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April 15, 2010 Issue 232-14-8

Study: Ethanol Critical to Economy

Look inside this issue for... • Tree Planting Is Important In Nebraska History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 • Table Talk Leads to a Marketing Venture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 • District 4 FFA . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pg 9-12 • District 9 FFA . . . . . . . . . . . .Pg 13-16

AGP Hastings ethanol plant (The Omaha World-Herald) By Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent A new economic study has found that maintaining policies that encourage domestic ethanol production and use is essential to the U.S. economy, said Todd Sneller, administrator for the Nebraska Ethanol Board. The study, prepared by IHS Global Insight, found that undermining the U.S. ethanol industry by eliminating import tariffs and increasing the tax on domestic ethanol would have severe economic consequences for American corn farmers. The study said dropping the current import tariff on ethanol would create a negative ripple effect, causing corn prices to drop by 30 cents per bushel and eliminating as many as 160,000 full and parttime jobs. Unlike other energy subsidies, incentives for biofuels are scheduled to end this year. Nebraska would lose more than 13,700 jobs should the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit (VEETC) not be renewed before it expires in

December, according to the Nebraska Corn Board. The job loss numbers were part of a recent study released by the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA). VEETC provides oil refiners and fuel blenders a 45-cent tax credit on each gallon of ethanol they blend with gasoline. The credit provides an important economic incentive to invest in equipment to blend and use ethanol, which in turn supports growth and advancements in the sector, according to the Nebraska Corn Board. "VEETC is an important component of our renewable fuels program, and now is certainly not the time to stunt the growth of biofuels or shock rural communities with significant job losses," said Jon Holzfaster, a director of the Nebraska Corn Board and chairman of the National Corn Growers Association ethanol committee. The study, conducted for RFA by ENTRIX, an economic consulting firm, concluded that not Continued on page 8

• Pasture Loss Due to Grasshopper Infestation Eligible for ELAP . . . . . .19 For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit the Heartland Express website at www.myfarmandranch.com • Country Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3, 5 • Lee Pitts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 • Government Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 • Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 18 • Heartland Cattleman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 • Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21-23

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 4/2/10

Wind Projects in Nebraska This article originally appeared in The Nebraska Lawyer (c)NSBA 2010. Reprinted with permission. By Jon Blumenthal & David Levy In 2008, Midwest Wind Energy, together with Edison Mission Group (Irvine, California) and Tenaska, Inc., developed an 80 megawatt wind farm in Bloomfield, Nebraska (Knox County). The Bloomfield project will serve approximately 25,000 homes with renewable energy. Twentyseven Vestas V-90 wind turbines were used to complete the project. Each turbine spans 410 feet from the base to the blade tip. The Bloomfield project - the largest privately developed wind energy project in Nebraska - signaled a turning point in the development of wind energy in the state. Nebraska has a wind resource which some estimate to be the sixth best wind in the nation, and an abundance of farmland in which to situate wind turbines and develop projects. However, Nebraska is also not without challenges with respect to wind energy projects. Nebraska is the only "public power" state in the United States, which limits the available purchasers of renewable energy developed from wind (and other) resources. In the Bloomfield project, Elkhorn Ridge Wind LLC-the entity formed by the above developers-entered into a power purchase agreement with Nebraska Public Power District for the purchase of the power generated. Nonetheless, certain tax incentives, political

pressure, and America's desire to increase renewable sources of energy make Nebraska poised to expand its wind development. Nebraska's neighbors, Iowa and Missouri, constituted two of the top three states in the addition of new wind power generation capacity created in 2009. In 2009, Iowa added 160 megawatts of new wind power generating capacity, and Missouri added 146 megawatts. Nebraska's unique public power distinction may limit it from reaching those goals, but NPPD and OPPD have publicly stated a desire to help Nebraska increase its wind energy generation. As wind energy expands in Nebraska, the myriad of legal issues associated with these projects will also develop. The passage of Nebraska's Community-Based Energy Development ("C-BED") statute in 2007 expanded developer demand to build wind projects in Nebraska. In short, the CBED statute offers the developer of a wind energy generation project an exemption from state sales tax on equipment purchased for a project. To earn the C-BED benefit, at least 33% of the revenues from the power purchase agreement for the project- the amount the utility pays the project for the electricity it generates-must flow to "qualified owners." The statute defines "qualified owners" as Nebraska residents, a limited liability company or companies made up entirely of Nebraska residents, a Nebraska non-profit corporation, an electric supplier, a tribal council, or the Continued on page 20

Nebraska Slaughter Steer 35-65% Choice, Live Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$84.76

89.44

97.12

Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600# . . . . . . . . . . . .113.00

124.54

131.01

Med & Large Frame, 750-800 # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94.86

102.00

110.61

Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750# Carcass . . . . . . . . . .135.20

150.34

163.47

Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.82

72.26

73.52

Feeder Pigs, National Direct, 50#, FOB . . . . . . . . . .70.00

*

*

Pork Carcass Cutout, 185#, 51-52% Lean . . . . . . . .56.48

74.93

73.87

Slaughter Lambs, Ch. & Pr.,Heavy, SD Dir. . . . . . . . .97.75

*

*

Nat. Carcass Lamb Cutout, FOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249.90

266.78

283.15

Crops, Daily Spot Prices Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.30

3.84

3.62

Corn, No. 2, Yellow, Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.93

3.54

3.35

Soybeans, No. 1 Yellow Omaha, bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.77

9.12

9.21

Grain Sorg. No. 2 Yellow, Dorchester, cwt . . . . . . . . .6.02

5.64

5.29

Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, MN, bu. . . . . . . . . . .2.04

2.26

2.08

Alfalfa, Lrg. Sq. Bales Good to Prem., NE Neb. . . . . .190.00

135.00

135.00

Alfalfa, Lrg. Rounds, Good, Platte Valley, . . . . . . . . .77.50

87.50

87.50

Grass Hay, Lrg. Rounds, Premium, Neb., . . . . . . . . .85.00

*

*

Dried Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129.50

101.00

98.00

Wet Distillers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49.25

38.00

35.00

Hay (per ton)

* No market.


Page 2

Heartland Express

April 15, 2010

Weather Commentary Provided By Al Dutcher—UNL, State Climatologist

Al Dutcher Report The most significant moisture received during the past 14 days fell across western Nebraska as eastern sections of the state fell in the dry sector of storm systems ejecting out of the southern Rockies. Model continues to point toward an aggressive storm patAllen Dutcher tern across the central U.S. during the next two weeks. It should be noted, however, that weather models have overplayed the quantity of precipitation expected for Nebraska for the better part of the last 40 days. Unless significant moisture falls across eastern Nebraska, the Climate Prediction Centers forecast for above normal April moisture will fail to verify. Current soil moisture values indicate four foot profiles are above 90% full, with the

Farm and Ranch

driest layer being the top 6 inches. In essence, it will take little thunderstorm activity to saturate surfaces, elevate runoff concerns, and bring planting to a standstill. Week One Forecast, 4/17 - 4/23: Dry weather should dominate the state on 4/17, but moisture is expected to return to the state on 4/18. A surface high over the southeastern U.S. will pump moisture from the Gulf of Mexico northward into the central U.S. A couple of weak waves are projected to slide south out of Canada and interact with this moisture. Scattered showers and thunderstorms will be possible across western Nebraska on 4/18, shifting toward the eastern half of the state on 4/19. Models indicate high pressure will build across the northern Plains on 4/20 and push the moisture southward into Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas for the remainder of the period. Nebraska is projected to remain on the northern periphery of this moisture, so scattered showers/thunderstorms are possible each day, especially for areas south of I-80. A shift to the north with this moisture pool would result in more significant rainfall for the state.

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Highs are projected to remain in the 60's through 4/19, possible cooling into the mid 50's to low 60's from 4/20-4/23 with an expected increase in cloud cover. Week Two Forecast, 4/24 - 4/30: Current weather models indicate that a strong storm system will move from the Pacific northwest early in the period to the central Plains by midweek. Dry conditions are expected from 4/244/25 as the systems moves into the Rockies and southerly winds warm temperatures into the 70's. Scattered thunderstorms are possible across on 4/26 ahead of a warm from that will be lifting northward through the state. Highs could reach the lower 80's across southern Nebraska, with 70's across the north. The storm system is projected to move slowly from the central Rockies through the central Plains from 4/27-4/28. Current forecasts place the heavy rainfall and severe thunderstorm bullseye directly over Nebraska. Clearing skies and cooler temperatures are expected for the 4/294/30 period, with high cooling into the upper 60's to low 70's

Nebraska Weather and Crop Report Agricultural Summary: For the week ending April 11, 2010, precipitation fell in the form of both rain and snow across the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Soil temperatures declined during the week in the eastern part of the state and showed little improvement in the west. A few fields of corn have been planted but statewide activity has not yet begun. Pastures, wheat, and alfalfa fields greened up. Other activities included preparation of equipment for planting, fertilization, tillage, marketing stored grain, and caring for livestock. Weather Summary: Temperatures for the week were cooler and averaged 1 degree below normal, with highs in the 70’s and lows in the 20’s statewide. The Southeast District had the warmest daytime temperatures in the state while the Northwest District reported the coolest lows. The Southwest and South Central districts received over an inch of precipitation. Field Crops Report: Wheat conditions rated 4 percent poor, 32 fair, 58 good, and 6 excellent, better than last week and near last year. Wheat jointed was at 3 percent, ahead of last year’s 2 but Continued on page 8


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express

Classic French Delight

Page 3 Rear View

Main Level

Plan E-2117 Classic French Delight Visit www.houseoftheweek.com

Compactly designed, this home is ideal for narrow or small lots. Living room features include 12' ceilings, fireplace, built-ins and a serving bar. A butlers pantry is conveniently located to make it easy to load the pantry with groceries straight from the garage but it can also be accessed from the kitchen and dining side. CAD files available.

Detailed Specifications Plan - E-2117 Title - Classic French Delight Style(s) / Influences - French Exterior Wall Framing - 2x4 Available Foundation(s) - Crawlspace, Slab Exterior Materials - Brick Dwelling Type - Single Family Bedrooms - 3 actual, 5 possible Baths - 2 full, 1 half Floors - 2

Living Area (Sq. Ft.) Level Finished Unfinished First 2149 Second 371 Total Living Area 2149 371 Dimensions - 64' x 80' x 31' (width x depth x height) Laundry Floor - First Master Suite Floor - First Master Suite Features - Dual Sinks, Private Toilet, Shower, Spa/Whirlpool, Walk-in Closet Fireplaces - 1 Kitchen Style - U-shaped Kitchen Features - Island, Nook, Open Layout, Pantry, Snack Extra Features - Fireplace, Porch Roof Style - Hip Roof Construction - Stick Roof Plane Plane Pitch Main 12.00/12.00 Garages Style - Attached 3 Cars 762 (sq. ft.) Room Information Room Floor Ceiling Height Bonus/Future Area Second 9.0' Dining Room First 9.0' Study/Office First 9.0'

Upper Level

A downloadable study plan of this house, including general information on building costs and financing, is available at www.houseoftheweek.com. To receive the study plan for this home, order by phone, online, or by mail. By phone: Call (866) 772-1013. Reference plan #E-2117. Online: Go to www.houseoftheweek.com.

Tree Planting Is Important In Nebraska History By Andrea Nisley UNL Extension Educator Family Consumer Science, Dawson County Tree planting is a tradition in Nebraska. Early settlers often transported tree seed or seedlings hundreds of miles to plant on barren homesteads. They realized the value of trees for protection, wood products, conservation and beauty. They often took great pains to plant and nurture the fragile seedlings. The following quotation is an excerpt from an 1891 article describing conditions on the Great Plains: “To see the prairie and the plains is to know their needs. To travel over them, even for a day, will make you feel their greatest want – the want of trees. Windswept every day, every hour, the comparative calm with even a single row of trees creates affords relief from the perpetual activity of the air beyond the influence of the windbreak. Man, beast and plant are constantly being dried out; evaporation can hardly keep the thirsty, evermoving atmosphere supplied with moisture, and many a rain only touches the ground to be at once

evaporated and returned to the clouds.” Organized tree distribution began in Nebraska as far back as 1904, when Rep. Moses P. Kinkaid introduced a bill which authorized the free distribution of trees west of the 100th meridian. This plan affected the western one-half of Nebraska, generally west of the present day Cozad. The success of this operation was poor, as quantities of trees were limited and supervision was unsatisfactory. However, the records show that more than 1.9 million trees were distributed from Bessey Nursery at Halsey between 1912 and 1924 to 9,298 applicants. On June 7, 1924, the Clarke-McNary Act was passed by Congress. This act authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to cooperate with the various states in the “procurement, production, and distribution of forest-tree seed and plants, for the purpose of establishing windbreaks, shelterbelts, and farm woodlots upon denuded or non-forest lands.” The plan became an instant success. In 1926, when the first plantings were made in Nebraska, 33,900 trees were distributed to 96 cooperators in 44 counties.

Although history shows fluctuation in the number of trees distributed each year, the need for conservation trees continues in Nebraska. To date, over 100 million tree and shrub seedlings have been planted for conservation purposes in Nebraska. The current Conservation Trees for Nebraska program is coordinated by the Nebraska Association of Resource Districts, with each Natural Resource District administering its local tree program. Approximately 1 million conservation tree/shrub seedlings are distributed by Nebraska’s 23 NRD’s each year. Although conservation tree programs vary by NRD, generally tree orders begin about Nov. 1 each year. Again this year, approximately 1 million tree and shrub seedlings are available. Selections can be made from a wide variety of tree and shrub species that are hardy and adopted to Nebraska. Prices average about 75 cents per seedling. For more information about Conservation Trees for Nebraska, contact a local Natural Resources Conservation Service or Natural Resources District.

