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POSTAL CUSTOMER

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE

April 26, 2012 Issue 253-16-9

Free Farm Insurance Could Save Taxpayers up to $18.5 Billion

Special Features Heartland Showpig Shootout. . . . . . . . 7-9 Kearney Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 FFA Chapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-25

Weather Al Dutcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Country Living House Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Quilt Pattern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

The Lighter Side Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Markets Grains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Government Report Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Ag Management Rainwater Basin Receives Federal Funding for NRCS Conservaton Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Livestock News WASHINGTON - A new report released last week shows that an Environmental Working Group proposal to reform the costly federal crop insurance program through the 2012 Farm Bill could save taxpayers up to $18.5 billion over 10 years and provide more farmers with a reliable safety net. EWG commissioned Dr. Bruce Babcock, an economics professor at Iowa State University, to analyze the impact of offering farmers a free insurance policy

that would cover 70 percent of average crop yield at 100 percent of the market price for the lost crop. If farmers were charged a small fee to cover administrative costs, taxpayers would save $10.4 billion over 10 years and cover every acre planted with corn, cotton, rice, soybeans and wheat in 2011. Savings would grow to $18.5 billion over 10 years if only the acres insured in 2011 were covered by the new safety net.

"The reality that giving away free insurance would actually save money underscores how inefficient the current system is," Babcock wrote. Under the current system, farmers only pay a small portion of the policy premiums, and the private insurers that sell the policies pay less than half of the damage claims from crop revenue losses. Taxpayers pick up the rest,

Heartland Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Production News Timing Critical to Treating Stripe Rust in Wheat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-31

Continued on page 14

Smith, Livestock Groups Concerned About Animal Production Mandates By Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent Legislation that would mandate on-farm practices involving livestock production in the House of Representatives was criticized at a recent briefing held by Rep. Adrian Smith, RNeb., and Rep. Joe Courtney, D-Conn., this week in Washington, D.C. Both Smith and Courtney are members of the Modern Agriculture Caucus. During the briefing, which included a number of Nebraska livestock producers, testimony was heard about the concerns farmers and ranchers have with legislation introduced in the House For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com

that would mandate strict on-farm production practices. Smith said science must be the driving force behind public policy decisions. He said farmers and ranchers are dedicated to caring for the health and well-being of their animals. Smith's Third Congressional District is the nation's largest cow/calf producing congressional districts in the country. Smith said ensuring public policy is driven by sound science is critical to the continued success of agriculture, and in turn, the long term safety and security of our nation's food supply. "The landscape of American agriculture

continues to evolve, but the concern and care farmers and ranchers show their livestock remains unchanged," he said. Smith said improved housing, updated handling practices and modernized health and nutrition products are the result of generations of investment and research into raising high quality animals. "Every day, our producers demonstrate their dedication to providing the highest quality, safest and most affordable products in the world," he said. Continued on page 9

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 4/13/12

Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$119.09 126.30 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .151.50 193.36 Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136.30 157.54 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . .188.89 191.24 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91.57 85.52 Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . .* * Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . .95.90 83.53 Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .182.50 150.00 Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .396.22 376.90

122.64 182.97 153.83 177.79 79.27 * 78.22 148.63 371.29

Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.26 Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.25 Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.24 Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . .11.91 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .3.83

6.28 6.66 13.31 11.48 3.62

5.48 6.20 13.83 10.45 3.43

Hay (per ton) Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . . .140.00 Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . . .72.50 Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . . . .* Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215.50 Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79.00 * No market.

225.00 225.00 145.00 145.00 97.50 97.50 220.00 229.25 76.50 76.75


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Heartland Express - Weather

April 26, 2012

Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Al Dutcher Report S e v e r a l precipitation events materialized during the past two weeks, with a widespread severe weather event materializing over the central U.S. during the 4/14-4/16 period resulting in 150+ tornado warnings issued and at least 12 confirmed Allen Dutcher tornadoes in Nebraska alone. Widespread 2-4 inches of rain were common east of the Panhandle, but most of this came hard and fast with significant runoff on sloped surfaces. Another system rolled through the state during the 4/18-4/20 period bringing light to moderate totals (0.25 -1.50 inches) to the northwestern 2/3 of the state. The final event materialized during the 4/25-4/27 period and brought decent moisture (0.50-1.00 inches, locally heavier) to the state. Models are not

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consistent with their forward looking projections, especially during the second week where they can’t seem to resolve the issue of whether it will be warm and dry or wet and cold. Week One Forecast, 4/28 - 5/4: The main focus this period will be the impacts of an upper air trough situated over the central Rockies and how it will move as the week progresses. Current model projections indicate that Nebraska will lie between cool air to the north and warmth to our south. Therefore, the main storm track is expected to lie in a west to east orientation across the central Plains with waves of energy ejecting out of the upper air trough on a daily basis. In short, there will be daily chances of showers with below normal temperatures early in the forecast period, gradually warming as the week progresses. Current model precipitation output places the best chances of moisture during the 4/30-5/2 period, but again there is a daily chance of moisture throughout the forecast period. High Temperatures: 4/28-4/29 (low 50'’s N - low 60's SW), 4/30 (upper 50's NE

- upper 60's S), 5/1 (low 60's NE - low 70's S), 5/2 (upper 60's NE - low 80's SW), 5/3-5/4 (low 80's N - upper 80's S). Week Two Forecast, 5/5 - 5/11: Weather models haven’t been able to resolve the expected movement of the western U.S. upper air trough and its eventual impact on the central U.S. This forecast period uses the warmer and drier forecast output from the atmospheric models. The best opportunities for moisture would be on 5/6 across eastern Nebraska, 5/8 across western Nebraska, and 5/10 for central and eastern Nebraska. Dry conditions are projected for 5/5 and 5/9, with just a slight chance of scattered showers for 5/7 and 5/11. If the colder model verifies, temperatures will average 5 F below normal with daily rain chances and above normal moisture for the entire week. High Temperatures: 5/5-5/7 (low 80's N - upper 80's S), 5/8 (mid 70's N - low 80's SE), 5/9 (low 70's N - upper 80's SW), 5/10-5/11 (low 80's N upper 80's S).

Nebraska Weather and Crop Report Agricultural Summary: For the week ending April 22, 2012, field activities picked up momentum but were slowed due to damp soils, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Corn planting increased to 14 percent complete during the 4.3 days suitable for fieldwork. Seeding of oats was 85 percent complete with about half of the crop emerged. Wheat jointed, at 59 percent, continued two and one half weeks ahead of average. The first fields of soybeans were planted and sugarbeet planting in the Panhandle has begun. Soil temperatures ranged from the low 50’s in the northern counties to upper 50’s across the south. Cattle and calves were in mostly good to excellent condition. Spring calving was 92 percent complete with calf losses below average. Weather Summary: In general, temperatures averaged one degree below normal across the northern half of the state and one degree above normal across the south. Highs reached the upper 70’s and lows fell to the high 20’s in the Panhandle. Light precipitation fell across much of the state with most areas receiving less than half an inch. Portions of Boyd and Holt Counties in North Central Nebraska received over 1.5 inches. Field Crops Report: Corn was 14 percent planted, ahead of 4 last year and 9 average. Corn emerged was 1 percent.

Wheat jointed was 59 percent, ahead of 9 percent last year and two and one half weeks ahead of 13 average. Wheat conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 5 poor, 30 fair, 53 good, and 11 excellent, well above last year’s 43 percent good to excellent and 58 average. Oats planted was at 85 percent, ahead of 66 last year and one and one half weeks ahead of 69 average. Oats emerged was 49 percent, well ahead of 18 last year and 23 average. Oats conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 2 poor, 21 fair, 70 good, and 7 excellent. Alfalfa conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 4 poor, 28 fair, 53 good, and 15 excellent, below last year’s 75 percent good to excellent but near 67 average. Concerns were expressed about insect levels. The first cutting of alfalfa was 5 percent complete. Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Cattle and calf condition rated 0 percent very poor, 0 poor, 6 fair, 73 good, and 21 excellent. Spring calving was 92 percent complete. Calf losses rated 32 percent below average, 67 average, and 1 above average. Pasture and range conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 6 poor, 33 fair, 54 good, and 6 excellent, below 67 percent good to excellent last year and 66 average.


April 26, 2012

Heartland Express - Country Living

Birds Attack Windows By Susan Hansen, Extension Educator, Colfax County American robins, cardinals and some other birds are persistent in defending their territory. This defense doesn’t work well, however, where window reflections appear to be another bird. A persistent bird will repeatedly attack its own reflection to drive the “intruder” out. Birds also may strike windows because they don’t see the glass in time. Instead of flying through what they perceive as an open space, they hit the solid window. One published study estimated more than 97 million birds in the United States collide with windows each year. Peak months were May and October, when migrating birds and young may be less familiar with window locations.

Cutting down on the reflection of windows can help prevent birds from running into them. Put sheer cloth, netting or crumpled plastic wrap between the window and the outside to cut down on the reflection and to remove the appearance of open space. Several inch-wide foil or cloth strips also may help, but these block light and may interfere with window use. Remove the covering when the bird changes behavior and is no longer a problem. Placing bird silhouettes in windows is another way to try and stop birds from running into their windows, but this practice hasn’t worked very well. On a few occasions, cardinals have been reported pecking a vehicle’s rear view mirrors, also trying to defend their territory. This problem can be solved by placing a bag over the rear view mirror to protect it, or moving the vehicle a short distance out of the bird’s territory.

Safe Mowing 101 By Susan Hansen, Extension Educator, Colfax County As mowing season begins, keep these safety tips in mind. 1. Know how to operate the equipment. Read the operator’s manual before using any power equipment. Know where the controls are and what they do. Follow safety instructions. 2. Dress properly for the job. Wear long pants, close-fitting clothes, sturdy shoes, and safety glasses. Don’t wear anything that could get caught in moving parts, such as loose jewelry or clothing; be careful of long hair. 3. Handle gas carefully. Fill up before you start, while the engine is cold. Don’t spill when filling the gas tank. Store gas in an approved container in a cool ventilated area. Never smoke around gasoline.

4. Clear the area before starting to mow. Pick up rocks, twigs, cans, golf balls, anything that could be thrown by moving equipment. 5. Keep children and pets away from the area until you’re finished. Never allow children to operate a mower. And never carry children as passengers on a riding mower. 6. Operate equipment carefully and follow recommended procedures. Always turn off the engine and disconnect the spark plug wire before attempting to unclog or work on outdoor power equipment. When leaving equipment unattended, turn off the engine and remove the key. 7. Keep hands and feet away from moving parts. Never work on equipment while it is running. Never remove or tamper with safety devices and labels. Labels are provided to protect you and your family.

Tree Planting Depth By Ruth Vonderohe, Extension Educator, Knox County Arbor Day is in April, making this a good time to write about not planting trees too deep. This is a practice that is becoming an epidemic and killing or stressing many trees. Researchers at the Bartlett Tree Research Laboratories in North Carolina excavated 363 newly planted trees and found 93 percent had either excessive soil or excessive mulch covering the root collar (the area where roots meet the trunk and the trunk flares slightly at the base). Trees planted too deep may not survive for more than two years. Those that do survive often remain in a weakened condition for a number of years. Eventually, some stress like drought, disease or insects are more likely to kill them. If a tree trunk enters the ground as straight as a telephone pole, with no flare visible, the tree has been planted too deep. Deep planting kills or stresses trees because the roots do not receive the level of oxygen needed for healthy root growth. As little as one to two inches of soil placed over the roots of established trees can cause trees to decline and die. During tree planting, it is not unusual for trees to end up being planted as much as six to nine inches deeper than they should be. To avoid planting trees too deep, do not follow the old recommendation of planting trees at the same depth they were at the nursery or in the container. Instead, locate the root collar of the tree before digging the planting hole. Some soil may need to be pulled away from the trunk to locate the root collar. Again, the root collar is the area where the roots meet the trunk. This area is also referred to as the trunk flare since the trunk flares slightly at this point. After the tree is planted, the trunk flare needs to be visible above the soil line with the first lateral roots just below ground. After locating the root collar, dig the planting hole only as deep as needed so the trunk flare remains just above the soil line after planting. If the hole is dug deeper, settling will occur after

planting and the tree may end up too deep. When planted, set the root ball on undisturbed soil. Do dig the planting hole two to three times wider than the root ball. Tree roots grow outward with the majority of roots growing in the upper 18 inches of soil. Digging a wide planting hole loosens the surrounding soil to encourage root growth. When planting, remove all containers, even peat pots. After balled and burlapped trees are planted, remove the twine around the trunk, cut away as much of the burlap as possible, and snip off all or as much of the wire basket as possible. When backfilling the hole, backfill with soil that was removed from the planting hole. Do not add soil amendments to the planting hole as this may encourage roots to grow in the planting hole and not outward into surrounding soil. As the hole is backfilled with soil, water every few inches to settle the soil. Do not tamp the soil with your foot as this can create compaction. Once the hole is filled with soil, place a two to four inch layer of organic mulch in a four foot diameter ring around the tree. Avoid using a deeper mulch layer or piling the mulch against the trunk. Just as planting too deep can decrease oxygen levels for roots, using too deep of a mulch layer will also decrease soil oxygen levels. Deep mulch is another epidemic killing or stressing young trees. Along with not planting too deep or using too much mulch, other general rules of thumb at planting time are do not prune living branches (it’s okay to remove dead or broken branches); do not fertilize, especially with nitrogen; and do not wrap the trunks of trees during the growing season. For larger trees planted on windy sites, stake the tree low on the trunk and use staking materials that will not damage or girdle the trunk. The purpose of staking is not to prevent the top half of the tree from gently swaying with the wind, but to prevent the root ball from shifting and damaging new roots. Trees should only be staked for one year after planting.

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Surrounded by a Covered Porch

Plan #HMAFAPW00760 Surrounded by a Covered Porch Visit www.houseoftheweek.com

A wraparound porch, a welcoming entrance, and a thoughtful floor plan make this house a pleasure to come home to. Just inside the foyer, a seat provides the perfect spot to take off muddy shoes. Further in, a fireplace framed by windows warms the great room, which is enhanced by a sloping ceiling. The adjacent nook and efficient U-shaped kitchen combine with the great room to create a spacious area for gatherings. The seated snack bar has room for three, making it a handy spot for serving breakfast or appetizers. The relaxing master bedroom is enhanced by a pampering bath, walk-in closet, and porch access. A linen closet sits close to the laundry area in this wing, making it easy to put away clean sheets. Upstairs, two secondary bedrooms each boast a window seat, built-in dresser, additional seat/storage, and attic access. A bridge between them holds the full hall bath and overlooks the great room.

Detailed Specifications House Style Country Farmhouse Victorian Foundation Type Crawlspace Fireplace Key Information 1,640 Square Feet Beds: 3 Baths: 2 ½ Stories: 2 Width: 52' Depth: 43' Room Summary Great / Gathering Room Special Features Split Bedrooms Main Level

Upper Level

A downloadable study plan of this house, including general information on building costs and financing, is available at www.houseoftheweek .com. To receive the study plan for this home, order by phone, online, or by mail. By phone: Call (866) 772-1013. Reference plan #HMAFAPW00760. Online: Go to www.house oftheweek.com.


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Heartland Express - The Lighter Side

April 26, 2012

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts • Cracks In The Concrete (Best Of) by Lee Pitts

“Youth is such a wonderful thing. What a crime to waste it on children." George Bernard Shaw As a childless man I’ve always thought I wanted to spend some time with kids. Then one day I did. Last week I spent a very important day doing very important things, like collecting bird's feathers, listening to bees buzz, hugging a sheep, throwing rocks, seeing how close we could get to a squirrel and talking to the dog. I shared communion with nature and my very special five year old nephew, D.J. D.J. likes to come to the ranch for a visit and every time he does I learn something important. He is from a big city where ecologists and environmentalists live in 20 story condominiums and tell us how to manage what they call “open space,” as if nobody lives there. D.J. comes from the land of manicured lawns where the only Lions, Moose or Elk are in men's clubs. Or in a zoo. I feel sorry for city kids whose only experience with mud pies is on a dessert plate in a restaurant. D.J. says he wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up and so in preparation for his latest visit to the ranch someone had given him a jar with a plastic leaf in it that was supposed to be good for catching and studying bugs and other small animals. It had a plastic green leaf in it and was just

like the old Mason jars which I used as a kid for the very same purpose, only his probably cost twenty bucks with a percentage of the price going to the Sierra Club because they recommended and endorsed it. I thought it might be neat for us to catch a frog for D.J. to put in his jar and take back to nursery school for show and tell. They had probably never seen a real frog before. "Hoppy" the frog stayed in his jar overnight but the next day D.J. wanted to turn him loose because "he looked so sad in the jar." I had to admit he did look a bit downcast and angry. So D.J. turned him loose in the house for my nervous wife to discover later while she was cleaning. Then it was her turn to look angry. Next we caught a psychotic honeybee and my five year old environmentalist nephew set it free in the enclosed space of the truck cab as we were driving down the road, nearly causing a crash. At five years of age D.J. already knew what most adults will never learn: if you try to manage or tame nature you’ll only end up destroying it. At lunch D.J.'s food disappeared into his pockets. Later I found him trying to feed his burger to my horse Gentleman, his crust to the birds who roost in the barn rafters, and his french fries to the squirrels.

D. J. doesn't know yet about global warming, that cows and aerosol cans are supposedly destroying the ozone, or about “disappearing” forests that ecologists write 700 page books about. Although his nursery school teacher had already subjected him to lesson plans about global warming, he only came away with the thought that, “Hey, maybe if it gets hot enough my parents might put in a swimming pool!” Frankly, for D.J. I don’t think global warming can come soon enough. Since D.J.'s visit I don't mind it so much when I close the shop door that a little dirt falls in my face from a bird's nest overhead, or that the deer eat my hedge, or that the raccoons dig for worms in my lawn. I actually took some time yesterday to watch some quail scratch in the dirt and to smile back at the cat. D.J. doesn’t know yet about all the environmental politics that we as ranchers live with every day, but he has already learned that plants still grow up and roots go down. Bees still buzz, grass still grows and frogs can be hard to catch. (Just ask my wife). Thanks to D.J., and one very special day, I rediscovered what every five year old knows: All is well with nature, it is just us grownups that are out of balance. If we covered the earth with concrete, grass would still grow up through the cracks.

www.myfarmandranch.com • www.myfarmandranch.com Features In Upcoming Issues: • FFA • Show Pig Shootout Nebraska’s Statewide Ag News Publication

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Farm & Ranch . . . Where Agriculture Is Always A Business 49146


April 26, 2012

Heartland Express

Page 5

SUMMER PICNIC TABLE TOPPER 58” x 58”

Hi Girls, This is a very easy one to make. Most of the cutting is done for you if you use a “Honey Bun”. Anyway here is what you need: 1 Honey Bun or 40 strips 1 ½” x 42” (WOF) 3/8 yd for inner border – sub cut into 5 strips 2 ½” x 42” 1 ½ yd for outer border – sub cut into 6 strips 8 ½” x 42” ½ yd for binding – sub cut into 6 strips 2 ½” x 42” 3 2/3 yd for backing 7 yds ric rac

QUILT CENTER - Start by cutting the selvedge off of all your strips. Then cut the 1 ½” strips in half…making 80 strips 1 ½” x 21”. Now sew them together diagonally end to end making one REALLY LONG strip. Easy so far??? Next cut about 9” off of one end of your long strip and toss it towards the trash can. Believe me you will have plenty for your project. From your long pieced strip, cut 40” strips. Then sew 36 of them together side by side to form the center of your topper. You may have a few left over, but this gives you a chance to pick the ones you like best to use. Now press and square this up. Mine came out 38”….yours may be different. This is okay. INNER BORDER - Now sew an inner border strip to the 2 sides. Press. Join the 3 remaining inner border strips together end to end then cut in half to make your top and bottom borders. Sew one strip to the top and the other to the bottom. Press. OUTER BORDER - Join 3 outer border strips together to make a long strip. Then cut it in half to make your 2 sides outer border strips. Sew to the sides. Repeat with the remaining 3 outer border strips and sew them to the top and bottom……..Cute and easy. IMBELISH IT!!!! I used the ric rac on mine. I just pinned it on and sewed down the middle. You could also add button flowers or yo-yo’s. • Fabric • Kits • Notions • Quilts • Gifts • Collectibles • Candles • Primative Wool Kits

Quilt and bind as desired and then ……….enjoy your summer picnic! ၡœ¤¤Š‘Ž š£“¡Š¤“œš£ၺၸၹၺ

Store Hours Tu-Fri 10 - 5:00 PM; Sat 10 - 4 Mondays by Appointment Phone/Fax: 308-697-4000 www.cottageinspirations.com

710 Nasby St. Cambridge, NE 69022 49559


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Heartland Express - Government

April 26, 2012

Looking at the Future of Nebraska Agriculture by Congressman Adrian Smith Scottsbluff Office 416 Valley View Drive, Suite 600 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Phone: (308) 633-6333 Fax: (308) 633-6335

Agriculture is a bright spot in our nation’s economy, sustainably meeting growing demands to provide food, feed, fuel and fiber for the world. Nebraska’s producers are masters of efficiency and make high-quality products. As the landscape continues to evolve, public policy will have to change with it. Getting these policies right is the key to the continued success of our farmers and ranchers and the reason why I serve as co-chair of the Modern Agriculture Caucus. With the 2008 Farm Bill set to expire this year, Congress has taken the initial steps toward a new authorization. In traveling the Third District as part of my ongoing Farm Bill listening tour, I’ve heard from producers with a variety of perspectives about how the future of agriculture policy should look. The nation is currently facing record-high deficits requiring difficult decisions, and I commend producers for their forward thinking. One aspect on which many agree is the importance of a strong, responsible, and efficient risk management system. We need to build on the successes of the crop insurance program to ensure the system works for all regions and

Grand Island Office 1811 West Second Street, Suite 105 Grand Island, NE68803 Phone: (308) 384-3900 Fax: (308) 384-3902

producers. As I continue to travel the Third District, I look forward to gathering more input from you. More information about the Farm Bill and my ongoing listening tour can be found on my website: www.adriansmith.house.gov. The growing role of international trade also is having a major impact on agriculture in Nebraska and throughout the country. With 95 percent of all consumers residing outside of the United States, the future of agriculture is increasingly connected to trade policy. Opening new export markets has been a top legislative priority for me on the House Ways and Means Committee. The new free trade agreements with Panama, Colombia, and South Korea, for example, will offer our farmers and ranchers a more level playing field to compete in these countries for new customers. Nebraska’s producers already are seeing the benefits of these high-standard agreements as South Korea recently began the process of lowering its tariff on U.S. red meat from 40 percent to zero. In addition, on May 15th the Colombian Free Trade Agreement will enter into force and begin reducing the 80 percent tariff

Washington Office 503 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6435 Fax: (202) 225-0207

levied on high quality U.S. beef. New opportunities such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership could offer even more market access for Nebraska’s agriculture products. On all fronts, policy should be guided by sound science. When politics becomes the primary consideration, the end result is almost always harmful. As we saw with the baseless media scare over lean finely textured beef, politics trumping science hurts both producers and consumers. I appreciate the bipartisanship in setting the record straight on this issue as well as on advancing new trade and farm policy. Certainly, this cooperation has been a breath of fresh air in an era dominated by political brinksmanship. The future of agriculture in Nebraska remains bright. My ultimate goal is to create policies which strengthen American agriculture and provide the long-term certainty producers need to grow our rural communities. The continued success of agriculture, and in turn the long-term safety and security of our nation’s food supply, depends on our unwavering commitment to forward thinking, science-based public policy.

