR SALE NE - 150 LARGE ROUND WHEAT STRAW BALES, (308) 882-4588 1505 - STRAW WANTED TO BUY IA - GOOD CLEAN, BRIGHT SM SQ IN SEMI LOADS, (641) 658-2738 FOR SALE NE - 96 BG RDS CERT WHEAT STRAW, 1000#/BL. 308-641-1240,, (308) 436-5491 1512 - SEED FOR SALE TX - FORAGE-TYPE TRITICALE SEED, CALL GAYLAND WARD SEEDS, (800) 299-9273 IA - BUYER & SELLER OF PRAIRIE GRASS & WILDFLOWER SEED, OSENBAUGH SEEDS, LUCAS, IA., (800) 582-2788 KS - TRITICALE SEED, A+ QUALITY, VOLUME DISCOUNT. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. CALL BROCK BAKER @, (800) 344-2144 NE - PASTURE & HAY MIXES, OATS, TURNIP, COVER CROPS, TEFF, MILLET, WILDLIFE, ALFALFA, ETC. , PRAIRIE STATES SEED 866373-2514 TOLL FREE, (866) 373-2514 NE - NATIVE GRASS SEED, WILDFLOWER, LEAD PLANT, SMART WEED & OTHERS. SOUTH FORK SEED COMPANY, (402) 4825491 1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER FOR SALE IA - WWW. REPLACEMENTRAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 366-2114 1806 - GRINDER MIXERS FOR SALE IA - IH 950, $950.00, (712) 299-6608 NE - 420 ART'S-WAY GRINDER MIXER, VERY GOOD, HAMMERS NEVER TURNED, SHEDDED, (402) 482-5491 1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471 NE - PARTED OUT JD 400 GRINDER/MIXER, IN & OUT AUGERS, GRINDER MILL W/PTO SHAFT, ALL W/SCREENS, (308) 467-2335 CO - TUB GRINDERS, NEW & USED (W/WARRANTY). OPERATE WELL W/70-175 HP TRACTORS, GRINDS WET HAY, TOUGH HAY & ALL GRAINS. HIGH CAPACITY. LOW PRICE. WWW. ROTOGRIND. COM, (800) 724-5498, (970) 353-3769 1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - BULK CAKE & GRAIN FEEDERS, (308) 587-2344 1815 - WATERERS/TANKS FOR SALE NE - BULL TOUGH BOTTOMLESS HEAVY GAUGE STOCK TANKS, (402) 387-0347 MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471 1818 - HAMMER MILL FOR SALE KS - 18" SCROUT WALDRON HAMMERMILL W/75HP MOTOR, $400.00, (785) 778-2962 1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE NE - REBUILT AIR MOTORS OR REPAIRS, (308) 587-2344 NE - MONITOR PUMP JACK-CHOICE OF GAS & ELECTRIC MOTOR, $650.00, (308) 4364369

Heartland Express 1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE - CONT’D TX - VIRDEN PERMA-BILT CO. FARM & RANCH PRODUCTS: ROOF & TANK COATINGS, WINDMILL PARTS. SEND OR CALL FOR FREE CATALOG. 2821 MAYS AVE. BOX7160FR AMARILLO, TX 79114-7160 WWW. VIRDENPRODUCTS. COM, (806) 3522761 1820 - LIVESTOCK BEDDING FOR SALE NE - CORRUGATED WINDBREAK STEEL, 8 GAUGE THROUGH 20 GAUGE, (402) 3870347 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - 20' BULL WHIP, (308) 587-2344 KS - USED HOG OR SHEEP PANELS & GATES, (785) 778-2962 FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", FOR FENCING CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - WE ARE YOUR STAMPEDE LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT DEALER. EMERSON EQUIPMENT. WHITMAN, NE, (308) 544-6421 KS - TIRE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS: WATER TANKS, MINERAL FEEDERS, SILAGE COVER WEIGHTS. WWW. GEETIRE. COM, (785) 231-8397 NE - GOPHER CONTROL MACHINE, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1901 - FEEDER STEERS FOR SALE MO - WE SPECIALIZE IN LOCATING "QUALITY" FEEDER CATTLE, (816) 688-7887 1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - GELBVIEH AND BALANCER OPEN HEIFERS, (402) 879-4976 MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT CATTLE LOCATORS - MAX HARGROVE, (816) 6887887 NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD VIRGIN REG ANGUS HEIFERS, (308) 569-2458 1904 - BRED HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - YOUNG COWS & BRED HEIFERS, AI'D TO ABS BULLS, AND CLEANED UP WITH SUMMITCREST BULLS, (308) 569-2458 1906 - BRED COWS FOR SALE NE - I'M DEALING ON COWS COMING OUT OF DROUGHT AREAS EVERY DAY. WWW. BREDCOWSWRIGHTLIVESTOCK. COM OR CALL, (308) 534-0939 1907 - DAIRY COWS WANTED TO BUY NE - FAIMLY MILK COW, PREFER GURNSEY, BUT WILL CONSIDER OTHERS, (308) 5872344 1908 - COW CALF PAIRS FOR SALE NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD REG ANGUS COW/CALF PAIRS, (308) 569-2458 1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - REGISTERED ANGUS, CELL: 308-8701119, (308) 732-3356 NE - 25 PB CHAROLAIS BULLS COMING 2S ALL RECORDS 40 YRS, (308) 995-5515 NE - GELBVIEH BULLS, RED & BLACK, 1 & 2 YR OLDS, (402) 879-4976 NE - (25) COMING 2 YR OLD CHAROLAIS BULLS(308) 567-2288, (308) 995-5515 NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, (402) 395-2178 NE - EASY CALVING, REG POLLED CHAROLAIS BULLS, (402) 395-2178 NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, 2 YEAR OLDS AND YEARLINGS, SONS OF 878, BLUEPRINT 202 AND TRAVELOR 722, (308) 569-2458 NE - PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS, YEARLINGS & 2 YR OLDS. TC TOTAL, OBJECTIVE, & ONE WAY BLOODLINES. SCHULTE ANGUS RANCH. KEARNEY, NE. 308-708-1839 OR, (308) 236-0761 OK - PB CHAROLAIS BULLS, 2 YRS OLD, RANCH RAISED. SCHUPBACH CHAROLAIS RANCH, (580) 829-2543

✖ BERGER BUCKING BULLS ✖ SEMEN FOR SALE from Little Yellow Jacket 3x Bucking Bull Champion