Nebraska’s Farmers and Ranchers are Everyday Environmentalists- Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of Earth Day Western Nebraska ranchers Rod and Laura Gray know what it means to care for their animals and the land that they live on. The Gray family has roots back to 1898 in the cattle business, Rod and Laura’s five children are the sixth generation to raise cattle. Not only is their ranch home to over 600 head of Registered Angus cattle, but it is home to wildlife such as antelope, mule deer, bald eagles, burrowing owls, and even a Swift fox now and then. “In celebrating the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, we want to thank Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers for being environmental stewards of the land and animals," says Lisa Brass, Director of Industry Relations for the Nebraska Beef Council. “The steps they take to improve the environment aren’t new; like Earth Day, they have been around for many decades. In fact, as long as cattle have been raised on the land, farm families have worked to protect and enhance our environment.” Farmers and ranchers embrace techniques to conserve the land for future generations. For

example, Rod and Laura have their land portioned safe, nutritious beef products using fewer natural off in half section and section pastures (one sec- resources than in the past. Today each American tion equals one square mile). They rotate the cat- farmer feeds about 144 people worldwide, and tle through the sections, resting one or two sec- they’ll need to feed even more in the future. tions each year. This helps increase production of Experts estimate global food production will need the grasses and increases plant diversification to increase 70 percent by 2050 to feed a growing and health. Rotational grazing will improve the world population. For more information on how overall condition of the land. “We want to leave Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers care for their the land for the next generation in better condi- land and animals log onto www.explorebeef.org. tion than we found it,” says Rod. Some of the other resource conservation strategies the Grays use include irrigating at night so that there is less evaporation. A meter is used on irrigation pivots so that crops receive optimal, but not wasteful, amounts of water. The Gray family, like many farming and ranching families, work with their local extension educator, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the University of Wyoming, South Dakota State University, and other conservation groups to ensure they are protecting the land and the livestock they raise. The Rod and Laura Gray Family (L to R)- Colt, Today’s cattlemen provide more people with Heath, Naomi, Garret, Levi, Laura, Rod


Page 4

Heartland Express

April 15, 2010

• IT’S THE PITTS by Lee Pitts • by Lee Pitts

Not-So-Great Moments In Histroy

Can you imagine how America’s past would have been altered had all the rules, regulations and political correctness that exist today been present throughout our nation’s history? Henry Ford never would have mass produced a single car if he had to meet CAFE emission standards, Johnny Appleseed would have been arrested and forced to pay a heavy fine for spreading an invasive species, and John Audubon might never have painted all those pretty bird pictures if, as an avid hunter, he had not been allowed to shoot an endangered species now and then. What? You thought he was able to get such detail in his pictures just by watching them fly by? We wouldn’t even be the good old US of A if our founders had to put up with all the nonsense that deadlocks our country today. The patriots dumping tea into Boston Harbor would have been arrested for polluting and I’m quite sure they did not have a permit to meet in a public place. Paul Revere would have been thrown in jail for disturbing the peace and PETA would have protested that he mistreated his horse. The Declaration of Independence would have been held up in committee by Congress and the National Organization for Women would have howled like a lovelorn coyote because not a single woman was asked to sign the document. George Washington would never have been a General, or our first President, because he’d have been in the hoosegow for chop-

ping down that cherry tree without a permit. Instead of becoming the Father of our Country he’d have rotted away in a federal penitentiary, being turned into a hardened criminal at taxpayer’s expense. Alaska and Hawaii would not be part of us, as in U.S., Louisiana would be owned by France today, heaven forbid, and the Saints would not have won the Super Bowl because we’d still be waiting for United Nations approval to invade a foreign country: The Midwest. The Wilderness Society would never have stood for our scouting the wilderness. Had NAFTA been in place America would, along with neighbors to the North and South, been just a part of the United Provinces of Mexico. Our soccer and curling teams might be better but can you imagine our cuisine or our language? Cod tacos, eh? Thomas Jefferson wouldn’t have sent Lewis and Clark on their epic journey without a Porta Potty every 100 yards and can you imagine the reaction of the Sierra Club and Defenders of Wildlife when they heard that Lewis and Clark had picked wildflowers and shot wolves? Animal rightists would never have stood for the mountain men, who were so instrumental in discovering unknown parts of this continent, to trap beavers. PETA would have thrown paint on Jeremiah Johnson for wearing fur. California would still be speaking Spanish, (even more than they already do) if those migrating to the Golden State had

not been allowed to cut firewood in a forest, shoot wolves and bears, or go to the bathroom on public land. Westward Ho! would have been Western Halt! because the US Humane Society and the Hollywood community would have stopped the immigrants in their tracks for abusing the oxen, horses and mules that pulled their wagons on their way west. The 49’ers would have been thrown in jail for creating a Superfund site, even though the money from the gold in California and the silver in Nevada helped pay for the Civil War which ended slavery. We’d all be homebodies today, still living in the original colonies, because railroads would never have been allowed to chop down forests for railroad ties, or to hire nonunion Chinese and immigrant Irishmen without OSHA breathing down their necks. Remember that glorious moment when astronaut Armstrong stepped out from his spacecraft, taking one giant leap for mankind? Well, that was before global warming. Al Gore would have said Armstrong’s historic leap would create a huge carbon footprint and our space program never would have got off the ground.

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Features In Upcoming Issues: • Beef Nebraska’s Statewide Ag News Publication

Featured Sections In Every Issue: • Ag Management • Classified Advertising • Country News

• • • •

The Lighter Side Livestock News Production News Schedule of Events

• Weather • Weekly Ag-Market Breakdown

Every Issue Features Available News From These Sources: • AccuWeather Forecasting • Ak-Sar-Ben • Associated Press • Commodities

• Department of Ag • Institute on Agriculture & Natural Resources • Nebraska 4-H

• News from All Heartland Coverage Areas • UNL Cooperative Extension • USDA The Only Publication That Features Statewide FFA Chapter News on a Regular Basis!

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• Nebraskaland Days • Ranch Expo • Hay & Forage • County Fairs • State Fair Preview • Gudmundson

Farm & Ranch . . . Where Agriculture Is Always A Business 42435


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express

Pasta Salad 4 cups cooked Pasta, drained & rinsed 1 cup chopped Green Onion 2 cups diced Tomatoes 1-4 oz. can chopped Green Chilies, drained 1 cup Sweet Corn (frozen or canned) 2 T. chopped fresh Cilantro

2 T. Lime Juice 2/3 cup Picante Sauce or Salsa Mayonnaise ½ cup sliced Black Olives Crushed Tortilla Chips, for topping

Add enough mayo to coat ingredients. Refrigerate a couple of hours before serving. Can crush tortilla chips over top or use tortilla strips. Serves 6.

Giant Sandwich 4 oz. sliced American Cheese 4 oz. thinly sliced Salami 4 oz. thinly sliced Cooked Ham 1 medium Tomato, sliced

½ cup Sugar 1 T. Salt 1 T. Dry Mustard 1 gallon prepared Coleslaw Mix

Mix all ingredients except the cabbage mix and refrigerate overnight.

Tea Punch 8 cups Water, divided 1 family size Tea Bag 1 Cinnamon Stick 3 /4 cup Sugar ½ cup frozen Orange Juice Concentrate, thawed

½ cup frozen Lemonade Concentrate, thawed Lemon Slice, for garnish Mint Sprig, for garnish

Bring 4 cups water to a boil in medium saucepan. Remove from heat. Add tea bag and cinnamon stick, and let stand for 5 minutes. Remove tea bag. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Stir in orange juice and lemonade concentrates. Pour mixture into pitcher, and add remaining 4 cups water. Serve over ice and garnish with lemon slices and mint sprigs if desired. Serves 8.

Chicken

Cut bread in half horizontally. Spread half of the dressing on bottom. Top with half of the lettuce. Layer with cucumber, green pepper, onion, cheese, meats and tomato. Top with remaining lettuce. Spread remaining dressing on top half before covering the bottom. Cut into 8 wedges. Serves 8.

BBQ Chicken 5 lbs. Roasting Chickens (cut up, bone-in, skin on, trimmed of excess fat and skin) 2 T. Kosher Salt 3 T. Brown Sugar

6 cups Miracle Whip 1 /3 cup Horseradish 1 T. Dill 1 T. Black Pepper 1 T. Celery Seed

Mix in cabbage mix 2 hours prior to serving, and refrigerate. Serves 20.

In salad bowl, combine pasta, onions, tomato, chilies, corn, cilantro, lime juice, salsa, and olives. Stir to blend.

1 loaf Focaccia Bread ½ cup prepared creamy Italian Dressing 6-8 Lettuce Leaves ½ Cucumber, thinly sliced ½ Green Bell Pepper, thinly sliced 2 Red Onions, thinly sliced and separated

Texas Coleslaw

2 T. Chili Powder 2 T. Sweet Paprika 2 t. ground Black Pepper ¼ t. Cayenne Pepper

Use sharp knife to make 2-3 short slashes in skin or each piece of chicken, taking care not to cut into meat. Combine salt, sugar, and spices in small bowl and mix thoroughly. Coat chicken pieces with spices, gently lifting skin to distribute spice rub underneath but leaving it attached to chicken. Transfer chicken skin side up to wire rack set over rimmed baking sheet, lightly tent with foil, and refrigerate 6-24 hours. Secure skin of each breast piece with 2-3 toothpicks placed near edges of skin. Adjust oven rack to middle position; heat oven to 425°. Roast chicken until done, about 15-20 minutes. Increase oven temperature to 500° and continue roasting until chicken is browned and crisp and completely done, removing pieces from oven and transferring to clean wire rack as they finish cooking. Continue to roast thighs and/or drumsticks, if using, until thickest part of meat registers 170-175°, about 5 minutes longer. Remove from oven; transfer chicken to rack and let cool completely before refrigerating or serving. Serves 8.

24 pieces skin-on, bone-in Chicken Parts (legs and thighs about 7 lbs.) 1 cup Sugar ¼ cup ground Ginger Powder

1 T. Garlic Powder 1 T. Onion Powder Oil 2½ cups Flour Salt & Pepper

Mix the sugar, ginger powder, garlic powder and onion powder in a bag. Drop chicken parts one at a time in seasoning to coat. Place coated chicken parts in a couple of gallonsize sealable plastic bags or a sealable dish and then sprinkle leftover seasonings over chicken. Seal and then refrigerate for 24 hours. Next day remove chicken from fridge and dispose of marinade. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium to medium high heat making sure to not fill the pan more than half way up with oil. While the oil is heating, mix the flour salt and pepper in a bag. Dip pieces in flour mixture to coat and then place chicken parts in hot oil and cook for 5 minutes until golden brown. Make sure to keep your eye on the chicken at this point as it may brown quickly because of the sugar. (Do not overcrowd the pan. This will need to be done in batches). Remove chicken to a rack over a baking sheet. Finish cooking the chicken in the oven at 350° for 30 minutes. (15 Minutes if using dark meat). 24 Pieces.

Page 5

Blueberry Bars BASE AND TOPPING: 1½ cups Oats, uncooked ½ cup Flour ½ cup Light Brown Sugar, packed FILLING: 1½ cups Blueberries, rinsed and drained 3 T. Sugar

¼ t. Baking Soda /8 t. Salt 6 T. unsalted Butter or Margarine, melted 1

2 t. Cornstarch 1 t. Fresh Lemon Juice Preheat oven to 350°. Line an 8" square baking pan with foil, letting ends extend above pan on 2 sides.

In a large bowl, mix oats, flour, brown sugar, baking soda and salt. Add melted butter and stir with a fork until evenly moistened (mixture will be crumbly). Reserve ½ cup crumb mixture for topping. Press remaining mixture evenly and firmly over bottom of ungreased, foillined pan. Bake 12 minutes to set crust. Filling: In a small saucepan stir berries, sugar, cornstarch and lemon juice over med. heat until simmering. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until juices are no longer cloudy, about 2 minutes. Spoon over crust. Crumble reserved crumble mixture over top. Bake for 30 minutes. Let cool completely in pan. Lift foil by ends onto a cutting board. Peel off foil; cut into 2"squares. Serves 16.

Chocolate Cake 2-1 oz. unsweetened Chocolate Squares 1¼ cups all-purpose Flour ½ t. Baking Soda ½ t. Salt

1 Egg 1 cup Sugar 3 /4 cup Cold Water 1 /3 cup Vegetable Oil 1 cup Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chips

In a microwave, melt chocolate; cool for 10 minutes. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt, set aside. In a mixing bowl, beat the egg and sugar. Beat in the water and oil. Stir in the melted chocolate and dry ingredients; mix until blended. Pour into a greased 8" square baking pan. Sprinkle with chocolate chips. Bake at 350° for 32-38 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack. Serves 9.

Nacho Dip 1-16 oz. jar Mild Salsa 1-37/8 can sliced Ripe Olives 1-8 oz. pkg. Shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese 2 T. chopped fresh Cilantro 1-4 oz. can chopped Tortilla Chips Green Chilies In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients except tortilla chips. Cover and refrigerate for several hours for flavors to blend. Serve with tortilla chips for dipping. Serves 10.


Page 6

Heartland Express - Government

April 15, 2010

Tax Day Cometh by Congressman Adrian Smith Grand Island Office 1811 West Second Street, Suite 105 Grand Island, NE68803 Phone: (308) 384-3900 Fax: (308) 384-3902

Scottsbluff Office 416 Valley View Drive, Suite 600 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Phone: (308) 633-6333 Fax: (308) 633-6335

April brings spring showers, but it also brings a date a little less pleasant -- tax day. For those who procrastinate, the next few days will be worrisome. For those who filed their taxes early, the refund may be in the mail, but that doesn’t mean your concerns are over. While April 15 may receive the bulk of the attention, another date should concern every tax payer. Tax Freedom Day falls on April 9 this year, which means Americans will spend more than three months working before they earn enough to pay their federal, state, and local taxes. Individual income taxes represent the largest component of Americans’ tax bills. Some taxes – such as sales and excise taxes – are less apparent to the taxpayer than income and payroll taxes because they can be difficult to factor in. Tax Freedom Day arrives a day later in 2010 than it did in 2009, but more than two weeks earlier than in 2007. The slow economy combined with the tax cuts enacted by President Bush, as well as some

one-year tax cuts signed by President Obama were able to keep this year’s tax burden low. Despite these tax reductions, Americans will pay more taxes in 2010 than they will spend on food, clothing, and shelter combined. However, Tax Freedom Day does not take into account our country’s massive deficit. If the federal government was planning to collect enough in taxes during 2010 to finance its spending, it would have to collect another $1.3 trillion in taxes - stretching Tax Freedom Day to May 17, adding an additional 38 days of work for every taxpaying American. Also, the recently passed health care legislation will add two to three days to the total once all of the new taxes are phased in. Government spending has already increased by an amazing factor in the past few years – and with it the size and scope of the federal government. But next year there also will be substantial tax increases for a great many Americans. This is notably due to the expiration of the Bush

Washington Office 503 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6435 Fax: (202) 225-0207

tax cuts. The top personal income tax rate will rise next January 1 to 39.6 percent from 35 percent, a hike of nearly one-eighth. The dividend tax rate also will rise to more than 2½ times the current 15 percent. The capital gains tax rate will rise by a third, to 20 percent. Meanwhile, a number of tax deductions from last year have expired due to the failure of Congress to extend them despite bipartisan pleas to do so. The tax deduction for state and local sales taxes is one; the deduction for college tuition and fees is another. In modern times, the Kennedy, Reagan, and Bush tax rate reductions helped spur economic growth. The tax increases looming on our horizon will have the opposite effect. Americans are worried about the increasing size and spending of the federal government. As we approach tax day – and our country takes stock of our financial situation – we are reminded more than ever of the necessity of keeping federal spending in check.

Health Care Reform and Small Business by Senator Ben Nelson Omaha Office 7502 Pacific St.,Suite 205 Omaha, NE 68114 Phone: (402) 391-3411 Fax: (402) 391-4725

Lincoln Office Federal Building, Room 287 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Phone: (402) 441-4600 Fax: (402) 476-8753

than 25 employees and all of these businesses will be eligible for some form of tax credit when they file their 2010 taxes. This credit will expand in the coming years. In 2014, when the health care law is more fully implemented, the credit will grow to a maximum of 50% of the employer health care contribution. In addition, the health care law prohibits insurance industry practices such as capping lifetime and annual benefits in group health plans. It ends the denial of coverage to individuals because of preexisting conditions and prohibits insurance companies from dropping coverage when you become sick. It also contains a provision that I fought for that ensures the premiums paid to insurance companies benefit enrollees. Starting on January 1, 2011, insurance companies must pay at least 85% of the premiums they collect back to enrollees as Immediate Benefits The health care law includes a small business benefits. If not, enrollees get a refund each year health care tax credit to help small businesses and for the difference. small tax-exempt organizations afford the cost of providing health insurance to their workers. The Long-Term Benefits By 2014, each state will create a health insurtax credit is available to small businesses with 25 or fewer employees and annual wages of $50,000 ance exchange – a competitive marketplace that or less. The size of the credit is based on a sliding contains private insurance plans, insurers that scale. The lower a small business’ annual wages, can sell across state lines, and non-profit options. the higher the credit, with a maximum of 35% of Small businesses with up to 100 employees along the employer’s contribution to employee health with the self-employed will be eligible to choose In care costs. The credit will be applied to 2010 tax their insurance through the exchange. Nebraska, 80% of all employers have fewer than returns filed next April. In Nebraska, 73% of all employers have fewer 100 employees. These businesses will also be eliSmall businesses form a huge part of the US economy, so now that health care reform is law, it’s important to understand how it will affect small business owners and their employees. In Nebraska, nearly 80% of businesses have fewer than 100 employees, and these businesses are the economic lifeblood of the state. The current system has made it very difficult for many small business owners to provide health care benefits to employees. Skyrocketing premiums have increased the number of small business that stop offering insurance every year. Fortunately, the health care reform law was designed to reduce costs for small businesses providing health insurance and provide choice and competition in the insurance market through the private sector.