Fairness In The Air by Senator Ben Nelson Omaha Office 7502 Pacific St.,Suite 205 Omaha, NE 68114 Phone: (402) 391-3411 Fax: (402) 391-4725

We live in a country that was founded on the principle that everyone is created equal. No one gets special treatment. We are all treated the same, especially in Nebraska where we pride ourselves on being polite and thoughtful. To put it in the most basic of terms, no one cuts in line. Everyone waits for his or her turn. However, this is not always the case at airports, where some air travelers are able to cut to the front of the security screening line. Bill Promotes Fairness for Airline Passengers That’s why I have introduced a bill called the “Air Passenger Fairness Act of 2012” to promote fairness for all air travel passengers by barring airlines and airport operators from using express security lines that allow for certain groups of air passengers to cut to the front of the TSA security screening line.

Lincoln Office Federal Building, Room 287 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Phone: (402) 441-4600 Fax: (402) 476-8753

My bill would prohibit a practice currently used at many airports, where queues to enter checkpoint screening lanes have been designed to provide "elite" flyer lanes that the airlines make available to first class, and sometimes business class travelers, as well as to travelers who have reached certain status levels in airline frequent flyer programs. This enables them to move to the front of the waiting line to pass through TSA screening. This bill is about fairness. Regardless of whether you have a first-class ticket or have reached a certain frequent flier status, the purpose of the airport security screening line is to ensure traveler safety. Allowing a select few to cut in front of those who are waiting patiently, just in order to provide a perk, has nothing to do with safety.

Washington Office 720 Hart Senate Office Building United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6551 Fax: (202) 228-0012

No Special Treatment Because all of the passengers are entering an area of airports where the federal government is performing a government function – security screenings – using special lines to expedite the security screening process for some passengers is inappropriate. All passengers pay the same fee in their airline tickets to cover the cost of the TSA screenings regardless of ticket class. They should be treated equally. The bill, however, would not affect the current “trusted traveler” Transportation Security Administration-administered program that travelers can use to apply for pre-screening clearance This may expedite their security screenings at designated locations in select airports. It also would not stop an airline or airport operator from setting up express lines for disabled passengers.

Dying Should Not Be A Taxable Event by Senator Mike Johanns Kearney Office: 4111 Fourth Avenue, Suite 26 Kearney, NE 68845 Tel: (308) 236-7602 Fax: (308) 236-7473

Lincoln Office: 294 Federal Building 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Tel: (402) 476-1400 Fax: (402) 476-0605

We have all experienced the pain of losing a loved one. The grieving process can be difficult, if not overwhelming. It is often worsened by a federal tax that is an unreasonable extra burden and bad policy. I believe the "death tax," as it is often called, should be repealed. This tax hits rural and farm families disproportionately and in some cases forces families to sell farms and ranches just to pay Uncle Sam. The federal government levies this tax – between 18 and 35 percent depending on the value of the property – on an estate when the owner dies and family members inherit the estate. Under current law, all estates valued under $5 million are exempt from the tax this year. While that may sound like a lot, it is not uncommon for local family businesses or farms and ranches to be valued at this level and higher. Those who inherit such property must often borrow to pay the tax, sell assets, or sell the inherited property altogether. Making matters worse, the estate tax is set to increase to 55 percent in 2013, with the

Scottsbluff Office: 115 Railway Street, Suite C102 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Tel: (308) 632-6032 Fax: (308) 632-6295

exemption falling to $1 million dollars. This will hit substantially more family farms, ranches, and small businesses throughout Nebraska and the country. With our economy still struggling to right itself, with many still looking for work, and with many trying to keep their businesses afloat, allowing this tax increase is irresponsible and would be devastating for many asking the government to stop erecting roadblocks along the path to recovery. Having been a mayor, governor and the Secretary of Agriculture, I am acutely aware of the damage the estate tax can have on families, small businesses and farms. Over the years, I've met with many citizens worried they will be forced to sell the family farm or business because of this onerous tax. Imagine being forced to sell your family's livelihood solely to afford a tax; or imagine your job disappearing because the federal government drove your boss into liquidation.

Omaha Office: 9900 Nicholas St., Suite 325 Omaha, NE 68114 Tel: (402) 758-8981 Fax: (402) 758-9165

Washington, D.C. Office 404 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510

Dying should not be a taxable event and Americans should not be forced to sell the family home, business, farm or ranch just to pay for more government spending. Whether farmers or business owners, employees or entrepreneurs, those who have worked to create a better life for their children should be able to pass down the fruits of their labor without penalty. I've signed on to legislation to repeal this tax and fix this problem. This bill already has more than 30 cosponsors. According to one study, this repeal could create 1.5 million additional small business jobs and decrease the national unemployment rate by nearly one percent. It's not right for grieving Americans to pay a tax on top of the pain of losing a loved one. I will advocate for this bill until it is passed by Congress and becomes law. Being rewarded, not penalized, for hard work and success has always been central to American life. It should stay that way.


April 26, 2012

Heartland Express - Heartland Showpig Shootout

Page 7

Heartland Showpig Shootout May 18-20, 2012 Buffalo County Fairgrounds Kearney, Nebraska The mission of the Heartland Showpig Shootout is to provide the best quality youth pig show possible and to create a positive educational experience while promoting agriculture among youth participants.

How it started...

Where it's going...

The idea for the Heartland Showpig Shootout started when a group of swine producers decided that they would like to bring a large Swine Show to Nebraska. After sharing their idea with a member of the Buffalo County Fairboard and the president of the Kearney Visitors Bureau, the idea got legs very quickly. The Kearney Visitors Bureau asked the Kearney Area Chamber of Commerce Agriculture Committee to get involved, and soon the Heartland Showpig Shootout took form.

The Heartland Showpig Shootout is estimated by many swine showmen to soon be the largest swine show around. This event not only offers the largest payout for a swine show in the Midwest, but offers a great learning experience to all youth involved. Shows like the Heartland Showpig Shootout offer excellent family time and also offer a way to teach our youth many things that they cannot learn in school. Everyone involved with this show is very proud of everything it stands for!

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Heartland Express - Heartland Showpig Shootout

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April 26, 2012

Heartland Express - Heartland Showpig Shootout

Page 9

SMITH, LIVESTOCK GROUPS CONCERNED ABOUT ANIMAL PRODUCTION MANDATES Continued from page 1

During the briefing, speakers raised concern with H.R. 3798, legislation that would codify an agreement between The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and the United Egg Producers (UEP) to seek federally mandated production practices for the egg industry. One of those speaking was National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) President J.D. Alexander, who is a Nebraska beef producer. He said a one-size-fits all approach to animal agriculture won't work. "No two farms or ranches are the same." he said. "What works for my neighbor may not work for me because all farmers and ranchers have to adapt to meet the needs of their animals, to comply with regulations and, ultimately, to satisfy consumer demand." Alexander said his biggest concern with H.R. 3798 is that outside groups with "no knowledge of the industry will be dictating my livelihood and potentially compromising the welfare of my livestock." "This legislation creates a slippery slope," Alexander said. "Today, it's egg farmers but tomorrow it could be any other segment of animal agriculture and we're not going to let that happen." But despite concerns from some segments of the livestock production industry, more and more consumers " along with corporations that sell food products to consumers " have demanded that food production be more humane. At the heart of the HSUS argument about egg production is that "more than 90 percent of the country's 280 million egg-laying hens into

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barren cages so small the birds can't even spread their wings." In these cases, HSUS said that "each hen has less space than a sheet of paper on which to spend her entire life. Virtually unable to move, these animals can't perch, nest, or dust bathe." There are also environmental and food safety concerns involving this type of egg production. That movement has been successful in another of large egg laying states " such as California, Ohio and Michigan " where laws are making it criminal to not only confine hens in cages, but also pigs in gestation crates, and calves in veal crates. California recently passed a law that requires all whole eggs sold statewide to be cage-free by 2015. According to HSUS, major corporations from mom-and-pop stores to retail giants seeking eggs from operations that don't use the cages that are in questions. Those corporations include Sara Lee, Hellmann's mayonnaise, and dozens of restaurant chains " including Starbucks, Wolfgang Puck, Burger King, Denny's, Carl's Jr., Hardee's, Subway and others. Compass Group, the world's largest food service provider, has switched roughly 100 million eggs to cage-free. Supermarket chains including Wal-Mart and Costco have exclusively cage-free private lines of eggs, while others like Harris Teeter and Safeway have increased their sales of cage-free eggs. Smith's briefing was hosted a coalition of agricultural organizations working to stop H.R. 3798. The coalition includes NCBA, the Egg Farmers of America, the National Pork

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Producers Council, the National Milk Producers Federation, the American Sheep Industry and the American Farm Bureau Federation. During Smith's hearing, Alexander said the groups are not alone in their opposition to mandated, prescriptive production practices. He said the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE) has acknowledged mandated animal production practices, such as those proposed H.R. 3798, are not in the best interest of promoting true animal welfare because they cannot easily be adapted or updated for different farming models. Alexander said an alternative, instead of legislation, are voluntary, producer-led programs like the beef industry's Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program. "BQA works and has been successful because it was created by beef producers working with veterinarians and other animal health and well-being experts to develop guidelines based on science," he said. Unlike legislative mandates that would require an act of Congress to update, Alexander said BQA standards are updated regularly to reflect the latest science. "No one cares more about the health and well-being of animals than the men and women who work each day raising them," he said. "Together, we will work to stop this illconceived attempt to take animal care decisions out of the hands of farmers and ranchers and veterinarians."

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49799


Page 10

Heartland Express - Heartland Showpig Shootout Map

April 26, 2012

1

56th St.

3/4 mile N. on Ave. N

39th St.

14

35th St.

18

13

4

US Hwy 30

31st St. US Hwy 30

2nd Ave.

29th St.

Buffalo County Expo Center

25th St.

24th St. 8

17

6 12

9

2

oad Railr

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Ave. N

20

19

Ave. I

Ave. C

3

Central Ave.

5th Ave.

8th Ave.

Railroad

11th St.

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1

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April 26, 2012

Heartland Express - Heartland Showpig Shootout Map

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Page 12

Heartland Express - Market

April 26, 2012

By David M. Fiala

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown

Country Grain Prices as of 4/24/12 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Sidney St.Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon Hemingford

New Corn

$6.11 $5.89 $6.02 $5.92 $6.01 $5.99 $6.14 $6.06 $5.72 $6.14 $5.91 $6.06 $5.97 $6.04 $5.91 $6.11 $5.95 $6.05 $6.13 $6.04 $5.96 $5.95 $6.15 $6.06 $6.07 $5.88 $6.13 $6.08 $5.88 $6.08 $6.03 $5.95 $5.99 $6.04 671 Above Above Above

$5.07 $4.88 $4.96 $4.97 $4.97 $4.98 $5.10 $5.05 $4.79 $5.07 $4.98 $5.05 $5.04 $5.04 $4.96 $5.04 $5.01 $5.03 $5.03 $5.00 $4.96 $5.05 $5.02 $5.02 $5.05 $4.95 $4.99 $5.04 $4.92 $5.00 $5.04 $4.91 $4.95 $4.97

Beans

New Beans

$13.77 $13.89 $13.92 $13.53 $13.95 $13.91 $14.31 $14.04

$12.72 $12.68 $12.72 $12.37 $12.72 $12.56 $13.04 $12.70

$13.77 $13.53 $14.11

$12.69 $12.37 $12.75

$13.97 $13.53 $13.94

$14.00 $12.37 $12.70

$13.80 $14.41 $13.75 $13.59 $13.86 $14.28 $13.92 $13.87

$12.67 $13.17 $12.50 $12.42 $12.57 $12.92 $12.80 $12.62

$13.91 $14.02

$12.77 $12.70

$13.73 $13.94 $13.89 $13.98

$12.70 $12.82 $12.67 $12.73

Northern $42.00 Oil Flowers Spring Wheat $7.04 Spring Wheat $7.09

Wheat

New Wheat

$6.10

$5.85

$5.53

$5.32

$5.88 $6.53 $5.88 $5.77

$5.69 $6.43 $5.69 $5.56

$5.53 $6.04 $5.93 $5.98 $5.53

$5.37 $5.87 $5.72 $5.73 $5.37

$5.53 $5.32 $6.03 $5.79 $5.63

$5.32 $5.67 $6.03 $5.62 $5.42 $5.64

$5.89 $5.53

$5.72 $5.38

$5.98 $5.53

$5.73 $5.33

$6.09 $6.00

$5.98 $5.72

$50.00 Pinto Oil Flowers (new) Spring Wheat(new) $4 Spring Wheat(new)

New Milo

$5.68

$4.91

$5.55

$4.51

$5.55

$4.51

$5.75

$4.71

$5.63

$4.52

$5.48 $5.46

$4.36 $4.45

$5.53 $5.73

Corn trade has mostly worked sideways in choppy trading this week. The July contract is 2 cents lower on the week and we have seen fairly wide mixed daily trading ranges. December corn is 2 higher on the week. New crop corn has lost significant ground to new crop beans due to a big surge higher in beans this week. On the chart the nearby July contract is below the 10-day moving average at $6.10, and the 20-day at $6.23, and then bigger overhead resistance is at $6.65, which is the 200day moving average. Support is at $6, then the $5.93 contract low. The chart has a negative slant, and spread trade has limited corn, despite the tight fundamental situation. The trade continues to act like it is not too concerned about tight supplies in the futures markets, while basis has remained strong in the interior and at the gulf indicating that demand for old crop corn remains firm. Ethanol production decreased slightly week on the week, but remains ahead of USDA projections. Producer margins are slightly in the red, while blender margins remain good. The USDA has made significant confirmations of old and new crop export sales this week to China and unknown destinations. Over 500,000 metric tons of old and 700,000 metric tons of new have been confirmed. Export inspections slipped on the week to the 29.5 million bushel range. The weekly export sales were within expectations of 550,000 to 1 million metric tons with 645,000 metric tons of old crop, and 180,600 metric tons of new crop. But we do not see this as a big enough number to alone support the bull argument. Planting progress remains ahead of normal, but at 28% was not as far along as expected. Progress is expected to be hindered by the weather this week. 9% of the corn was declared emerged this week, which is 7% ahead of normal. Hedgers call with questions and to discuss your 2012 and 2013 hedging plan. This is a confusing year, you have us to consult with.

Dec. 12 518 560

July 2012 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .6.036 High . . .6.072 Low . . . .6.022 Close . . .6.046 Change .+.036

The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

Crop Basis Charts from Reporting Locations as of 4/24/12 Corn Basis

Soybean Basis

Wheat Basis

Sorghum Basis

$4.87 $4.74

Soybeans

Wheat

July 12 580 632

to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options.

$701 $7.11

Corn

Support: Resistance

Milo

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience

The wheat trade has chopped along with corn market. Chicago is up 3 cents on the week, KC is up 7, and Minneapolis is down 8. The US crop is well ahead of normal and so far the only cold weather damage has been in the east, although Monday may have created some isolated hard wheat damage. Western Europe has raised winter kill estimates but dryness has been eased by showers. Central and Eastern Europe have seen well above normal temps, and are forecasted to be dry into May. July Chicago wheat remains below the short term moving averages, with the lowest at $6.27 (the 10-day) and $6.38 (the 20-day), the 200-day remains elevated at $6.98. The chart remains negative but the large short position will remain very vulnerable to a bullish weather surprise. Speculative long liquidation due to losses remains the biggest downside risk. The KC/Chicago spread has come off fresh lows of a dime, moving back to 15 cents. The Chicago wheat contract is at a 25 cent premium to corn, which could discourage feeding if it sticks around. On Monday the USDA reported overall crop conditions for winter wheat at 62% good to excellent, which is much better than last year. However, there were sharp declines in parts of the soft wheat belt. Spring wheat planting is at 57% complete, which is well ahead of normal. The crop is 42% headed, which is also well ahead of normal. The export market has been fairly quiet as far as big tenders go, but the US remains the price leader. The Ukraine reduced expectations for their crop to 11 to 14 million metric tons, from last year’s 22.3 million metric tons. Australian exports are at record pace. Export inspections were up to 24.4 million bushels, which keeps shipments well ahead of pace. The weekly export sales were just over the top end of expectations at 735,000 metric tons. We need a trend of good weekly sales to help turn wheat out of our bear market. Hedgers call with questions.

Support: Resistance

Chicago 599 661

K City 622 668

Minneapolis 748 832

July 2012 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . . .6.274 High . . . .6.312 Low . . . .6.244 Close . . .6.300 Change . .+.034

The soy complex has surged higher this week due to upward chart momentum along with fresh reductions in South American production estimates. On the week July futures are 27 higher and November futures are 27 higher. Nearby meal is $8 higher and bean oil is down 25 points. The soy complex has gained relative to corn again, and it is running out of time to secure additional acres from row crops. The trade will also be watching potential double crop oilseed acres, as sunflower acreage behind wheat may jump as well. The chart is supportive with July trading above the 10-day moving average, at 14.40, as well as the 20-day at $14.27, and then the 200-day at 13.01 would be next support. The trade has pressed into new contract highs for the move, and Wednesday’s spike high at $14.97 will be resistance for now. November beans have moved above their 10-day and 20-day moving averages at 13.54, and $13.57. Harvest progress continues to move along in South America with mostly disappointing yields. Argentina saw a late frost on double crop acres, and estimates continued to slide for South America. Export inspections slipped to 12.05 million on the week, but still ahead of the pace needed to reach USDA expectations. Vegeoil prices have edged lower, but overall tight stocks will continue to support the complex, especially as we move beyond palm harvest. Chinese crush margins have improved with the strong product prices which should encourage further imports. South American offers for summer are not competitive with the US, which will limit downside. Chinese intake of beans is up 13% year on year. Soybean exports were at the high end of expectations of 800,000 to 1.3 million metric tons with 926,000 metric tons of old crop sales, and 483,000 metric tons of new crop sales. Meal sales were above expectations coming in just over 221,000 tons and soybean oil exports were at the low end at 700 metric tons. Hedgers call with questions, we favor using this move to get a bigger portion of new crop priced and get some options under everything maybe before the month is over.

Support: Resistance

July 1392 1467

July Meal 379 401

July Oil 5794 5820

May 2012 Soybeans (CBOT) - Daily Chart Open . . .14.746 High . . .14.810 Low . . .14.664 Close . .14.742 Change .-0.016


April 26, 2012

Heartland Express

Page 13

Pew research: U.S. New Global Leader in Clean Energy Investment Global clean energy finance and investment grew to $263 billion in 2011, a 6.5 percent increase over the previous year, according to new research released by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Among Group of Twenty (G-20) nations, the United States, under President Obama's administration, reclaimed the top spot from China, which led the global clean energy race since 2009. Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and India were also among the nations that most successfully attracted private investments last year. "Clean energy investment, excluding research and development, has grown by 600 percent since 2004, on the basis of effective national policies that create market certainty," said Phyllis Cuttino, director of Pew's Clean Energy Program. Cuttino said the increase was due in part to the number of countries that have implemented effective national policies to support the clean energy market. "In the United States, which attracted $48 billion last year, investors took advantage of the country's stimulus programs before they expired at the end of 2011, as well as the production tax credit for electricity from renewable energy, which is to end this December," Cuttino said. The stimulus plan was a key economic growth provision of the Obama administration. Among renewable technologies, solar increased globally by 44 percent, attracting $128 billion and accounting for more than half of all clean energy investment among members of the G-20. Dramatic price declines, with the cost of solar modules dropping by half in the past 12 months, fueled the activity. Wind prices also were lower in 2011.

The combination of falling prices and growing investments accelerated installation of clean energy generating capacity by a record 83.5 gigawatts (GW) in 2011. Almost 30 GW of new solar and 43 GW of wind power were deployed. Renewable power generating capacity, at 565 GW globally, was nearly 50 percent more than installed nuclear generating capacity in 2010. "The clean energy sector received its trillionth dollar of private investment just before the end of 2011, demonstrating significant growth over the past eight years," said Michael Liebreich, CEO of Bloomberg New Energy Finance, Pew's research partner. "Solar installations drove most of the activity last year as the falling price of photovoltaic modules, now 75 percent lower than three years ago, more than compensated for weakening clean energy support mechanisms in a number of parts of the world." China attracted $45.5 billion in clean energy investment, which spurred deployment of 20 GW of wind power, the most of any nation. Germany ranked third among the G-20 with $30.6 billion and 7.4 GW of solar power installed. Italy received $28 billion in clean energy financing last year, an increase of 38.4 percent from 2010, enabling deployment of a record of nearly 8 GW of solar generating capacity. Over the last five years, no G-20 country has experienced higher growth rates than Italy, which led the world with investment levels relative to the size of its economy. India's clean energy sector continued to flourish in 2011, with investment up 54 percent to $10.2 billion. India's "National Solar Mission," with a goal of 20 GW of power installed by 2020, helped drive the sevenfold jump in this type of energy, to $4.2 billion. Wind received $4.6 billion, and an additional

2.8 GW of capacity was installed during the year. Other key findings from the report include: " Led by 42 percent growth in the United States and 15 percent in Brazil, investment in the Americas region grew by more than 21 percent to $63.1 billion, faster than any other region. " The clean energy sector in the Asia/Oceania region increased more than 10 percent to $75 billion. Relatively flat investment in China was mitigated by sharp gains in India, Japan, and Indonesia, which were among the fastest-growing clean energy markets in the world. " The clean energy sector in the European region grew by a modest 4 percent but remains the leading destination for such investment, at $99.3 billion. Significant investment growth in Italy, the United Kingdom, and Spain helped to offset declines in other European Union member states. Germany and Italy continue to lead the world in deployment of small, distributed solar photovoltaic power installations, accounting for more than 50 percent of worldwide solar capacity additions, and 38 percent of G-20 solar technology investments. " The United States remains the leader in venture capital financing, an important measure of energy innovation, attracting $6 billion, or 70 percent of the G-20 total. Germany and China were distant followers, with $635 million and $458 million, respectively, in venture capital investments. Read the entire report, including country profiles and interactive graphics, at www.PewEnvironment.org/CleanEnergy.