701-400-3831 • 701-400-6201 NE - YEARLING ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE OR LEASE. TAYLOR AND TAYLOR CATTLE CO., (402) 469-5507 1910 - SHOW STOCK FOR SALE NE - CLUB CALVES, "THE WINNING KIND", STEERS/HEIFERS, (402) 395-2178 1915 - SEMEN/EMBRYO/AI SERVICE FOR SALE NE - DBL BLACK DBL POLLED CALVING EASE GELBVIEH BULLS, (402) 879-4976

1915 - SEMEN/EMBRYO/AI SERVICE FOR SALE - CONT’D

SEMEN FOR SALE HYDRO-OCTANE HURRICANE West Coast Bucking Bulls email: pbrnick@gmail.com

Semen & Laboratory Supplies 800-247-7877 www.internationalboarsemen.us

AR - SEMEN-4-SALE, $100/STRAW, ABBI REGISTERED, 2009 BUCKING BULL, #58 WOLF KAT ACA, SON OF SKAT KAT OUT OF BAKER #602 (WOLF MAN DAUGHTER). CALL TODAY, HALL RODEO, CLINE @, (501) 412-3644 1916 - DAIRY HEIFERS FOR SALE WI - DAIRY EQUIP- STALLS, GATES, HEADLOCKS, TMR MIXERS, BARN CLEANERS, MANURE AUGERS/PUMPS, VENTILATION, ALLEY SCRAPERS. REASONABLY PRICE LONG LASTING EQUIP EQUALS VALUE. MEETING ALL DAIRYMEN'S NEEDS SINCE 1919. BERG EQUIPMENT CORP. WWW. BERGEQUIPMENT. COM, (800) 494-1738 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT & BREEDING CATTLE LOCATORS, (816) 688-7887 CO - IT'S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292 UT - WILL DO LIVESTOCK HAULING, ALL CLASSES. SPECIALIZING IN PUREBRED LIVESTOCK HAULING. WILL DO COAST TO COAST. ROCKY MOUNTAIN GENETICS. MARTY MICKELSION, CALL FOR PRICING, (435) 757-0811 2011 - HOG EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - CHORE TIME FEED SYSTEM WITH BULK TANK, 100 FT. OF TUBING AND SCREW. CELL 402-920-3612, (402) 9231196 2200 - REGISTERED HORSES FOR SALE NE - 2003 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, MORGAN BROOD MARE, 2004 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, 1995 MORGAN STALLION, (308) 587-2344 NE - AQHA, YEARLINGS, MARES AND COLTS, (308) 569-2458 NE - PEPPY DOC SAN, SHINING SPARK, JET DECK, THREE BAR & SKIPPER W BRED, STALLIONS, MARES, FILLEYS, & GELDINGS, MOSTLY SORREL & PALOMINO, GREAT STOCK, GOOD DISPOSITIONS, CALL 1-866800-1232 OR, (308) 384-1063 NE - TOP QUALITY GELDINGS-DOC O'LENA, HOLIDOC, DOC BAR, COYS BONANZA, DOCS JACK SPRAT BLOODLINES- NATURAL COW SENSE-RIVER ROAD QUARTER HORSES 308452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - ONLY TWO REPLACEMENT MARES LEFT-REGISTERED QUARTERHORSESDON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY! RIVER ROAD QUARTERHORSES 308-452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - IT COSTS NO MORE TO FEED A GREAT HORSE THAN A POOR ONE. RIVER ROAD QUARTERHORSES ARE WELL FED, DON'T HAVE BAD HABITS AND ARE GOOD LOOKING. MUST CUT HERD SIZE. 308-452-3860, (308) 452-4272 NE - AQHA HORSES, BLUE ROAN STUD AND MARES. OLDER GREY MARE, WELL BROKE, GRANDDAUGHTERS HORSE, (308) 5692458 2202 - STUD SERVICE FOR SALE NE - MORGAN STALLION STANDING AT STUD, (308) 587-2344 NE - ILLINI DESTINY LEO, 2004 BUCKSKIN STALLION, STANDS AT MORAN QUARTER HORSES, AMHERST, NE. COW HORSES, ROPING AND BARREL PROSPECTS. FOR INQUIRIES ON THE STUD OR STUD FEES PLEASE CALL TERRY MORAN AT 308-3255587 OR JOSH PUTNAM AT, (308) 708-1938 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE NE SELL-TRADE MORGAN STALLIONS:BESSIA'S, BON, ACCORD 135969; T-BONE, LAD, CLASSY, 149831; TBONE, B, CONGO, 164062, (308) 587-2344 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Page 29 2301 - DOGS FOR SALE KS - AKC FARM RAISED GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES, FIRST SHOTS, DEW CLAWS. 785398-2231, 785-731-5174,, (785) 731-5190 KS - FULL BLOOD BORDER COLLIE PUPS, 2 1/2 MONTHS OLD, HAD FIRST SHOTS, $150 EACH, NO PAPERS. ALL PUPS BLACK\WHITE OR WHITE\BLACK, (620) 896-2394 2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK KS - NEED RESPONSIBLE HARD WORKING INDIVIDUALS FOR 2010 HARVEST CREW. TX TO MT & FALL CORN HARVEST. GUARANTEED MONTHLY WAGE PLUS ROOM & BOARD. NEW JD COMBINES, PETERBILT/KW TRUCKS. SKINNER HARVESTING LLC, CALL DAN OR LEAVE MESSAGE AT (620) 340-2843, (620) 343-8140 OK - EXPERIENCED FARM FAMILY, MECHANICAL ABILITY A MUST, NORTHWEST OKLAHOMA, HOUSING PROVIDED, (580) 8292543 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES

JD COMBINES FOR RENT From Kansas to North Dakota Finnicum’s Custom Combining combiner@midrivers.com PH: (406) 480-2119 PH: (406) 480-2510 PH: (406) 489-0837

KS - CORN, MILO, WHEAT HARVESTING WANTED. TWO JD MACHINES & SUPPORTING TRUCKS., (785) 567-8515

CUSTOM LEASING or CUSTOM HARVESTING New Class 7 Machines, Drapers or Augers Tables, 12/12/12