Washington Office 720 Hart Senate Office Building United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6551 Fax: (202) 228-0012

gible for the expanded tax credit to help afford premiums. By forcing insurance companies to compete among each other for a large pool of potential enrollees, the exchanges are designed to give small businesses the same purchasing power enjoyed today by large companies. Choosing insurance from an exchange is the same way Members of Congress get their health insurance. At no point will small businesses with less than 50 full-time equivalent employees be required to provide health insurance to their employees. In Nebraska, less than 30% of these small businesses can afford to offer their employees health insurance, and this legislation will go a long way to helping them do that. Businesses with more than 50 employees have the option of either providing coverage or paying a fee to help their employees purchase individual coverage on the exchange. It’s worth noting that in Nebraska, 97% of employers with more than 50 employees already offer health insurance coverage to their employees. The new health care law is a step in the right direction and is supported by groups representing small businesses like the Small Business Majority and the Main Street Alliance. The law creates private-sector competition to help control unsustainable costs, helps small businesses provide insurance to their employees and ends the worst practices of insurance companies.

Fiscal Responsibility Means Owning Up to Costs by Senator Mike Johanns Kearney Office: 4111 Fourth Avenue, Suite 26 Kearney, NE 68845 Tel: (308) 236-7602 Fax: (308) 236-7473

Lincoln Office: 294 Federal Building 100 Centennial Mall North Lincoln, NE 68508 Tel: (402) 476-1400 Fax: (402) 476-0605

Dear Nebraskans, With the call for fiscal responsibility growing louder and louder, the Senate passed legislation in January that was purported to address irresponsible spending. The bill, nicknamed "Pay As You Go" or PAYGO, was advertised as preventing passage of legislation that would be paid for by adding to our already astronomical national debt. Under PAYGO guidelines, if a bill spends $1 billion, it should produce $1 billion in revenue or spending cuts to offset the cost. However, not advertised in the legislation were numerous exceptions and loopholes rendering it relatively ineffective. Yet even with all the exemptions, supporters of PAYGO are struggling to adhere to their own rules. In just two months, supporters have twice circumvented PAYGO as well as fiscal responsibility. The champions of PAYGO were quick to celebrate the law when it passed earlier this year. It was supposed to be proof that the days of out-

Scottsbluff Office: 115 Railway Street, Suite C102 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 Tel: (308) 632-6032 Fax: (308) 632-6295

of-control spending in Congress were over. Yet they neglected to mention one thing: the PAYGO provision can be ignored if enough Senators vote to do so, or if legislation is deemed an "emergency." In February, not even a month after Congressional leaders touted the passage of PAYGO, the Senate took a $15 billion bill to the floor. They were immediately faced with the problem of how to pay for it, since the newly enacted PAYGO legislation prevented its passage without funding. Their solution? A vote to waive PAYGO and add the cost of the bill to our national debt. The notion of paying for what you spend is a laudable and common sense goal; but ignoring the rules when fiscal responsibility is inconvenient is not leadership, it is passing the buck. Most recently, the Senate last week passed a bill with a $148 billion price tag. PAYGO was once again ignored with approximately two-

Omaha Office: 9900 Nicholas St., Suite 325 Omaha, NE 68114 Tel: (402) 758-8981 Fax: (402) 758-9165

Washington, D.C. Office 404 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510

thirds of the legislation's cost deemed "emergency" spending. Saying you're for fiscal responsibility but voting to waive these budget rules at every turn is not right and will not get our country's fiscal house in order. In my short 15 months in the Senate, I've been beating the drum loudly for fiscal responsibility, a principle the state of Nebraska embodies. The premise of PAYGO is a step in the right direction, but it contains too many exceptions and Congress is too willing to ignore it when spending decisions get tough. Unfortunately, Congress is patting itself on the back for passing PAYGO with one hand and finding ways to circumvent it with the other. It is disingenuous to American taxpayers who are simply fed up with our out-of-control spending. This is unacceptable to me, and I will continue to seek the same fiscal responsibility in Congress that Nebraskans demand of their government leaders.


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express

By David M. Fiala FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of marketing, brokerage,

farming and ranching experience to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-488-5121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options. The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

County Grain Prices as of 4/8/10 Location

Corn

Aurora Bloomfield Bruning Chappell Columbus Franklin Fremont Funk Gordon Grand Island Grant Hastings Hemingford Holdrege Imperial Kearney Kimball Lexington Lincoln Maywood McCook Merna Nebraska City Norfolk North Platte Ogallala Ord Overton Scottsbluff Sidney St. Paul Superior Waco Wahoo Wayne Alliance Imperial Gordon

New Corn

$3.32 $3.20 $3.28 $3.12 $3.27 $3.32 $3.28 $3.39 $3.04 $3.32 $3.07 $3.35 $3.16 $3.30 $3.07 $3.38 $3.16 $3.28 $3.31 $3.25 $3.11 $3.24 $3.35 $3.30 $3.27 $3.03 $3.40 $3.34

$3.45 $3.34 $3.39 $3.49 $3.34 $3.45 $3.44 $3.52 $3.29 $3.45 $3.47 $3.49 $3.44 $3.40 $3.47 $3.50 $3.53 $3.39 $3.37 $3.42 $3.41 $3.32 $3.41 $3.43 $3.42 $3.40 $3.42 $3.46

$3.13 $3.33 $3.34 $3.24 $3.25 $3.13

$3.49 $3.44 $3.49 $3.37 $3.36 $3.34

671 Northern Above Oil Flowers Above Spring Wheat

Beans

New Beans

$9.28 $9.12 $3.18 $8.95 $9.08 $9.21 $9.46 $9.36

$8.66 $8.00 $8.56 $8.42 $8.55 $8.63 $8.90 $8.77

$9.25 $8.95 $9.30

$8.63 $8.42 $8.75

$9.13 $8.95 $9.22

$8.67 $8.42 $8.70

$9.08 $9.39 $9.02 $8.98 $9.01 $9.48 $8.94 $9.14

$8.65 $8.92 $8.54 $8.51 $8.25 $8.83 $8.71 $8.66

$9.04 $9.21

$8.68 $8.75

$9.13 $9.20 $9.26 $8.98

$8.65 $8.75 $8.67 $8.64 $8.65

Wheat

New Wheat

$4.08

$4.49

$3.83

$4.06

$4.05

$4.34 $4.73 $4.34 $3.94

$4.05 $3.83 $3.83 $4.20 $3.88 $4.09 $3.83 $4.23 $3.83 $3.97 $4.00 $3.89 $3.81

$4.06 $4.52 $4.04 $4.29 $4.06 $4.34 $4.06 $4.33 $4.49 $4.18 $4.09

$4.09 $3.73

$4.18 $4.09

$4.09

$4.29

$3.83

$4.04

$4.13 $4.19

$4.44 $4.39

Pinto Oil Flowers (new) $16.25 Spring Wheat(new) $4.88

Milo

New Milo

$3.11

$2.74

$2.89

$2.92

Page 7 May 942 989

May Meal 261 284

May Oil 3890 4090

Soy Complex

Support: Resistance

Soybean trade has been firm this week due to positive outside market action and light chart buying. The weekly net changes are 17 higher on nearby May futures and November futures are up 10. Meal is up $9 and bean oil down 14; there has been some corrective action in the spreads. The NOPA March crush number was at 149.6 million bushels which was in the upper part of expectations. Soy oil stocks were down from a month ago, but within expectations and the meal number was a little bigger suggesting a negative usage argument. The outside market influence has been positive due to the weak dollar and crude oil hanging in the upper part of our range near the 18 month highs. The weekly soybean export sales numbers were 158,000 tons of old crop and 293,200 tons of new which were within expectations. Meal sales were at the low

end of expectations with 85,000 of old crop and 16,300 tons of new. Bean oil sales were good at 13.500 tons of old crop sales. The USDA Monthly Supply and Demand report last Friday was friendly for old crop with the domestic carryover unchanged at 190 million when the trade was looking for a 210 type number. But the world soybean carryover moved to 62.96 million tons versus 60.67 last month and 42.82 last crop year. The now 20 million ton, or near 50% increase in world carryover leaves an upcoming implication of extremely bearish supply side items next crop year if global growing weather is good. That remains my biggest concern looking further down the road in 2010. Hedgers we believe you should get caught up on desired sales levels if you have not and call us to discuss your individual situation.

May 2010 Beans (CBOT) - Daily Chart - 4/15/2010 $2.92

$3.05

$3.09

$2.86

$2.99

$2.74 $2.74 $2.70

$2.97 $2.99 $2.99

$3.15 $2.97

$3.14 $3.02

Navy

Open . . .9.730 High . . .9.760 Low . . . .9.660 Close . . .9.410 Change +0.010

N/A

May 10 337 374

Dec. 10 371 403

Corn

Support: Resistance

Corn trade saw limited selling interest at new lows in early April which has given us some short covering. The weekly net changes are a dime higher on new crop and 12 higher on nearby; we are also around 15 cents above the early April lows. The fundamentals remain poor in the bigger picture, but bounces will be seen and we should expect a positive reaction to any weather issue. Right now I believe the weather is negative with big plantings likely next week and we should have 50%-60% or more of the crop in the ground by the weekend of May 1. The weekly corn plantings were listed at 3% complete versus 2% last year and the 4% average pace. The USDA Supply and Demand report was mostly neutral last Friday versus expectations. The domestic carryover was smaller than expected at 1.899 billion bushels, but this was still up 100 mil-

lion bushels from the March report and the Quarterly Stocks report continues to project a higher number on future reports. The world carryover jumped by 4 million tons up to 144.2 million metric tons due to some wheat feeding and a 2.5 million ton increase in the Brazilian production estimate. Argentine production was left at 21 million tons. So world competition from South America will be good the rest of the year. The weekly export sales number was again good at 1,006,300 tons of old crop sales and 140.900 tons of new crop. Hedgers call with questions; although we obviously have our growing season to get through, the supply side equation is big and could give us unfriendly prices later in the year so rallies should be viewed as opportunities to get to desired hedge levels.

May 2010 Corn (CBOT) - Daily Chart - 4/15/2010 Open . . .3.552 High . . .3.630 Low . . . .3.542 Close . . .3.580 Change +0.054

Chicago 455 492

K City Minneapolis 472 491 509 521

Wheat

Support: Resistance

Wheat trade started a bounce withoversold conditions last week which has continued. The high this week is 35 cents above the low printed at the beginning of the month. The weekly net changes on the July contracts are 8 higher in Chicago and Kansas City and Minneapolis is up 6 cents. The rally does seem to be running out of steady. The weak dollar helped firm the market and get some shorts to exit. The weekly winter wheat condition report showed good to excellent ratings at 65% which was unchanged from last week and well above the 42% last year, which was negative. The weekly export sales were at 101,100 tons of old crop and 310,800 tons of new which combined were

within expectations. Overall there was little new this week for wheat in my view. The smaller than expected domestic and world wheat carryovers last Friday did help support the bull argument, but supplies are simple but still very large. Trade will likely be flat to lower in the week ahead. We need to get further into the growing season before the market should take a direction. At this time there is limited reason for a rally and we do not need to test the downside much further until we know more about the growing season. Hedgers call with questions, continue to look forward at the carry in the futures, for example July 2010 wheat is around $5 with new crop 2011 up over $5.70.

May 2010 Wheat (CBOT) - Daily Chart - 4/15/2010 Open . . . .4.762 High . . . .4.814 Low . . . .4.710 Close . . .4.746 Change .-0.012


Page 8

Heartland Express

April 15, 2010

STUDY: ETHANOL CRITICAL... Continued from page 9 renewing VEETC would cost the United States more than 112,000 jobs because as much as 37 percent of the ethanol industry would shut down. Since Nebraska is the second largest ethanol producing state, more than 12 percent of those jobs would be lost in and around mostly rural Nebraska communities that support an ethanol facility. Some job losses would come from those directly involved in ethanol production, while other job losses would be caused by a reduction of dollars spent by ethanol producers " dollars that would normally flow throughout all sectors of the economy, according to the study. "There is legislation in front of Congress right now that will extend VEETC beyond Dec. 31, when it is set to expire. It is important that Congress act on this legislation to keep renewable fuels on track," Holzfaster said. In Nebraska, 20 ethanol plants are located in the Third Congressional District, more than any other district in the U.S., and another four are located in the First District. "Those who support ethanol and rural economic

development need to make sure their representatives understand the importance of VEETC," Holzfaster said. "We'll need their support to ensure it is renewed as quickly as possible." On a national scale, the research shows that not renewing VEETC would eliminate some $2.7 billion in state and local tax revenues and another $2.4 billion in federal tax revenue, reduce household income by $4.2 billion and reduce the gross domestic product by $16.9 billion, further eroding the economic output of the U.S. manufacturing sector. In Nebraska, the Nebraska Ethanol Board said that ethanol production had another record year in 2009, with 1.4 billion gallons of ethanol produced despite plant shutdowns and falling fuel prices. Ethanol plants used 525 million bushels of corn, about one-third of Nebraska's record corn crop, in 2009. Nebraska's ethanol production capacity will likely exceed 2 billion gallons per year by the end of 2010. Sneller said that increased production and plant reopenings confirm the viability of the ethanol industry and its positive impact on the state.

"The ethanol industry has created thousands of good-paying jobs in Nebraska," Sneller said. "Elimination of the ethanol tariff and biofuel incentives would be a misguided policy considering the significant economic impact generated by this domestic industry. The current policies help create jobs, they keep a domestic industry more competitive and they reduce fuel costs for consumers." Most ethanol plants that have been idled in the past year have resumed production or restarted construction, according to Sneller. He said the plant in Cambridge began operating again last month after acquisition by Zeeland Farm Services, and Aventine announced that construction at its Aurora West plant has resumed. The plant may be producing ethanol as soon as September. "Many economists say that the ethanol industry has largely kept the Midwest's economy afloat during the recession," Sneller said. "We need to retain policies that help keep the ethanol industry healthy and our economy strong."

NE WEATHER AND CROP REPORT

Table Talk Leads to a Marketing Venture

Continued from page 2

By Sandra Hansen, The Scottsbluff Star-Herald

behind the average of 5. Oats planted increased to 43 percent, ahead of last year’s 29 and equal to the average of 43. Oats emerged was at 6 percent, ahead of last year’s 2 but below the average of 9. Alfalfa conditions rated 1 percent poor, 19 fair, 72 good, and 8 excellent, better than last year. Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Cattle and calves conditions rated 4 percent poor, 21 fair, 71 good, and 4 excellent, better than last year. Spring calving was 79 percent complete. Calf losses rated 3 percent below average, 85 average, and 12 above average. Pasture and range conditions rated 2 percent poor, 15 fair, 75 good, and 8 excellent, above last year.