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Heartland Express

April 26, 2012

Smith Among Group Defending Lean, Finely-textured Ground Beef By Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent Rep. Adrian Smith, R-Neb., is one of a 29member bipartisan coalition of Congress wanting to know what action the U.S. Department of Agriculture is taking to "correct the public record and educate consumers" about lean, finely textured beef. On Friday, the bipartisan coalition sent a letter to USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack seeking answers about what actions are being taken by the USDA. In March, the USDA reported that groundbeef sales, including trimmings, fell 11 percent to 37.7 million pounds, the smallest amount sold for that month in 10 years. USDA estimates that 42 percent of all beef eaten in the U.S. is in the form of ground beef and that Americans consume about 67 pounds of ground beef each year. According to the letter, Smith and the other members of Congress said "a great deal of misinformation has been disseminated to the public regarding the high quality lean, finely textured beef that is produced by companies like Beef Products Incorporated."

"This isn't just a problem that will impact those who produce beef; every American who buys beef could end up being harmed by this misinformation," said Smith and the other members of Congress. At the heart of the controversy, which was labeled by the media as "pink slime," was a food safety process used in ground beef production, which was criticized for being unhealthy. But, according to Nebraska beef officials, the process of using ammonia gas to kill foodborne illness caused by bacteria is safe. With Nebraska the nation's number one commercial red meat production state and one of the nation's leading cattle producing states, the ramifications of the controversy could have a negative impact on Nebraska's economy. In 2010, Nebraska led the nation in beef slaughter with 6.9 million head and in commercial red meat production at 7.1 billion pounds. In Grand Island, JBS Swift is the community's largest employer at more than 3,000 jobs. Last year, Nebraska was second in the nation in cattle on feed at 2.55 million head; second with value of all cattle and calves at $6.4

billion; and third in the number of cattle and calves at 6.2 million head. Last month, Lt. Gov. Rick Sheehy toured the Beef Products Inc. plant in South Sioux City, along with the governors of Texas, Iowa and Kansas and the lieutenant governor of South Dakota. Beef Products Inc. is the main producer of the product and the processed used, but the use of ammonium hydroxide to change the acidity of the beef and kill bacteria is being criticized. The company suspended operations at plants in Texas, Kansas and Iowa this week, affecting 650 jobs, but it defends its product as safe. Smith, who serves as co-chair of the Modern Agriculture Caucus, said, "America's beef producers continue to demonstrate they are dedicated to providing the highest quality, safest, and most affordable food in the world." "The continued success of agriculture, and in turn, the long term safety and security of our nation's food supply depends on our unwavering commitment to science-based public policy," Smith said.

Cowboy And Gearhead Wellfleet Youth Enjoys a Variety of Activities Jaden Clark is a cowboy and a gearhead. The 17 year old Wellfleet resident loves to ride bucking horses and rope, but he also loves to fix up motorcycles. He’s in his second year of competition in the Nebraska State High School Rodeo Association, where he rides saddle broncs and barebacks and is a tie-down roper and team roper. But he’s just as comfortable with engines, gaskets and carburetors. He’s fixed up two bikes; one in bad shape from a crash, and one that’s 30 years old, to running condition. Jaden doesn’t have his motorcycle license yet, but “they both go fast,” he grins. Clark, a junior at Medicine Valley High School in Curtis, loves variety in school, too. He competes in a different sport each year. His freshman year it was wrestling and track. He tried basketball as a sophomore, and this year, he will run long distance races for track. Next year, it might be football. But football will interfere with his favorite sport, rodeo. If something tickles his fancy, he’ll do it. “When people say, ‘that’s not my thing, or that’s weird,’ or they’re afraid to do stuff, I’m not afraid. There’s not much I won’t try.” He also raises Alpacas. His herd of three is part of his FFA project. Jaden hopes to buy two more, and breed them. But he’ll check on profitability before he gets too far in. As for crazy things, riding saddle broncs and barebacks can easily be construed as crazy. But

Jaden loves it. “They can be tough sports, but the feeling you get when you ride your bronc and the feeling you get when you have a god ride, there’s nothing else like it. I like riding broncs.” Jaden qualified for the 2011 Nebraska State High School Finals Rodeo in the saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping and team roping, and won the saddle bronc riding championship. He is also captain of his school’s Academic Quiz Bowl, and this is the second year his team has qualified for state competition. After graduation, he hopes to attend the University of Wyoming and go into the school’s Air Force ROTC program. He’ll also compete on their rodeo team. Jaden also is considering following in his brother and dad’s footsteps. His dad, JR, and his brother, Wyatt, were both president of the National High School Rodeo Association when they were in high school. Jaden may run for the office this summer during the national rodeo, held in Rock Springs, Wyo. But whatever he does, it won’t be boring. Jaden is the son of JR and Julie Clark.

Jaden Clark rides his saddle bronc during the Nebraska State High School Finals Rodeo in Hastings in 2011. He is the 2011 Nebraska State High School Saddle Bronc Riding champion. Photo by JJJ Photo

FREE FARM INSURANCE COULD SAVE TAXPAYERS UP TO $18.5 BILLION Continued from page 1

along with exorbitant administrative costs and agents' commissions. The result is that one taxpayer dollar goes to insurance companies and agents for every dollar sent to farmers to pay claims. The cost to taxpayers of the current crop insurance system has soared from $2.4 billion in 2001 to nearly $9 billion in 2011 as a result of high commodity prices and the generous premium subsidies that lead farmers to buy the most expensive insurance available. A new Government Accountability Office report found that one farm business that had insured its cotton, tomatoes and wheat across two counties received $1.8 million in premium subsidies in 2010, while the average farmer received only $5,339. More stunning, GAO estimated that taxpayers sent $309,000 to insurance companies to administer the policies for this one large business alone.

The Congressional Budget Office predicts that taxpayers will spend $90 billion over the next 10 years on the highly subsidized insurance program " far more than $66 billion the CBO predicts will be spent on traditional farm subsidies. Instead of trying to save money and fix the egregious flaws of current insurance programs detailed by Babcock in a previous paper, some farm lobbyists and their allies in Congress have proposed layering an entirely new entitlement program on top of this ballooning insurance scheme. It would guarantee business income for the same large and profitable farm businesses that have been collecting the lion's share of federal farm subsidies, and it would add $30 billion to the $90 billion taxpayers are already spending to insure farm business income.

Conservation, food, research and other critical farm bill programs would be have to be cut in order to fund the new mandate. "Dr. Babcock's analysis shows that Congress could craft a farm bill that provides an effective farm safety net, protects food stamps, fully funds conservation programs and invests in healthy food while still meeting deficit reduction targets " said Craig Cox, EWG's senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources. "That is the farm bill that taxpayers and consumers want." For more information, go online to www.ewg.org.


April 26, 2012

Heartland Express

Page 15

Rainwater Basin Receives Federal Funding for NRCS Conservation Program Lincoln, Neb. - Nebraska landowners with farm ground located in the Rainwater Basin wetland complex in south central Nebraska may be eligible for wetland restoration assistance from the Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program (WREP), said Craig Derickson, state conservationist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Lincoln, Neb. The program aims to restore and protect wetlands in an active agricultural landscape by allowing center pivots to cross WREP wetland easements, ensuring wetlands are compatible with the agriculture production in this region. The deadline to apply for this assistance is May 25. The Rainwater Basin wetland complex was one of three Nebraska projects approved to receive WREP funding to restore, enhance and protect high-priority wetlands and improve wildlife habitat. WREP is a voluntary conservation program that is carried out through partnership agreements with state and local governments and non-governmental organizations. NRCS administers the program. NRCS will be working with the Rainwater Basin Joint Venture (RWBJV) and the Nebraska Association of Resources Districts (NARD) to carry out wetland restoration projects.

Derickson said, “NRCS is pleased to partner with the Rainwater Basin Joint Venture and the NARD to help landowners and managers keep working lands working, while also restoring and enhancing critical Rainwater Basin wetlands.” This WREP was developed in response to the particular agriculture and habitat conditions in the Rainwater Basin landscape. Of the 1,861 wetlands that still functioned in this region in 2010, over two-thirds were intersected by center pivots. “Allowing these lands, when eligible, to be enrolled into a conservation program provides an opportunity that benefits both agriculture and habitat,” says RWBJV coordinator Andy Bishop. He notes that the WREP funding will encourage more landowners to apply for restoration projects. Through the WREP during fiscal year 2012, over $500,000 is available to purchase 150 acres of conservation easements within the Rainwater Basin. The WREP could provide $2.5 million total funding over three years. In addition to the WREP funds, $10,000 from the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, and $50,000 from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will be contributed to the wetland restoration projects. The Rainwater Basin wetland complex encompasses 21 counties in south central

Nebraska (see map). This area is the narrowest portion of the migration route known as the Central Flyway. The Rainwater Basin wetlands provide a crucial stopover where millions of ducks and geese gather each spring to rest and feed on their way to their northern breeding grounds. In addition to millions of ducks and geese, an estimated 200,000 to 300,000 shorebirds stop in the Rainwater Basin wetlands each spring. Throughout much of the twentieth century, wetlands were drained for farming, bisected by roads, or silted in by erosion. Currently, only about 10% of the original Rainwater Basin wetlands remain. The WREP funding will help landowners restore some of these vital wetlands. Landowners can choose to enroll eligible land into a permanent or a 30-year easement. Landowners retain ownership and access to the land and may be able to generate income from NRCS-approved grazing, haying, or recreation opportunities. Interested farmers and ranchers with land located in the approved project area may apply for assistance at their local NRCS offices or by contacting the Rainwater Basin Joint Venture at (308) 382-8112. Additional information about WREP is also available at http://www.ne.nrcs .usda.gov/wrep_index.html.

Nebraska Youth Range Camp By Shelly Taylor, Director Do you know a young person age 14-18 that is interested in learning more about the outdoors? If so, encourage them to attend the 49th annual Nebraska Youth Range Camp that is sponsored by the Nebraska Section Society for Range Management. It will be held June 11th – 15th, 2012 at the Nebraska State 4-H Camp in Halsey. The Nebraska Youth Range Camp consists of a four-and-a-half day dynamic curriculum that appeals to students with a wide array of interests including, but not limited to, rangeland management, conservation, ecology, animal science, and wildlife. With nearly 50 years to perfect and evolve this curriculum, every student, no matter what prior experience they have, will learn substantial information that will help them become more aware of Nebraska’s most prevalent landuse. Rangelands cover nearly 50% of Nebraska and approximately 60% of the United States. These numbers convey the dominance of this landuse, but recently there has been several political issues regarding the management of these rangelands which further emphasizes the reason it is imperative for us to educate the youth so we may enable them to become proficient and effective leaders in resource management as well as educated voters. The students that attend this camp will be actively involved with field activities, lectures, hand-on experience, and recreational leadership and team-building activities that are all led by up to 20 of Nebraska’s most respected and dedicated leaders, teachers, and professionals from various

Ranch tour at the Hamilton Ranch during the 2011 Range Camp.

agencies, colleges, and universities. Each student will be sent home with a binder that is filled with educational materials. Financial sponsorship is available! Every student that attended last year received a substantial level of sponsorship. Interested

individuals can find more information, the Range Camp application, and the brochure by visiting the Nebraska Society for Range Management website at www.nesrm.org and then clicking on the Nebraska Youth Range Camp link on the left of the page.

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April 26, 2012

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Oh, Nebraska! Investing in Little Towns and Wide Open Spaces through USDA Rural Development – Video Released Lincoln Neb. – USDA Rural Development Nebraska State Director Maxine Moul has released “Oh, Nebraska! Investing in Little Towns and Wide Open Spaces through USDA Rural Development”, a video depicting the array of projects USDA Rural Development has funded, impacting rural Nebraskans. USDA Rural Development can build a rural community from the ground up. “It is with great pleasure that I share this video with Nebraskans,” said Moul. “I think that by

viewing the video you will find projects with which we can assist rural communities as well as our accomplishments.” The video reflects that in federal fiscal year 2011, Nebraska USDA Rural Development delivered $189 million to rural areas of the state. Programs of housing was $121.9 million, community facilities and water and wastewater $29.1 million, business $26.6 million, telecommunications $10.3 million, and distance learning and telemedicine $1.5 million. More

than $1.9 billion has been invested in rural Nebraska since the year 1996. Please view the video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjO8PA1ft1k&f eature=youtu.be. The video was produced and directed by State Director Maxine Moul. The music “Nebraska” was provided by the Marcy Brothers of Hay Springs, Nebraska.

Timing Critical to Treating Stripe Rust in Wheat By Noel Mues, Extension Educator, Furnas County A survey of wheat fields in southeast and south central Nebraska on April 18 showed that stripe rust is widespread in this region. Fields were surveyed in seven counties (Saline, Jefferson, Thayer, Nuckols, Webster, Adams, and Clay). Stripe rust was found in all counties and in nearly all fields surveyed. Incidence (percentage of diseased plants) ranged from trace to about 50%. Severity (percentage of leaf area diseased) ranged from low to high. High severity was observed mostly on lower leaves in “hot spots” in the field and low severity was observed on upper leaves including the leaf immediately below the flag leaf. The spray window for producers to decide if they are going to use a fungicide to prevent disease development on wheat flag leaves is occurring right now instead of in May, when it more typically occurs. This week UNL Extension Plant Pathologist Stephen Wegulo, and Extension

Educator, Randy Pryor, surveyed quite a few wheat fields in Saline County and found stripe rust widespread. Stripe rust, caused by P. striiformis, normally occurs in Nebraska during cool periods in early June. It’s unusual and unfortunate to see it this early. Stripe rust develops at slightly cooler temperatures (55-75°F) than does leaf or stem rust. Once temperatures exceed 75°F, stripe rust develops slowly. Cool temperatures and moisture are more conducive to stripe rust development. The decision to apply a fungicide should be based on the amount of disease in the field, the yield potential, and the susceptibility of the variety planted. Fungicides are most effective if applied when disease levels are still low and flag leaves are out and still clean. One of the surveyed fields had high yield potential but was a susceptible hybrid with early onset of disease at high levels in the lower canopy. While the decision to spray seems appropriate, we can’t say with

certainty that it will pay to spray. That assessment will come at harvest. With stripe rust already present in many fields, it is important to note that you need a fungicide with both preventive and curative activity. Most of the grain fill period will occur in May this year instead of in June. High wheat yields are possible if adequate moisture and mild weather occurs during grain fill, the same weather that favors stripe rust. If adequate moisture occurs, double cropping opportunities will exist with an expanded growing season window that we normally don’t see. A complete list of fungicides for wheat diseases has been compiled by the North Central Regional Committee on Management of Small Grain Diseases (NCERA-184). Contact your local UNL Extension Office for more information.

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April 26, 2012

Heartland Express

Page 19

Commemorating Earth Day 2012 Farmers put nature to work to the benefit of human vitality, and their commitment to safeguarding the quality of the land, water and air is evident on Earth Day (April 22) and every day. A timely example, according to the Iowa Soybean Association (ISA), is the growth in the production and use of biodiesel, a renewable fuel made from soybean co-products. The Iowa Department of Revenue reported that the amount of pure biodiesel (B100) sold by fuel retailers in Iowa last year nearly doubled from 7.4 million gallons in 2010 to 13.9 million in 2011. Biodiesel blends comprised about 42 percent of all on-road diesel sold at the retail level in the state. Iowa is home to 13 biodiesel plants. In 2011, the state produced about 175 million gallons of biodiesel, an impressive 17 percent of the nation's total production. Advancements in farming methods have resulted in soy biodiesel having the best energy balance of commonly available fuels. It takes just one unit of energy to make 5.5 units of energy in the form of soy biodiesel. Conversely, one unit of energy is required to refine and transport just 0.8 units of petroleum fuel.

Biodiesel is just one example of the continuous improvement soybean farmers are making to safeguard environmental quality while advancing an economically viable agricultural production system. "Sustainability is defined by continually improving production systems that will over the long-term satisfy human food, fiber and fuel needs," said Roger Wolf, ISA's director of environmental programs and services. "It is also about enhancing environmental quality and the natural resource base upon which the agriculture economy depends and improving the economic viability of farm operations and overall quality of life for farmers and society as a whole." The world population is currently seven billion and is expected to surpass nine billion by 2050. If this growth coincides with an increase in personal income, the United Nations predicts that agricultural output must double to satisfy stronger demand for more dairy, fruit and meat and plant protein. The ISA said soybean farmers play a leading role in balancing the needs of nature with those of consumers. From 1987 to 2008, improved soybean productivity resulted in 26 percent less land used per bushel. At the same

time, more sustainable farming practices have enabled energy use per bushel of soybean produced to decrease by 61 percent. In addition, soybean farmers have: - Decreased soil loss by 1.17 tons per acre, or 37 percent, from 1978-2008 - Decreased soil loss per bushel during that same time by 46 percent due largely to a dramatic increase in conservation tillage - Reduced carbon emissions 22.13 pounds per acre, or 24 percent, and emissions per bushel by 35 percent over the study period - Reduced overall carbon emissions by an average of 104.23 million pounds each year since 2000. That would be the equivalent of removing more than 31,000 cars from the road each year. These accomplishments, said ISA President Dean Coleman, a farmer from Humboldt, motivate farmers to do even more. "When we see progress, we're driven to do even more," he stated. "Conserving soil and protecting and improving water quality are foundational to maintaining healthy families, communities and economies. Environmental stewardship is a role I take seriously, on Earth Day and every day."

NRDs Celebrate 40 Years of Success and Partnerships (Lincoln, NE) – Nebraska’s natural resources districts (NRDs) protect lives, property and the future of Nebraska’s natural resources through a variety of projects, programs and partnerships. Projects and programs range from flood control structures, cost-share funding, tree plantings, and water quality and quantity management. Many of these would not be possible without strong partnerships with other organizations; partnerships that provide opportunities for land owners and provide protection and conservation of Nebraska’s natural resources. Over the past 40 years Nebraska NRDs have built many different types of partnerships on a local, state and national level. Partners have become friends and are strong supporters of natural resources management. Working with agencies such as the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ), Nebraska Department of Natural Resources (NDNR), and the Natural Resources Commission, as well as citizen/environmental groups and landowners, NRDs combine projects and programs to protect Nebraska natural resources. These projects and programs provide flood control to protect lives and property, manage groundwater, prevent soil erosion, plant conservation trees and shrubs, provide education opportunities and other important conservation activities. “The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is proud to call itself a partner of the NRDs in Nebraska,” said Craig Derickson Natural Resources Conservation Service State Conservationist. “Our legacy of working with local conservation districts dates back to the days of the

dust bowl when conservation started getting national recognition. Today, times have changed, and the conservation mission has become more complex. Natural resource conservation at the NRD level now involves policy making and governance of issues that far exceed the scope of typical soil and water conservation, especially in issues such as groundwater management,” said Derickson. The USDA NRCS is currently working with several NRDs across the state to leverage funding to acquire LiDAR coverage. LiDAR, which stands for Light Detection and Ranging, combines Global Positioning Systems (GPS) with a laser scanner. LiDAR aims a laser beam from an aircraft. It then measures the laser’s return to determine elevations resulting in the efficient collection of highly accurate surface-elevation data for large geographic areas. This information is then used to help restore wetlands and design conservation practices like terraces. This technology can be used by both the NRCS and NRDs to help conserve natural resources across Nebraska. “The NRDs have also been a key partner by serving as the local sponsor of the watershed projects NRCS has developed across Nebraska. As the local sponsor, the NRDs have worked with area landowners to obtain land rights needed to complete watershed projects,” Derickson said. “Nebraska is fortunate to have had leaders with the vision to establish natural resources districts (NRD’s) some 40 years ago,” said Derickson. “NRDs are unique to Nebraska because they are governed by locally-elected boards and are based on watershed boundaries that go beyond traditional county lines. The NRD system gives us an advantage – the “Nebraska Advantage” - when

it comes to managing natural resources. NRDs rely on locally-elected conservation board members who have the ability, the heart, and the motivation to care for our natural resources,” said Derickson. The NARD, the trade association for Nebraska's 23 natural resources districts, works with individual NRDs to protect lives, protect property and protect the future of Nebraska’s natural resources. 2012 marks the 40th Anniversary of Nebraska’s unique Natural Resources District system. NRDs are local government entities with broad responsibilities to protect our natural resources. Major Nebraska river basins form the boundaries of the 23 NRDs, enabling districts to respond best to local conservation and resource management needs.

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Page 20

Heartland Express

April 26, 2012

Farm and Ranch’s

HEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Dedicated to the Livestock Industry

Grass Tetany... Fast Growing Grass Can Mean Problems matter basis, with no pure alfalfa hay in the Forage Library qualifying as tetany-prone hay. Besides Mg, minerals such as potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) can contribute to grass tetany. A so-called tetany ratio, (K)/(Ca + Mg) can be calculated for forages. If this ratio is greater than 2.2, the forage can be classified as tetanyprone. The tetany ratio is calculated on an equivalent weight basis (that is, does not use the percentage or ppm as shown in the feed analysis report, but rather uses the amount of each element corrected for molecular weight.) Thus, the formula is: (K concentration/39) / (Ca concentration/20) + (Mg concentration/12.1) Treatment of grass tetany is difficult because of the rapidness with which the disease progresses (within hours). Be prepared to respond on your own, help may be too late in arriving. Commercial preparations of Mg solutions for injection under the skin are available. Intravenous injection is also an option, however, rapid delivery can be harmful to cardiac function. Administration of Mg enemas is another possible emergency treatment. Keeping stress to a minimum is critical with grass tetany. Treat effected cattle, increase the supplemental Mg of the remaining animals’ diet (2 oz of MgO per head per day), quietly remove the herd to more mature pastures or legume mixed pastures, or to a location where they can be fed hay and supplemental Mg. Be prepared for this disease by taking preventative measures and by keeping supplies on hand in case you need to treat animals. The best cure is prevention. Keep daily Mg supplied to the cattle when tetany problems are anticipated. Contact your veterinarian to discuss a herd health program and for help with specific incidences of grass tetany.