(515) 897-4784 (515) 897-4785 2601 - CARS FOR SALE CO - 1964 FORD GALAXIE 4 DR, 390 V8 THUNDERBIRD ENGINE, FACTORY OPTION. BODY FAIRLY STRAIGHT, NEEDS PAINT. INTERIOR ROUGH. ENGINE & DRIVETRAIN ARE GOOD. 86K MILES $1500 OR BEST CLOSE OFFER. PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER, (719) 643-5267 LINCOLN 2002 CONTINENTAL CREAM, SEDAN, AUTO, 8-CYL., 2 WD, 65,200, PB/PS, CD, A/C, AM/FM, STEREO, RUNS WELL, MOON ROOF, LEATHER INTERIOR, VERY CLEAN. GREAT CONDITION. $7,900. 308-380-4353. 2602 - PICKUPS WANTED TO BUY NE - HD COIL SPRINGS FOR 1971 3/4 TON CHEVY PICKUP, END GATE FOR 1980 GMC 3/4 TON, (308) 587-2344 KS - GOOD LONG WIDE FACTORY BED FOR '73-'79 FORD, (620) 865-2541 FOR SALE KS - 88 CHEVY 1 TON, 4WD, 6. 2 DIESEL, 4 SP, FLATBED, (785) 935-2480 NE - THIRD SEAT FOR 95-99 SUBURBAN, TAUPE LEATHER, $100.00, (402) 564-5064 KS - 1993 F-350 CREWCAB XLT DIESEL, AUTO, 4X4, FACTORY TURBO AVAILABLE, $5,900.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - FRONT BUMPER FOR 2005 CHEVY SILVERADO, (308) 587-2344 CO - 1961 FORD F250, 292 V-8, 4 SP TRAN. 2 WH DRIVE, LONG STEP SIDE BOX, GOOD CONDITION, OLDER RESTORA TION $6500, PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER., (719) 643-5267 2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE SD - 1951 CHEVY FIRETRUCK, LIGHTS & SIREN WORK, 10K, DRIVES GREAT, REAL NICE, $4,500.00, (605) 386-2131 KS - '59 CHEVY 60, V8, 4&2 SP, 15' B&H, 2 NEW TIRES, TUNED UP, ETC, $999.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - 60 FORD F700, 24' STEEL FLATBED, CHEATER AXLES, 5&2, W/ 2-1000 GAL FLAT BOTTOM VERTICAL FERTILIZER TANKS, USE TO HAUL BIG ROUND OR LITTLE SQUARE HAY BALES, (308) 390-0642 KS - 1976 FORD 3500 CAB & CHASSIS, $500.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - '97 FLD 120, 470, DETROIT 60, 20' STAKE SIDE BOX, NEW SCOTT HOIST, ROLLOVER TARP (BEING BUILT), $29,500.00, (785) 421-3465 KS - '89 IHC 8300, L10, 330, 20' B&H, SPRING RIDE 9500, $22,000.00, (785) 4213465 KS - (2) '00 CENTURY DAYCABS LWB, WILL TAKE 20' BOX, 470 SERIES 60, W/AUTO SHIFT, $19,500.00, (785) 421-3465 NE - IH ENGINES, 304'S & 345'S, (308) 4672335 NE - OMAHA STANDARD 16' GRAIN BOX WITH HOIST, (308) 467-2335

2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE - CONT’D CO - 1979 GMC 1 TON TOW TRUCK, 2WD, 350 V8, 4 SP, HOLMES 440 BED & WINCH, TOLLE TX-3000 WHEEL LIFT. 3300 MILES SINCE REPAINT & REFURBISH IN '97. NEW SEAT, INTERIOR & GOOD TIRES. $7500 OR BEST CLOSE OFFER. GOOD CONDITION LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER, (719) 6435267 KS - '05 CENTURY, 14L, SERIES 60 DETROIT, 515 HP, W/ AUTO SHIFT, WILL TAKE 20' BOX, $28,000.00, (785) 421-3465 2605 - STOCK TRAILERS FOR SALE NE - 2004 HILLSBORO 7X24 ALUMINUM, (402) 482-5491 NE - MID 70'S 45' WILSON ALUMINUM STRAIGHT FLOOR LIVESTOCK TRAILER. 3 COMPARTMENTS. NEW BRAKES, FLOOR GOOD. $15,500 CALL 308-623-2745 OR, (308) 623-2126 2607 - UTILITY TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY NE - FLATBED W/HEAVY DUTY AXLES, METAL FLOOR AND WIDE ENOUGH TO HOLD A PICKUP, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - 1979 TRAIL MOBILE ALUMINUM 9000 GAL. TANKER, (402) 369-0212 2613 - MOBILE HOMES & RV'S FOR SALE NE - AVION SILVER R, 30FT, TRAVEL TRAILER, VERY CLEAN, EXCELLENT SNOWBIRD TRAILER, NEW BATTERIES, $7400/OBO, (402) 564-5064 2614 - BOATS & WATER CRAFTS FOR SALE KS - 16' HOBIECAT, $600.00, (785) 7782962 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE NE - MONI MOTOR GLIDER AND TRAILER, LOW HOURS, (402) 364-2592 2616 - TIRES WANTED TO BUY NE - HOT PATCH VULCANIZING PATCHES, (308) 587-2344 NE - NEW OR USED 24. 5 X 32 REAR TRACTOR TIRES TO FIT JD COMBINE OR STEIGER TRACTOR, (402) 256-3696 FOR SALE NE - 15" SPLIT RIMS, 8 HOLE, 750 MUD/SNOW, (308) 587-2344 NE - 10 BOLT RIMS W/18. 4 X 38" TIRES, (402) 336-2755 NE - 2-320-90R50 W 10 BOLT RIMS, (402) 787-2244 2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY IA - LATE MODEL TRLRS & TRUCKS WITH LIGHT DAMAGE OR IN NEED OF ENGINE REPAIRS, (641) 658-2738 NE - 18' STEEL TRUCK GRAIN BOX, 52" OR 60" SIDES HOIST AND ROLL TARP, (308) 436-4369 FOR SALE KS - 66 IH 2000, DETROIT, 15 SP W/HENDERSON TWINSCREW, TULSA WINCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 NE - 1975 24' SEMI LOWBOY TRLR. $1950, $2,250.00, (402) 545-2255 MO - '99 IH 4900, TS, 18K FRONT, 40K LB HENDRICKSON, $26,000.00, (660) 5483804 MO - '95 CHEVY TOPKICK, 20' FLATBED & HOIST, CAT 250 HP, 8LL TRANS, 40K HENDRICKSON REARS, 14K FRONT, 190K MILES,, $19,000.00, (660) 548-3804 NE - 1978 BRENNER 6500 GAL STAINLESS STEEL INSULATED TANKER, GOOD CONDITION, (402) 369-0212 NE - '69 FREAUHF ALUMINUM TANKER, INSULATED 7200 GAL. , GOOD CONDITION, (402) 369-0212

1999 Frtlnr. Day Cab, Cummins Power, 10-Spd.

1997 Frtlnr Day Cab, Cummins Power, 10-Spd.

1996 Frtlnr Day w/PTO/Wet Kit

Also: ‘95 KW W900 Day Cab, 10-Spd., CAT Pwr.