It was just a bunch of "good old boys" sitting around a table. But then the conversation took a radical turn, and now about five years later, 14 producers are learning the ins and outs of marketing their corn in a much more profitable manner. According to Craig Henkel, Bayard area farmer and now president of the LLC, he and a few other producers were talking about how cheap food is and how everyone in the production chain makes a living off the farmer, while the man on the land struggles. There is the commodity markets, where some money could be made, but it is difficult if not impossible for a small producer to make any headway in that direction. There isn't much left to work with when that 200 acres of

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©

43496

corn has to be shared with the landlord, the fuel supplier, tire salesman, parts store, corn seed dealer, herbicide and pesticide dealers, and just every day living for a family. But, what about pooling resources? If several farmers pooled their harvest, they might be able to accomplish something. "With a bigger pie, we might have an opportunity to get a deal that could make us some money," Henkel said. "But we wouldn't do anything foolish." After talking it over some more, Henkel and a few others started contacting producers until they established a core of 14 farmers between Gering and Bridgeport, ranging in age from mid to late 30s to late 50s. They then hired a marketer to do the trading. The group set targets and established how they would like to sell their pooled corn. "The first couple of years were absolutely wrong to be hedging," Henkel explained, but they've learned as they go, and "We're doing good this year," Henkel said. "We've sold some corn already." Henkel said the farmer LLC works with Justin Trompke of Ag West. Dealing with Trompke has been good for the group. "He's found better markets for us, and we're not putting our operations at risk. "It's not perfect, but we're learning. Normally, farmers talk and speculate about the markets, then sell when the price is going down. You have to put a pencil to it, know the break even point, and be informed about the markets to stay in business," Henkel said. The structure of the LLC is unique, Henkel said. "I don't know of anyone else doing this. Even our accountant has been confused but she's getting the bugs out." Henkel said no one has to put all of the harvest into the pool. It depends on what each individual has going in his or her life, how much they direct to the LLC. The group is expanding its reach into bulk purchases, which save on freight and delivery charges in addition to lower prices by buying large quantities. They also give each other first chance at doing some custom work. "It's working real well," Henkel said last week, while waiting out another wet spell to get back in the fields. "We can produce 700,000 bushels of corn, so now buyers know they can make one phone call and get what they need. The bottom line is that the money is really good." Henkel is the first to stress that this type of operation isn't attractive to the more traditional individual producer who has 100 percent control. "We think it's a good fit for a young producer who is in for the long haul. They have to be serious about it, and be good farmers. The money isn't great, but we're staying in business." Henkel also believes the LLC would work well with wheat, but first the group wants to fine tune the corn project before they diversify. "We want to get the bugs out before we make any problems for anyone," Henkel explained. Continued on page 19


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express - District 4

Page 9

DISTRICT 4

Crofton FFA Members Lead Out Loud in a Variety of Ways

Bloomfield Creighton Crofton Hartington Laurel-Concord Norfolk Pierce Plainview Randolph Verdigre

Hello FFA members and supporters!! The school year has gone by so quickly and we are almost through the 2009-2010 school year. Since our last article in the Heartland Express, Crofton members have been busy and have done an outstanding job of “Leading Out Loud”! District Leadership Skills Events were held in Crofton on January 4th after being postponed in December due to the massive amounts of snowfall we had. Over 250 members from eleven schools competed in speaking events with the hopes of earning a spot at the state convention. Crofton speakers had an outstanding showing and we qualified 13 members. District Livestock Judging was held at the Northeast Community College Ag Complex on January 28th. Once again, Crofton members

The Verdigre FFA Chapter Caroline Cook, Reporter The Verdigre FFA chapter will be attending the State FFA Convention. Our state finalists in proficiencies are Spencer Frederick in Forestry Management and Russ Hirschman in Wildlife Management. The Landscaping and Nursery team, composed of Angela Boggs, Amanda Grim, Caroline Cook, and Alina Koch, received a 1st place at the district level and will also be competing at the state level. Many others qualified in various areas and they are looking forward to doing there best and having fun while doing it. For our FFA week one of the activities we did was a barnyard for the younger kids. This year we had a wide range of animals and the kids really enjoyed it. We also had some kids from a neighboring town come over and see what its all about. The Barnyard is also a good way to help recruit and introduce the future members of our chapter to what FFA is all about. The Vedigre FFA chapter will compete at the State FFA Convention in Lincoln on April 7 through 9th.

stepped up to the challenge and qualified both a junior and senior team for state. District Proficiency Reviews were held in Crofton on February 6th. The FFA Advisors from all ten chapters in our district gathered to evaluate proficiency applications. Crofton was represented by four members in the competition. Earning silver merits for both the Outdoor Recreation and Diversified Ag Production Placement areas was Nicole Allvin. Earning golds and qualifying for state competition were Austin Mann in Diversified Ag Production Placement, Charlie Sukup in Diversified Horticulture Entrepreneurship and Mollie Wilken for her Beef Production Entrepreneurship proficiency. State FFA Degree Interviews and Testing were also held at Crofton High School on Monday, February 8th. Six senior members were vying for the prestigious State FFA Degree, the highest honor a member can receive at the state level. The procedure involves extensive record keeping on two to four years of the member’s SAE (Supervised Agricultural Experience), completion of a 14 page application, a FFA general knowledge exam and an interview with two judges. National FFA Week was celebrated the week of Continued on page 12

Among the awards received at the Nebraska State FFA Convention recently were six State Degree recipients from Crofton: Randy Ausdemore, Mollie Wilken, Austin Mann, Amy Krepel, Charlie Sukup and Nicole Allvin. Austin Mann and Mollie Wilken were named as State Star Finalists. Also shown are the State Champion Agriscience team members Abby Braun, Mathew Guenther, Taylor Johnson and Taylor Tammen. Mollie Wilken was State FFA Officer, Tyler Spilinek, recently conalso elected to serve as a state FFA Vice President ducted leadership workshops for students in the Ag for the upcoming year. Education classes in Crofton

The Bloomfield FFA Chapter In spite of the snow, the Bloomfield FFA Chapter has been very busy. In late January, we participated in District livestock judging contests. Both our junior and senior teams qualified for state competition placing 2nd and 4th respectively. Cody Allen won the Senior individual honors and Tyrel Stark was named Junior individual winner. Districts CDE contests were held in March at NECC. This year each team that participated in a qualifying contest earned their way to state convention competition. The food science and meat science teams were district winners. The Ag Sales and Welding teams placed 2nd, while the Floriculture and Livestock Management teams placed third. State Convention has come and gone. The entire school year we were working on our competitions and getting ready to compete at the state level. Bloomfield had many achievements at State this year. This past week, 48 members of the FFA Chapter from Bloomfield, Wausa and Niobrara

attended the 82 Nebraska State FFA Convention. Attending members participated in several CDE and LSE contests, attended leadership conferences and business sessions. Four seniors also received their State Degrees. The parli-pro team of Ali Gieselman, Lynndsy Hauger, Hannah Seagren, Morgan Kauth, Tanner Schumacher, and Jonathan Carhart competing in Senior Parliamentary procedure. They earned a silver award for their efforts. In state proficiency competition, Ali Gieselman was named second place recipient in Diversified Horticulture and received third place in Home and Continued on page 11

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Page 10

Heartland Express - District 4

Randolph FFA By: Jared Korth The Randolph FFA chapter has attended a number of contests and events this semester. On January 28, members attended the Livestock Judging contest in Norfolk at the Northeast Community College Ag Complex. This included the judging of cattle, swine, and sheep. February 2127 was National FFA Week. There were many activities, including a paper bags coloring contest for the elementary students, a breakfast served by FFA officers, FFA trivia, and many other activities. March 3 was district Career Development Events, where our Agricultural Mechanics team received 1st and state qualification. The Agriscience team also received qualification to the state convention. March 27 was the Ken Iverson project contest and auction, where 18 area chapters competed to create the best steel sculpture. The Randolph Chapter received 2nd and a prize of $400. They also received an additional $225 at the auction. This event was sponsored by Nucor Steel of Norfolk, NE. We would like to give Nucor a special thank you for their support in this project. April 710 was the Nebraska State FFA Convention, where more than 4,000 members attended. We had 3 teams attend the contests, including Ag Mechanics, Agriscience, and Natural Resources. Results are still pending. April 11 was the interviewing of FFA officer applicants. A vote at the

April 15, 2010

Norfolk FFA takes State FFA Ag Mechanics Title Sixteen members of the Norfolk FFA chapter traveled to Lincoln this year for the State FFA Convention. Teams qualified through district competition and competed at State in Senior Livestock Selection, Welding, Ag Sales, Meat Evaluation, Floriculture, Nursery and Landscape and Ag Mechanics. Three students also competed in the State 4-H and FFA tractor driving. Norfolk came out on top in the Ag Mechanics contest, winning first and qualifying for the National FFA Contest in October 2010. Team members were Blake Otte, Dalton Henery, Shelby Hopkins, and Heath Weiher. Blake took 3rd overall and received a medal in the Machine and Equipment area of the contest. Max Henn, a senior FFA member, also won first in the State

Tractor Driving. Max received a $500 scholarship to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Students did much more than just compete in contests. They used the State Convention as a time to bond as a chapter and hone their leadership skills through workshops offered at the convention. Senior FFA member Katie Skaff says, “State was a great experience. We really bonded as a chapter and I think it will help us to work together better in the future.” Students were also able to attend the Career Fair held at Pershing Auditorium. They enjoyed talking to several vendors about future job opportunities and the possibility of scholarships to continue their educations. State FFA convention proved to be a valuable opportunity for all who attended.

Continued on page 11

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43537


April 15, 2010

Page 11

Heartland Express - District 4

THE BLOOMFIELD FFA CHAPTER

RANDOLPH FFA

Continued from page 9

Continued from page 10

Community Improvement. Lynndsy was named third place winner in Floriculture. The Food Science team of Ali Gieselman, Lynndsy Hauger, Whitney Goeden and Jonathan Carhart placed 2nd in state competition receiving a plaque, purple ribbon and each received a silver medal. Individually Ali received a purple, Lynndsy received a blue, and Whitney received a white ribbon. The Ag Sales team and welding teams won a white ribbon. The Livestock Judging team received a red ribbon also. Several members receiving individual ribbons including Ty Alexander and Callen Koester receiving purples in ag science. Our chapter also had the privilege of receiving a $750 transportation scholarship to National Convention from Farm Credit Services as a part of the program. We thank them for this contribution. The session was completed with the awarding of State Degrees to Ali Gieselman, Lynndsy Hauger, Cody Allen, Morgan Kauth and over 400 other state FFA seniors. State convention finalized another successful year of competition by the Bloomfield chapter. Congratulations for all of the hard work and accomplishment throughout the 2009-10 school year. In late March we held our annual labor auc-

tion, which raises money to sponsor members to various leadership activities. Over 100 students were auctioned off raising over $20,000 for this purpose. Currently our younger students are raising garden vegetable to sell to local patrons in our greenhouse. We are also using flowers acquired from Shamrock Nurseries to make a variety of hanging baskets that we will sell to the public. Last year we developed a partnership with a local landowner and several seed, chemical and fertilizer dealers to farm a 40 acre research plot. We are continuing the venture this year researching planting date, seed population, planting depth, fertility, and pest controls on soybeans. We are also developing a seed corn variety plot with approximately 50 different varieties. SAE projects are being developed for the summer and student visits are being scheduled. County and State fair will be here before we are ready. We will finish the year’s activities by selecting out new officers next week and celebrating our accomplishment with our banquet on April 25th. Then it is time for our new officer team to say thank you to the old one, and develop their 2010-2011 program.

FFA meeting on April 12 will decide our new officers for the 2010-2011 year. April 22nd is the FFA Awards Banquet where jacket pins, state awards, and new officers will be sworn in.

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43038


Page 12

Heartland Express - District 4

April 15, 2010

CROFTON FFA MEMBERS.... Continued from page 9 George Washington’s birthday (February 22nd through the 26th) The week was started off with 65 locker posters designed and posted by the Crofton FFA members in junior high and 9th grade. The week was busy with many other activities such as “Tractor Tuesday”, a “guess who” contest, a bale throwing contest, cookie delivery to area businesses, elementary visits by members in official dress, food contests, t-shirt day and the teacher and staff appreciation breakfast. All contests were followed up with prizes to the winners. As you can guess, a lot of fun was had by all! The week of March 1st was also very busy. Tyler Spilinek, a Nebraska State FFA Vice President spent the day in Crofton. He prepared and delivered leadership workshops to the students in the Animal Science, Natural Resources and Plant Science classes throughout the day. On March 3rd, many Crofton members once again represented our chapter in the Career Development Events, which were held at Northeast Community College in Norfolk. Thirty-four Crofton members qualified for state by earning a total of five championship team trophies, six first place individual gold medals and numerous individual ribbons in the areas of Agribusiness, Agricultural Sales, Agriscience, Agronomy, Envirothon, Floriculture, Food Science, and Livestock Management. Somewhere in between all of the previously mentioned competitions and activities, members found time to conduct and attend regularly scheduled chapter meetings and community service projects. We continue our weekly school wide paper recycling project and a seat belt survey was conducted. We were disappointed in the seat belt survey results and we are encouraging students

and adults to please take the few seconds it takes to buckle up. It is the law, but more importantly, it can save your life! A roadside cleanup through the Adopt-a-Highway program is scheduled for the week of April 19th and we always have a lot of fun while doing our part to help out the environment. The 82nd Nebraska State FFA Convention was held on April 7-9th and Crofton members had some breathtaking moments! Each of the evenings found the Nebraska State FFA Honor Choir performing some incredible songs. Among the 100 members selected was Brandon Hegge of Crofton. We were honored with a silver National Chapter award during the opening session. On Thursday evening, our chapter was presented with the Governor's Agricultural Excellence Award and Austin Mann was selected as a state finalist in the proficiency area of Diversified Agricultural Production. He earned 2nd place! On Friday, a number of exciting things happened on stage at Pershing Auditorium. Six of our members; Nicole Allvin, Randy Ausdemore, Amy Krepel, Austin Mann, Charlie Sukup and Mollie Wilken were presented the prestigious State FFA Degree. In addition, Austin Mann and Mollie Wilken were recognized as State Star Finalists in the areas of Placement and Production, respectively. Earning silver medals in their speaking events were: Wesdon Wortmann – Creed; Katie Mueller – Jr. Public, Amy Krepel – Coop; Charlie Sukup – Sr. Public; and the Jr. Parli Pro team. Earning a gold medal was Sara Kohles for her Job Interview LSE. The Agriscience team of Abby Braun, Mathew Guenther, Taylor Johnson and Taylor Tammen were announced as the State Champions and Taylor Johnson earned 1st place

individually in the state! The Livestock Management team earned the 3rd place plaque in the area of Horse Management. In addition, other members earned 39 individual and team ribbons in the Career Development Events such as Agribusiness, Agronomy, Agricultural Sales, Food Science, Livestock Management, Livestock Selection and Natural Resources. To top off the excitement of convention and another successful year, Crofton's Chapter President, Mollie Wilken was selected as a Nebraska State FFA Vice President! She is the first state FFA officer to come out of our chapter. She will begin her duties right away and will begin to train and prepare many workshops for members from across the state. As the year winds down, the new officer candidates will be interviewed and voted on to see who will lead our chapter for the 2010-2011 school year. Our annual FFA banquet will be held Sunday, April 25th and as you can tell we have much to celebrate and share with the approximately 200 members, parents and guests who will be in attendance. As you can see the chapter has and will continue to keep busy during the rest of the school year and throughout the summer. Crofton members have exemplified this year's National FFA theme, which was “Lead Out Loud”! It is very fulfilling to see all that we can accomplish through hard work and dedication to being student, chapter and community leaders! Thank you for your support and we look forward to the many exciting challenges and opportunities which await us!