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Mature cattle grazing pasture with rapidly growing grass are sometimes found to be afflicted with a disease called grass tetany. It is characterized by an uncoordinated gait (grass staggers), convulsions, coma, and death. The primary cause is limited dietary intake of magnesium (Mg) leading to hypomagnesemia (low blood Mg) in the cow. Cows nearing calving and up to two months post-calving are most susceptible as they must draw on feed and body reserves to supply minerals for milk production. Tetany is rarely observed in younger cattle. In sheep it is not a common problem, but may occur in ewes in the first few weeks after lambing. Tetany-prone pastures are typified by rapidly growing grass with a slow plant uptake of Mg from the soils. This leads to succulent forage with a low Mg content (less than 0.12%). Most tetany episodes occur in the months approaching spring and on into the growing season. Heavy nitrogen fertilization, high soil potassium levels, and cool, rainy weather accentuate the problem. If you can delay the use of tetany-prone pastures by mother cows until forage growth is less lush or include dry forages with safe levels of Mg (0.2 to 0.25%) along with pasture, it will help decrease the incidence of grass tetany. Graze less susceptible animals (steers, heifers, dry cows, cows with calves over four months old) on these tetany-prone pastures. Cattle that develop grass tetany are prone to repeat occurrences so cull these animals out of your herd. Planting legumes along with grasses can help increase Mg content of the pasture diet. Although grass tetany is a problem in mineral metabolism, preventing it is not always possible just by providing a trace mineral supplement (with or without salt). Of

course, making trace minerals available to livestock is certainly recommended in order to satisfy the daily requirement for essential minerals under normal circumstances. The problem in trying to prevent grass tetany with a mineral mix is inconsistent consumption of supplements, especially on large pastures. Try using a trace mineral mix with high Mg available through your veterinarian or visit your local feed supply store for other alternatives. Be sure to evaluate cost and effectiveness of any supplement you choose for the specifically intended use. Loose mineral mixes, compared to solid blocks, are more uniformly consumed and the amount eaten can be monitored on a weekly basis. Feed minerals out of a strategically placed weather resistant container. Alter the location of the mineral mix to help distribute your cattle more evenly around the pasture. This will help with manure distribution (natural fertilizer) and give more uniform grazing of the forage (promotes healthy pastures). Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a common form of Mg however it is not very palatable. Try mixing MgO with dry molasses to make it more attractive to your cattle. Fortifying the drinking water with Mg is an alternative to mineral mixes. MgO is insoluble in water, so make sure you use the proper amount of a soluble form so that toxic amounts are not consumed. Supplement levels up to 0.25 lb/day are not toxic to cattle. However, Mg at 0.4 to 0.8 lb/day has resulted in deleterious effects. The National Research Council has established maximum tolerable levels of Mg for beef cattle at 0.4% of the ration. Typically, harvested forages (especially grasses) are not rich in Mg. Forages with less than 0.12% Mg are considered tetany-prone, while those with 0.12 to 0.18% Mg are marginal and 0.2 to 0.25% Mg are safe. The range of Mg in the hay surveyed was 0.06 to 0.36% on a dry

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April 26, 2012

Heartland Expres - Market

Page 21

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report Week Ending: 4/21/2012

Weekly Ag Market Breakdown marketing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience to provide customers FuturesOne President and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. and Chief FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des company, FuturesOne, is a Moines and at the Chicago Board of full service risk Trade. You may contact David via email management and futures at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1brokerage firm. A primary 800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful on the web at www.futuresone.com. agricultural marketing advice via daily, Everyone should always understand the weekly, and monthly analysis of the risk of loss and margin needed when domestic and global markets. trading futures or futures options. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management The information contained herein is solutions and will also actively manage gathered from sources we believe to be pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and reliable but cannot be guaranteed. management services for speculative Opinions expressed are subject to change accounts. David and his staff at without notice. There is significant risk in FuturesOne draw on decades of trading futures.

By David M. Fiala

MARKET: Loup City Commission Co. – Loup City; North Platte Livestock Auction – North Platte Receipts: 2,690 Last Week: 12,577 Last Year: 3,350 Compare to last week’s moderate movement, steers and heifer sold mostly steady with instances 2.00 lower on 600 to 800 lbs heifers. Demand was moderate to good for the short supply. Supply will continue to short with most auction markets in their summer sale schedule holding sales every two weeks. Nebraska slaughter cattle sold higher with live sales trading mostly 1.00 higher from 123.00-124.50 and dressed sales sold 5.00 higher from 199.00-200.00. Cattle on Feed: On feed 102%; Placed 94%; Marketed 96%. Supply this week included 55 percent steers; 43 percent heifers with the balance on bull calves. Near 71 percent of the offerings were over 600 lbs.

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 47 . . . . . .358-379 . . . . . 360 . . .202.00-204.00 . . . . . . 202.18 20 . . . . . . .430-449 . . . . .441 . . .202.00-205.00 . . . . . .203.25 26 . . . . . . .463-491 . . . . .476 . . .187.00-196.00 . . . . . .192.47 71 . . . . . . .503-547 . . . . .523 . . .184.50-192.50 . . . . . .187.97 67 . . . . . . .558-598 . . . . .582 . . .178.00-186.00 . . . . . .180.44 37 . . . . . . .601-641 . . . . .608 . . .165.00-179.00 . . . . . .172.04 68 . . . . . . .651-671 . . . . .662 . . .157.00-169.00 . . . . . .163.41 124 . . . . . .715-745 . . . . .727 . . .150.00-166.00 . . . . . .158.96 335 . . . . . .800-831 . . . . .818 . . .146.50-147.80 . . . . . .146.99

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 5 . . . . . . . . .388 . . . . . . . .388 . . . . . . .184.00 . . . . . . . .184.00 24 . . . . . . .413-433 . . . . . .422 . . . .176.50-178.50 . . . . .177.37 36 . . . . . . .461-495 . . . . . .476 . . . .171.00-178.00 . . . . .173.62 50 . . . . . . .502-541 . . . . . .518 . . . .162.00-175.75 . . . . .169.91 7 . . . . . . . . .539 . . . . . . . .539 . . . . . . .150.00 . . . . . . . .150.00 58 . . . . . . .550-597 . . . . . .574 . . . .154.00-164.50 . . . . .158.51 40 . . . . . . .605-639 . . . . . .614 . . . .155.00-160.50 . . . . .156.57 140 . . . . . .654-691 . . . . . .679 . . . .143.00-150.00 . . . . .147.88 23 . . . . . . . .689 . . . . . . . .689 . . . . . . .138.00 . . . . . . . .138.00l 99 . . . . . . .701-728 . . . . . .721 . . . .140.25-144.10 . . . . .142.41 273 . . . . . .754-783 . . . . . .779 . . . .139.00-139.85 . . . . .139.44 15 . . . . . . . .823 . . . . . . . .823 . . . . . . .135.25 . . . . . . . .135.25 26 . . . . . . . .933 . . . . . . . .933 . . . . . . .129.00 . . . . . . . .129.00

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2 Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 21 . . . . . . . .344 . . . . . . . .344 . . . . . . .201.00 . . . . . . . . 201.00 17 . . . . . . . .444 . . . . . . . .444 . . . . . . .195.00 . . . . . . . .195.00 7 . . . . . . . . .467 . . . . . . . .467 . . . . . . .160.00 . . . . . . . .160.00 7 . . . . . . . . .508 . . . . . . . .508 . . . . . . .170.00 . . . . . . . .170.00 54 . . . . . . .550-585 . . . . . .578 . . . .153.00-178.00 . . . . .173.90 57 . . . . . . . .637 . . . . . . . .637 . . . . . . .165.25 . . . . . . . .165.25 13 . . . . . . . .697 . . . . . . . .697 . . . . . . .152.50 . . . . . . . .152.50 44 . . . . . . . .809 . . . . . . . .809 . . . . . . .145.50 . . . . . . . .145.50 14 . . . . . . . .947 . . . . . . . .947 . . . . . . .130.25 . . . . . . . .130.25 61 . . . . . . . .954 . . . . . . . .954 . . . . . . .131.80 . . . . . . . .131.80

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 4/20/2012 Eastern Nebraska: Compared to last week alfalfa, grass hay, ground/delivered alfalfa and Dehy pellets sold steady. Grass hay and ground/delivered alfalfa continues to move at a slow and steady pace for right now. Some cattlemen are buying limited supply of hay hoping there current supply will get them to summer turn out pastures. Few, small squares of grass hay has moved to horse owners in the bigger towns and out of state. Light to moderate rain showers last weekend in most of the state. Also hail and strong winds came with it in some areas. Some corn planting has been noted in Eastern and Central parts of the state. It appears that more acres of grass and alfalfa will be torn up for row crop production this spring. Prices are dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Prices from the most recent reported sales. Nebraska Department of Agriculture has a hay and forage directory available at www.agr.state.ne.us click on Hay Information. Northeast Nebraska: Alfalfa: Premium large square bales 225.00. Good large rounds 135.00150.00, few fair large rounds 115.00. Grass Hay: Good large rounds 95.00-100.00; fair large rounds 70.0080.00; small square bales 145.00-160.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 290.00-320.00. Platte Valley of Nebraska: Alfalfa: Good large rounds 140.00-150.00, Fair to good large rounds 130.00-135.00. Grass: Good large rounds 90.00100.00, Fair to good 80.00-85.00, few good large rounds 115.00 delivered. Alfalfa ground and delivered to feedlots: local hauls 180.00-185.00. Ground and

delivered corn stalks 110.00-115.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 300.00. Western Nebraska: Compared to last week: All classes trading steady to weak. Many areas are reporting limited availability or are sold out for the year. Dry and windy conditions continue in most areas. Demand light to moderate. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Most horse hay sold in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales.

Detailed Quotations Western Nebraska Alfalfa Premium Lg. Sqs 250.0090. Premium Lg. Rd. 230.00 Fair-Good Lg. Sqs. 169.00 Wheat Lg. Round Ground & Deliv. New Crop 70.00-85.00 170.00

Mixed Grass Wheat Straw 60.00-65.00 Corn Stalks 60.00-65.00

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, April 16, 2012 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 10,172; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 5,832 Head; Carcass Wt: 35-109 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 90.9; Wtd avg. Dressing: 50.7; choice or better; 96.7% YG 55.1% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 178 . . . .under 55 lbs . . . . . .38.6 . . . . . . .370.00 - 460.00 . . . . . . . .400.34 480 . . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .59.9 . . . . . . .320.00 - 340.00 . . . . . . . .333.19 1,966 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .70.8 . . . . . . .289.77 - 340.00 . . . . . . . .318.87 2,514 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .81.2 . . . . . . . .299.98 - 341.20 . . . . . . . .323.62 4,335 . . .over 85 lbs . . . . . .97.5 . . . . . . . .295.10 - 325.94 . . . . . . . .308.71

Lean hog trade has chopped along this week in our sideways to lower trend. Concerns about demand weigh on trade along with our solid weekly slaughter numbers. So far trade is mixed on the week. The chart picture is back to negative with the trade below the 10-day and 20-day moving averages at 8872, and 9044. Support is a big question mark at the moment with trade below long term lows. Speculators have moved away from hogs at the moment. Cash prices have been steady to soft but packer coverage is seen to be declining as production eases seasonally. The pork cutout has been erratic but is showing some signs of improvement for big grilling items. Export demand will become more of question mark with China beginning to stockpile pork to improve negative feeding margins domestically. Beef and Chicken prices remain elevated which should give pork an opportunity to build market share especially with plentiful stocks. Cold storage supplies are elevated which should offset a seasonal decline in production near term which has been easing along quietly.

Support: Resistance

Apr. 12 8515 9005

Jun. 12 8635 9045

June 2012 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open . . .87.700 High . . .87.700 Low . . .87.000 Close . .87.575 Change .+1.025

Head . . . . . . . . . .Wt . . . . . . . . .Avg Wt . . . . . . . .PriceAvg . . . . . . . . . . . .Price 7 . . . . . . . . .435 . . . . . . . .435 . . . . . . .171.00 . . . . . . . .171.00 22 . . . . . . .463-496 . . . . . .476 . . . .159.00-164.50 . . . . .161.23 10 . . . . . . . .642 . . . . . . . .642 . . . . . . .143.75 . . . . . . . .143.75 60 . . . . . . . .758 . . . . . . . .758 . . . . . . .133.50 . . . . . . . .133.50

Look for more news @ www.myfarmandranch.com 5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 4/22/12

Confirmed: 108,802 Week Ago: 107,068 Year Ago: 118,558

Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,776 . . . . . . . . .1,250-1,515 . . . . . . . . . . .121.00-127.00 1,375 . . . . . . . . . . .123.97 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11,394 . . . . . . . .1,200-1,470 . . . . . . . . . . .121.00-125.00 1,345 . . . . . . . . . . .123.20 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14,672 . . . . . . . .1,075-1,415 . . . . . . . . . . .118.00-124.50 1,278 . . . . . . . . . . .122.05 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .992 . . . . . . . . . .1,100-1,350 . . . . . . . . . . .120.00-122.00 1,167 . . . . . . . . . . .120.61 Weighted Averages Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,932 . . . . . . . . .1,100-1,355 . . . . . . . . . . .120.00-126.00 1,261 . . . . . . . . . . .122.83 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,834 . . . . . . . . .1,100-1,350 . . . . . . . . . . .121.00-125.00 1,214 . . . . . . . . . . .122.75 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10,920 . . . . . . . .1,035-1,315 . . . . . . . . . . .120.00-125.00 1,157 . . . . . . . . . . .121.86 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .635 . . . . . . . . . .1,050-1,152 . . . . . . . . . . .120.00-121.00 1,078 . . . . . . . . . . .120.84 ============================================================================================================== Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) (Paid on Hot Weights) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,313 . . . . . . . . . .781-951 . . . . . . . . . . . . .193.00-200.00 891 . . . . . . . . . . . .198.57 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,567 . . . . . . . . . .775-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .193.00-200.00 874 . . . . . . . . . . . .198.83 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,329 . . . . . . . . . .784-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .192.00-200.00 885 . . . . . . . . . . . .198.35 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 . . . . . . . . . . . .790-790 . . . . . . . . . . . . .192.00-192.00 790 . . . . . . . . . . . .192.00 Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,156 . . . . . . . . . .750-968 . . . . . . . . . . . . .197.00-200.00 841 . . . . . . . . . . . .199.07 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,932 . . . . . . . . . .683-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .195.00-200.00 827 . . . . . . . . . . . .198.68 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,658 . . . . . . . . . .718-950 . . . . . . . . . . . . .194.00-200.00 837 . . . . . . . . . . . . .198.8 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .31,834 . . . . . . .1,313 . . . . . . .122.71 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .21,321 . . . . . . .1,190 . . . . . . .122.25 Dressed Del Steer . . .19,302 . . . . . . .881 . . . . . . . .198.63 Dressed Del Heifer . . .11,746 . . . . . . .835 . . . . . . . .198.88

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Week Ago Averages:

Year Ago Averages:

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .35,746 . . . . . . .1,313 . . . . . . .122.16 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .24,273 . . . . . . .1,184 . . . . . . .122.05 Dressed Del Steer . . .14,750 . . . . . . .872 . . . . . . . .195.03 Dressed Del Heifer . . .10,486 . . . . . . .811 . . . . . . . .195.38

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .35,592 . . . . . . .1,301 . . . . . . .119.29 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .30,469 . . . . . . .1,176 . . . . . . .119.01 Dressed Del Steer . . .16,710 . . . . . . .852 . . . . . . . .191.38 Dressed Del Heifer . . .15,676 . . . . . . .773 . . . . . . . .190.66

Cattle

Hogs

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1-2

Support: Resistance

June 12 10867 11807

Aug. 12 Feeder 14815 15830

Live cattle trade had a brush with BSE this week which sent futures tumbling Tuesday, but the muted reaction has helped prices stabilize, and may spur a bounce in the coming days. The June contract is $3 lower so far this week, but we may have found a bottom. Feeder Cattle contracts are $3 lower on the week, with declining corn prices and feeder cattle availability supporting the cash trade. The June chart is negative at the moment with first resistance at the $115 area, and resistance at $115.70. The cutout has been stronger this week with choice up 2.74 at $190.94, and select up $3.42 to $187.34, as retailers step up purchases. Choice continues to rebuild its premium, and the cutout moved higher in spite of the BSE scare. Boxed beef movement has improved on the week along with the higher price which is impressive, but needs to continue for another week to drum up more market bulls. The pace of export demand coming forward will remain a concern with world economic issues. Showlists are mixed this week, with some growth in the North.

Some cattle traded in Texas at $119 off $3 but that was mostly due to the huge basis overage. The remainder of the feedlots are looking for $123 to $125. Packer margins remain poor, but the cutout has helped them substantially this week. World economic concerns are also limiting speculative enthusiasm for beef in the near term. The Monthly USDA Cattle on Feed report released last Friday was in line with expectations with total numbers at 102% of a year ago. Placements were at 92%, and marketings at 94.5%. Report numbers were 102% on Feeder, placements 94%, and marketing 96%. So far, major export destinations have not suspended trade due to the BSE incident except for some isolated incidences in South Korea. Cow calf operators need to consider futures or at least options. We understand numbers are down and market items are bullish, but we are up around $160, not $130 cwt right now. Across the board everyone’s production costs are mixed, but we should be looking at $350-$600 projected profit per calf; which is something to protect/hedge.

August 2012 Feeder Cattle (CBOT)

June 2012 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart

Open .152.600 High .152.675 Low . .151.825 Close .152.300 Change +0.125

Open .112.525 High .112.775 Low . .111.900 Close .111.950 Change .-0.325 AG NEWS COMMODITIES myfarmandranch.com


Page 22

Heartland Express - FFA

April 26, 2012

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April 26, 2012

Heartland Express - FFA

Page 23

West Central FFA Chapter By Stephanie Rogers This is our third year as the West Central FFA chapter with 33 members. The West Central chapter consists of Paxton, Maywood and Sutherland and, of course, our teacher, Mrs. Katy Snyder of Maywood. To start out our year we began Range Judging. After about a month of practice we went to our first competition in Tryon, where Jason Rezek won and then went on to receive second place at state. Our junior team was the District Junior Team Champions. After state range judging, we began practicing for Livestock Judging. We qualified with a senior and junior team for State Livestock Judging. Next we went to Leadership Skills Event’s where Brett Storer received 6th gold at state in Natural Resource Speaking and our Parli Pro team received a bronze at state. Next were the CDE competitions, where we had a great showing. The AgriScience team, Karlee Schow, Brett Storer, Rhett O’Connor and Jason Rezek, won districts. The Welding team Landon Frederick, Jason Rezek, and Clay Chittick also won districts. We also qualified an Ag Mechanics team for state, and the Agronomy, Ag Sales, and Floriculture teams all received second and qualified for the State FFA Convention. Last, but definitely not least, we have State FFA. We headed to Lincoln on the morning of March 28. When we arrived, our days of competing in lots of contests and attending lots of sessions and activities had begun. When we first arrived, we checked into the Holiday Inn in

downtown Lincoln. That evening we went to our first activity, a hypnotist, where two chapter members Karlie Scott and Tyler Bollish were chosen to go up on stage and get hypnotized. That was very entertaining, to say the least. They were hypnotized to believe they were in Jamaica, on a roller coaster, on a plane, and even to think that they were geese in a corn field. Definitely something you will never forget watching. The next couple days were full of speaker sessions and competitions. We had teams compete in; Ag Communications: where Carrick Perlinger was the FFA State Champion Electronic Media , Weston Richards recived 2nd place and the team got 3rd overall, Ag Technology and Mechanics: Clay Chittick placed in the top 10, Ag Sales, AgriScience, Agronomy, Floriculture: Tyler Bollish placed 14th and team received 6th, Meat Evaluation, Junior Livestock Judging: Tyler Fear placed 6th, Senior Livestock Judging: Anna Fischer placed 20th, and Welding where Landon Frederick was the FFA State Champion Arc welder, Jason Rezek recived 8th and the team placed 4th. State was fun, and with over 3,600 other FFA kids there, it was always busy. One of the best things at state was, after all of our competitions, we went to the dance on Friday night at the UNL East Campus. But, finally it was all over and we left for home the next morning . Overall the West Central FFA chapter was quite successful for it only being our third year. Seven

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Page 24

Heartland Express - FFA

April 26, 2012

Dundy County Stratton FFA Attends State Convention On the morning of March 28th at 4:30am four members and our advisor loaded a van for the Ag Mechanics contest at the State Fairgrounds in Grand Island to kick-off the 84th Annual Nebraska State FFA convention. The other 20 members took the bus to Lincoln at a later time. Teams competing (ribbons) at convention were, farm business management (blue), agriscience (red), nursery/landscape (white), ag mechanics (white), agronomy, welding, senior livestock judging and junior livestock judging. Those medaling individually were as follows: Mitchel Shillington (4th overall) – Ag Mechanics, red Elisabeth Jensen – Agriscience, purple Kyle Newcomb - Agriscience, red Faith Stroup – Agronomy, red Morgan Jones and Ben Fox – Farm Business Management, purple Mariah McAfos – Farm Business Management, white Paige Tecker – Farm Business Management, red Kyle Newcomb and Aaron Yauney – Jr. Livestock judging, white Taylor Walker – Nursery/Landscape, blue Faith Stroup – Nursery/Landscape, white Paige Tecker – Sr. Livestock judging, red Trever Borchard – MIG welding, blue Also competing at the state convention were seniors Morgan Jones and Michaela Lutz in the job interview. It was an awesome feat to qualify both members from the same district. Morgan received a silver medal and Michaela received a gold medal. This year we had five members put forth the effort to maintain records throughout their FFA career and receive their State FFA

Degrees. Those who received their degrees were Mariah McAfoos, Paige Tecker, Tayler Jensen, Faith Stroup and Morgan Jones. While at convention members attended leadership workshops, sat in on numerous contests, attended sessions at Pershing auditorium, enjoyed a night of bowling and had a lot of fun! Upcoming events to look forward to for DCS FFA members and supporters are April 16th – Labor Auction, April 26th – officer interviews, April 30th – recognition banquet and May 16th – last day of school!