Call 608-574-1083 KS - 8000 GALLON ALUMINUM TANKER TRAILER, (785) 871-0711


Heartland Express

Long Block GM 6.5 Diesel

515-994-2890 2802 - DOZERS FOR SALE KS - TEREX 8220A DOZER, PS, TILT, GOOD RUNNING MACHINE, (785) 935-2480 KS - CAT SINGLE SHANK, DEEP PENETRATION RIPPER, FITS D8-K, WITH VALVE AND ALL, EXCELLENT CONDITION, (785) 4485893 2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 NE - PULL BEHIND BOX SCRAPERS, 10' & 12'; 3PT'S 6' & 8', (402) 678-2277 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 MO - USED TOREQ 10 YD DIRECT MOUNT, EXCELLENT, (660) 548-3804 NE - 2004 BUFFALO 12' BOX SCRAPER, (402) 482-5491 2804 - MOTOR GRADERS FOR SALE KS - CAT 120 ROAD GRADER. $15,500, (785) 871-0711 KS - CAT 12F-13K, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (785) 448-5893 2805 - BACKHOE FOR SALE KS - CAT 235-32K, VERY GOOD CONDITION, ONE OWNER, (785) 448-5893 2806 - CRANES & DRAGLINES FOR RENT NE - 28 TON NATIONAL CRANE, 152 FT. REACH, (402) 387-0347 FOR SALE KS - LORAINE 25 TON TRUCK CRANE, LOTS OF BOOM, VERY GOOD CONDITION, (785) 448-5893 2807 - GENERATORS FOR SALE MN - AUTOMATIC GENERATOR SETS 15KW500KW, NEW & USED, LOW TIME GEN SETS. REMOTE WELL GENERATORS. SERVING FARMERS SINCE 1975. STANDBY POWER SYSTEMS, WINDOM MN, MON-SAT 9-5., (800) 419-9806 2809 - CONSTRUCTION TRUCKS FOR SALE KS - 1997 LOADKING, 55 TON, 3 AXLE, LAY DOWN NECK, W/BEAVERTAILS. CALL 785817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 KS - 15 TON TANDEM AXLE TRAILER, DUALS, TILT TOP, WENCH, EXCELLENT CONDITION, TIRES 70%, (785) 448-5893 OK - 1999 CC TRASH TRUCK, EXTRA NICE COND. $10,500. CAT WATER WAGON DW-21. 5000 GAL. IN GOOD SHAPE $3,500. OFFICE-918-967-4773 OR CELL, (918) 4480621 2813 - WHEEL LOADERS FOR SALE NE - CASE 621 PAYLOADER, MODEL 6T 590 CUMMINS MOTOR, MOTOR NEEDS WORK. $21,000, $21,000.00, (402) 545-2255

MORE THAN JUST SPRAYERS! Check With Us First For Parts

• Banjo Valves, Strainers and Fittings • Hypro. and Ace Pumps and Parts • Teejet Nozzle Bodies • Turbo Drop Nozzles • Fertilizer Orifices • All Sizes of Hose

Select Sprayers, LLC

4319 Imperial Ave., East Hwy. 30, Kearney or call

308-338-8006

42855

3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE - CONT’D KS - HIGHWAY GUARDRAIL, OILFIELD PIPE, SUCKER RODS, FENCING CABLE. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. BUTTERFLY SUPPLY, WWW. BUTTERFLYSUPPLYINC. COM, (800) 249-7473 KS - CATTLE & HORSE PANELS, 5'3" X 10', 8-BAR, 60 LBS, GREEN OR SILVER, STARTING AT $66.00 CELL: 620-546-5155, (620) 549-6604 KS - LOTS OF USED GUARDRAIL, USED CORRUGATED METAL PIPE, LARGE & SMALL, 30' STEEL I-BEAMS, (785) 448-5893 NE - STRUCTURAL OIL FIELD TUBING, MAKES GREAT CORRALS AND FENCES, 2 3/8" AND 2 7/8" CALL, (308) 235-4881 NE - CONTINUOUS FENCE: 1 1/4", 1 1/2", 1 3/4", EXCELLENT FOR FEEDLOT, LIVESTOCK & HORSE FENCE, WEST POINT, NE. CALL, (402) 380-1107 BARBWIRE FENCE BUILDERS: Removal, construction and repairs. PH: (785) 625-5819; PH: (800) 628-6611; Cell: (785) 635-1922. 3007 - PIPE FOR SALE MO - GOOD USED RR TANK CAR SHELLS FOR CULVERTS (7-10' DIAMETER)(30'-55' LONG), ALSO GOOD USED STEEL PIPE, 8 5/8" DIAMETER THRU 48" DIAMETER, 20', 30', 40' & 50' LENGTHS. CALL GARY AT GATEWAY PIPE & SUPPLY, (800) 489-4321 3009 - FUEL TANKS FOR SALE NE - 300 GAL FUEL TANK ON STAND, $50.00, (308) 894-6965 NE - NEW 5000 GALLON HEAVY DUTY TANKS, $3950. OTHER SIZES ALSO, (402) 563-4762 KS - '76 FORD 2000 GAL TANK WAGON FUEL TRUCK, 2 HOSE REELS, 5 COMPARTMENTS, READY TO GO, (785) 448-5893 3011 - HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS WANTED TO BUY NE - REAR TINE ROTO TILLER, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE MO - OUTSIDE WOOD FURNACE $1595. CHEAP SHIPPING. EASY INSTALL. FORCED AIR. 100,000 BTU. HOUSES, MOBILES. WWW.HEATBYWOOD.COM, (417) 581-7755 3016 - BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES FOR SALE KY - KENTUCKY BUILDINGS, LLC. ALL STEEL STRUCTURE. PACKAGES FROM 24' TO 75' WIDE. WE SELL COMPONENTS, SLIDING AND ROLL-UP DOORS, INSULATION, WINDOWS, SHEET METAL, TRIM, AND STEEL FRAMING. KYBUILDINGSLLC. COM, (606) 668-3446 3024 - FINANCIAL SERVICES MO - PUT OUR MONEY & 45 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE TO WORK FOR YOU. ALL TYPES OF AG LOANS AVAILABLE AT LOWEST RATES. FREE CONSULTATIONS. MIDWEST LOAN BROKERS. JAM@LYN. NET OR CALL, (660) 339-7410 3030 - OTHER WANTED TO BUY SD - JACOBS 32 VOLT WIND GENERATOR, ALSO WINCHARGER USED DURING THE '30'S & '40'S, WILL PAY ACCORDING TO CONDITION, (605) 386-2131 NE - SCRAP BATTERIES- WE WANT 'EM! WE ALSO BUY STEEL CASE & GLASS PACK. CALL FOR DETAILS! ALLEN'S NEW & USED BATTERIES. BUY/SELL, NEW/USED. WE CARRY ALL KINDS!! ALLEN FELTON, OWNER. LINCOLN, NE., (402) 467-2455 FOR SALE NE - REASONABLY PRICE MECHANICS GLOVES, WARM GLOVES, MITTENS & OTHER GLOVES., (308) 587-2344 NE - PROPANE REFRIGERATOR FOR REMOTE CABIN, COMBINA TION WOOD-PROPANE, COOKING-HEATING RANGE; WATER COMPARTMENT, (308) 587-2344 DE - BIG BUD BOOK-THE INCREDIBLE STORY OF THE BIGGEST, MOST POWERFUL TRACTOR EVER BUILT. BOOK IS 12"X9" - PACKED WITH PICTURES, SIGNED BY AUTHOR, ONLY $37.47 PLUS $5 S&H. CLASSIC TRACTOR FEVER, BOX 437, ROCKLAND, DE 19732. CLASSICTRACTORS.COM OR CALL US, (800) 888-8979 5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE IA - NATIONWIDE - 1031FEC - PAY NO TAX WHEN SELLING-EXCHANGING REAL ESTATE, EQUIPMENT, LIVESTOCK. FREE BROCHURE/CONSULTATION. VIEW EXCHANGE PROPERTIES AT WWW. 1031FEC. COM OR CALL, (800) 333-0801 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE - CONT’D