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43374


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express - District 9

Page 13

The St. Paul FFA Chapter

DISTRICT 9

The St Paul FFA chapter had a very good convention as the Junior Livestock team of Jefferson Keller (Pur,10th), Kelsey Scheer (Pur,16th), Cole Scheer (Bl), and Clark Rathman (red) place third overall. Zach Watson (red), Nicholas Jerabek (red), Michael Duester, and Jordan Kosmicki received a white team ribbon in the Natural Resource contest.

Ansley Broken Bow Burwell Elba GreeleyWolbach Loup City Loup County North Loup-Scotia Ord St. Paul Sandhills Sargent SEM Wheeler Central

The Senior Livestock Judging team of Kelly McCarty (red), Nicholas Jerabek (red), Blake Thomsen (white), and Kyle McCarty received a white team ribbon. The Agriscience team of Kelsey Scheer (pur), Chris Svoboda (red), Spencer Kulwicki (white)and team Captain CaLee Thomsen received a blue team ribbon.

St. Paul's ten State Degree recipients, Front row-Kelly McCarty, Kendra Alberts, Beth Wroblewski, 2nd rowMatt Zulkoski, Crysta Naylor, Travis Buchanan, Zach Watson, 3rd row, Austin Rathman, Blake Thomsen, Kyle McCarty, Lucky Advisor Mr. Voigt

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Sr Parliamentary Procedure team of Rachel Lewandowski, Matt Zulkoski, Kendra Alberts, Travis Buchanan, Beth Wroblewski, Quinton Mrkvicka won District 9 and received a bronze at State.

Austin Rathman First Place proficiency, Swine Production Entrepreneur, Austin was also up for Stars Over Nebraska Pageant in the Ag Production area, but did not win overall after winning District 9 Star Production.

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Officer Picture - Front row - Beth Gideon, Leela Dunbar, Hannah Meeks Back Row - Adviser Mr. Sheets, Haylee Jordan, Lisa Kraus, Bill Jordan, and Kayla Dunbar

Proud Supporters of Garfield County FFA

in Lincoln. They were Mikey Horky and Lisa Kraus. Next we had our CDEs which were held in Grand Island. We qualified teams for state competition in Floriculture, Nursery and Landscape, Welding, Ag Mechanics, and Ag Sales. We also participated in District Livestock judging. We have two seniors receiving their State FFA Degrees they are Bill Jordan and Lisa Kraus. We also have community service activities which include taking care of Harrop Park, Adopt a Highway program, and our big project was refinishing the gazebo in our park and repairing some of the picnic tables also found in the park. I do apologize that we currently do not have a large group picture of our chapter.

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43562


Page 14

Heartland Express - District 9

April 15, 2010

S-E-M FFA Takes State Convention by Storm By Boyd Bowder and Lauren Ibach What an eventful 3 days of competitions and activities for the S-E-M FFA Chapter at the 82nd State FFA Convention in Lincoln, NE. Members competed in over 20 different events and attended different workshops, seminars, speakers and career fairs. In speaking events, Emily Ibach placed 5th with a gold in Job interview where she applied for a job managing a farmers market. In Natural Resources Sara Simmons took home a bronze with her speech on water in Nebraska. In Extemporaneous speaking Benjamin Trampe took home a high silver with his topic on HSUS and Nebraska. And in the highlight of the speaking events, Junior, Lauren Ibach captured first place with her news broadcast themed speech over cooperatives. Another highlight of the state convention was the agriculture demonstration team consisting of Sara Simmons, Lauren Ibach and Dillan Line. They gave a demonstration on how to collect DNA hair follicles and send them into Pfizer for testing. The demonstration went great and the students captured the state Runner-Up plaque. Another state runner up team was the Agriculture communications team consisting of Travis Line-Broadcasting, Sara Simmons – News writing, Nissa Brown – Graphics, and Benjamin

Trampe in Press Release writing. The students prepared their information over animal welfare in the state of Nebraska. This is the highest S-E-M has ever placed in this contest. In addition, Travis Line captured 2nd place in his area. In Livestock Management the team consisted of Alyssa Jeffrey, John Frerichs, Evan Ibach, Lauren Ibach, and Bailey Adair and Ashley Albright, captured second in the Dairy management area. The members also competed in other areas such as swine, beef, poultry, horse and sheep. The agronomy team was another area where members performed well, the team placed 5th over all led by seniors Jacob Pierce, Benjamin Trampe and Dylan Smith and Brookelyn Tampe. The boys all received purples. With all the successes already mentioned, the Senior Livestock Judging team took the cake. They qualified for Nationals with team members Lauren Ibach, Travis Line, Alec Ibach and Evan Ibach. Evan received second overall and the team members all received purples. The Junior Parliamentary procedure team received a bronze, but all but one of the team members can come back and perform. The Natural Resources team received a red ribbon, and Brandon Trampe and Austin Pierce received a blue. The Junior Livestock Judging team received a purple ribbon and all team members received blues. That team consisted of Dillan Line, Tab

Anderson, and Brandon Trampe. The Agriscience team received a blue ribbon with Joe Harshbarger receiving a blue, Kristen Karlberg received a Red and Brookelyn Trampe received a purple with (7/360). The meats team of Travis Line – purple, John Frerichs – Purple, Calvin Frerichs – Blue, and Nissa Brown – Blue got a purple. The ag sales team of Cy Barnes, Zach Burden, Deidra Brooks and Nolan Smith ran up on some tough luck and didn’t receive a ribbon. In a first for our chapter, 7 seniors received their state degrees. Those seniors that put in the 4 years of hard work included: Dylan Smith, Benjamin Trampe, Alec Ibach, Evan Ibach, Emily Ibach, Jacob Pierce, and Travis Line. Finally at the conclusion of the convention state officers for the 2010-2011 year were announced. Alec Ibach was awarded a vice president office. This is an exciting first for our chapter. Junior Nissa Brown said “I’m glad Alec is representing our state and FFA chapter this upcoming year.” “I was really happy with how our kids performed and represented our chapter at the state convention.” Said Mr. Bowder Just a reminder that the chapter/member banquet will be on Friday April 23rd at 7:00 and the Alumni Pancake feed will be on Sunday April 25 time TBD.

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42943


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express - District 9

Page 15

State Degrees, District Livestock Judging, and CDE’s Tyler Schindler, Wheeler Central Reporter We had six seniors try to get their state degrees. Those six seniors where Danielle Nichols, Trevor Kahl, Raymond Bernt, Zac Thramer, Katie Thunker, and Kelsey Weber. The State FFA Degree is the highest degree that can be handed out to FFA members. We had a good turn out at district livestock judging. We had three purple ribbons Lane Day, Sydney Gehl, and Tyler Schindler. For blue ribbons we had Margo Erickson, Joni Qualm, and Kelsey Weber. For red ribbons we had Greg Olson, Jentry Qualm, Kent Snider, and Shelby Kasselder. For white ribbons we had Cassie Thunker, Andrea Pelster, Nathan Smith, Kylee Weber, Jordan Wietzki, and Trevor Kahl. Even though some had a gallant effort they did not place. CDE’s stands for Career Development Events. At this event we had a good outcome of ribbon

placements. We had three blue ribbons. Those ribbons where awarded to Sadie Scarborough in Agriscience, Kent Snider in Welding, and Chelsea Nichols in Farm Management. For red ribbons we had Tyler Schindler in Meats, Jordan Wietzki in Agriscience, Jordyn Abbot in Floriculture, Jentry Qualm in Floriculture, Jake Kasselder in Arc Welding, Kassy Winter in Agriscience, and Kelsey Weber in Nursery and Landscape. For white ribbons we had Jentry Qualm in Nursery and Landscape. For team ribbons we had a small outcome. With a red ribbon qualifying for state was the Nursery and Landscape team consisting of Kelsey Weber, Hilary Kasperbauer, Jentry Qualm, and Joni Qualm. With a white ribbon qualifying for state was the Meats team consisting of Mitch Erickson, Morgan Pelster. The Floriculture team got a red Jentry Qualm, Jordyn Abbot, Hilary Kasperbaur and Joni Qualm. Good job everyone!!!

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43578


Page 16

Heartland Express - District 9

April 15, 2010

Broken Bow FFA Attends State Convention

ANSLEY AGENCY INC.

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State Degrees from left to right (Collin Chytka, Allyn Leick, Lance Oatman and Sam Troxel)

On April 7, 2010 the Broken Bow FFA Chapter sent a busload of students to the 82nd Annual Nebraska State FFA Convention in Lincoln, Nebraska. At the convention, FFA members com43545 peted in contests, listened to speakers, and participated in several workshops. Broken Bow FFA members competed in events InSURAnce such as Nursery/Landscape, Farm Business Management, Floriculture, Agriscience, Welding, • Home • Auto • Crop • Business • Bonds • and Agricultural Communications. Some notable performances included a 5th place in MIG welding by Nate Birnie, 2nd place in the news article porAgent • Owner tion of Ag Communications by Allyn Leick, a blue ribbon by the Nursery/Landscape team. 308-836-2245 • 308-836-2327Fax The chapter as a whole also received awards for P.O. Box 160 • 111 East Kimball Street • Callaway, NE 68825 its efforts in improving the school and community. E-mail: rsmeyer@gpcom.net The chapter was ranked in the top ten for Natural www.callaway-ne.com/jrmeyer Resources, Chapter Safety, and Community 43591 Development projects, as well as receiving a gold rating for the National Chapter Award. Seniors receiving State FFA Degrees this year included Lance Oatman, Samuel Troxel, Allyn Leick, Jonathan Jones, and Collin Chytka. Samuel Troxel and Lance Oatman were also State Star finalists in Agribusiness and Placement, respectively. Members also won proficiency awards. Samuel Troxel received first place in Equine Entrepreneurship, and Allyn Leick won 2nd place in Equine Placement. Members that weren’t competing had the opportunity to attend events throughout the day. In the 43575 Cornhusker Marriott, students could participate in leadership workshops and listen to motivational speakers. They also had the opportunity to journey over to Pershing center for a career fair. The convention proMain Office: Broken Bow 308-872-2466 M E M B E R vided a chance for members to be recognized for Branch Locations: Callaway, Mason City, their efforts throughout Merna & Oconto 43544 the year and to learn more about themselves and others. The annual State Convention conINC. tinually provides opportunities for students to gain leadership skills and careers skills that are invaluable in any career field.

J.R. MeyeR Agency

Randy Meyer

Commercial Feedlot Located 1 mile South of Oconto on Hwy. 21 77920 Highway 21 • Oconto, NE 68860

308-858-4455 Roger Schultze, Manager Res: 308-784-5168 Cell: 308-870-0812

Tim Pflaster, Asst. Manager Res: 308-858-4428 Cell: 308-870-4695

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Allyn Leick on the left was 2nd in Equine Placement Proficiency; Sam Troxel won the Equine Entrepreneurship Proficiency.

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Lance Oatman on right was a State Star Finalist in Placement and Sam Troxel was a State Star Finalist in Agribusiness.


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express - Heartland Cattleman

Page 17

Farm and Ranch’s

HEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Dedicated to the Livestock Industry

Nebraska NDA Director Provides Update Beef Council Seeks on Bovine Tuberculosis in Nebraska Director Candidates Nebraska Agriculture Director Greg Ibach endured a series of tests that are part of a new Kearney, NE (April 5, 2010) The Nebraska Beef Council (NBC) will hold Board of Director Elections in four districts in 2010. This opportunity is open to qualified Nebraska beef producers that are 21 years of age or older, a registered voter, and a resident of the district that he or she will represent. Nebraska Beef Council directors volunteer their time to represent beef producers’ checkoff investments on the state and national level. The Board’s major responsibility is to oversee checkoff expenditures by determining promotion, research and education programs for checkoff investments. The term is four years and will begin on January 1, 2011. Ann Marie Bosshamer, NBC Executive Director, encourages anyone interested in becoming a beef council director to visit with current and past directors to learn more about this valuable experience and its commitment. In addition, candidates are encouraged to attend a beef council board meeting to witness firsthand the duties of the board of directors and how the checkoff is invested. Election packets are availible beginning on May 1, 2010. Possible candidates must obtain 100 signatures from beef producers in their districts on a candidate petition. All candidate materials, including signature petition, statement of intent, and candidate affidavit must be returned to the NBC office by September 1, 2010. The following districts will hold elections: District #2 includes Grant, Hooker, Thomas, Blaine, Loup, Rock, Brown, Keya Paha, and Cherry Counties. (Note: Dave Hamilton, the current District 2 director, is eligible for reelection.) District #4 includes Boyd, Holt, Wheeler, Knox, Antelope, and Boone Counties. (Note: David Wright, the current District 4 director, has served two terms and is not eligible for reelection.) District #6 includes Arthur, McPherson, Logan, Keith, Perkins, Lincoln, Chase, Hayes, Dundy and Hitchcock Counties. (Note: Mark Spurgin, the current District 6 director, has served two terms and is not eligible for reelection.)

today provided information on the status of bovine tuberculosis (TB) testing in the state. The update included details to wrap up the investigation into the June 2009 finding of two TB-positive beef cows in a Rock County herd. Ibach also offered information in follow-up to a January announcement regarding NDA’s cooperation with South Dakota officials on the finding of a TB-positive beef cow in that state. “We are extremely pleased that after extensive testing, we did not find any additional positive cases of TB in association with the Rock County investigation,” Ibach said. “Unfortunately the disease has been found in association with another investigation. “I don’t believe this new case is indicative of a TB problem in our state,” he said. “I think it is representative of the vast scope of agriculture in Nebraska and the regionalization of the livestock industry. We are a major processor of red meat, and we are one of the largest cattle feeding states. Those factors mean NDA must exercise due diligence regarding disease surveillance and investigations.” ROCK COUNTY CASE Ibach said NDA staff, in coordination with federal animal disease officials, tested 21,764 head of cattle in association with the investigation of two TB-positive cows found in a Rock County beef herd last year. A total of 61 herds in 20 counties were quarantined as NDA traced cattle movement into and out of the affected herd and tested cattle that may have shared a fence line with the herd. No additional positive cases of TB were found, and Ibach said only three herds remain under quarantine at this time, with those quarantines to be lifted as those feeder cattle move to slaughter. In addition, the initial affected herd has been released from quarantine. Ibach said the herd

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) federal “test-and-remove” strategy. One final whole-herd “assurance test” will be conducted a year from now, he said. “Obviously, we are pleased with the outcome of this investigation. We appreciate the cooperation we had from area ranchers and others who were impacted,” Ibach said. SOUTH DAKOTA CASE NDA began working with South Dakota officials in January after they announced the finding of a TB-positive cow in the southeastern part of that state. Preliminary work to trace cattle movements into and out of the South Dakota herd included a link to Nebraska. Ibach said today NDA testing based on that epidemiological investigation has led to the finding of a TB-positive cow in a Cedar County beef herd. “Owners of four northeast Nebraska herds had purchased cattle from the South Dakota herd,” Ibach said. “Three of the four herds tested free of the disease, but the results of the last cow in the last herd to be tested returned as positive for TB.” Ibach said NDA officials now are in the process of conducting a new epidemiological investigation on the Cedar County herd. The investigation will include tracing the movement of cattle into and out of the herd, as well as locating other herds that may have shared a fence line with the affected herd. It is unknown how many new herds may have to be quarantined for testing, he said, but at this point the scale of the investigation appears to be much smaller than the Rock County investigation. ONGOING WORK Ibach said the TB testing and other related disease surveillance work is part of NDA’s ongoing efforts to protect Nebraska’s livestock herds. Such efforts include communication with other states regarding movements of animals, as well Continued on page 19

Continued on page 19

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Page 18

Heartland Express June 9235 9605

May Feeder 10982 11697

Cattle

Support: Resistance

Live cattle trade appears to have topped out this past week with a good downside correction so far this week. The weekly net changes are down around $2.50 on the April futures which are down $3 from the high, June futures are nearly $2 on the week and August Feeder Cattle are down around $3. We have some downward momentum going in the futures at this time. The close yesterday was the second daily close below the 20-day moving average on the June Live cattle contract but the April futures found support at the 20-day. The daily closes on Thursday and Friday are important chart items because two poor daily closes could indicate that the bull move is over. If we slip we will be looking to levels of supports which on the April contract would be at $95 and $92 or just below there for the June contract. Cash

trade yesterday was $1 to $2 lower than last week at the $98 area. There was some light trade early in the week steady with last week at $100. The cutout trade has advanced this week with choice up at 166.74 on Wednesday afternoon and select at 164.85. The cutout prices suggest we should hold up at these cash prices, but the market needs to believe the beef demand will stay firm with cutout levels $20 to $25 higher than where we had been most of the past year. Hedgers call with questions. Make sure your focus remains on profitability and not ownership of expensive calves or exiting profitable hedges because it could have been or could be better. As we mentioned last week, there is a risk of a brisk set back here, and the action the past few sessions is suggesting it may have begun.