Dundy County Stratton FFA: Pictured left to right: Mariah McAfoos, Paige Tecker, Tayler Jensen, Faith Stroup and Morgan Jones

Medicine Valley FFA Wraps Up a Successful Convention By Madison Clark, Reporter The Medicine Valley FFA Chapter attended yet another successful and enjoyable State FFA Convention last week, March 28th-30th. Members competed in numerous contests, activities, and sessions throughout the convention. Members had the opportunity to attend sessions with speakers such as the National FFA secretary Jason Troendle, Teresa Scanlan, the 2011 Miss America and motivational speakers CC Vernon and Patrick Maurer. We also had a great opening session complete with a welcome from Governor Dave Heineman, who spoke about the strength of Nebraska agriculture and his dedication to stopping groups such as the Humane Society of the US and PETA from trying to control production agriculture in our state. FFA members also went to workshops, including the workshops for the Nebraska Ag Youth Institute, Social Media in Agriculture and Agriculture in Afghanistan. One of the most exciting moments of the convention this year was watching our State FFA Degree recipients cross the stage and receive their honors. Jacob Brennemann, Blake Hodson and David Nutt have finally completed four years of hard work and dedication to the FFA to earn this degree, which is the highest honor that a State association can bestow on an FFA member. We had a great turnout as far as results from the competitions go. In the Leadership Skills Events, Madison Clark received state runner-up in Creed Speaking. In Junior Public Speaking Regan Garey received a 6th place gold medal, with Jessa Lemon receiving a bronze medal. In the Career Continued on page 27

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April 26, 2012

Heartland Express - FFA

Page 25

Eustis Farnam FFA Wins 3 State Championships Eustis Farnam FFA Chapter competed at the Nebraska State FFA Convention March 28-30th, 2012 in Lincoln. The chapter won State Championships in Agronomy Judging, Meats Judging, and Jr. High Agricultural Quiz Bowl, and also competed in Jr. Livestock Judging. The Agronomy contest consists of identifying plants and seeds, both weeds and crops, by name and by life cycle; identifying insects by name, life cycle, and economic damage; identifying plant diseases and disorders by name and causal agent and damage to plant; the gen. knowledge soils exam; and identifying machinery by name. Individuals who competed for Eustis Farnam FFA were Clay Easterday, first place individual, Morgan Smith, 2nd Place individual, William Jack 21st, and Tyler Green, 25th place individual. This was Eustis Farnam’s 8th State Championship in Agronomy. Morgan Smith, senior Eustis-Farnam FFA member, said, “It felt good to be champions, after last year’s heartbreak.” The Meat’s judging contest retail meat identification; judging classes of beef, pork, and lamb, carcasses wholesale cuts and retail cuts; questions over judging classes; beef quality and yield grading; a lab practicum over pork marbling and color; and a general knowledge written exam. Individuals who competed for Eustis Farnam FFA were Garhett Nielsen 1st Place individual, Jordan Bischoff-3rd Place individual, Jared Rupp-5th place individual, Aaron Hueftle-9th Place individual, and alternate Kevin Lemon. This was Eustis Farnam’s 13th State Championship in Meat’s Judging. “Great experience going down and competing our best and coming out with a State Championship is a big thing,” says Garhett Nielsen, Eustis-Farnam Sophomore. He continued, “Placing all four of our individuals in the top ten is a great big deal.” Junior Ag. Quiz Bowl is an event that tests Students knowledge in all aspects of Agriculture including Animal Science, Plant Science, Soil

Science, Food Science, Horticulture, Turf Grass parliamentary procedures, complete 25 hours of Management, Ag Business, and FFA. Eustis community service, be involved in 10 or more Farnam had 2 teams competing. The State school or community activities outside of FFA and Champion team members were Isaac Hueftle, take a FFA General knowledge exam. The 5 Dannyl Bromander, Lane Baxter, and Mitch Head. Seniors who earned this distinction were Jordan The 2nd Eustis Farnam team didn’t place but Adkisson, Joy Larsen, Tira Redenbaugh, Shane competed very well. Those members were: Gage Robbins, and Morgan Smith. “It was an honor to Bellamy, Jessica Deterding, and Matthew walk across the stage to get our State Degrees,” Blender. “State was a good experience, I said Joy Larsen, Senior Eustis-Farnam FFA recommend everyone try FFA,” says Isaac Hueftle Chapter Secretary. “I am very proud of how our students competed 8th Grade FFA member. Hueftle also related, “The State Finals were nerve-wracking, because against excellent competition of 143 Chapters across the state.” says Chad Schimmels, Ag. every question counted.” The Eustis Farnam FFA Livestock Team Teacher of Eustis Farnam. Schimmels continued, members were Collin Thompson-Blue Ribbon, “It’s not really about 1 day, 1 competition, it’s Katie Adkisson-Red Ribbon, Austin Boller-White about the months and years of showing up to Ribbon, Marcus Wilcox, and alternate Chris practice early in the mornings and evenings. Werth. Livestock Judging is a contest where These students showed the kind of dedication to students are asked to look at 6 classes with 4 earn the title of State Champion. I would like to animals each. Students are asked to rank the personally thank my deeply devoted and animals based on their market or breeding outstanding wife, Angie and Mr. Faron characteristics. Students are also asked to Klingelhoefer for helping to coach and sponsor the evaluate 2 Keep-Cull classes of 8 animals each to teams.” Agronomy and Meats will compete at determine the best 4 animals for breeding Nationals in late October. purposes. All of these can be beef cattle, swine, or sheep. There are also questions over 3 of the judging classes and a written exam asking students general knowledge and EPD specific questions. Collin Thompson, a Freshmen in the Eustis-Farnam FFA, said, “State FFA was once again a very enjoyable trip. Our Chapter had three State Champion teams. The livestock judging team competed well with the large number of competitors. I am looking forward to next year.” 5 Eustis Farnam FFA Seniors received their State FFA Degree, which is the highest degree the State FFA can bestow on one of its members. To earn the State FFA degree, a student must work in State Degrees (LtoR): Joy Larsen, Morgan access of 1500 hours, or earn $3000 or productively invest $3000 as part of the Smith, Tira Redenbaugh, Shane Robbins, & Supervised Agriculture Experience (S.A.E) Jordan Adkisson Program. Students also have to demonstrate 10

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Page 26

Heartland Express

April 26, 2012

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inside and out. Caps, labels and slipcover plastic labels must be removed since they cannot be recycled as part of the program. They should be disposed of as solid waste. Before delivery to collection sites, containers and drums should be cleaned, rinsed and drained. Rinsate should be returned to the spray tank. Remove and properly dispose of booklets and caps from containers and remove and properly dispose of plastic shrinkwraps. Glued-on paper labels can be left on the container. Area year-around collection sites: Kearney Recycling Center, Kearney, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Area sites collecting pesticide containers on specific days: Cooperative Producers Inc., Giltner, Aug. 1-2, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Aurora Cooperative, Aurora, July 23-27, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cooperative Producers Inc., Minden, Aug. 7-9, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; accepts drums. Area sites collecting pesticide containers by appointment only: Custer County Recycling Center, Broken Bow, (308) 870-0313; accepts drums.

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Also for Home Use

• Creates better appearance of lawn & garden

Recent research continues to document that FRE-FLOTM (an established non-chemical water conditioner since 1972) increases crop quality and quantity, while saving water. Within days of planting Spring Mix salad greens. a stainless steel FRE-FLOTM unit was installed to irrigate a 135 acre field. The expected yield was 6,000 pounds per acre. When the field yielded 8,000 pounds per acre, a quick Return-on-Investment (ROI) was calculated by the agronomist. ROI for this crop was 133%, outstanding for a 60 day crop. Grapes also experienced this positive FRE-FLOTM results. The crop yield in the FRE-FLOTM area was 16% greater than in the non-FRE-FLOTM area. Crop quality also improved. The grape brix (sugar) content was 7% greater, and the grapes had firmer, healthier skin.

“Seeing a noticeable visual difference in landscaping within days made me a believer” ~ Don ~~~~~ “Hard to believe my roses showed that much improvement so fast with just water” ~ Alice ~~~~~ “Never having a water conditioning system before, I am amazed at how such a small unit can deliver such results inside the home and out.” ~ Paul

Further research has shown that the FRE-FLOTM allows more water and nutrients to reach the crop root zone. This results in a healthier, higher grade crop (with higher revenue). A sampling of crops on which FRE-FLOTM has documented successful results:

A high quality versatile unit with many practical uses; on the FARM.

Watermelon • Grapes • Corn • Alfalfa • Garlic Walnuts • Cotton • Sweet Potatoes • Onions Tomatoes • Strawberries • Cantaloupe • Broccoli

One system serves household, lawn and garden. No...magnets, chemicals, filter, electricity, salt

USING LESS WATER at FAR LESS COST FRE-FLO™ for a green environment 308-236-5399 • freflowaterne.com • freflowater.com

For additional information contact David Kindt at online at 308-236-5399 or visit FRE-FLOTM www.freflowater.com

Water Ecology of Nebraska 49635


April 26, 2012

Heartland Express

Page 27

MEDICINE VALLEY FFA... Continued from page 24 Development Events, the Floriculture Team placed 7th out of 39th teams. Individual placings are as follows: Rulon Taylor 12th, Taylor Sandoe 43rd, Riley Garey 44th, and Keith Towne 124th out of 156 individuals. In Welding, Jaden Clark placed 40th in Oxy-Acetylene, Connor Russell 42nd in SMAW, and Dallas Petersen 59th in MIG, with the team receiving 49th out of 73 teams. The Senior Livestock Selection Team placed 57th out of 71 teams. Dallas Petersen placed 54th, Blake Hodson 229th, Jacob Brennemann 262nd, and Brendan Johnsen 263rd out of 284 individuals. In Food Science, Connor Russell received 19th, Regan Garey 43rd, Shaylee Schroeder 89th, and Starla Henderson 99th out of 129 individuals. Overall they received 21st out of 31 teams. The Agronomy Team did well, placing 16th out of 80 teams. Individual placings include: Rulon Taylor 41st, Riley Garey 47th, Keith Towne 73rd, and Shaylee Schroeder placed 229th out of 320 individuals. The Agriscience team acquired 16th place out of 71 teams, with the individuals placing as follows: Rodger Farr 45th, Spencer Bierfreund 72nd, Madison Clark 104th, and Brett Jones placing 139th out of 284 individuals. Many blue and red ribbons came home with the chapter, both for individuals and teams. Our chapter has had a very successful year, doing well at all of our competitions and other events attended. The annual chapter banquet will take place April 30, where members, their families, and FFA alumni will celebrate everything we have achieved this year. Thank you to all of the FFA sponsors who have helped make this year possible.

Your one stop source for ag information on the internet

www.agnet.net Also featuring news and information from: Farm and Ranchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Equipment & Livestock Handbook, Buying & Selling Guide & Heartland Express.

For more information, contact Central Nebraska Publications at (800) 658-3191

Schedule of Events Apr 30-May 4 - Beatrice (Gage County) Heartland Storytelling Festival; Homestead National Monument of America, 8523 W. Hwy 4. Storytellers entertain and educate visitors with stories about American culture and heritage. 10am-3pm, Free Susan Cook (402) 223-3514 www.nps.gov/home May 5 - Ogallala (Keith County) Catfish Classic; Lake McConaughy. Darrell Marrow (308) 778-5879 May 5-6 - Grand Island (Hall County) Nebraska Muzzle Loading Rifle Association Gun Show; Fonner Park and Heartland Events Center, 700 E. Stolley Park Rd. Sat, 8am-5pm; Sun, 8am-4pm Neal Kelley (308) 384-7565 www.nebraskamuzzleloaders.com May 5-6 - Ogallala (Keith County) 8th Annual Spring Classic Golf Tournament; West Winds & Bayside Golf Courses (308) 284-4066 www.visit ogallala.com May 5-6 - Papillion (Sarpy County) Midlands Pirate Festival; Bellevue Berry & Pumpkin Ranch, 11001 S. 48th St. A stranded pirate ship, fully stocked pirate tavern, treasure cave, shopping, hands-on activities and the finest festival gruel. 11am-6pm, $10 Ed Schaefer (402) 331-5500 www.bellevueberryfarm.com May 5-6 - Ponca (Dixon County) Becoming an Outdoor Chef; Ponca State Park 88090 Spur 26 E. A hands-on cooking weekend for all levels of outdoor cooks. Grilling, smoking, dehydration, fish cleaning, campfire cooking, Dutch oven cooking, wild edibles and more. Andrea Johansen (402) 755-2284 www.outdoornebraska.org May 8 - Grand Island (Hall County) Nebraska Children's Groundwater Festival; Central Community College and College Park. Educating youth through lively entertainment, interactive displays and tangible experiments. Water magicians, folksingers, storytellers and raptor shows. 8am-4pm Kelly Cole (308) 385-6282 www.cpnrd.org May 11-12 - North Platte (Lincoln County) Honky Tonk BBQ Festival; Platte River Mall Sanctioned competition and BBQ feed, live entertainment and more. Rob Mandeville (308) 5305139 www.honky tonkbbq.com

May 12 - Ashland (Saunders County) 2nd Annual - Lucky Bucket 7K Trail Run; Mahoney State Park, I-80 Exit 426. 5pm (402) 763-8868 thebucketrun.com May 12 - Kearney (Buffalo County) Outdoor Discovery Family Day; Fort Kearny State Recreation Area, 1020 V Rd. Learn more about hunting, fishing, kayaking, shotgunning, camping and other outdoor activities. 9am-4pm, Free admission, park permit required. Julia Plugge (402) 471-6009 www.outdoornebraska.ne.gov /odp/familyday.asp May 13 - Bellevue (Sarpy County) Runway Run; Offutt AFB. A 7-mile run through the base and down the runway among a formation of Air Force planes. www.bellevuenebraska.com May 18-20 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Lincoln Quilter's Guild 2012 Quilt Show; Weary Center, Nebraska Wesleyan University, 53rd & Huntington. More than 300 quilts, vendors, live and silent auction, demonstration and tours of the International Quilt Study Center. 9am-5pm, $6 Elizabeth Sterns (402) 467-9467 www.lincolnquiltersguild.org May 19 - Ashland (Saunders County) Mud, Sweat, & Beers 7K Trail Run; Quarry Oaks Golf Club, 16600 Quarry Oaks Dr. More than 2,500 costumed and crazy runners and walkers compete in this 4.3 mile trail run through some of the most spectacular wooded terrain in eastern Nebraska. 6pm, See website Joe Sutter (402) 9446000 mudsweatandbeerrun.com May 19 - Grand Island (Hall County) Island Area Cruisers Annual Charities Tour; Grand Island and Hastings Walmarts Show and shine tour. Cars, trucks and motorcycles welcome. 7:30am-4:30pm Debra Rinke (308) 382-2958 www.visitgrandisland.com May 19 - North Platte (Lincoln County) Woofstock; Memorial Park, E. Fourth St. Contests for dogs, children's games and vendors with specials on animal care and accessories. 10am-2pm, Free Dianne Morales (308) 650-7297 www.pphs.com

May 19 - Waverly (Lancaster County) Camp Creek Antique Machinery Swap Meet and Flea Market; Camp Creek Threshers Show Grounds, 17200 Bluff Rd. Machinery, tractors, parts and equipment and flea market. 6:30am3pm, Free (402) 726-2487 www.ccthreshers.org May 25 - Lexington (Dawson County) Buzzard Migration Wine Release Party; Mac's Creek Winery & Vineyards, 43315 Rd 757. Join the winery in releasing the 2011 vintage of Nebraska's favorite summertime wine - Buzzard's Roost Blush. Appetizers, live entertainment and wine tastings. 5-9pm, Free Barry McFarland (308) 324-0440 www.macscreekvineyards.com May 26 Beatrice (Gage County) Monumental Fiddling Championship and Acoustic Band Contest; Homestead National Monument of America, 8523 W. NE Hwy 4. A day of music and competition with fiddlers and musicians of all ages. 10am-9pm, Free Susan Cook (402) 223-3514 www.nps.gov/home May 26-27 - Chadron (Dawes County) Chadron State College Golf Classic; Ridgeview Country Club (308) 432-6362 www.chadron.com May 26-28 - Brownville (Nemaha County) Spring Flea Market; Main St. More than 200 vendors from across the United States. Antiques, flowers, jewelry, collectibles and food. 8am-6pm, Free Jim Doty (402) 825-3731 www.brownvillene.com May 27 - Omaha (Douglas County) Military Appreciation Day; German American Society, 3717 S. 120th St. Live music and food. A day of appreciation for active, reserve and retired military. noon-8pm, Free (402) 333-6615 www.ger manamericansociety.org May 30-Aug 29 - Grand Island (Hall County) Cruise Night at the Airport; Central Nebraska Regional Airport, 3773 Sky Park Rd. Displays of vintage and classic autos, golden oldies tunes and food specials. Last Wednesday of each month, 68pm, Free Doug Brown (308) 390-5372 www.fly grandisland.com May 31-June 3 - Comstock (Custer County) Comstock Country Fest; 46095 Sargent Ord Rd. Nebraska's party in the pasture brings your favorite country artists up close and personal. Camping available. Glenn Zacek (308) 225-4843 www.comstockmusicfestivals.com


Page 28

Heartland Express

April 26, 2012

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, May 3rd. The next Heartland Express will be printed on THURSDAY, May 10th. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, call 800-658-3191 and ask for Lesli 1001 - MOWERS WANTED TO BUY NE - IHC #24 MOWER & PARTS, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE NE - REBUILT KOSCH HAYVESTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - IHC H W/WO MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - KOSCH SIDE MOUNT MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - EMERSON DOUBLE VICON DISC, (308) 544-6421 NE - VICON 3 PT DISC MOWER, (308) 5446421 NE - REBUILT KOSCH TRAILVESTER MOWERS, 14’, WITH WARRANTY, $5,000.00, (308) 544-6421 MO - M & W PC1547 BATWING MOWER, 15’, GOOD CONDITION, $7,500.00, (660) 5483804 1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE KS - NH HS HEAD. PLANETARY DRIVE & PUMP FOR NH 8040, (785) 731-5190 NE - 2008 1903 CASE IH ROTARY HEAD SWATHER, (402) 461-9336 1005 - RAKES WANTED TO BUY NE - LH CHANNEL IRON FRAME ON NH56 OVER 56B SIDE RAKE, AND A WHEEL, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE IA - WWW. RAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 3662114 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE NE - BALER BELTS AND CHAINS; BEARINGS & FLANGES, (308) 587-2344 NE - BELTS FOR MOST BALERS & SWATHERS, (308) 587-2344 AL - ROUND BALER BELTING: LRGST DEALER IN US. ORIGINAL BELTING FOR ALL ROUND BALERS INCLUDING NEW JD IN STOCK! SAVE HUNDRED$! FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE! NO 800#, JUST BEST PRICES. SINCE 1973. HAMMOND EQUIP. MC/VISA/DISC/AMEX OR COD, BALERBELTS.COM, (334) 627-3348 TX - BALER BELTS- ALL BRANDS. MADE IN THE U. S. A. ! JD WITH GENUINE JD PLATE FASTENERS. FREE SHIPPING ON SETS. WWW. BALERBELTSANDHAYBEDS. COM, (800) 223-1312 NE - AIR BAGS FOR 855NH BALER, NEAR NEW, (402) 482-5491 NE - KRONE 3 X 3 BIG SQ BALERS, VERY LOW BALES, (402) 461-9336 NE - VERMEER 605 SUPER M ROUND BALER-NET WRAP ONLY, (402) 461-9336 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - NEW EMERSON BALE MOVER-FEEDERS, (308) 544-6421 KS - E-Z HAUL INLINE SELF DUMPING HAY TRAILER, 32’ 6 BALE, GOOSENECK, BUMPER HITCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS/PARTS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS FOR SALE NE - JD 200 STACKMAKER, $900.00, (308) 876-2515 ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS/PARTS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 NE - EMERSON 13X24 STACK MOVER, ELECTRONIC SCALES, W/ OR WITHOUT HYDRAFORK, (308) 544-6421 1010 - FORAGE HARVESTORS WANTED TO BUY KS - JOHN DEERE CHOPPERS & HEADS, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, KS, (785) 336-6103 FOR SALE NE - KNIFE BAR & RECUT SCREEN FOR JD 35, (308) 995-5515 NE - RECUT SCREEN & AXLE EXTENSION FOR IHC 730, (308) 995-5515 1013 - DUMP WAGON WANTED TO BUY KS - RICHARDTON HIGH DUMP WAGONS, ROEDER IMPLEMENT, (785) 336-6103 1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY KS - NH SELF PROPELLED & PULL-TYPE, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, (785) 336-6103 ID - NEW HOLLAND 2 & 3-WIDE, SELF-PROPELLED, PULL-TYPE MODELS/PARTS. JIM,, (208) 880-2889 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND’S-ALL MODELS/PARTS. CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE. WWW. BALEWAGON. COM, (208) 880-2889 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE WANTED TO BUY NE - HAYBUSTER GEAR BOX FOR 1600 STACKER, BEDROLLERS, PUSH OFF ASSEMBLY, A FEW OTHER PARTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - HAY PROBE FOR TESTING, (308) 5872344 IA - DRY HAY PRESERVATIVE—1/3 PRICE OF ACID. WATER SOLUBLE. 1. 5 GRAMS PER TON, NON-CORROSIVE. 26% MOISTURE AND UNDER. FROMMELT AG SERVICE. EMAIL TERRY AT FROMMELTAG@IOWATELECOM. NET OR CALL, (563) 925-2270

1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE FOR SALE - CONT’D IA - WINTER SPECIAL ON TWINE AND NET WRAP, (866) 999-1006 1101 - TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY NE - BUYING TRACTORS FOR SALVAGE MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (308) 5824303 NE - MF 35, 50, 65, 135, 235, 245, OR 255 TRACTOR, (402) 678-2277 MO - AC D17’S & UP, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 MO - IH 560 TO 1566, SALVAGE OR GOOD, (816) 378-2015 KS - AGGRESSIVELY BUYING JD TRACTORS, NEWER MODELS, DEALERS WELCOME, WILL TRADE, CALL FOR CASH OFFERS, (785) 776-6176 NE - OLDER TRACTOR WITH LOADER - PREFER AC WD-45 OR M FARMALL BUT WILL CONSIDER OTHERS., (308) 624-2177 FOR SALE NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885 NE - NEW, USED AND REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, MOST MAKES AND MODELS, (308) 582-4303 NE - 8 HOLE 15” TRACTOR FRONT WHEELS, FITS IHC, (308) 587-2344 NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, (308) 436-4369 KS - FORD 2N WITH 5’ WOODS BELLY MOWER, $2,900.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - IHC 706 FOR SALVAGE, (308) 269-2586 NE - 90% TREAD 24. 5 X 32 DIAMOND TREAD 12 PLY ON 10 HOLE RIM, (308) 2692586 IL - LARGE SELECTION OF NEW, USED & REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, IH, JD, MM, MH, AC, OLIVER & OTHERS. WE SHIP DAILY. PLEASE CALL, (217) 370-1149 NE - 1976 CASE 1270, 600 HRS ON OH, FRONT WEIGHTS, DUALS, A/C, $8,500.00, (308) 874-4562 IA - ‘82 A-C 7020, CAT 3116, LOW ENGINE HOURS, WESTENDORF WL64 LOADER, 8’ BUCKET, $15,000.00, (712) 254-2408 1102 - LOADERS FOR SALE NE - DUAL LOADER MOUNTS TO FIT JD 4520 OR 4620. CUSTOM BUILT, VERY HEAVY, VERY NEAT, WITH CUSTOM GRILL GUARD BUILT IN. DUAL LOADER 325 OR 345, (402) 482-5491 NE - 7. 5’ GNUSE BUCKET, HEAVY 3 PT, (402) 726-2488

120 OWS 6P PL E E GEA F W O S R RH D N EP NE - SALE EAD SA E ADS W W O 1101 - TRACTORS S L S ON(3, 0 150 P E HE ' N I 5 6 I 8 H B X 0 T ) P I N M 4 PER 11 FOR SALE - CO ALE KING COND 1 E - 995-55 GEAR TRIP 8712 S S 0 ' R H 3 1 R 1 EAD 1 20 ) NE - 5010 JD HANCOCK SELF FO FLE X OOD 5-2541 5P0IC0KHEP 4 AMAR 5 , 6 OR SALE OURNE 0, (785 G ) 86 ING HP :3 $ ILL R B 0 F . LOADING SCRAPER, OLDER UNIT, KS L O A 0 0 TIOSHE P W, (62 LE X K 51N5E - R4O:W ,50 5 , 700 G DR A (308) 436-4369 PLO 00.00, F 95-5 90H HARUS 74$-600 , 70 H E ARH KS - , ER, $5 36' ER, B W 1 8 0 D , , E 9 H P P E 1 151 N 96 DAPT 0 50ITH 048:3) MOT (308 5:4 ADHSEA KS - FORD 2N WITH 5' WOODS $ W - N 308) CD9O - CJOD A ELL 58 NE EELS, ( , 6-16'S3.00H0, P(130:1 $45O0 NORS ) 624- $650 0:711 M BELLY MOWER, $2,900.00, (620) A F O I G , 0 2 0 1 $SH , 7-0 E A P ES R C H R 6 5 1 7 5 9 4 W K :3 ,$CU 700874 HP RH 7 865-2541 O NE0 SERSIA5LE00 NST-A2265 U IH W, $ E S E , ' 3 5 ) E A 2 N 08 5 361 LK NO 12, L/ N 18 : D IL - LARGE SELECTION OF NEW, 8 4- 00, (300, (3080HP 5: 3 $40 S IAWEEWEELL, $3X,4(X5880) POLY S BAOLR IKE 0 L 3 R . L 0 4 R , 6" USED & REBUILT TRACTOR PARTS, E ) 62 2 0 7 , OE 456 - JI CAS , $1,00 4-21 $600, (712 1L2A6R5GE2N0," N&E.3 N36E0A-R037 IH, JD, MM, MH, AC, OLIVER & , S 7 ) E 8 R M ( R 7 N 8 3 0 E N E 2 R IND 08 N70 . O3U 200 E LT EN OTHERS. DAILY. GPLEASE THE WE YSHIP COIULE2RS H1A9Y09- C- OBRHUEL-1AL1DS24 30NDS, M ) 832- E - RE U 260 WIND RGER F 0 - O (217) B370-1149 A 3 N 6 O 1 R G O A 5 03CALL, T S R T A IST 4 T KE O 156 WFROR SBAALLE28T2AL H OL 3 S, ERE APP ES K B R AINE - 2 SALE TED KSS 32FOVR W-INTCR & '40' I- - GRAIN FFE G N F D A R A S A E L W LES CELL: D. HOR NE& G- REGISTERED FOR ANGUS, PPE INDOWION, 003 B COBB& A-L'S59O SEAL'E30'SUCKSCOND2604 LE O A S A H R J & S HAESR AS LS(308) O SA SAL GR A 6' 2 , W L2E0A04SE - MOR L ACK SD TOERT,C HI,N2G TCHHEDING T ES. S TO O WA 732-3356 999308-870-1119, 199 525BL A G AN MO FOR 11 GSI 3 L TARP SS . OLD N R VY 1 NE (25) COMING 2 EYR C 3 T P 5 U ERSA KDS -DU, R$9A9CCNOEW L 0 R C 6 2 O 73 LE AS T FO ED A NET 136 OR L 55807 MO K M BRO GAN CHAROLAIS BULLS(308)L 567 OK - ER R USIES P19AY 9 86-2 0

To place your classified ad call Lesli @ 800-658-3191

1103 - LOADER ATTACHMENTS WANTED TO BUY NE - DIRT OR MANURE BUCKET HEAD FOR F10 LOADER, NEEDS TO HAVE ORANGE FRAMEWORK W/GRAPPLE, (308) 587-2344 1105 - DISKS WANTED TO BUY NE - JD 235, 20’-25’, (402) 726-2488 FOR SALE NE - DISK BLADES AND BEARINGS, (308) 587-2344

DISC ROLLING STEEL BLADES ..........AND..........