AGRI ENTERPRISES, INC.

Real Estate • Fort Collins, CO www.agrienterprises.com +/- 6,280 AC. OF EXC. NATIVE GRASS PASTURE, 6,080 ac. deeded, 640 state lease, 560 Federal lease (all contiguous), Weld Co. CO, SE Cheyenne, Wyoming, NE of Greeley, Colorado. The ranch is nestled up against scenic chalk bluffs, with huge rolling grasslands and a few rock outcroppings. Numerous wells, water tanks, a spring, good fences, $2,495,000. Office 970-221-2607 Les 970-214-6139 • Greg 970-218-5911 VIEW ALL OF OUR LISTING WITH PICTURES & DETAILS ON OUR WEBSITE Buying • Selling • Ranches • Water Rights

WANTED TO RENT KS - YOUNG FARMER LOOKING FOR LAND TO RENT, CUSTOM FARM OR PLANT IN SHERMAN & CHEYENNE COUNTIES. DAN SHIELDS FARMING, (785) 821-0804 7001 - SPECIAL EVENTS FOR SALE NE - MID-AMERICA ALFALFA EXPO, FEATURING THE NEWEST HAY EQUIPMENT & PRODUCTS, ALSO AN EXHIBITOR AUCTION. EXPO IS FEB 1 & FEB 2, 2011, 8 AM-5 PM AUCTION IS FEB 1, 3:45PM; ALL OF THIS TAKES PLACE AT BUFFALO COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, KEARNEY, NE, (800) 743-1649

• (800) 658-3191 •

NEW ENGINE

2821 - CRAWLERS FOR SALE WI - UNDERCARRIAGE REPAIR. NEW, USED & REBUILT PARTS. ALSO TRACK PRESS SERVICE. M & R TRACK SERVICE., (800) 564-0383 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS WANTED TO BUY NE - 66" BUCKET FOR 1835C CASE SKID STEER, 10. 00X16. 5 TIRE-WHEEL, PLUS OTHER ATTACHMENTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - COMPLETE SET OF BOOKS (REPAIR MANUALS) T-200 BOBCAT SKID LOADER, $100.00, (785) 778-2962 2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE NE - 1500-8000# (MOSTLY 4000#), AIR TIRES & NEW FORKS, (402) 678-2277 OK - PETTIBONE, 30' LIFT, $3,500.00, (580) 361-2265 2827 - BUILDING SUPPLIES FOR SALE NE - NEW 2' X 24' CULVERT, $650.00, (308) 894-6965 2840 - OTHER CONST EQUIP FOR SALE NE - 12-20'LONG 12"I BEAMS, 1/4"THICK W/ 1/2" THICK TOP & BOTTOM, 4 3/4" WIDE $180 EA OR ALL 12 FOR $2000. 12-7' LONG 10", 6" H BEAMS, 1/4" THICK, $35 EA OR ALL 12 FOR $400., (308) 894-6965 NE - 1991 BLUEBIRD BUS, 5. 9 CUMMINS, CALL 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - ALLIS CHALMERS FORK LIFT 5500LB. RUNS GOOD CELL 402-920-3612, (402) 923-1196 3001 - ANTIQUES FOR SALE NE - STATIONARY GAS ENGINES, (402) 5824874 3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY SD - MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE ANY OLDER MM, (605) 386-2131 FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTORS! BIEWER'S TRACTOR & MACH. SALV. SPECIALIZES IN 1920-85 TRACTOR PARTS. FREE NATIONWIDE LOCATING. BARNESVILLE, MN. SEARCH PARTS & SEE OVER 100 ANTIQUE TRACTORS PICTURED AT SALVAGETRACTORS. COM, (218) 493-4696 NE - TRACTOR PARTS FOR SALE. NEW AFTERMARKET PARTS FOR MOST MAKES OF TRACTORS. FRONT END PARTS, 3 PT HITCH PARTS, RADIATORS, SEATS, STEERING WHEELS, BATTERY BOXES, PTO PARTS, DRAWBARS, WATER PUMPS, DECALS & MORE. CLASSIC AG, AINSWORTH, NE., (800) 286-2171 NE - D17 DIESEL. MF 35 DIESEL, (308) 5446421 NE - A-C B, A-C C, 2 A-C WD'S, M-M R. OSMOND, NE., (402) 582-4874 NE - IHC H W/9' KOSCH BELLY MOWER, (308) 544-6421 NE - 1952 JD B, RECONDITIONED, PULLED IN DIV 1 4500LBS, $3,500.00, (402) 5452255 NE - 1938 JD B, UNSTYLED, RECONDITIONED, $3,100.00, (402) 545-2255 NE - 1941 JD A, ELECTRIC START, 4 SP, BEHLEN OVERDRIVE,, $2,500.00, (402) 545-2255 OK - ALLIS-CHALMERS WC56821, MASSEYHARRIS LP 55BISH, SERIAL #11062, (580) 829-2543 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES WANTED TO BUY SD - IH 6 SPEED SPECIAL TRUCK, (605) 386-2131 SD - OLDER JEEPS, CJ 2A, 1948 OR OLDER, ALSO MILITARY, (605) 386-2131 NE - TEENS, 20'S, EARLY 30'S IHC TRUCKS, PARTS, LITERATURE, (308) 894-6965 NE - 1950 FORD CRESTLINER & 1951 VICTORIA, (308) 876-2515 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - PIPE 2 3/8", 2 7/8", 3 1/2", 4 1/2", 5 1/2", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356

in the Heartland Express!