June 2010 Live Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart - 4/15/2010 Open . .93.550 High . .93.725 Low . . .92.900 Close . .92.950 Change .-0.525

April 15, 2010 By David M. Fiala

FuturesOne President and Chief Analyst/Advisor David M. Fiala’s company, FuturesOne, is a full service risk management and futures brokerage firm. A primary focus of FuturesOne is to provide useful agricultural marketing advice via daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of the domestic and global markets. FuturesOne designs and services individualized risk management solutions and will also actively manage pricing decisions for ag producers. FuturesOne also provides advice and management services for speculative accounts. David and his staff at FuturesOne draw on decades of market-

ing, brokerage, farming and ranching experience to provide customers and readers quality domestic and global market analysis, news and advice. FuturesOne has Nebraska offices located in Lincoln, Columbus and Callaway—Des Moines and at the Chicago Board of Trade. You may contact David via email at fiala@ futuresone.com, by phone at 1-800-4885121 or check FuturesOne out on the web at www.futuresone.com. Everyone should always understand the risk of loss and margin needed when trading futures or futures options. The information contained herein is gathered from sources we believe to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice. There is significant risk in trading futures.

Jun 8272 8682

July 8337 8607

Hogs

Support: Resistance

Lean hog trade has remained a firm to higher tone this week. After three days of trade this week the April futures are up over $1 and June futures up just short of a buck. Many new contract highs have been printed, but we did not make any big upside extensions suggesting the momentum is flat. Cattle have begun to correct, which may spell a topping type action in the hogs over the next week. Cash trade has come up into the upper $70 range, so it is supporting the current futures price and the premium in the

May-August contracts. We now have the October contract up above $75 with some upward momentum; make sure hedgers look to start hedging here, or using options at least, if you have not. Historically we do not see October over $75 too often. Hedgers call with questions. As we look forward everything is looking good to me with December and February trade now inching into the mid $70 range! Make sure you are looking forward at your margins.

June 2010 Hogs (CBOT) - Daily Chart - 4/15/2010 May 2010 Feeder Cattle (CBOT) - Daily Chart - 4/15/2010 Open .113.550 High .113.600 Low . .112.175 Close .112.200 Change .-1.400

Open . .85.700 High . .85.750 Low . . .84.750 Close . .84.950 Change .-0.525

Nebraska Weekly Weighted Average Feeder Cattle Report Week Ending: 4/10/2010

MARKET: Bassett Livestock Auction - Bassett, NE; Ericson/Spalding Auction Market - Ericson, NE; Huss Livestock Market LLC - Kearney, NE; Imperial Livestock Auction - Imperial, NE; Lexington Livestock Market - Lexington, NE; North Platte Livestock Auction - North Platte, NE Receipts: 18,220 Last Week: 12,250 Last Year: 15,670 Compared to last week the bulk of steers trended 8.00 to 14.00 higher with instances of steady to 6.00 higher. Heifers weighing less than 600 pounds traded steady to 5.00 higher. Heifers 600 pounds and heavier trended 4.00 to 7.00 lower most likely due to lack of offerings in that weight group after last week's plethora of heifer offerings. Feeder steers accounted for 53 percent of total receipts, heifers 47 percent. Weights over 600 pounds were 70 percent of total offerings.

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1

Feeder Steers Medium & Large 1-2

Head . . . .Wt . . .Avg Wt . . .PriceAvg . . . . . .Price

Head . . . .Wt . . .Avg Wt . . .PriceAvg . . . . . .Price

16 . . . . .337 . . . .337 84 . . .355-399 . .381 284 . .400-448 . .420 397 . .450-498 . . 475 425 . .502-548 . .523 1351 .550-598 . .578 715 . .600-648 . .625 25 . . . . .635 . . . .635 1175 .650-699 . .671 833 . .700-749 . .720 1183 .750-795 . .768 71 . . . . .795 . . . .795 955 . .800-848 . .824 840 . .854-895 . .883 228 . .900-946 . .917 22 . . . . .1002 . . .1002

36 . . .402-440 . .422 40 . . .460-495 . .482 47 . . .520-545 . .527 5 . . . . . .566 . . . .566 88 . . .620-645 . .642 101 . .650-690 . .671 8 . . . . . .700 . . . .700 3 . . . . . .793 . . . .793 12 . . . . .878 . . . .878

. . . .158.00 . . . . .158.00 .138.50-157.50 . .149.96 .127.50-161.75 . .150.56 .126.00-156.00 . .143.73 .119.00-145.25 . .137.32 .124.00-138.50 . .131.36 .116.00-138.00 . .128.95 . . . .119.00 . . . . .119.00 .117.00-132.00 . .125.30 .110.50-129.50 . .120.69 .108.75-125.00 . .116.34 . . . .110.29 . . . . .110.29 .106.00-114.00 . .111.22 .102.50-114.00 . .109.56 .100.00-107.10 . .104.82 . . . .100.25 . . . . .100.25

.136.50-146.00 . .141.61 .120.00-147.00 . .138.48 .130.00-134.00 . .132.77 . . . .121.00 . . . . .121.00 .121.00-124.00 . .122.13 .116.25-119.00 . .118.22 . . . .110.50 . . . . .110.50 . . . .100.50 . . . . .100.50 . . . .100.00 . . . . .100.00

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1 Head . . . .Wt . . .Avg Wt . . .PriceAvg . . . . . .Price 32 . . .325-343 133 . .352-391 324 . .400-448 466 . .453-498 313 . .509-548

. .335 . .379 . .424 . .475 . .529

.126.00-135.00 .124.00-155.00 .120.25-141.00 .118.00-134.00 .114.00-133.00

. .131.13 . .142.38 . .132.48 . .127.83 . .124.27

1033 .550-599 . .579 .113.00-127.50 . .122.13 1051 .601-646 . .627 . .99.00-122.75 . . .117.53 17 . . . . .630 . . . .630 . . . .113.25 . . . . .113.25 1061 .650-696 . .673 .103.00-120.00 . .113.99 213 . .658-699 . .682 .114.75-119.00 . .116.49 952 . .700-748 . .722 . .95.00-115.75 . . .110.94 207 . .701-720 . .710 .113.00-119.00 . .116.84 853 . .751-795773 100.00-112.25 . . . .105.34 75 . . .772-783 . .774 .103.00-112.00 . .110.18 819 . .801-826 . .810 . .95.50-108.75 . . .104.53 120 . .816-847 . .840 .101.75-106.50 . .102.86 144 . .850-897 . .873 . .97.00-102.00 . . . .99.47 16 . . . . .852 . . . .852 . . . .102.35 . . . . .102.35 44 . . .912-927 . .919 . .94.00-97.25 . . . .95.77 9 . . . . . .978 . . . .978 . . . . .93.50 . . . . . . .93.50

Feeder Heifers Medium & Large 1-2 Head . . . .Wt . . .Avg Wt . . .PriceAvg . . . . . .Price 31 . . .405-445 . .434 .103.00-132.00 . .124.19 118 . .500-545 . .527 .101.00-125.25 . .121.11 7 . . . . . .590 . . . .590 . . . .105.00 . . . . .105.00

Check Us Out On The Web @ www.myfarmandranch.com 5 Area Weekly Weighted Average Direct Slaughter Cattle Week Ending: 4/4/10

Confirmed: 140,103 Week Ago: 172,943

Year Ago: 183,776

Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . .Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6,572 . . . . . . . .1,225-1,500 . . . . . . . . . . .94.00-98.00 1,395 . . . . . . . . . .96.60 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,924 . . . . . . . .1,200-1,450 . . . . . . . . . . .94.50-98.00 1,331 . . . . . . . . . .96.34 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22,992 . . . . . . .1,100-1,435 . . . . . . . . . . .95.00-97.50 1,281 . . . . . . . . . .96.12 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .268 . . . . . . . .1,250-1,300 . . . . . . . . . . .96.00-96.00 1,294 . . . . . . . . . .96.00 Live Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Weighted Averages Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,347 . . . . . . . .1,115-1,400 . . . . . . . . . . .93.50-97.00 1,282 . . . . . . . . . .96.00 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,773 . . . . . . . .1,030-1,350 . . . . . . . . . . .93.00-98.00 1,204 . . . . . . . . . .96.10 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17,786 . . . . . . .1,025-1,265 . . . . . . . . . . .94.00-98.00 1,161 . . . . . . . . . .96.05 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .======================================================================================================= Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head Count . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) Slaughter Steers (Beef Breeds): (Paid on Hot Weights) (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,057 . . . . . . . . .726-921 . . . . . . . . . . .151.00-157.00 853 . . . . . . . . . . .156.28 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12,439 . . . . . . . . .750-950 . . . . . . . . . . .152.00-157.00 849 . . . . . . . . . . .155.88 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,566 . . . . . . . . .736-950 . . . . . . . . . . .151.50-157.00 820 . . . . . . . . . . .155.23 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Weighted Averages Dressed Basis Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head Count . . . . Weight Range (lbs) . . . . . . . . .Price Range ($) (lbs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .($) Slaughter Heifers (Beef Breeds): Over 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,992 . . . . . . . . .682-850 . . . . . . . . . . .151.00-157.00 780 . . . . . . . . . . .155.52 65 - 80% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,923 . . . . . . . . .680-950 . . . . . . . . . . .150.00-158.00 770 . . . . . . . . . . .156.47 35 - 65% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,847 . . . . . . . . .685-950 . . . . . . . . . . .152.00-157.00 739 . . . . . . . . . . .153.76 0 - 35% Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 . . . . . . . . . .729-729 . . . . . . . . . . .156.00-156.00 729 . . . . . . . . . . .156.00

NEBRASKA HAY SUMMARY Week Ending 4/9/2010 Eastern Nebraska: Compared with last week, hay sales trading steady with light to moderate demand and trade activity light. Ground and delivered hay sales trading fully steady to firm and pellet sales were fully steady. Northeast Nebraska: Alfalfa: Large Squares Premium: 120.00150.00 Ground and Delivered to feedlots 80.00-95.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent protein: 180.00-190.00. Platte Valley of Nebraska: Alfalfa: Large Squares Premium: 120.00-150.00; Good Round Bales 80.00-95.00; Fair Round Bales 65.00-75.00. Grass: Large and Medium Squares Premium: 100.00130.00, Good Round Bales 75.00-90.00, Fair Round Bales 60.0070.00. Ground and Delivered To feedlots 95.00-105.00. Corn Stalks: Large Round Bales 50.00-65.00. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17 percent: 175.00-185.00. Western Nebraska: Trade and movement slow. Hay prices mostly steady. Demand moderate to good for dairy quality hay, moderate to light for cow hay. Supplies remain good as it appears there will be some carry over this spring. All prices dollars per ton FOB stack in medium to large square bales and rounds, unless otherwise noted. Horse hay in small squares. Prices are from the most recent reported sales.

Detailed Quotations Western Nebraska Alfalfa Premium 90.00-125.00 Sm. Sqrs. 5.00-5.50/bale Good 75.00-90.00 Fair 60.00-75.00 Utility 55.00 Ground & Deliv. New Crop 90.00-110.00

Weekly Weighted Averages (Beef Brands): Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .38,756 . . . . . . .1,312 . . . . . . . .96.25 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .32,906 . . . . . . .1,193 . . . . . . . .96.06 Dressed Del Steer . . .23,062 . . . . . . .843 . . . . . . . .155.81 Dressed Del Heifer . . .14,821 . . . . . . .762 . . . . . . . .155.33

Week Ago Averages:

Mixed Grass 70.00-75.00 Wheat Straw 50.00

Sales fob feedlots and delivered. Estimated net weights after 3-4% shrink. Other: Contract sales; Formula sales; Holsteins; Heiferettes; Cattle sold earlier in the week, but data not collected on day of sale; Etc.