GRINDING HARD BORON BLADES Installed after 2005

Now grinding both sides for maximum effectiveness and longer blade life. Will travel to your farm within 200 mile radius of Craig, NE

Call Roy’s Cell: 402-660-8298 Or Leave Message: 402-377-2437 1106 - PLOWS AND SWEEP PLOWS FOR SALE KS - FLEX KING 4X5’ SWEEP PLOW, GOOD CONDITION, $1,100.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - NEW FLEX KING PICKER WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 1109 - PLANTERS FOR SALE NE - NEW #92 IHC COVERING DISK ASSEMBLY, (308) 995-5515 NE - IHC SEED DRUMS, (308) 995-5515 NE - LIFT ASSIST AND/OR TRANSPORT KIT FOR IHC LISTER/ PLANTER, ALSO GAUGE STRIPE WHEELS, (308) 995-5515 KS - 1990 JD 7200, 16R30”, 250 MONITOR, MARKERS, IN-ROW FERT. GOOD CONDITION., $23,000.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - C-IH 12R36” VERTICAL FOLD 3 PT, ALWAYS SHEDDED, (308) 995-5515 1110 - SEEDERS FOR SALE NE - 4010 CONCORD AIR SEEDER. 308-3600377 OR, (308) 282-1330 1111 - DRILLS WANTED TO BUY NE - TYE DRILL FOR PARTS, (402) 482-5491 FOR SALE NE - !! ROUND CAPS !! THE ULTIMATE GRAIN DRILL PRESS WHEEL CAP! COVERS COMPLETE FACE OF WHEEL. CONVERTS V FACED WHEELS TO ROUND FACE FOR BETTER FLOTATION & DEPTH CONTROL. PERFECT FIT! EASY TO INSTALL! DON YUNG DISTRIBUTING, KIMBALL, NE., (308) 2352718 KS - 30” HOE AIR SEEDER DRILL $3500. 40’ DISC AIR SEEDER DRILL, $14,000, (785) 871-0711 NE - 150 & 7100 DRILLS, FERT. BOXES, BLACK HEAVY DUTY WHEELS, DBL HITCH, TRANSPORTS & PARTS, (308) 995-5515

1113 - CULTIVATORS FOR SALE SD - 3-PT 8R FLAT FOLD, $1,500.00, (605) 386-2131 NE - IHC GO-DIG PARTS, (308) 995-5515 1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE NE - JD 25A, 3 PT. HITCH, 150 GAL, 20” BOOM, (308) 587-2344 NE - CENTURY 500 GALLON PULL BETWEEN, $400.00, (402) 787-2244 KS - SPRA-COUPES. I BUY/SELL. CALL FOR BID. WALKER GATZ, (785) 547-7711

Speidel Weed Wiper

#1 Herbicide applicator for weed control. Uses very little chemical. Kill rye in winter wheat, and weeds in pastures, all sizes available. Recovers in stock ATV mounting brackets & Quality Carts. 580-886-2396 • 800-544-1546 www.acrsales.com

KS - ‘07 MILLER MD 1000, 90’ BOOM, CUMMINS & ALLISON, RAVEN GPS, 1500 HRS, $98,000.00, (620) 865-2541 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY NE - YETTER 2995 COULTERS, (308) 2821330 FOR SALE NE - NEW SLURRY EQUIPMENT, (800) 2847066 KS - APPLY PRE-PLANT, DUAL, AT PLANTING SIDE-DRESS, FOLIAR OR IRRIGATION. SURE CROP QUALITY LIQUID FERTILIZERS. BALANCED FORMULAS BLENDED TO YOUR SPECS. FLEXIBLE FINANCING OPTIONS. “ASSURING CROP SUCCESS FOR YOU”. DELIVERY DIRECT TO YOUR FARM, (800) 635-4743 1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER FOR SALE NE - FRONT WEIGHTS FOR CASE IH MAGNUM, (308) 995-5515 NE - HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS, HOSES & PTO PUMPS, (308) 587-2344 NE - ORTHMAN FLAT FOLD 8R30” TOOLBAR, $3,500.00, (308) 485-4486 TX - NEW & USED FARM EQUIPMENT. NEW & USED PARTS. TRACTORS, COMBINES, HAY & FARM EQUIPMENT. KADDATZ AUCTIONEERING & FARM EQUIPMENT SALES. ORDER PARTS ONLINE AT: KADDATZEQUIPMENT. COM, (254) 582-3000 1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 413 CHRYSLER FOR SALVAGE, (308) 995-5515 NE - USED VEE BELTS: 3-IHC C176” $15 EA; 4 GATES C240” $20 EA; 3 DAYCO C240” $15 EA; 4 DAYCO C270” $15 EA 1 DAYCO C116 $10 EA; 1 DAYCO 94” X 1 1/4” WIDE $10, (308) 624-2177 NE - USED 350 CHEVY, OIL & WATER SHUT OFFS, SURGE TANK, CENTURY WELDER, AC/DC, (402) 726-2488 1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE NE - 10” WLR BOWLS, (308) 995-5515

MEYERS TRACTOR SALVAGE Aberdeen, So. Dak. 1000+ Tractors & Combines 400+ Reground Crankshafts 500+ Tractor Tires 300+ Radiators Large line of Swather, Baler & Cutter Parts

GOOD BUYS AND SERVICE WANT TO BUY TRACTORS & COMBINES & SWATHERS FOR SALVAGE

Phone (605) 225-0185 5 Miles North & 1 Mile West of CASE IH Mon. - Fri. 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM & Sat. 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM


April 26, 2012 1202 - PUMPS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - SEVERAL USED PTO PUMPS, (800) 284-7066 NE - 3X4 BERKELEY PUMPS, PRIMING VALVES AVAILABLE, (402) 364-2592 1203 - PIPE WANTED TO BUY NE - WANTED TO BUY: USED ALUMINUM PIPE. PAYING TOP CASH PRICES. WE PICK UP ANYWHERE IN THE STATE OF NEBRASKA. MINIMUM PURCHASE 1000’ PIPE. CALL FOR A QUOTE, (308) 380-4549 FOR SALE NE - 8” TEXFLO 20” GATES, ALL KINDS OF FITTINGS, (308) 995-5515 NE - 6” BAND & LATCH MAIN LINE, (308) 995-5515 NE - 8” MAIN LINE HASTINGS, (308) 9955515 NE - 28, 000 FT. 8”-9”-10” GATED PIPE, (800) 284-7066 NE - LOOKING TO SWAP 1, 050’ 20” PLASTIC DOUBLE GATED PIPE FOR 20” SINGLE GATED PLASTIC PIPE. PLEASE CALL, (308) 390-6336 NE - IN STOCK UNDERGROUND PIPE, WIRE AND FITTINGS. TRENCHING AVAILABLE. PLEASE CALL, (402) 678-2765 1205 - GENERATOR WANTED TO BUY NE - USED WINPOWER PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 FOR SALE NE - WINPOWER - NEW & USED PTO GENERATORS, (308) 775-3298 IA - WINCO PTO GENERATORS, CALL US FOR PRICE BEFORE YOU BUY! HARVEY AT EDEN SUPPLY 8AM - 10PM., (515) 679-4081 IA - WINCO GENERATORS, NEW & USED, 1PH 50KW $4,170. KATO LIGHT NEW 1PH AND 3PH WINPOWER USED 1PH $1,000. CALL WES SEBETKA AT, (641) 990-1094 1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE NE - 150 HP GEARHEAD, 6 RATIO, (308) 995-5515 NE - AMARILLO GEARHEADS: 110HP 4:3 $700, 70 HP 4:5 $650, 50 HP 4:5 $600, (308) 624-2177 NE - US MOTORS GEARHEADS 90HP 4:3 $450, 50HP 5:6 $650, 50HP 10:11 $700, 50HP 5:4 $600, 30HP 4:3 $300, (308) 6242177 NE - DERAN/RANDOLPH GEARHEAD 100HP 4:3 $500, PEERLESS GEARHEAD 2:3 $300, (308) 624-2177 1207 - PIVOTS FOR SALE NE - USED PIVOTS FOR SALE FOR INFORMATION CALL PLAINS IRRIGATION AT 308-3829240 OR, (800) 584-9334 1208 - TRAVELER SYSTEMS FOR SALE NE - NEW GREENFIELD HARD HOSE, (800) 284-7066 NE - NEW CADMAN 4” X 1250’ HOSE, (800) 284-7066 NE - 3 HEINZMAN SOFT HOSE TRAVELERS, (800) 284-7066 NE - BOSS SOFT HOSE TRAVELER, (800) 284-7066 1209 - PUMPS WITH MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 3/4 BERKELEY PUMPS WITH PRIMING VALVES, ATTACHED TO YOUR CHOICE OF INDUSTRIAL 300 FORD OR 262 ALLIS W/RADIATORS, AND CARTS, (402) 3642592 1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. FOR SALE WI - SERVING THE MIDWEST WITH COMPLETE IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. CONTACT ROBERTS IRRIGATION COMPANY AT 1500 POST ROAD, PLOVER, WI 54467, (800) 434-5224 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE OK - REBUILT COMBINE SIEVES. NEW REEL BATS, GALVANIZED AND BLACK CELL 580525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 OK - ‘82 GLEANER N6, 24’ HEADER CELL 580-525-1265, $7,500.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - C-IH 1480, 810 24’ HEAD CELL 580525-1265, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - TR85 NEW HOLLAND, 3208 CAT, 24’ HEADER CELL 580- 525-1265, $5,000.00, (580) 361-2265 NE - PARTS FOR 1680 CLEANING SYSTEM, CALL FOR LIST, (308) 269-2586 OK - R70 GLEANER, 2689 ENGINE HRS, 1904 SEPARATOR HRS, $20,000 CELL 580525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 NE - 2 SETS OF JD COMBINE DUALS, 50 THRU 70 SERIES. 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - 1986 CASE IH 1680, 3, 093 HRS. NEW STYLE UNLOAD GEAR BOX, NEW STYLE FAN, TSR LONG SIEVE CHOPPER NEW ROTO CAGE AND SPECIALTY ROTOR, (308) 2692586

Heartland Express 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 30 INCH STRADDLE DUALS FOR 2388 WITH AXLE EXTENSION, 18. 4 X 38 RADIALS, (308) 269-2586 KS - ‘99 JD 9610, SHEDDED, DUALS, EXT, CM, 1600 HRS. , NEW PARTS, EXCELLENT, $85,000.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - 27’ RIGID HEAD FOR A GLEANOR R72 COMBINE., $3,000.00, (402) 461-6637 1302 - COMBINE HEADS FOR SALE KS - SHELBOURNE 20’ STRIPPER HEADER, $5,500.00, (785) 871-0711 NE - 20” & 36” POLY SNOUTS, JD HEAD. 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - JD 925 & 930 FLEX HEADS. 308-3600377 OR, (308) 282-1330 NE - JD 853A. 308-360-0377 OR, (308) 2821330 NE - ‘04 CASE IH 1020 20’ FLEX HEAD W/CRARY AIR REEL, ALWAYS SHEDDED, NICE, $14,900.00, (402) 787-2244 SD - WE REBUILD COMBINE & WINDROWER HEADER AUGERS TO LIKE NEW CONDITION. PONCELET’S WELDING, RAMONA, SD. (605) 480-4860 OR, (605) 482-8405 1305 - WAGONS/GRAVITY WAGONS FOR SALE IA - DEMCO 550 OR 650 GRAVITY WAGONS. CALL, (712) 210-6587 1306 - GRAIN CARTS FOR SALE IA - 25’, 30’ & 36’ GRAIN HEADER CARTS. CALL, (712) 210-6587 NE - A&L 425 BUSHEL. ROLLOVER TARP, 540 PTO, (308) 436-4369 1307 - GRAIN DRYERS FOR SALE NE - 2001 DELUX 850 BU/HR. , 1992 MC 970 1 PHASE, 1992 MC 970 3 PHASE, FARM FANS 500H, FARM FANS 420J, MC 2100 1850 BU/HR., (800) 284-7066 NE - USED 4” & 5” AIR SYSTEMS, (800) 284-7066

GRAIN DRYERS

Reliable - Efficient Vacuum Cool Towers NEW Trilogy Low

Call Jeff (515)577-7563 Ask about M-C Trax Remote Monitoring NE - NEW & USED AERATION FANS, (800) 284-7066 1310 - AUGERS FOR SALE NE - HUTCHINSON BIN OR TRUCK FILL AUGER, 8-10”, PORTABLE, WITH SPECIAL ORDER OF 1/4” THICK FLIGHTING ALL THE WAY UP. “BIG WINTER DISCOUNTS” CALL HARLEY AT, (402) 649-6711 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE NE - 8” AERATION TUBING AND AERATION FANS, (308) 995-5515 NE - BULK HEAD FOR 51’ CURVET, (308) 995-5515 NE - SINGLE PHASE MOTORS, (308) 9955515 NE - BROCK BINS & GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT, EPS & BEHLEN BLDG SYSTEMS, BUCKLEY STEEL, AINSWORTH, NE, (402) 387-0347 NE - CONRAD AMERICAN-EATON BINS. GRAIN STORAGE, CONCRETE, & ERECTION. HYNEK CONSTRUCTION. MIKE HYNEK. 402984-1200 CELL,, (402) 257-2200 1315 - COMBINE TRAILERS FOR SALE SK - COMBINE TRAILERS: TRAILTECH OR JANTZ, SINGLE & DOUBLE. HYDRAULIC FOLD HEAD TRANSPORTS. FLAMAN SALES, BOX 280, SOUTHEY, SK, CANADA S0G 4P0, (306) 726-4403 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - CHICAGO FANS, (308) 995-5515 FOR SALE NE - 8” AERATION TUBES, FANS, TUNNELS FOR CONCRETE FLOORS, (308) 995-5515 IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LOANS W/ GREAT RATES. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487 NE - NEW ORTHMAN DRY BEAN CUTTERS, (308) 995-5515 OK - ROTEX GRAIN CLEANER, HAS CORN SCREENS RIGHT NOW, CELL 580-525-1265 OR, (580) 361-2265 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1407 - ELECTRIC MOTORS FOR SALE NE - COMPLETE LINE OF SHEAVES, BEARINGS, DRIVES, & MOTORS, (402) 387-0347 1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY WI - USED BULK MILK TANKS, ALL SIZES, (800) 558-0112 FOR SALE

BULK TANKS-USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT Buy-Sell-Trade

800-844-5427 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC WANTED TO BUY NE - 110V WELDING ROD DRYING OVEN, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - BRAKE DRUM/ROTOR TURNING LATHE, $80.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - ARMITURE TURNING LATHE, $50.00, (785) 778-2962 1413 - PRESSURE WASHERS FOR SALE

Stop and see us at our new location 1719 Aspen Circle Unit #14, Grand Island, NE. Hotsy Pressure Washer Sales and Service. New and used hot/cold water pressure washer. Parts and detergents. Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4 :30 p.m. 308-675-1115 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - ELSTON GOPHER MACHINE, (308) 5872344 IA - WWW. WHEELRAKE. COM, (712) 3662114 KS - ORTHMAN & BUCKEYE FRONT 3 PT HITCHES, $1500 EACH., (620) 865-2541 IA - 6 ROW 30 BUFFALO CULTIVATOR WITH GUIDANCE SYSTEM. CALL, (712) 210-6587 1501 - ALFALFA HAY WANTED TO BUY NE - HYDRAFORK CUSTOM GRINDING, GROUND HAY DELIVERIES, BUYING & SELLING HAY. NILSEN HAY CO. HAZARD, NE, (308) 452-4400 FOR SALE NE - ALFALFA, 4X4X8 BALES, DAIRY QUALITY, SHEDDED & TARPED, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - GRINDING QUALITY ALFALFA IN LG RD BALES, HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-9626399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 NE - HORSE QUALITY IN SM SQ BALES, SHEDDED & TARPED HAMEL HAY CO CELL 308-962-6399 HOME, (308) 962-5474 OR - TEST MOISTURE. HAY, GRAIN, SILAGE, SOIL, WOOD, WINDROW TESTER. BALE STROKE COUNTER. MOISTURE READ OUT AS YOU BALE! WWW. LEHMANFARMS. NET, (503) 434-1705 KS - 3X3X8’S, 3X4’S, 4X4X8’S ALFALFA HAY DAIRY & BEEF COW QUALITY. OUR DAIRY ALFALFA IS TOP OF THE LINE & TESTED. WE ARE LOCATED IN CENTRAL KANSAS. CALL FOR QUOTE. JASON DEVINE @ 785766-6501 OR RAE RAE MUNDEN AT, (620) 285-8748 IA - HAY & STRAW AUCTIONS EVERY MONDAY & THURSDAY AT 12:30. ROCK VALLEY, IA. FREE EXPERIENCED ORDER BUYING SERVICE. TRUCKING AVAILABLE. ROCK VALLEY HAY AUCTION. ROCKVALLEYHAY. COM CELL: 712-470-1274, OFFICE:, (712) 4765541 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE KS - TOP QUALITY SM SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - TOP QUALITY 4X4X8 SQ, CAN DELIVER SEMI LOAD LOTS, (785) 528-3779 KS - 2008 BROME BIG ROUND BALES, (785) 935-2480 1505 - STRAW FOR SALE NE - 200+ LG RDS CERT WHEAT STRAW, 1000#/BL. 308-641-1240, (308) 436-5491 1506 - CORN WANTED TO BUY KS - DAMAGED GRAIN. HIGHEST PRICES, IMMEDIATE PAYMENT. WE HAVE GRAIN VACS. MINIMUM QUANTITY 800 BUSHEL., (800) 214-7788

To place your classified ad call Lesli @ 800-658-3191

Page 29 1506 - CORN WANTED TO BUY - CONT’D

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DAMAGED GRAIN OR FEED CONSUMING VALUABLE BIN SPACE? -------------------------------CLEAN THEM OUT BEFORE HARVEST! $$ HIGHEST PRICES $$ • Poor quality, bugs, odor, low test weight, etc. • Picked up at your farm or storage facility • We have vacs & equipment • Immediate shipment & payment • Min. quantity 800 bushels • Satisfaction Guaranteed. No Surprises.

MGM Marketing PH# 800-214-7788 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 1512 - SEED WANTED TO BUY KS - WE BUY DAMAGED GRAIN - GRAIN VACS AVAILABLE. ALSO DAMAGED GRAIN FROM GROUND PILES., (316) 640-3203 FOR SALE TX - FORAGE-TYPE TRITICALE SEED, CALL GAYLAND WARD SEEDS, (800) 299-9273 IA - BUYER & SELLER OF PRAIRIE GRASS & WILDFLOWER SEED, OSENBAUGH SEEDS, LUCAS, IA., (800) 582-2788 NE - NATIVE GRASS SEED, WILDFLOWER, LEAD PLANT, SMART WEED & OTHERS. SOUTH FORK SEED COMPANY, (402) 4825491 WY - CERTIFIED SAINFOIN SEED: CAN OUT PRODUCE ALFALFA. WILL NOT BLOAT LIVESTOCK. VARIETIES INCLUDE: SHOSHONE/BIG HORN REMONT. $1.45/LB. TO ORDER GO TO WWW.SAINFOINSEED.COM OR CALL MARK AT 307-202-0704 OR CARMEN AT, (307) 645-3380 IA - BEAN LADDERS FOR SOYBEAN SEED. SEED OATS & ROUND- UP READY SOYBEAN SEED; APHID RESISTANT., (712) 210-6587 1530 - HAY & GRAIN OTHER WANTED TO BUY

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED ANYWHERE WE BUY DAMAGED GRAIN & CORN IN ANY CONDITION WET OR DRY INCLUDING DAMAGED SILO CORN AT TOP DOLLAR WE HAVE VACS & TRUCKS CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

NORTHERN AG SERVICE, INC. 800-205-5751 FOR SALE IA - WWW. REPLACEMENTRAKEWHEELS. COM, (712) 366-2114 1806 - GRINDER MIXERS FOR SALE

LONE STAR ROLLER MILLS

1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - BULK CAKE & GRAIN FEEDERS, (308) 587-2344 IA - 24’ HAY FEEDERS MEALS ON WHEELS. SAVES HAY, SAVES TIME & SAVES MONEY! CALL, (712) 210-6587 NE - 20 USED BALE RING FEEDERS, (402) 461-9336 “USED CATTLE FEEDERS”. SEVERAL USED “HEAVY-BILT BRAND”. WELDED STEEL, CATTLE SELF FEEDERS ON HEAVY DUTY TRAILERS WITH FLOATATION TIRES, VERY NICE UNITS. 3 ARE 7 TON, 1 IS A 14 TON. UNITS 1-2 YRS. OLD.