2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS FOR SALE - CONT’D OK - 1998 FREIGHTLINER MID ROOF, DETROIT MOTOR, 10 SP, AIR RIDE, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - 1998 FREIGHTLINER, MID ROOF, C12 CAT, SUPER 10SP AIR RIDE, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - 2000 VOLVO, 60 SERIES DETROIT, 10 SP, AIR RIDE, CONDO, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - 1997 KW900B, N14 CUMMINS, 13 SPD, (308) 995-8329 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER FOR SALE NE - TRANSMISSION, GENERATOR, STARTER, REAR AXLE REMOVABLE CARRIER DIFFERENTIAL UNIT. FITS 1946 CHEVY 2 TON TRUCK, (308) 587-2344

May 13, 2010

Call Tim or Eric to advertise

Page 30

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

NE WEATHER & CROP REPORT Continued from page 2 Field Crops Report: Corn planting progressed to 78 percent complete statewide. This was a day ahead of the 74 last year and four days ahead of the 65 average. Corn emerged was 16 percent complete, which was near last years 17 but ahead of the 14 average. Soybean planting was 26 percent complete, which was the same as last year, but a week ahead of the 15 average. The first soybean fields have begun to emerge. Sorghum planting was 8 percent complete, ahead of last year’s 6 and ahead of 5 average. Wheat conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 5 poor, 25 fair, 62 good, and 8 excellent, below the 74 percent good or excellent of last year but above the 61 average. Wheat jointed was at 55 percent, behind last year’s 61 and 64 average. Oats conditions rated 11 percent fair, 72 good, and 17 excellent. Oats planted was 99 percent ahead of last year’s 98 and 96 average. Oats emerged was 83 percent, behind last year’s 91 but ahead of the 79 average. Alfalfa rated 1 percent poor, 10 fair, 74 good, and 15 excellent. Conditions were above last year’s 74 percent good or excellent condition and 63 average. First cutting of alfalfa was 3 percent complete. Wild Hay conditions rated 1 percent poor, 11 fair, 76 good, and 12 excellent. Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 12 fair, 75 good, and 12 excellent, well above last year’s 71 good and excellent and 61 average.

ESTROUS SYNCHRONIZATION CAN BOOST CATTLE PRODUCERS' PROFITS Continued from page 24 The synchronization system used was a single injection of prostaglandin F2-alpha given five days after bull turn in and cost less than $2 per dose. Funston does not recommend shortening the breeding season of the cow herd with this synchronization system the first year as late calving, non-cycling cows will not respond to this synchronization protocol and may need the additional days to become pregnant. "It is likely more profitable to have your veterinarian identify those late pregnant animals and either market them as pregnant females or calve them and sell the pair next spring," Funston said. "The place to start is with replacement females, having a short first breeding season coupled with synchronization so they never are introduced into the herd as a late calver. "In a modest to low input heifer development system, a non-pregnant female at pregnancy diagnosis is generally a valuable commodity as a yearling." For more information, visit the Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle Web site at http://beefrepro.unl.edu/. 5/2010-SK Source: Rick Funston, Ph.D., associate professor, animal science, (308) 696-6703, rfunston2@unl.edu. estrous.bp Writer: Sandi Alswager Karstens, IANR News Service, (402) 472-3030, salswager2@unl.edu


May 13, 2010

Heartland Express

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Midlands Classified Ad Network OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST: RESPONSIBILITIES ARE TO PROVIDE OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SERVICES TO STUDENTS IN GRADES K-12 AS INDICATED ON THE STUDENT'S I.E.P.; PROVIDE TEACHER CONSULTATION IN THIS AREA. MUST HAVE KNOWLEDGE OF FEDERAL, STATE AND DISTRICT STATUTES, RULES AND REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO SERVICES TO STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES. (CLOSING DATE: 5/5/2010) MUST HOLD A CURRENT LICENSE TO PROVIDE OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SERVICES IN THE STATE OF WYOMING. SALARY: DISTRICT CERTIFIED STAFF SALARY SCHEDULE (2009-10 BASE = $44,800) EMPLOYMENT TERM: 185 CONTRACT-DURING 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR, BEGINNING 8/17/2010. FOR DETAILS AND APPLICATION INFORMATION, PLEASE SEE OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.PARK1.K12 .WY.US OR CONTACT THE SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, PARK COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT #1, 160 N. EVARTS, POWELL, WY 82435 (307-754-2215; FAX: 307-764-6156). EOE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER: TRI-COUNTY AREA HOSPITAL DISTRICT IN LEXINGTON, NEBRASKA IS SEARCHING FOR A DEDICATED PROFESSIONAL AS A CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER. INDIVIDUAL MUST POSSESS A BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION; MASTER’S LEVEL OR CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT IS PREFERRED. FIVE YEARS OF ACCOUNTING EXPERIENCE IN A SUPERVISORY CAPACITY IS ALSO REQUIRED. COMPETITIVE SALARY OFFERED PLUS INCENTIVES INCLUDING HEALTH, DENTAL, PENSION PLAN AND MORE. FOR CONSIDERATION, PLEASE SUBMIT/FAX APPLICATION TO JILL DENKER, P.O. BOX 980, LEXINGTON, NE 68850 FAX – (308) 324-8607. JOB APPLICATION IS AVAILABLE ON THE WEB SITE, WWW.TRICOUNTYHOSPITAL.COM. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER FLEET MANAGER, CITY OF GILLETTE, WYOMING. UNDER GENERAL DIRECTION, PLANS, ORGANIZES AND DIRECTS FUNCTIONS AND ACTIVITIES RELATED TO THE PROCUREMENT, SERVICING, OPERATION, MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF CITY VEHICLES; COORDINATES AND DIRECTS PERSONNEL, RESOURCES AND COMMUNICATION TO MEET CITY VEHICLE NEEDS AND ASSURE SMOOTH AND EFFICIENT ACTIVITIES; SUPERVISES AND EVALUATES THE PERFORMANCE OF ASSIGNED PERSONNEL. PROVIDES IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING OF FLEET OPERATING COSTS TO INCLUDE DEPRECIATION AND REPLACEMENT PLAN FORECASTING.