Year Ago Averages: Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price

Live FOB Steer . . . . . .52,139 . . . . . . .1,302 . . . . . . . .95.95 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .44,759 . . . . . . .1,186 . . . . . . . .96.11 Dressed Del Steer . . .29,635 . . . . . . .848 . . . . . . . .152.14 Dressed Del Heifer . . .18,312 . . . . . . .765 . . . . . . . .152.22

Head Count Avg Weight Avg Price Live FOB Steer . . . . . .59,091 . . . . . . .1,320 . . . . . . . .84.73 Live FOB Heifer . . . . .41,864 . . . . . . .1,200 . . . . . . . .84.64 Dressed Del Steer . . .34,211 . . . . . . .882 . . . . . . . .134.61 Dressed Del Heifer . . .21,466 . . . . . . .799 . . . . . . . .134.56

• St. Joseph Sheep - Week Ending Monday, April 5, 2010 • Prior Week Slaughtered Lamb Head Count -- Formula : Domestic - 15,708; Imported - 0 Slaughtered Owned Sheep: Domestic: 6,426 Head; Carcass Wt: 46 - 89 Lbs.; Wtd Avg Wt: 77.4; Wtd avg. Dressing: 49.2; choice or better; 98.6% YG 91.4% Domestic Formula Purchases: . . . .Head . . .Weight (lbs) . . .Avg Weight . . . . . .Price Range . . . . . . . . .Wtd Avg 151 . . . . under 55 lbs . . . . .38.1 . . . . . . .230.38 - 290.00 . . . . . . . .278.36 535 . . . . .55-65 lbs . . . . . . .59.7 . . . . . . . .214.00 - 236.53 . . . . . . . .221.48 3,206 . . . .65-75 lbs . . . . . . .71.3 . . . . . . . .214.76 - 238.00 . . . . . . . .228.30 9,391 . . . .75-85 lbs . . . . . . .77.9 . . . . . . .209.00 - 239.56 . . . . . . . .231.96 1,570 . . . .over 85 lbs . . . . . .87.6 . . . . . . . .220.86 - 224.07 . . . . . . . .222.46


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 19

Pasture Loss Due to Grasshopper Infestation Eligible for ELAP Craig Schaunaman, State Executive Director of USDA's Farm Service Agency in South Dakota announced that the state of South Dakota has been approved for pasture grazing loss assistance under the Emergency Livestock Assistance Program (ELAP) as a result of grasshopper infestation during the 2009 grazing season. "ELAP provides emergency relief to livestock producers to aid in the reduction of losses due to

disease and adverse weather that are not covered by the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program (SURE), Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP), and Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP)," Schaunaman said. Producers that had pasture grazing losses for the 2009 season due to grasshoppers can now contact their local FSA Service Center for a late filed ELAP signup. The producer must certify to the

actual number of grazing days that were lost due to the grasshopper infestation. This signup will only be open for a limited period of time. Producers should contact their local FSA Service Center for details regarding the ELAP program. Additional information about the ELAP program or any other program administered by FSA can be obtained on the web at www.fsa.usda.gov.

ARS Scientists Work to Reduce Spread of Cattle Viruses Viral infections in cattle can be costly for producers. Two such viruses—bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)—cause outbreaks in the United States that leave animals with symptoms that can reduce production efficiency. However, the viruses’ impact or the way they spread among animals is not always straightforward. Cattle Value Reduced After Virus Exposure Fever, pneumonia, diarrhea and compromised immunity are among the telltale signs of infection with the group of viruses that cause bovine viral diarrhea, an economically significant disease that affects cattle herds throughout the world. Calves exposed to a BVDV in utero may develop persistent infections and shed the virus throughout their lives. Post-birth exposure to BVDV usually leads to acute infections that last 7–10 days. With lifelong compromised health, persistently infected (PI) cattle are obviously a drain on economic resources, but they may be even more costly than previously assumed. A collaborative study involving scientists from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) shows that PI cattle can actually decrease the profitability of surrounding cattle—even those that never develop clinical disease. This work was published in the January 2009 issue of the American Journal of Veterinary Research. PI cattle have higher mortality rates and lower production efficiency than other cattle. But the economic consequences of BVDV don’t end there, according to a study initiated by veterinary consultant Bill E. Hessman of the Haskell County Animal Hospital in Sublette, Kansas. In collaboration with ARS and university colleagues, Hessman showed that after exposure to PI cattle, non-PI cattle had higher morbidity rates and lower production efficiency than cattle with absolutely no exposure to PI animals. Microbiologist Julia Ridpath at the ARS National Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa, helped design and analyze the study, which was conducted in a newly constructed feedlot. The collaborators tested 21,743 calves as they entered the feedlot. They identified PI animals, characterized the BVDV strains present, and tracked the spread of strains within and between pens. Some pens held one or more PI cattle. Others had no PI cattle, but were adjacent to infected pens. The remaining pens neither held infected cattle nor adjoined infected pens. The scientists found that the mortality rates were 25.6 percent for PI cattle and 2.4 percent,

overall, for non-PI cattle. Of the non-PI cattle, those that were exposed to PI cattle had a mortality rate of 3.6 percent, and those that had no exposure had a mortality rate of 1.7 percent. The higher mortality and morbidity rates due to PI exposure have been reported previously. But this study was one of the first to compare performance outcomes, such as production efficiency, of PI-exposed animals and non-PI-exposed animals. Production efficiency, based on the ratio of feed intake to weight gain, for PI-exposed animals was less than half that of non-PI-exposed animals. This is a significant observation for livestock producers because it demonstrates that the economic damage incurred by exposure to PI animals is not limited to increased treatment costs. Even PIexposed animals that remained clinically healthy gained weight less efficiently than non-PI-exposed animals. Based on this study, estimated economic losses caused by exposure to PI cattle could be between $40 and $90 per animal, due to increased mortality and morbidity and decreased performance. Immunizing young animals against bovine viral diarrhea is important to reducing losses. Here, microbiologists John Neil and Julia Ridpath vaccinate calves with a commercial available vaccine to study the immune response it generates in the animals. New Leads in the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Transmission Cycle VSV is endemic in Mexico and causes sporadic outbreaks in the United States. Though rarely fatal, VSV causes physical discomfort in livestock, reduces production efficiency, and may result in serious secondary infections. And because clinical signs in cattle and pigs are similar to those of footand-mouth disease, every outbreak must be closely monitored. New research from ARS scientists in Wyoming could help prevent the spread of VSV. Barbara Drolet at the agency’s Arthropod-Borne Animal Diseases Research Laboratory (ABADRL) in Laramie and Justin Derner at the ARS High Plains Grasslands Research Station in Cheyenne have shown that, under laboratory conditions, rangeland plants can harbor VSV and pass the virus to grasshoppers feeding on them. Though there are no reports to date of field rangelandplant testing during outbreaks, the scientists showed that a common grasshopper pesticide also kills the virus on the plants. Infected animals salivate heavily, shedding virus in the saliva, which results in animal-to-ani-

mal transmission. During an outbreak, producers try to control the spread of VSV by restricting animal movement, disinfecting all materials used, and limiting the animals’ exposure to insects that transmit the virus. Soil and plants have been thought to be sources of VSV, but because this has not been previously confirmed, current recommendations for VSV control do not include decontamination of corral soils and pastures. Previous research by ABADRL and University of Wyoming scientists showed that, in grasshoppers, the virus can multiply and then infect cattle that eat the insects while grazing. That study prompted Drolet to investigate two assumptions made in the initial proposal of a grasshopper-cattle infection cycle: If infected animals shed the virus onto pasture plants as they graze, can the virus remain infectious on the plant surface? If so, will grasshoppers become infected by eating the contaminated plants? To determine the window of opportunity for grasshoppers to ingest viable VSV from contaminated plants, Drolet and Derner selected 14 rangeland plant species that grasshoppers eat, exposed the plants to VSV in a laboratory setting, and measured virus survival over time. “Several plant species harbored viable virus up to 24 hours in the lab,” Drolet says. This is the first report demonstrating the stability of VSV on rangeland-plant surfaces. The scientists then exposed two of the plant species to VSV and fed them to grasshoppers 24 hours later. The grasshoppers became infected, which supports the hypothesis that grasshoppercattle-grasshopper transmission of VSV is possible. The scientists next tested a common grasshopper pesticide and found that it could deliver a double punch if used during an outbreak in pastured animals: In addition to reducing the grasshopper population, the pesticide inactivated VSV on contact, thus potentially reducing a source of virus for grazing animals and any remaining grasshoppers. Click here to sign up for our free quarterly Healthy Animals newsletter! “We haven’t investigated the molecular mechanisms behind it,” Drolet says. “But the results clearly show that this pesticide is lethal to VSV.” This knowledge could be useful in making disease-management decisions during future outbreaks. This research was published in the May 2009 issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

NEBRASKA BEEF COUNCIL....

NDA DIRECTOR PROVIDES...

TABLE TALK LEADS TO...

Continued from page 17

Continued from page 17

Continued from page 8

District #8 includes Adams, Webster, Clay, Nuckolls, Fillmore, Thayer, Seward, Saline, Jefferson, Lancaster, Gage, Otoe, Johnson, Pawnee, Nemaha, and Richardson Counties. (Note: Ann Bruntz, the current District 8 director, has served two terms and is not eligible for reelection.) “Beef producers who are passionate about the industry and who are willing to provide leadership to the beef checkoff program and its investments are needed as we face the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead,” said Bosshamer. “We need strong leaders to enhance our mission and strengthen beef demand in the global marketplace.” Ballots will be mailed to beef producers in the election districts on November 1, 2010 and must be postmarked by November 15th to be eligible. Results will be announced on December 1, 2010. For additional information or to receive your candidate petition packet, contact the Nebraska Beef Council office at 1-800-421-5326.

as coordination with federal USDA officials and other state agencies. “Disease surveillance and testing are a part of our day to day tasks. That includes work with not only beef cattle, but also dairies and cervids,” he said. “However the efforts of our staff over the past several months have been far from routine. They’ve worked many extra hours to address the TB emergency in Nebraska in order to protect our valuable livestock industry, and I thank them for their efforts.” NDA will provide updates on the Cedar County investigation as new information becomes available. General information about bovine TB can be found on the NDA web site at www.agr.ne.gov, under the bovine TB button on the right side of the home page.

"I don't know why, but after talking that time, Tim and I did something about it, instead of just talking. Now we'll see how it works and keep moving." In addition to Henkel, officers include Tim Erdman as executive director/secretary, and Tom Henson as vice president. The group is considering storage possibilities as a way to increase the revenue on their crops. Instead of having to sell off the combine, they could hold it back and sell when prices are better. Costs could be spread among the group, which would spread the risk and diversify their opportunities and operations. "It might be slow, but this is radical and new, and it takes a while to get to where we wanted to go, but we knew that. This way there are more resources, and markets and researchers. We just need to use all of them."

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Page 20

Heartland Express

April 15, 2010

Schedule of Events Apr 22-24 - North Platte (Lincoln County) 10th Annual Country Bluegrass Festival; Lincoln County Fairgrounds, 5015 W. US Hwy 30; Enjoy bands and entertainers from across the United States including Bobby Osborne, Michael Cleveland, Audie Blaylock, Barely Herd and Nothin' Fancy. Donna Mentzer (308) 532-1465 www.countryblue grassshow.homestead.com Apr 23-24 - Omaha (Douglas County) AllAmerican Fanfare; Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St; Hearts will soar and tears may fall at this patriotic concert celebrating what makes America great. 8pm, $15-$75 (402) 342-3560 www.omahasymphony.org Apr 23-25 - Chadron (Dawes County) Festival of Quilts; Assumption Arena, 4th & Spruce Sts Quilt show, competition, displays, vendors, programs and demonstrations. Fri-Sat, 9am-6pm; Sun, noon-4pm, $4 Charlotte Kriz (308) 432-4041 www.festivalofquilts.com Apr 23-25 - Omaha (Douglas County) Polka Fest; German American Society 3717 S. 120th St; Featuring local and regional acts, dancing, refreshments and more. 11am-midnight. (402) 333-6615 www.germanamericansociety.org Apr 24 - Kearney (Buffalo County) A Night to Remember the Titanic; Frank House, 2010 W. 24th; Enter the drama of that fateful night while you enjoy a luxurious 8-course formal dinner in the historic Frank House. 5-9pm, $165 KrisAnn Sullivan (308) 865-8284 www.frankhouse.org Apr 24 - Peru (Nemaha County) The Great Nebraska Mushroom Hunt; Steamboat Trace Trailhead, 300 5th St; A down-to earth experience. Morel mushroom hunting with instruction for novice hunters. 8:30am-4pm, $10. Linda Tynon (850) 916-1616 www.nebraskathegoodlife.com

Apr 25 - Beatrice (Gage County) Industry Day; Gage County Historical Museum, 101 N. 2nd St; Jayhusker Antique Engine Club will show and operate engines used on the farm, home and factory before electrical motors. 1-4pm, Free. Lesa Arterburn (402) 228-1679 beatricene.com/gage countymuseum Apr 25 - Gering, Scotts (Bluff County) Spring Up the Bluff Relay Race; Scotts Bluff National Monument, 190276 Old Oregon Trail; Relay race up Scotts Bluff National Monument via Summit Road. Running and walking divisions. Free Mark Davison (308) 436-9700 www.nps.gov/scbl Apr 25 - Sargent (Custer County) Heartland MX Series Racing; Sandhills Motorsport Park, 401 S. 7th St; Gates open 8am, racing at 11am, $5 entry, $25-$30 competitors Lisa Grint (308) 2150564 www.teamupr.com Apr 29-30 - Beatrice (Gage County) Storytelling Festival; Homestead National Monument 8523 W. NE Hwy 4; Storytellers entertain and educate visitors with stories about American culture and heritage. 10am-3pm & Fri 7pm, Free. Susan Cook (402) 223-3514 www.nps.gov/home Apr 30 - Grand Island (Hall County) Kenny Rogers in Concert; Heartland Events Center, 700 E. Stolley Park Rd; 8pm, $25-$55 www.heart landeventscenter.com Apr 30-May 2 - Nebraska City (Otoe County) Arbor Day Celebration; City-wide Children's activities and live entertainment. Parade and 5K trail run/walk, commemorative tree plantings and more. (800) 514-9113 www.nebraskacity.com

May 1 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) 90 Year Celebration of the Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory; UNL East Campus, 35th & Fair Sts; Museum open house with laboratory tours and displays. 10am-2pm, Free Jeremy Steele (402) 472-8389 tractormuseum.unl.edu May 1 - North Platte (Lincoln County) Woofstock; Memorial Park, E. Fourth St; Contests for dogs, children's games and vendors with specials on animal care and accessories. 9am, Free Dianne Morales (308) 650-7297 www.pphs.com May 1 - Plattsmouth (Cass County) Living History Day; Cass County Historical Museum, 646 Main St; Living history demonstrations including blacksmithing, basket making, weaving and soapmaking. 10am-3pm, Free Margo Prentiss (402) 296-4770 www.nebraskamuseums.org/cass countymuseum.htm May 2 - Hastings (Adams County) Chapparral's Motorcycle Poker Run; Highland Park Motorcycles drive to 5 check points to draw a card. The best poker hand at the end wins. Registration 8:30am-12:30pm, $5 Doug Mick (402) 463-6889 www.hastingschapparrals.blogspot.com May 2 - Lincoln (Lancaster County) Lincoln Czech Festival; The Moose Lodge Family Center, 4901 N. 56th St; Czech baked goods including kolaches, crystal items for sale, ethnic songs, singing, dancing and the crowning of the Czech queen. 9am-6pm, Free Deb Vocasek (402) 4381903 www.lincolnczechs.org

May 1 - Cozad (Dawson County) 2nd Annual In & Out Expo; Chipper Hall, 144 E. 8th; Vendors showcasing everything you need. 10am-4pm, Free Judy Andres (308) 784-3930 www.cozadnebraska.net