G & G SALES 712-229-6162 1815 - WATERERS FOR SALE NE - BULL TOUGH BOTTOMLESS HEAVY GAUGE STOCK TANKS, (402) 387-0347 MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471

GIANT RUBBER WATER TANKS Tanks made from used earth moving tires. Sizes from 6 to 13 foot. Can be open topped or drinker holes cut for frost-free winter use. Full loads can be delivered anywhere in the United States.

Guaranteed best quality & lowest price. Call

605/473-5356

1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE NE - REBUILT AIR MOTORS OR REPAIRS, (308) 587-2344 TX - VIRDEN PERMA-BILT CO. FARM & RANCH PRODUCTS: ROOF & TANK COATINGS, WINDMILL PARTS. SEND OR CALL FOR FREE CATALOG. 2821 MAYS AVE. BOX7160FR AMARILLO, TX 79114-7160 WWW. VIRDENPRODUCTS. COM, (806) 3522761 NE - MONITOR PUMP JACK-CHOICE OF GAS OR ELECTRIC MOTOR, $650.00, (308) 4364369 1820 - LIVESTOCK BEDDING FOR SALE NE - CORRUGATED WINDBREAK STEEL, 8 GAUGE THROUGH 20 GAUGE, (402) 3870347 MN - BEDDING FOR SALE. DRY SAWDUST FOR DAIRY BARNS, DELIVERED ON WALKING FLOOR TRAILERS. WILL DELIVER TO MN, EAST SD, WEST WI, & NORTH IA ONLY. ALSO AVAILABLE SWEET CORN SILAGE IN THE FALL. CALL FOR PRICES, (320) 8642381 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - 20’ BULL WHIP, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8”, 3/4”, 7/8”, 1”, FOR FENCING CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - WE ARE YOUR W-W STAMPEDE & NORTHSTAR DEALER. EMERSON EQUIPMENT. WHITMAN, NE, (308) 544-6421 KS - TIRE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS: WATER TANKS, MINERAL FEEDERS, SILAGE COVER WEIGHTS. WWW. GEETIRE. COM, (785) 231-8397

We Buy, Sell & Trade Feed Mill Equipment, Rollers, Crackers, Hammer Mills, Ribbon & Paddle Mixers, Grain Handling Equipment, Etc...

G & G Sales

712-229-6162 KS - USED HOG OR SHEEP PANELS & GATES, (785) 778-2962

“Meridian Mfg. Group” Discounts available on all

New, Rebuilt or Reconditioned Roller Mills, Stationary or Portable, Single, Double & Triple Stack Mills, Customized to Your Needs...

G & G Sales Authorized Dealers

Dave 712-229-6162 • Brian 712-299-6051

1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

your liquid & dry ingredient storage needs, mild steel or stainless, overhead structures, Ag & Commercial application’s.

G & G Sales Authorized Meridian Dealer

Brian 712-299-6051 • Dave 712-229-6162

NE - 2 1/2 TON CUBER FOR BESLER BALE BED, (402) 461-9336


Page 30

Heartland Express

1901 - FEEDER STEERS FOR SALE MO - WE SPECIALIZE IN LOCATING “QUALITY” FEEDER CATTLE, (816) 688-7887 IL - COLORED FEEDER CATTLE AVAILABLE WEEKLY. 70% BLACKS, CHAR X’S, REDS, BOTH BLACK NOSE & PINK NOSE CHAR’S. AVERAGE WEIGHT IS 530 LBS. “SPECIAL” HOME RAISED FROM DAIRIES “HOLSTEIN STEERS” 250 LBS & UP. PLEASE CALL, (877) 498-9150 1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE NE - GELBVIEH AND BALANCER OPEN HEIFERS, (402) 879-4976 MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT CATTLE LOCATORS - MAX HARGROVE, (816) 6887887 NE - YEARLING & 2 YEAR OLD VIRGIN REG ANGUS HEIFERS, (308) 569-2458 1906 - BRED COWS FOR SALE NE - I’M DEALING ON COWS COMING OUT OF DROUGHT AREAS EVERY DAY. WWW. BREDCOWSWRIGHTLIVESTOCK. COM OR CALL, (308) 534-0939

T H E

CATTLE SHOP .COM

Fall Calving Cows Available Several Nice Sets of Angus Cows The Simple Way to Buy & Market Cattle The Cattle Shop helps buyers and sellers connect online

Visit www.TheCattleShop.com to learn more If you would like to speak to a Cattle Shop Representative Contact Us at 660-641-9945 or contact@thecattleshop.com

1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - REGISTERED ANGUS, CELL: 308-8701119, (308) 732-3356 NE - 25 PB CHAROLAIS BULLS COMING 2S ALL RECORDS 40 YRS, (308) 995-5515 NE - (25) COMING 2 YR OLD CHAROLAIS BULLS(308) 567-2288, (308) 995-5515 NE - REG ANGUS BULLS, 2 YEAR OLDS AND YEARLINGS, SONS & GRANDSONS OF 878, TRAVELER & SITZ ALLIANCE SONS, FORESIGHT GRANDSONS, (308) 569-2458 NE - PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS, YEARLINGS & 2 YR OLDS. SITZ UPWARD, TC TOTAL, CONNEALY RIGHT ANSWER, WAR PARTY BLOODLINES. SCHULTE ANGUS RANCH. KEARNEY, NE CALL 308-708-1839 OR, (308) 236-0761 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT & BREEDING CATTLE LOCATORS, (816) 688-7887 CO - IT’S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292 2101 - FEEDER LAMBS FOR SALE SD - CUSTOM SHEEP FEEDLOT: LAMBS & EWES TO FEED, FATTEN & GROW!!! SHIPPY SHEEP FEEDLOT. CALL KYLE AT 605-8420935 OR DALE 605-842-3967. WWW. SHEEPFEEDLOT. COM, (605) 842-3967 2200 - REGISTERED HORSES FOR SALE NE - 2003 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, MORGAN BROOD MARE, 2004 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, 1995 MORGAN STALLION, (308) 587-2344 NE - PEPPY DOC SAN, SHINING SPARK, JET DECK, THREE BAR & SKIPPER W BRED, STALLIONS, MARES, FILLEYS, & GELDINGS, MOSTLY SORREL & PALOMINO, GREAT STOCK, GOOD DISPOSITIONS, CALL 1-888689-8924 OR, (308) 384-1063 NE - AQHA HORSES: BLUE ROAN STUD & MARES, (308) 569-2458 NE - BUCKSKIN COMING 2 YR OLD STUD COLT FROM TOP MARE, DOC BAR DASH FOR CASH, ACTIVE COLT, (308) 569-2458 2202 - STUD SERVICE FOR SALE NE - MORGAN STALLION STANDING AT STUD, (308) 587-2344

To place your classified ad call Lesli @ 800-658-3191

2208 - HORSE TRAINING FOR SALE

Colt Started Colt started on cattle Horse breaking and training Problem solved Cutting and reined cow horses Ranch horses Ranch rope work Arena work Thousands acres to ride out on Clinics and lessons

605-430-0529 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE NE - SELL-TRADE MORGAN STALLION, TBONE, LAD, CLASSY, 149831;, (308) 5872344 NE - 2007 BLACK MORGAN GELDING, WELL BROKE, GENTLE, RANCH BROKE, NO VICES, (308) 587-2344 2305 - LLAMAS FOR SALE NE - ALPACA HERD LIQUIDATION. BREEDING STOCK, FULL RECORDS, VET CHECKED, READY TO GO. GRAND ISLAND, NE. FOR INFO OR A VIEWING CALL, (308) 382-5345 2313 - BEES FOR SALE IL - HARDEST WORKING FARM HANDS ON EARTH. HONEY BEES WORK FOR ROOM & BOARD TO POLLINATE YOUR CROPS & PROVIDE YOU WITH HONEY. FOR SUPPLIES CONTACT DADANT & SONS, INC. WWW. DADANT. COM OR CALL, (888) 922-1293 2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK NE - JIM JOCHIM, DVM WITH 20+ YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH MIXED ANIMALS IS LOOKING FOR A FULL-TIME POSITION ON A RANCH, FEEDLOT OR A MIXED ANIMAL PRACTICE. HE IS LICENSED IN NE, CO, MT AND KS. PLEASE CALL CELL 402-705-0061 OR HOME, (402) 236-8805

CDL TRUCK DRIVERS 2012 Harvest Season $2,800/month and bonuses, non-smoking environment.

PH-308-928-9013 CELL-308-920-0362 MN - HARVESTING WORK WANTED! NEW JD COMBINES. 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! PLEASE CALL PETER AT, (320) 221-3789 NE - FAMILY OWNED AG EQUIPMENT DEALER LOOKING FOR A FULL-TIME SALES PERSON. EQUIPMENT INCLUDES MCCOR MICK, VERMEER, TYM, BUSHHOG & SEVERAL SHORT LINES. RESUMES WITH REFERENCES MAY BE SENT TO MILLER REPAIR LLC, PO BOX 89 MAXWELL, NE 69151. CALL, (308) 582-4303 Cowboy/Ranch Hand wanted for Northern Arizona ranch. Bunkhouse living quarter only. Need: well-rounded livestock experience, tack, clean driving record. In addition to horseback work must be willing to haul water, shoe horses, mechanic, and run fence. Call 928-289-2619 or 928-699-8587 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. pst. or email info@bartbar.com

ID - EARN $75,000/YR PART TIME IN THE LIVESTOCK OR EQUIPMENT APPRAISAL BUSINESS. AGRICULTURAL BACKGROUND REQUIRED. CLASSROOM OR HOME STUDY COURSES AVAILABLE., (800) 488-7570 NE - CENTRAL NEBRASKA GRAIN/LIVESTOCK FARM IS SEEKING A FULL-TIME EXPERIENCED INDIVIDUAL FOR GRAIN & LIVESTOCK ENTERPRISE. REFERENCES REQUIRED. CDL PREFERRED. COMPETITIVE WAGE BASED ON EXPERIENCE. NEAR KEARNEY, NE. CALL, (308) 233-4244 Combine Operators & Truck Drivers Needed for the 2012 Harvest Season If you can take pride in doing a job well done and make a commitment to doing your best, call Gary Frank Harvesting 1210 Steel Ave. • Scott City, KS 67871

Cell 620-874-1295 Home 620-872-5704 www.garyfrankharvesting.com • garyfrank9770@gmail.com

KS - HARVEST HELP NEEDED FROM MAY THROUGH NOVEMBER OF 2012. CDL DRIVERS & MECHANICS. PLEASE CALL, (785) 545-5636 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES KS - CORN, MILO, WHEAT HARVESTING WANTED. TWO JD MACHINES & SUPPORTING TRUCKS., (785) 567-8515 IA - DISC BLADE SHARPENING. ON-SITE ROLLING, NO TEAR DOWN, NO GRINDING. CALL, (319) 377-0936 SD - WILL BALE LARGE ROUND BALES WITH MF HESSTON 2856A OR LARGE SQUARE BALES WITH NEW MF HESSTON 2170XD (EXTRA DENSITY) BALER. ALL CROPS. WILL TRAVEL CALL DENNIS AT, (605) 430-1496

2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES CONT’D SD - SPREAD IT, LLC-CUSTOM FEEDLOT CLEANING & MANURE, (605) 940-3275 NE - WANTED ALFALFA, GRASS & WHEAT STRAW TO CUT, BALING INCLUDED FOR CASH OR SHARES. PLEASE CALL, (308) 999-3673 FOR SALE NE - CUSTOM MANURE HAULING. 3 SPREADERS & A PAYLOADER AVAILABLE. OUR REPUTATION FOLLOWS US. KENT BACKER, (402) 499-8060

STUPKA CUSTOM PAINT & DESIGN Residential • Commercial Farm & Ranch 15 years experience in painting, staining & finishing Reasonable Prices Call Jesse for an estimate

308-293-5484

email: stupkapainting@gmail.com 2601 - CARS FOR SALE NE - FORD 289 MOTOR 1967, (402) 4825491 2602 - PICKUPS WANTED TO BUY NE - HD COIL SPRINGS FOR 1971 3/4 TON CHEVY PICKUP, END GATE FOR 1980 GMC 3/4 TON, (308) 587-2344 KS - GOOD FACTORY BED FOR ‘73-’79 FORD PICKUP, NO RUST THROUGH, (620) 8652541 FOR SALE KS - 88 CHEVY 1 TON, 4WD, 6. 2 DIESEL, 4 SP, FLATBED, (785) 935-2480 NE - THIRD SEAT FOR 95-99 SUBURBAN, TAUPE LEATHER, $100.00, (308) 624-2177 NE - ‘55 IH 6 CYL TRUCK MOTOR, (402) 482-5491 NE - ‘57 FORD 292 ENGINE, (402) 482-5491 NE - PARTING OUT A DODGE 3/4 TON, CUMMINS, (402) 482-5491 NE - 1984 FORD, IH DIESEL MOTOR, (402) 482-5491 2603 - TRUCKS WANTED TO BUY

COLLECTOR WANTS SALVAGE: Old Pick-ups, Trucks, Cars, Panels, Station Wagons Before 1959, Model A Bodies. PAYING WAY MORE THAN SALVAGE PRICE! Please let me know what you have! In the Dakotas every week! Call, E-mail, or write

218.639.2809 ddonley@eot.com • David Donley 36961 State HWY 78 • Ottertail, MN 56571

FOR SALE SD - 1952 IH L160 TRUCK, 16’ COMBINATION GRAIN & STOCK BOX & HOIST, GOOD CONDITION. $2000, (605) 386-2131 2604 - GRAIN TRAILERS FOR SALE NE - 1996 48’ WILSON GRAIN TRAILER, 10’1” SPREAD, LED LIGHTS, 66” SIDES, GOOD TIRES & BRAKES, $18,750.00, (308) 485-4486 KS - GOOSENECK 350 BUSHEL, DUAL HOPPER, TANDEM DUAL, ROLL TARP, EXCELLENT, $6,500.00, (620) 865-2541 2605 - STOCK TRAILERS FOR SALE WY - B/P STOCK TRAILERS, HORSE TRAILERS, DELUXE HORSE TRAILERS & GOOSENECK STOCK TRAILERS & MANY MORE TRAILERS AVAILABLE. CONTACT ARLIN HORST AT BIG HORN MACHINERY TO ORDER: ARLINHORST@Q. COM OR CALL, (307) 321-4706 2614 - BOATS & PWC FOR SALE KS - 16’ HOBIECAT, $600.00, (785) 7782962 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE NE - MONI MOTOR GLIDER AND TRAILER, LOW HOURS, (402) 364-2592 2616 - TIRES WANTED TO BUY NE - HOT PATCH VULCANIZING PATCHES, (308) 587-2344 NE - WANTED 4 18. 4 X 34 FIRESTONE TIRES, (308) 587-2344 NE - 11. 2 X 36 OR 12. 4 X 36 TIRES, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - 15” SPLIT RIMS, 8 HOLE, 750 MUD/SNOW, (308) 587-2344 NE - RIM-GARD, NON CORROSIVE, TIRE BALLAST, (308) 587-2344

April 26, 2012 2616 - TIRES FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - FOR SALE: (2) 23. 5 X 25” LOADER TIRES. (2) 18. 4 X 42” TEN PLY. (1) 1200 X 20” 16 PLY. CALL CELL - 402-826-0632 OR HOME -, (402) 826-5264 2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS FOR SALE KS - 66 IH 2000, DETROIT, 15 SP W/HENDERSON TWINSCREW, TULSA WINCH. CALL 785-817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 KS - 1974 UTILITY CHASSIS W/2-350 BU. GRAVITY BOXES, HYD AUGERS, ETC., $9,500.00, (620) 865-2541 NE - 1996 WILSON MACHINERY TRAILER. 48’ MOVE ALL, NEW BREAKS & NEW DRUMS. NEW CABLE ON THE WINCH. ALUMINUM PULL OUTS ON THE SIDE. $25,000. PLEASE CALL, (308) 340-8389 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER WANTED TO BUY KS - 14. 5” RIM FOR TRAILER HOUSE, 5 HOLE, (785) 778-2962 FOR SALE NE - TRANSMISSION, GENERATOR, STARTER, REAR AXLE REMOVABLE CARRIER DIFFERENTIAL UNIT. FITS 1946 CHEVY 2 TON TRUCK, (308) 587-2344 KS - 1992 6. 2 CHEVY DIESEL COMPLETE ENGINE., $110.00, (785) 778-2962 2802 - DOZERS FOR SALE KS - TEREX 8220A DOZER, PS, TILT, GOOD RUNNING MACHINE, (785) 935-2480 MO - LEON 1040 10’ DOZER BLADE, $2,500.00, (660) 548-3804 2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 SK - WANTED: CATERPILLER CABLE SCRAPERS, LEVER HOLDINGS INC. CALL, (306) 682-3332 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 NE - PULL BEHIND BOX SCRAPERS, 10’ & 12’; 3PT’S 6’ & 8’, (402) 678-2277 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 MO - TOREQ 40” PTO DITCHER, $7,800.00, (660) 548-3804 MO - BUFFALO 12’ BOX BLADES IN STOCK, (660) 548-3804 ND - SCRAPER: BUY & SELL OLD CABLE SCRAPERS, CAT 60, 70, 80; LETOURNEAU LS, LP, FP; A/C; ALL MAKES AND SIZES, WILL CONVERT OVER TO HYDRAULICS, VERY PROFESSIONALLY DONE, TIRES & PARTS. CONTACT STEVE, WWW. STEVEVOIGHTMAN. COM. CELL 701-6808015 OR BUS., (701) 742-2182 MO - TOREQ 6 YD. HYD EJECT, (660) 5483804 KS - JD 770 BH GRADER, $35,000.00, (785) 871-0711 KS - 6 YD PULL TYPE FORCED EJECTION, $2,950.00, (785) 871-0711 2806 - CRANES & DRAGLINES FOR RENT NE - 28 TON NATIONAL CRANE, 152 FT. REACH, (402) 387-0347 2807 - GENERATORS FOR SALE MN - AUTOMATIC GENERATOR SETS 15KW500KW, NEW & USED, LOW TIME GEN SETS. REMOTE WELL GENERATORS. SERVING FARMERS SINCE 1975. STANDBY POWER SYSTEMS, WINDOM MN, MON-SAT 9-5., (800) 419-9806 ND - GENERATORS: 20 KW TO 2000KWDIESEL, PROPANE & NATURAL GAS. ALL LOW-HOUR TAKEOUT GENSETS. CUMMINS /ONAN, KOHLER, CAT, DETROIT DIESEL & MORE. ABRAHAM GENERATOR SALES COOPERSTOWN, ND (INVENTORY ONLINE) WWW. ABRAHAMINDUSTRIAL. COM. WE SHIP NATIONWIDE!, (701) 797-4766 2809 - CONSTRUCTION TRUCKS FOR SALE KS - 1997 LOADKING, 55 TON, 3 AXLE, LAY DOWN NECK, W/BEAVERTAILS. CALL 785817-5188 (CELL) OR, (785) 935-2480 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS WANTED TO BUY NE - PALLET FORK, NEEDS TO BE QUIK TATCH & TINES NEED TO BE 60” FOR SKID STEER, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE KS - COMPLETE SET OF BOOKS (REPAIR MANUALS) T-200 BOBCAT SKID LOADER, $50.00, (785) 778-2962 KS - BOBCAT 963, $20,000.00, (785) 8710711 2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE NE - 1500-8000# (MOSTLY 4000#), AIR TIRES & NEW FORKS, (402) 678-2277 OK - PETTIBONE, 30’ LIFT CELL 580-5251265, $3,500.00, (580) 361-2265

2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE - CONT’D MO - CAT 8000# 2 STAGE W/PNEUMATIC TIRES, HYDRAULICS ARE EXCELLENT, ENGINE NEEDS WORK. CHEAP!, (660) 5483804 2827 - BUILDING SUPPLIES FOR SALE

MN - THE BEST RADIANT FLOOR HEAT WATER TUBING. CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE ON A COMPLETE SYSTEM. VOLUME DISCOUNTS, FACTORY OUTLET PRICES. COMPARE & SAVE! GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES. WWW. MIKESHEATING. COM & CALL, (800) 446-4043 3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS WANTED TO BUY SD - MINNEAPOLIS MOLINE ANY OLDER MM, (605) 386-2131 FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTORS! BIEWER’S TRACTOR & MACH. SALV. SPECIALIZES IN 1920-85 TRACTOR PARTS. FREE NATIONWIDE LOCATING. BARNESVILLE, MN. SEARCH PARTS & SEE OVER 100 ANTIQUE TRACTORS PICTURED AT SALVAGETRACTORS. COM, (218) 493-4696 NE - TRACTOR PARTS FOR SALE. NEW AFTERMARKET PARTS FOR MOST MAKES OF TRACTORS. FRONT END PARTS, 3 PT HITCH PARTS, RADIATORS, SEATS, STEERING WHEELS, BATTERY BOXES, PTO PARTS, DRAWBARS, WATER PUMPS, DECALS & MORE. CLASSIC AG, AINSWORTH, NE., (800) 286-2171 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES WANTED TO BUY SD - IH 6 SPEED SPECIAL TRUCK, (605) 386-2131 SD - OLDER JEEPS, CJ 2A, 1948 OR OLDER, ALSO MILITARY, (605) 386-2131 NE - 1950 FORD CRESTLINER & 1951 VICTORIA, (308) 876-2515 FOR SALE NE - TEENS, 20’S, EARLY 30’S IHC TRUCKS, PARTS, LITERATURE, (308) 894-6965 NE - 1950 GMC 450 WRECKER, GOOD TIRES, GOOD CAB, GOOD GLASS, $2,500.00, (308) 874-4562 NE - ‘67 MERCURY CYCLONE, 289, TO BE RESTORED, (402) 482-5491 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8”, 3/4”, 7/8”, 1”, CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356

BARBWIRE FENCE BUILDERS: Removal, construction and repairs. (785)625-5819 • (800)628-6611 Cell: (785) 635-1922 NE - PIPE 2 3/8”, 2 7/8”, 3 1/2”, 4 1/2”, 5 1/2”, CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356