DEVELOPS CITY-WIDE FLEET BUDGET AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN. CONFERS WITH VARIOUS CITY DEPARTMENTS CONCERNING VEHICLE NEEDS AND ISSUES; ASSURES PROPER AND TIMELY RESOLUTION OF RELATED PROBLEMS AND CONFLICTS STRONG COMPUTER AND ANALYTICAL SKILLS AND STRONG COLLABORATIVE APPROACH ARE REQUIRED. FULL JOB DESCRIPTION AVAILABLE AT HTTP://WWW.CI.GILLETTE .WY.US/EMPLOY MECHANICAL ENGINEER FOR AG MANUFACTURER – MUST BE ABLE TO LIFT 50+ LBS, FARM OR EQUIPMENT EXPERIENCE, AUTO CAD AND SOLID WORKS. 2 YEARS EXPERIENCE, DEGREE PREFERRED 307-532-4451 X21 CHECK OUT OUR VIDEO JOB CLIP AT WWW.HIGHPLAINSJOBFINDER.COM ST. JOSEPH'S CHILDREN'S HOME SERVING CHILDREN & FAMILIES FOR OVER 75 YEARS. ST. JOSEPH'S CHILDREN'S HOME A 62 BED RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT CENTER IN TORRINGTON, WYOMING - SERVING YOUTH AGES 6-17 AND IS ACCREDITED BY THE JOINT COMMISSION. ATTENTION: THERAPISTS INDIVIDUALS WITH UNIQUE CREDENTIALS OR CERTIFICATIONS IN SPECIFIC PROGRAM AREAS OR EXPERIENCE IN RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT, ADOLESCENT CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY, ACUTE CARE, INDIVIDUAL, GROUP & FAMILY THERAPY SESSIONS, PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT, OR MANAGEMENT ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO APPLY. MASTER'S DEGREE FROM A CACREP OR CORE ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN COUNSELING OR PSYCHOLOGY, A CSWE ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN SOCIAL WORK OR AN AAMFT ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN MARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPY. ALSO POSSESS WY LICENSE, PROVISIONAL LICENSURE, OR BE ELIGIBLE TO MEET WY LICENSURE REQUIREMENT WITHIN ONE YEAR OF EMPLOYMENT. BENEFITS: COMPETITIVE SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS, MAJOR MEDICAL, DENTAL/VISION INSURANCE, PAID TIME OFF, RETIREMENT PLAN, LIFE AND LONG TERM DISABILITY INSURANCE, SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM, EXTENSIVE STAFF DEVELOPMENT. APPLICATION CAN BE FOUND WWW.STJOSEPH-WY.ORG OR STOP BY AND PICK ONE UP AT 1419 MAIN STREET, TORRINGTON, WY. OFFICIAL APPLICATION SHOULD BE SUBMITTED TO THE HUMAN RESOURCE DIRECTOR, PO BOX 1117, TORRINGTON, WY 82240 OR E-MAIL SLOW-

ER@STJOSEPH-WY.ORG. OPEN UNTIL FILLED. EOE. CLINICAL NUTRITION SUPERVISOR IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL FUNCTIONS RELATED TO THE CLINICAL ASPECTS OF THE NUTRITION SERVICES DEPT., OVERSEEING PLANNING AND DELIVERY OF NUTRITION CARE TO PTS, ALSO WORKS AS A CLINICAL DIETITIAN ON INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM. BA DEGREE IN FOOD & NUTRITION OR EQUIV. COMMISSION ON DIETETIC REGISTRATION REQUIRED. NE LICENSE TO PRACTICE AS A MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPIST. CONTACT: THE RECRUITMENT DEPARTMENT; 601 WEST LEOTA, NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101. EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM . 308-696-8888 OR 800-543-6629. FAX: 308-696-8889. CHECK US OUT AND APPLY ONLINE AT GPRMC.COM DECISION SUPPORT ANALYST: DECISION SUPPORT ANALYST PARTICIPATES IN PROVIDING ANALYTICAL DATA IN ORDER TO EVALUATE NEW AND EXISTING PRODUCT LINES AND SERVICES WITHIN THE HOSPITAL. ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR MAINTAINING ACCURATE DECISION SUPPORT AND COST ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS AND PREPARING REPORTS FOR MANAGEMENT. BACHELOR DEGREE IN ACCOUNTING OR FINANCE FROM AN ACCREDITED COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY IS REQUIRED. CONTACT: THE RECRUITMENT DEPARTMENT, 601 WEST LEOTA, NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101, EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM . 308-696-8888 OR 800-543-6629. FAX: 308-696-8889. CHECK US OUT AND APPLY ONLINE AT GPRMC.COM GERING PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING QUALIFIED CANDIDATES FOR THE 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR: ELEMENTARY TEACHERS- BUILDING(S) AND GRADE(S) TO BE DETERMINED. INTERESTED CANDIDATES ARE REQUESTED TO APPLY VIA OUR WEBSITE WWW.GERINGSCHOOLS.NET. APPLICATIONS WILL BE TAKEN UNTIL MAY 17, 2010. CURRENT OPEN POSITIONS ARE LISTED ON OUR WEBSITE. EOE NORTH PLATTE NEBRASKA PHYSICIAN GROUP IS CURRENTLY SEEKING A EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR RESPONSIBLE FOR DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING THE STRATEGIC DIRECTION OF THE ORGANIZATION IN COLLABORATION WITH PHYSICIANS AND BOARD. INSURES COMPLIANCE IN BILLING AND CODING PROCESSES. BACHELOR’S DEGREE REQUIRED. MASTER’S DEGREE PREFERRED. A MINIMUM OF 5 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN CLINICAL ADMINISTRATION OR HEALTHCARE ADMINISTRA-