12 GAUGE USED GUARDRAIL Hot Dip galvanized. 26’ Please call for delivered quote 423-791-4771 • 721-726-3562 620-546-3507 SD - FOREVER POST 4”X6’; 4”X7’; 4”X8’; PLASTIC FENCE POST CAN BE NAILED, STAPLED, SCREWED, WON’T ROT. MAJOR DISC. W/2 BUNDLES OR MORE. QUALITY HAY TARP W/STRAP STEEL STORAGE CONTAINERS 8’X20’ 8’X40’. WE DELIVER HAENSEL DISTRIBUTING. CALL CLINT 605-310-6653 JOHN, (605) 351-5760

STRUCTURAL PIPE

 Excellent Condition  Overstock Price 

2 3/8 @ $.95 ALL SIZES AVAILABLE RPJ ENERGY Call or E-mail Ray: 970.405.8866 raypropes@rpjenergy.com • www.rpjenergy.com


April 26, 2012 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 500-5 1/2” STEEL T POSTS, 50-5” X 8’ CREOSOTE CORNER POSTS, (402) 4619336 NE - RED BIRD CEDAR POSTS WITH LOTS OF RED. 6 1/2 TO 7’ LINE POSTS, $4.25. CORNER & CORRAL $1.30 PER FOOT. 402-3406406 OR, (402) 569-2174 3010 - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES FOR SALE

Legitimate Work-At-Home Opportunity No Sales. No Investments. No Risk. Training and websites provided. Weekly/monthly income plus bonus and benefits. Contact Kim: 303-915-8858

SMALL TOWNS OR BIG CITIES, EVERYONE NEEDS STORAGE! We build storage units and teach you how to run your own business. Perfect for retirement security or extra income! Call and make an appointment to get started today! Office: 308.284.4946

Cell:

Heartland Express 3030 - OTHER FOR SALE NE - REASONABLY PRICE MECHANICS GLOVES, WARM GLOVES, MITTENS & OTHER GLOVES., (308) 587-2344

HI-TEMP MINI-INCINERATORS Coming soon create your own BIOCHAR for your garden. For Updates go to: WWW.BURNRIGHTPRODUCTS.COM Outdoor incineration Thermal shredding Home - Business - Cabin

BURN BARREL REPLACEMENT Call 262-227-5727 WY - FOR SALE: NEW AND USED COAL STOKER STOVES. ALSO MAGIC HEAT, RECLAIMERS, PARTS, SERVICE AND ADVICE FOR MOST MAKES. THANK YOU!, (307) 7543757 NE - SELLING OUT NUT AND BOLT BUSINESS. GRADE 5, ZINC PLATED BOLTS, NUTS, LOCKS AND FLATS AT OR BELOW 2005 WHOLESALE PRICES. EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE BIG! FOR COMPLETE INVENTORY CALL 308-928-2869 OR 308-920-1010 SOUTH CENTRAL NEBRASKA www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

3011 - HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS WANTED TO BUY NE - REAR TINE ROTO TILLER, (308) 5872344 3018 - LUMBER FOR SALE NE - CEDAR LUMBER, GREEN OR KILN DRIED, PINE, BLACK WALNUT, COTTONWOOD & OAK AVAILABLE. CEDAR MULCH CHIPS. PEELED TREATED CEDAR FENCE POST. DRY KILN CEDAR OR PINE SHAVINGS. DELIVERY AVAILABLE. SPRINGVIEW, NE. WE ALSO BUY LOGS. CALL, (402) 322-3600

.3032 - GIFT ITEMS FOR SALE MN - GREAT GIFTS FOR YOUNG & OLD! ILLUSTRATED CHILDREN’S BOOKS ABOUT FARM FAMILIES. COLLECTOR SERIES OF STORIES ACCURATELY DEPICT FARM FAMILIES, ANIMALS & CHORES WITH IMAGINATION & HUMOR. PRESERVE YOUR FARM HERITAGE WITH THESE KEEPSAKE, BOOKS. SAMPLE PAGES & REVIEWS BY CHILDREN, FARMERS, PARENTS & GRANDPARENTS AT WWW. GORDONFREDRICKSON. COM. ORDER FROM AUTHOR ONLINE, BY EMAIL OR BY PHONE. FOR MORE INFO OR QUESTIONS: TWOGFSC@INTEGRA. NET, (952) 461-2111 3034 - WIND GENERATORS WANTED TO BUY SD - JACOBS 32 VOLT WIND GENERATOR, ALSO WINCHARGER USED DURING THE ‘30’S & ‘40’S, WILL PAY ACCORDING TO CONDITION, (605) 386-2131 5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE NE - HALF BLOCK IN FAIRFIELD, NE. 40’ X 25’ BUILDING., (402) 726-2488 WANTED TO RENT KS - YOUNG FARMER LOOKING FOR LAND TO RENT, CUSTOM FARM OR PLANT IN SHERMAN & CHEYENNE COUNTIES. DAN SHIELDS FARMING, (785) 821-0804 www.myfarmandranch.com

308.289.5777

Page 31

WANTED:LEADERS

Moms and Dads, are you looking for a home-based business that will allow you to spend more quality time for yourself and family, and still earn a great income for your farm or ranch? This is it!

5001 - NON-FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FOR SALE BY OWNER COUNTRY LIVING! 34 ACRES AND LARGE NEWLY REMODELED HOME. 4 MILES NORTHEAST OF BRIDGEPORT, MORRILL COUNTY, NEBRASKA. 24 IRRIGATED ACRES, TREES, HUNTING, GUEST OR RENTAL HOUSE, BARN, EXTRA GARAGE, GRAIN BIN AND MORE.

PHONE 308-262-1370

HI-TEMP MINI-INCINERATORS Coming soon create your own BIOCHAR for your garden. For Updates go to: WWW.BURNRIGHTPRODUCTS.COM Outdoor incineration Thermal shredding Home - Business - Cabin

BURN BARREL REPLACEMENT Call 262-227-5727

LEAVE MESSAGE IF NO ANSWER.

Home for Sale 30 minutes from Lake McConaughy In quiet & serene Big Springs, NE. 2008 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, full basement 1.5 car garage. ---$47,900--Must see to appreciate! Picture available by email.

Please Call Kathy at 308-889-3119 7000 - TRADE SHOWS FOR SALE IN - PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT YOUR LAND. EARN TOP $$$ FOR HUNTING RIGHTS. CALL FOR A FREE QUOTE & INFO PACKET TOLL FREE 1-866-309-1507 OR WWW.BASECAMPLEASING.COM, (866) 309-1507

• Rated in Top 100 growth companies by Business Week and Fortune Magazine. • Regional leaders earning $5K-$15K per month helping people

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

I AVERAGE

$100,000PER YEAR

Let me show you how! “Business success is determined by each individual’s own efforts.”

CALL BOBBY, Independent Distributor

7001 - SPECIAL EVENTS FOR SALE NE - MID-AMERICA ALFALFA EXPO, FEATURING THE NEWEST HAY EQUIPMENT & PRODUCTS, ALSO AN EXHIBITOR AUCTION. EXPO IS FEB 5 & FEB 6, 2013, 8 AM-5 PM AUCTION IS FEB 5, 3:45PM; ALL OF THIS TAKES PLACE AT BUFFALO COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, KEARNEY, NE, (800) 743-1649 7003 - AUCTIONS FOR SALE

1-866-234-8426

Skyline Woods Country Club Liquidation Wall to Wall Including Salvage Live On-Site Auction with Online Bidding

Saturday, June 2, 2012 at 9:00 AM CDT 2410 S 217 St. • Elkhorn, NE 68022 Skyline Wood Golf Course has been sold. The new Owner is planning a complete makeover of the entire course, clubhouse and equipment. Everything on the grounds will be sold. The Clubhouse will be razed. Salvage rights will be auctioned.

www.auctionsolutionsinc.com

Annual Iowa DNR Gun and Bow Auction Live On-Site Auction

Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 7:00 AM CDT Iowa State Fairgrounds Des Moines, IA Iowa DNR annual gun and bow auction at the fairgrounds in Des Moines Saturday May 19. Over 400 long guns, bows, tree stands and more.

www.auctionsolutionsinc.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Midlands Classified Ad Network WORK FOR DEPT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES. VIEW CURRENT JOB OPENINGS AT WWW.DHHS.NE.GOV GOSHEN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 1 WWW.GOSHEN.K12.WY.US. TEACHING VACANCIES. SALARY RANGE $42,000 – $75,250. $3,000 SPECIAL ED INCENTIVE BENEFIT PACKAGE. SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER – ELEMENTARY (WILL SERVE A WIDE RANGE OF DISTRICT STUDENTS K-8; REQUIRES EXPERIENCE WITH BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS & AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS). ENGLISH TEACHER – HIGH SCHOOL. SCIENCE TEACHER – HIGH SCHOOL IN GOSHEN COUNTY, 100% OF TEACHER RETIREMENT IS PAID BY THE SCHOOL DISTRICT, WITH NO STATE INCOME TAX. THE DISTRICT IS AFFILIATED WITH THE SCHLECHTY CENTER AND IS COMMITTED TO OFFERING OUTSTANDING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES. LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT #2 IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE TRANSPORTATION COORDINATOR ADMINISTRATOR POSITION. THE POSITION IS 260 DAYS PER YEAR AND IS RESPONSIBLE FOR MANAGING THE COMPLETE TRANSPORTATION OPERATIONS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT INCLUDING SUPERVISION OF ALL SCHOOL BUS STAFF, MECHANICS, AND TRANSPORTATION OFFICE STAFF. MAIL COMPLETED CLASSIFIED APPLICATION ALONG WITH A RESUME TO: LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT #2, P.O. BOX 489, PINE BLUFFS, WY 82082. APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE FROM OUR WEB SITE AT HTTP://LARAMIE2.ORG. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE CALL 307245-4050 HIGH VOLUME VETERINARY CLINIC IN THE PANHANDLE AREA IS SEEKING THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: RECEPTIONIST; KENNEL ATTENDANT; LICENSED VET TECH; TECH ASSISTANTS. (BOTH FOR SMALL AND LARGE ANIMAL AREAS). MUST BE MOTIVATED AND FRIENDLY INDIVIDUALS. EMAIL RESUME TO: PIONEERANIMALCLINIC@YAHOO.COM SECONDARY MATH POSITION. DUE TO RETIREMENT MITCHELL PUBLIC SCHOOLS WILL BE ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR A SECONDARY MATH POSITION FOR THE 2012-2013 SCHOOL YEAR. POSITION MAY INCLUDE ASSISTANT VARSITY FOOTBALL AND TRACK. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 308-623-1707 OR 308-623-2235. INTERESTED APPLICANTS NEED TO SEND A LETTER OF APPLICATION, REFERENCE’S, RESUME’ AND TRANSCRIPTS TO: SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS MITCHELL PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1819 19TH AVE, MITCHELL NE 69357 DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES SUPERVISOR.

CONSIDER MAKING A DIFFERENCE WITH DHHS. THIS POSITION HIRES, TRAINS, SUPERVISES, AND EVALUATES SERVICE COORDINATORS PROVIDING SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES. MONITORS POLICIES AND PROGRAMS AND MEETS WITH FAMILIES AND SERVICE PROVIDERS AS NEEDED. A BACHELOR DEGREE AND EXPERIENCE IN A RELATED FIELD IS REQUIRED. FIND OUR MORE AT WWW.STATEJOBS.NEBRASKA.GOV. W. NEBRASKA GROCERY STORE OWNERS RETIRING. PROFITABLE, FULL SERVICE GROCERY. TOTALLY RENOVATED FACILITY. EXCELLENT LOCATION AND PARKING. GREAT SMALL TOWN LIVING. KEVIN ROSS, ASMUS BROTHERS REALTY, 308-641-5600. UTILITY LINE INSTRUCTOR (OFF-CAMPUS/SERVING WESTERN NEBRASKA) FULL-TIME POSITION STARTING WITH THE FALL 2012 SEMESTER. ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN RELATED FIELD AND FIVE YEARS' EXPERIENCE REQUIRED; BACHELOR'S DEGREE PREFERRED. EXTENSIVE BACKGROUND IN ELECTRICAL SAFETY AND REGULATORY ISSUES RELATED TO HIGH VOLTAGE RURAL ELECTRIC PRACTICES REQUIRED. FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO APPLY FOR THIS POSITION, VISIT THE COLLEGE WEBSITE AT WWW.NORTHEAST.EDU AND CLICK ON THE EMPLOYMENT TAB. APPLICANTS MUST COMPLETE THE ONLINE APPLICATION TO BE CONSIDERED. CLOSING DATE: MAY 1, 2012. NORTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE HUMAN RESOURCES 800-348-9033 X7044/402-844-7044 EOE EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE IS A DIVERSE INSTITUTION WELCOMING ALL APPLICATIONS FOR A FULL-TIME 12- MONTH ADMISSIONS COORDINATOR. RESPONSIBILITIES: MATCHING THE NEEDS OF PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS WITH EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE THROUGH STUDENT RECRUITMENT, RETENTION, AND ADMISSIONS ACTIVITIES. REQUIREMENTS: BACHELOR'S DEGREE. FAMILIARITY WITH ADMISSIONS, RECRUITING, MARKETING, AND FINANCIAL AID DESIRED. SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE MUST DEMONSTRATE STRONG COMPUTER SKILLS AND EXCEPTIONAL INTERPERSONAL AND PUBLIC COMMUNICATION SKILLS. MUST HAVE THE ABILITY TO SEEK OUT AND COMMUNICATE WITH MINORITY STUDENTS; POSSESS A VALID DRIVER LICENSE; AND BE WILLING TO TRAVEL. EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACKAGE, HIRING RANGE $45,487 - $50,209. SUBMIT LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME, THREE LETTERS OF REFERENCE, OFFICIAL GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE TRANSCRIPTS TO THE PERSONNEL OFFICE 3200 WEST C ST. TORRINGTON, WY 82240 FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO; WWW.EWC.WY.EDU

IRRIGATION PARTS & INSIDE SALES HELP Center pivot Dealer in Central Nebraska looking for a parts person/inside sales person. Must have excellent computer skills and people skills. Would prefer some knowledge of irrigation equipment. Call 866-544-2300 for an application or fax resume to (308) 537-2379. Resumes can be e-mailed to horizonag@cozadtel.net 49839

EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER SIMON CONTRACTORS, A DIVERSIFIED GENERAL CONTRACTOR SPECIALIZING IN HIGHWAY, BUILDING AND ROAD CONSTRUCTION THROUGHOUT WY, NE, SD, AND CO HAS AN IMMEDIATE OPENING IN OUR SCOTTSBLUFF, NE LOCATION FOR: TRUCK DRIVERS CDL-A OR B AND CLEAN DRIVING RECORD REQUIRED. COMPETITIVE WAGES AND EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACKAGE OFFERED. SEND RESUME TO: P.O. BOX 147 SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361, FAX TO 308-632-3442, OR APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.SIMONCONTRACTORS.COM. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, M/F, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION WORKERS WANTED: WERNER CONSTRUCTION IS LOOKING FOR CLASS A CDL TRUCK DRIVERS, FLAGGERS, GENERAL LABORERS, LOADER OPERATORS, MILLING MACHINE OPERATORS AND GENERAL PLANT HELPERS TO WORK THROUGHOUT THE STATE OF NEBRASKA. CALL WERNER CONSTRUCTION AT 1-(800)-967-2295 OR (402) 463-4545 FOR APPLICATION. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT/NURSE PRACTITIONER – ED. PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT/NURSE PRACTITIONER OPPORTUNITY IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT. ACLS & PALS REQUIRED. ATLS PREFERRED; MEMBERSHIP TO MEDICAL STAFF, INCLUDING HOSPITAL PRIVILEGES & REGISTER WITH THE DEA, REQUIRED. NEBRASKA LICENSE AS A PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT OR NURSE PRACTITIONER. ONE OR MORE OF YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IS REQUIRED. GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER. CALL: JOHN AT (800) 543-6629 EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM ICU MANAGER. STRONG LEADERSHIP AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS ARE REQUIRED. 3 TO 5 YEARS CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN INTENSIVE CARE SETTING REQUIRED. 3 TO 5 YRS EXPERIENCE IN MANAGEMENT REQUIRED, EXPERIENCE AS A CHARGE NURSE, EDUCATOR, COORDINATOR AND/OR OTHER LEADERSHIP ROLES WILL BE CONSIDERED. NE RN LICENSE & BSN REQUIRED. GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER CALL: JOHN AT (800) 543-6629 EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM MEDICAL/SURGICAL FLOOR MANAGER. STRONG LEADERSHIP AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS ARE REQUIRED. NE RN LICENSE & BSN REQUIRED. 3 TO 5 YRS EXPERIENCE IN MANAGEMENT REQUIRED, EXPERIENCE AS A CHARGE NURSE, EDUCATOR, COORDINATOR AND/OR OTHER LEAD-

ERSHIP ROLES WILL BE CONSIDERED. GREAT PLAINS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER. CALL: JOHN AT (800) 543-6629 EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.GPRMC.COM AUTO TECH – WANTED. ART'S REPAIR SERVICE LOOKING FOR MECHANIC W/ GENERAL REPAIR EXPERIENCE & POSITIVE ATTITUDE. EMAIL RESUME TO A1TRUCKPERFORMANCE@GMAIL.COM OR FAX 308-630-8080 AGRONOMIST. SCOTTSBLUFF, NE AGRONOMIST WITH BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE NEEDED TO FILL POSITION VACANT DUE TO RETIREMENT. THE AGRONOMIST WILL WORK WITH GROWERS AND COMPANY FIELD REPS, RESEARCH FACILITIES AND INDUSTRY GROUPS. THIS POSITION IS HEAVILY INVOLVED WITH SEED PROGRAMS AND SEED TRIALS. SOME WORK EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. SOME TRAVEL REQUIRED. SEND RESUME AND COVER LETTER TO: HUMAN RESOURCE DEPARTMENT KELLEY BEAN CO. PO BOX 2488 SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69363. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY & DRUG-FREE EMPLOYER NATIONAL DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY IS LOOKING TO HIRE A DELIVERY DRIVER FULL RANGE OF BENEFITS. SALARY DOE. MON-FRI, ON CALL WILL BE EXPECTED. DRUG TESTING & BACKGROUND SCREENING A MUST. SEND RESUME TO: STACY.MUSGRAVE@ROTECH.COM EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE IS SEARCHING FOR A 9-MONTH TENURE TRACK MUSIC INSTRUCTOR. REQUIREMENTS: MASTER'S DEGREE IN MUSIC, MUSIC EDUCATION, OR RELATED FIELD. DUTIES: TEACHING DAY, EVENING, AND ONLINE MUSIC THEORY AND APPLICATION COURSES; FACILITATING A LEARNING-CENTERED ENVIRONMENT; AND SUPPORTING THE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE COLLEGE. MUST BE AN ENTHUSIASTIC TEAM PLAYER WHO CAN CONNECT WITH STUDENTS AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS. POSITION BEGINS AUGUST OF 2012. SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE. PLEASE CONTACT OUR WEB SITE HTTP://EWC.WY.EDU/EMPLOYMENT FOR FURTHER DETAILS. APPLICATION PROCESS: SUBMIT LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME, THREE LETTERS OF REFERENCE, AND OFFICIAL GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE TRANSCRIPTS TO THE PERSONNEL OFFICE 3200 WEST C ST. TORRINGTON, WY 82240. POSITION OPEN UNTIL FILLED. EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE IS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER LARRY KLIMEK TRUCKING, INC. IS LOOKING FOR AN EXPERIENCED OTR DRIVER. CLASS A CDL. HOME WEEKLY, INSURANCE, PAID VACATIONS,

MORE THAN JUST SPRAYERS! Check With Us First For Parts

• Banjo Valves, Strainers and Fittings • Hypro. and Ace Pumps and Parts • Teejet Nozzle Bodies • Turbo Drop Nozzles • Fertilizer Orifices • All Sizes of Hose

Select Sprayers, LLC

4319 Imperial Ave., East Hwy. 30, Kearney or call

308-338-8006

48953

COMPETITIVE WAGES. 800-258-8361 TYLOR PETITT OF SMITH, SNYDER & PETITT SEEKS ENERGETIC, HARDWORKING LEGAL ASSISTANT OR LITIGATION PARALEGAL W/ EXPERIENCE. MUST BE ORGANIZED, DETAIL ORIENTED, ABLE TO COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY W/ CLIENTS & ABLE TO MULTITASK. SEND RESUME TO 1904 FIRST AVENUE, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361 OR E-MAIL RESUME TO AMY@VANLAW.NET EQUIPMENT OPERATORS & CDL DRIVERS PLEASE GO TO PAUL REED CONSTRUCTION OFFICE AT 2970 N 10TH IN GERING, NE 69341 FOR APPLICATION OR CALL 308-635-2213. THE POTTER-DIX PUBLIC SCHOOL IS SEEKING APPLICANTS FOR A PRINCIPAL/ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR POSITION FOR THE 2012-2013 SCHOOL YEAR. THE POSITION COULD BE K-6 OR 7-12. FULL BENEFITS AND COMPETITIVE SALARY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE. THE POSITION WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL A QUALIFIED CANDIDATE IS SELECTED. SUBMIT A LETTER OF INTEREST, TWO RECENT LETTERS OF SUPPORT, RESUMÉ, AND A COPY OF A VALID NEBRASKA ADMINISTRATIVE CERTIFICATE TO: SUPERINTENDENT POTTER-DIX PUBLIC SCHOOLS PO BOX 189 POTTER NE 69156-0189 OR YOU MAY EMAIL TO KTHOMAS@PANESU.ORG POTTER-DIX IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. BRIDGEPORT PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING APPLICANTS FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR. RECOMMENDED QUALIFICATIONS INCLUDE FIVE YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN NETWORK ADMINISTRATION, TWO YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WITH SERVER AND DESKTOP VIRTUALIZATION, MCSE OR MCSA PREFERRED, TWO YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WITH ROUTER AND SWITCH CONFIGURATION, AND EXTENSIVE EXPERIENCE SUPPORTING DESKTOP AND END USERS. THIS IS A SALARIED POSITION WITH PAY NEGOTIABLE BASED ON EXPERIENCE. APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE AT 800 Q IN BRIDGEPORT. CALL (308) 262-1470 IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS.

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EXPERIENCED SERVICE TECHNICIAN Central Nebraska Irrigation Dealership looking for experienced service technicians. Competitive pay with benefits package for proper candidate. Late model equipment. Must have a drivers license. Moving bonus for chosen applicants, call 866-544-2300 for an application or fax resume to (308) 537-2379. Resumes can be e-mailed to horizonag@cozadtel.net 49838


Page 32

Heartland Express

April 26, 2012

49311

FROM THE PLANT TO YOUR

PICKUP As an American-made fuel, biodiesel is the only proven high-performing

©2012 United Soybean Board [44373-3/12]

diesel fuel that can also help us declare our freedom from foreign oil. And now that there are more distributors than ever before, there’s never been a better time to ask for it and use it.

AVAILABLE WHERE FARMERS GROW America’s Advanced Biofuel www.biodiesel.org

49400

/HE_042612  

http://www.agnet.net/pub_pages/HE_042612.pdf

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