TION. GPRMC OFFERS EMPLOYMENT IN A PROGRESSIVE ENVIRONMENT, COMPETITIVE SALARIES, CONTINUING EDUCATION WITH TUITION REIMBURSEMENT AND AN EXCELLENT BENEFIT PACKAGE INCLUDING: MEDICAL/DENTAL INSURANCE; 401K; LIFE INSURANCE AND EDUCATION LOAN REPAYMENT. INTERVIEW ASSISTANCE AND RELOCATION ALLOWANCE AVAILABLE. GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER, RECRUITMENT DEPARTMENT, 601 WEST LEOTA, NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101. EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM 308-696-8888 OR 800-543-6629, FAX: 308-696-8889. CHECK US OUT AND APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM GERING PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING QUALIFIED CANDIDATES FOR THE 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR: SPEECH PATHOLOGIST. INTERESTED CANDIDATES ARE REQUESTED TO APPLY VIA OUR WEBSITE WWW.GERINGSCHOOLS.NET. CURRENT OPEN POSITIONS ARE LISTED ON OUR WEBSITE. EOE ALLIANCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS FOR THE 2010-11 SCHOOL YEAR: FOURTH GRADE; HIGH SCHOOL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC; HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH I & II; HIGH SCHOOL ELL; HIGH SCHOOL RESOURCE; SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. PLEASE SUBMIT LETTER OF APPLICATION, APPLICATION FORM, RESUME, TRANSCRIPTS AND CREDENTIALS TO DR. DAN HOESING, SUPERINTENDENT, ALLIANCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1604 SWEETWATER, ALLIANCE, NE 69301; OR EMAIL TO JBOTTGER@APS.K12.NE.US. APPLICATION CAN BE DOWNLOADED AT WWW.APSCHOOLS.SCHOOLFUSION.US. POSITIONS ARE OPEN UNTIL FILLED. WORK FOR DEPT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES. VIEW CURRENT JOB OPENINGS AT WWW.DHHS.NE.GOV SIDNEY PUBLIC SCHOOLS HAS AN OPENING FOR AN ELEMENTARY TEACHER. EXTRA DUTY ASSIGNMENTS AVAILABLE: ASST. MS WRESTLING, ASST. V-VB, HEAD V-WRESTLING. SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME, AND CREDENTIAL FILE TO JAY EHLER, 1101- 21ST AVE., SIDNEY, NE 69162. APPLICATION AVAILABLE AT WWW.SIDNEYRAIDERS.ORG. EOE HEALTHCARE CLINIC MANAGER-RN – ALL AREAS; CAN; MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST; PHLEBOTOMIST; SURGICAL TECH. DOUGLAS, WYOMING, WWW.CONVERSEHOSPITAL.COM. 307-358-2122 HOUSE SUPERVISOR- GPRMC IS RECRUITING FOR HOUSE SUPERVISOR POSITIONS, WHICH ARE

RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SU PERVISION AND DIRECTION OF THE NURSING STAFF, COORDINATE/MONITORS THE HOSPITAL PLANT AND BUILDING WHEN ANCILLARY DEPARTMENTS ARE OFF DUTY, ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR APPROPRIATE STAFFING. ACTS AS A LIAISON AND PATIENT COORDINA TOR FOR STAFF, PHYSICIANS, PATIENTS AND FAMILIES AND INTERDISCIPLINARY DEPARTMENTS. BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PREFERRED. NE RN, BLS, CPI REQUIRED. ACLS, TNCC, PALS PREFERRED. GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER- RECRUITMENT DEPARTMENT, 601 WEST LEOTA, NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101. EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM 308-696-8888 OR 800-543-6629 FAX: 308-696-8889 CHECK US OUT AND APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM THEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING APPLICATIONS FOR K-12 BAND/VOCAL MUSIC FOR THE 2010-11 SCHOOL YEAR. PLEASE SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME AND TRANSCRIPTS TO: HENRY EGGERT, SUPT., THEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS, P.O. BOX 248, THEDFORD, NE 69166 HEMINGFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS ENGLISH OR MIDDLE GRADE ENDORSED K-12 MUSIC W/COACHING POSITIONS AVAILABLE. HEMINGFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS, A CLASS C2 DISTRICT IN WESTERN NEBRASKA HAS THE FULLTIME TEACHING POSITIONS LISTED ABOVE FOR THE 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR. OTHER ENDORSEMENTS FOR ENGLISH CONSIDERED IF WILLING TO WORK TOWARD ENDORSEMENT. THE SALARY AND BENEFIT PACKAGE IS COMPETITIVE WITH LARGER DISTRICTS. INDIVIDUALS INTERESTED IN A GREAT JOB ATMOSPHERE PLEASE SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, INCLUDING COLLEGE TRANSCRIPTS AND A COPY OF YOUR CURRENT NEBRASKA TEACHING CERTIFICATE TO: MS. PEGGY THAYER, HS PRINCIPAL, PTHAYER@PANESU.ORG FOR QUESTIONS. HEMINGFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS, PO BOX 217, HEMINGFORD, NE 69348. WWW.HEMINGFORDSCHOOLS.ORG POSITIONS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. EOE JOIN STERLING'S ALLIANCE NE TEAM PROVIDING ELECTRO-MECHANICAL SUPPORT AT A MAJOR REPAIR FACILITY. LOCOMOTIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS/PLC EXP PREFERRED. MILITARY OR DEGREE PREF NOT REQ. CALL (866) 478-3754X409 PLUMBERS, HVAC TECHNICIANS & INSTALLERS EXCELLENT WAGES AND BENEFITS. COMPETITIVE WAGES, PAID TIME OFF, HEALTH INSURANCE AND IRA. 785-628-8088, HAYS, KANSAS.

Auctioneers — Don’t miss your opportunity to get your auction bills in front of this audience across the Midwest!

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Heartland Express

May 13, 2010

Contact Your Local Co-op Dealer For More Information

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WHAT IF YOUR LOCAL ANIMAL AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY DISAPPEARED?

What else would disappear with it? Well, to start, the millions of dollars that livestock and poultry producers generate to help build and restore your local schools and parks. Then there’s the locally produced meat that we trust to be part of the safe and healthy meals we feed our families.

© 2010 United Soybean Board. (38420-NE-FRN-5/10)

And of course saying goodbye to your local poultry and livestock industries would also mean saying goodbye to the number one customer for U.S. soybean meal. Animal agriculture helps our community thrive. That’s why it’s important that we continue to give them our support. Because a safe and secure food supply and a safe and secure rural community both come from the same place – inside the barns and out in the fields of America’s farmers and producers. Soybean farmers helping livestock and poultry producers just makes sense.

www.animalag.org www animalag org 43080

http://www.agnet.net/pub_pages/HE_051310  

http://www.agnet.net/pub_pages/HE_051310.pdf

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