WIND PROJECTS IN NEBRASKA Continued from page 1 "local community." Nebraska law defines payments to the local community for this purpose as including, but not limited to, "lease payments to property owners on whose property a turbine is located, wind energy easement payments, and real and personal property tax receipts from the C BED project." No single qualified owner may own more than 15% of the project.5 Upon origination, wind farms must be completed in an efficient and fair manner between a group of landowners and a developer. Landowners may wish to agree on a single form of lease or easement and select a landowner committee to negotiate directly with the developer, ensuring the developer cannot play landowners against each other. Of course, developers are entering into a potential 40year relationship involving hundreds of millions of dollars in equity and equipment. Thus, developers have a strong incentive to treat landowners fairly and maintain good relationships. Most wind developers will require an option agreement with landowners in the subject county prior to entering into an easement or lease agreement. Of course, savvy developers and their attorneys will check with the local county zoning officials to determine any zoning and occupancy issues. The developer or the attorney will typically approach a landowner to determine the elements of the option agreement. As in any option agreement, it is critical to specify the property description, and to perform any necessary due diligence to verify clean title. For instance, a developer will want to make sure there are no encumbrances to the property which could be foreclosed and affect the desired option, or impede the developer's intended use of the property. Developers should request leasehold title insurance policies insuring the leasehold to be created, and should request subordination and non-disturbance agreements from any lienholders or crop lessees. The developers will typically secure easements which mirror easements on commercial real estate development projects. However,Nebraska has enacted specific statutes with respect to wind easements and leases which are more narrowly focused than typical easements. In particular, the legal description on any easement for a wind energy project must contain a description of the dimensions of the wind energy easement sufficient to determine the horizontal space across and the vertical space above the burdened property that must remain unobstructed. In addition, Nebraska Legislative Bill 568 was

passed in 2009, which requires a memorandum of wind leases and easements to be recorded. Additionally, LB 568 requires that wind leases and easements are automatically terminated after 10 years if construction has not commenced. This is an important component to the new legislation, as previously, landowners were at risk of burdening their land to wind developers who might not site the land with turbines (which would "tie up" the land and deprive landowners of income generated from wind turbines). LB 568 also limits the term of wind leases and easements in Nebraska to 40 years, subject to renewal. Additionally, wind developers need to be thoughtful about other easements which are necessary in connection with wind projects. For instance, the large machinery which is necessary to be delivered to construct turbines requires that trucks delivering this equipment "cut corners" due to wide turning radiuses across interstates, highways and local roads. Accordingly, developers need to determine delivery routes ahead of time, and obtain easements from landowners who will have their corners "cut". A variety of other easements may be required, including easements to maintain transmission lines, to construct, repair, remove and/or replace wind turbine components, and easements for any corollary equipment to be maintained, such as meteorological tower siting. From a landowner's perspective, wind energy projects can present a good opportunity to produce extra income for property, although landowners must determine the value to be obtained versus the burdens of a wind site. Obviously, landowners will want to maximize compensation in connection with the leasing of land in connection with the turbine site. Most easement agreements compensate landowners on a per megawatt, per year basis. However, landowners are free to negotiate any agreement which may be available, such as a percentage of revenues available to the developer. Like any legal negotiation, leverage is of critical importance. Obviously, crop damage is of crucial concern to any landowner. A landowner will want to obtain an easement or lease agreement containing indemnification provisions for any damage to crops (or other damage). Additionally, the easement agreement should state accurately and precisely how crop damage will be calculated. The removal of wind turbines at the expiration of an easement/lease term should be addressed in any agreement. Because wind projects may span 15-30 years, and there is a risk of developer failure, landowners should consider whether or not a

bond or other forms of collateral are available to ensure maintenance and removal of wind turbine equipment. Finally, zoning, permitting and environmental issues will factor into any wind development project. In Nebraska, many counties have been receptive to wind projects due to the income and jobs created at the county level. The primary environmental issues that arise with wind energy development in Nebraska are impacts to migrating birds and prairie chickens. Prairie chickens, which are hunted in Nebraska for sport, are like sage grouse in that they create and use "leks" for mating dances and other rituals. Leks are areas on the ground to which the prairie chickens return each year. There is some concern that wind turbines within a quarter of a mile or less of a lek may displace the prairie chickens, but the evidence is inconclusive. Nonetheless, most wind developers survey their sites for active leks and try to set turbines back from active leks by a quarter mile or more. Regarding migrating birds, the biggest concerns arise with respect to threatened or endangered species, which in Nebraska is primarily the whooping crane. To date, developers have worked with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission to develop plans on a case-by-case basis to mitigate for any loss of prairie chicken habitat and for impacts to migratory birds. While there are certainly a myriad of other issues that can arise in connection with the development of wind energy development project, the above outlines just a few considerations for any developer or landowner. With creativity and sound legal advice, Nebraska is poised to take advantage of an exciting opportunity. About the Authors: Jon Blumenthal and David Levy are partners in the Real Estate and Renewable Energy practice groups at Baird Holm LLP in Omaha, Nebraska. Blumenthal primarily represents clients with respect to real estate and secured lending, including the purchase and sale of real estate, construction planning, financing matters, foreclosures, leasing, bankruptcy/workouts and insolvency matters. Levy represents clients in zoning, land use, environmental and general real estate matters, in transactional, administrative, legislative and judicial proceedings. Levy and Blumenthal represented the developer of Nebraska's first privately developed CBED wind energy project, an 80 megawatt wind project in Bloomfield, Nebraska.


April 15, 2010

Heartland Express

Page 21

The Heartland Express Category Index 1000 - Hay & Forage Equip

1500 - Hay and Grain

2200 - Horses

3000 - Other Equipment

Mower, Windrowers, Swathers, Rakes, Balers, etc.

Alfalfa, Prairie Hay, Straw, Seed, Corn, Bean, etc.

Registered, Grade, Studs, Tack, Mares, etc.

Antique Items, Fencing, Buildings, Catchall, etc.

1100 - Tillage Equip

1800 - Livestock Equip

2300 - Other Animals

5000 - Real Estate

Tractors, Implements, Sprayers, Cultivators, etc.

Chutes, Gates, Panels, Feeder Wagons, Bunks, etc.

Dogs, Poultry, Goats, Fish, etc.

Farm Real Estate, Non Farm Real Estate

1200 - Irrigation Equip

1900 - Cattle

2500 - Services

6000 - Bed and Breakfast

Engines, Motors, Pumps, Pipe, Pivots, Gear Heads, etc.

Feeder Cattle, Heifers, Bulls, Services, etc.

Help Wanted, Custom Work and Services, etc.

Your home away from home

7000 - Special Events

1300 - Grain Harvest Equip

2000 - Swine

2600 - Transportation

Combines, Heads, Augers, Dryers, Carts, etc.

Feeders, Sows, Boars, etc.

Cars, Pickups, Truck, Trailers, ATV, Planes, etc.

1400 - Other Equipment

2100 - Sheep

2800 - Construction

Snowblowers, Blades, Shop Tools, Washers, Heaters etc.

Feeder Lambs, Ewes, Bred Ewes

Dozers, Scrapers, Loaders, Crawlers, Heavy Trucks, etc.

Guide Hunts, Fishing Trips, Singles

Deadline for next issue: THURSDAY, April 22nd. The next Heartland Express will be printed on Thursday, April 29th. To run a classified ad in the Farm and Ranch, simply fill out the form below and mail it to us with a check. This will eliminate any errors and help keep the classified cost to a minimum. 1001 - MOWERS WANTED TO BUY NE - IHC #24 MOWER & PARTS, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE NE - REBUILT KOSCH HAYVESTOR, (308) 587-2344 NE - IHC H W/WO MOWER, (308) 587-2344 NE - KOSCH SIDE MOUNT MOWER, (308) 587-2344 1002 - WINDROWERS FOR SALE NE - NH WINDROWER, SHEDDED, 1200 HRS, 14' HEADER, 6CY FORD GAS, EXCELLENT CONDITION, (308) 826-4481 1003 - SWATHERS FOR SALE OK - 2005 936 DRAPER HEAD, NEW BELTS & TRANSPORT PACKAGE, $35,000.00, (580) 541-6663 KS - '89 HONEY BEE 36' CANVAS SWATHER. GOOD COND. DUAL 18' UNITS. PTO DRIVEN DUAL HYDRAULIC PUMPS POWER PICKUP REELS, CANVASES & SICKLE DRIVES. GOES FROM ROAD TO FIELD AND BACK AGAIN IN 2 LESS MINUTES. CURRENTLY MOUNTED ON IH 5488 TRACTOR, HAYS, KS., $12,000.00, (785) 628-8003 1005 - RAKES WANTED TO BUY NE - LH CHANNEL IRON FRAME ON NH56 OVER 56B SIDE RAKE, AND A WHEEL, (308) 587-2344 1006 - BALERS FOR SALE NE - BALER BELTS AND CHAINS; BEARINGS & FLANGES, (308) 587-2344 NE - BELTS FOR MOST BALERS & SWATHERS, (308) 587-2344

1006 - BALERS FOR SALE - CONT’D AL - ROUND BALER BELTING: LRGST DEALER IN US. ORIGINAL BELTING FOR ALL ROUND BALERS INCLUDING NEW JD IN STOCK! SAVE HUNDRED$! FREE SHIPPING ANYWHERE! NO 800#, JUST BEST PRICES. SINCE 1973. HAMMOND EQUIP. MC/VISA/DISC/AMEX OR COD, BALERBELTS.COM, (334) 627-3348 TX - BALER BELTS- ALL BRANDS. MADE IN THE U. S. A. ! JD WITH GENUINE JD PLATE FASTENERS. FREE SHIPPING ON SETS. WWW. BALERBELTSANDHAYBEDS. COM, (800) 223-1312 WI - BALER KNOTTER RESURRECTIONS: ALL HAVE REBUILT KNOTTERS. BUY-SELLTRADE-FIX BALERS. ., (715) 5561400 1007 - BALE MOVERS/FEEDERS FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889 IA - MEALS ON WHEELS, 24' BALE FEEDER, SAVE MONEY, SAVE TIME, SAVE LABOR & MONEY, SAVE HAY, (712) 210-6587 KY - (2) NH BW38 BALE WAGONS, $89,500/EACH. (2) NH 5070, (615) 3903708 KS - HAY ELEVATORS, 2 ON WHEELS, 36' & 32'; 1 24' FLAT WITH 24' EXTENSION. ALL FOR SMALL SQ BALES. EXCELLENT., (785) 255-4579 1009 - STACKERS/STACK MOVERS FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND BALE WAGONS, WWW. BALEWAGON. COM. ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/TRADE., (208) 8802889

1010 - CHOPPERS/FORAGE HARVESTORS WANTED TO BUY KS - JOHN DEERE CHOPPERS & HEADS, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, KS, (785) 336-6103 1013 - DUMP WAGON WANTED TO BUY KS - JD SILAGE WAGONS & HIGH DUMPS, ROEDER IMPLEMENT, (785) 336-6103 1014 - BALE WAGONS WANTED TO BUY KS - NH SELF PROPELLED & PULL-TYPE, ROEDER IMP, SENECA, (785) 336-6103 ID - NEW HOLLAND 2 & 3-WIDE, SELF-PROPELLED, PULL-TYPE MODELS. JIM,, (208) 880-2889 FOR SALE ID - NEW HOLLAND'S-ALL MODELS, CAN DELIVER/FINANCE/ TRADE. WWW. BALEWAGON. COM, (208) 880-2889 1030 - OTHER- HAY & FORAGE WANTED TO BUY NE - HAYBUSTER GEAR BOX FOR 1600 STACKER, BEDROLLERS, PUSH OFF ASSEMBLY, A FEW OTHER PARTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - HAY PROBE FOR TESTING, (308) 5872344 1101 - TRACTORS FOR SALE NE - IH DISGUSTED? HAVE SHIFTING DIFFICULTIES W/YOUR IH 706, 806, 1206, 4106, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 786, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3688, 3788, 6788?FOR A PERMANENT FIX, CALL WENZ SERVICE TO PRICE THE KIT FOR YOUR MODEL, (800) 808-7885 NE - 8 HOLE 15" TRACTOR FRONT WHEELS, FITS IHC, (308) 587-2344

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Complete this form and mail with payment to: Farm and Ranch • PO Box 415 • Kearney, NE 68848 A $2.50 billing charge will be added if payment is not enclosed. Complete the following Information (Please Print):

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1101 - TRACTORS FOR SALE - CONT’D WI - HESSTON 4700, $5999, JD336, 24T & 14T, NH851, 273 & 65. ALL HAVE REBUILT KNOTTERS BY BALER KNOTTER RESURRECTIONS., (715) 556-1400 SD - 8870 FNH, FWA & POWERSHIFT, (605) 695-0411 KS - 1997 NH 8770 FRONT WHEEL ASSIST TRACTOR, (785) 626-9477 KS - 1993 FORD BI-DIRECTIONAL 9030, 8800 HRS, FRONT- END LOADER, GRAPPLE, NEW TIRES, LOOKS, RUNS GOOD, USING DAILY, $26,000.00, (785) 891-3778 NE - 1967 AC 190XT, BAD MOTOR, PROPANE. 1965 AC 190 CAB, MOTOR STUCK, GAS, (308) 569-2345 KS - '84 IH 5488, 190 HP, 5378 HRS, EXC. COND. NEAR NEW GY 18. 4-38 DUAL TIRES, HEAVY DUTY FRONT AXLE, NEAR NEW GY FRONT TIRES, 3 PT. HITCH, TRIPLE HYD. YOU WILL LIKE IT. HAYS, KS., $26,000.00, (785) 628-8003 1103 - LOADER ATTACHMENTS WANTED TO BUY NE - DIRT OR MANURE BUCKET HEAD FOR F10 LOADER, NEEDS TO HAVE ORANGE FRAMEWORK W/GRAPPLE, (308) 587-2344 1105 - DISKS FOR SALE NE - DISK BLADES AND BEARINGS, (308) 587-2344 OK - KRAUSE DISK 42', LIKE NEW BLADES, $15,000.00, (580) 796-2549 1107 - RIPPERS FOR SALE NE - BLU-JET SUB-TILLER, (308) 380-1536 TX - (16) DAWN PLURIBUS STRIP-TIL UNITS, $2,200 PER ROW, KYLE, (254) 717-6655 1108 - HARROWS FOR SALE OK - WAKO BIG COUNTRY 57', WITH HARROW, 3 YRS OLD, EXCELLENT CONDITION, $38,000.00, (580) 796-2549 1109 - PLANTERS FOR SALE KS - 1998 JD 1770 PLANTER, 16R W/PRECISION PLANTING E SET, CORN/BEAN PLATES, DAWN CURVED TINE CLOSING WHEELS ON ONE SIDE, 250 COMPUTER TRAC $29,900 SOUTHEAST KANSAS, 620332-4761, 620-485-4295 OR, (620) 3782334 KS - 15' UNVERFERTH DRILL OR PLANTER FILL AUGERS, 6", HYDRAULIC MOTOR, MOUNTINGS FOR JD 1590 DRILLS, USED 1 SEASON. $2,000 785-527-0581,785-3744559,, (785) 374-4231 NE - KINZE BRUSH METERS - 6 METERS, WITH SOYBEAN AND MILO PLATES, USED VERY LITTLE. $500. 308-325-0043. NE - JD 7100 PLANTER - 6RW, DAWN TRASH WHEELS, PRECISION METERS, GAUGE AND CLOSING WHEEL UPDATES, SQUEEZE PUMP, FERTILIZER TANKS, AND INSECTICIDE BOXES. $2,000. (308) 325-0043. 1111 - DRILLS FOR SALE KS - 30" HOE AIR SEEDER DRILL $3500. 40' DISC AIR SEEDER DRILL, $19,500, (785) 871-0711 KS - 2 SECT. GREAT PLAINS FOLDING DRILL, SOLID STAND, 3010 NT NO-TILL DRILL, GOOD CONDITION, FIELD READY $29,750/OBO, (316) 204-4505 1114 - SPRAYERS FOR SALE KS - 1600 GAL. FLOATER. 3000 WET BOOM SPRAYER, $6,500.00, (785) 871-0711 NE - JD 25A, 3 PT. HITCH, 150 GAL, 20" BOOM, (308) 587-2344 1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - SQUEEZE PUMP CDS AG INDUSTRIES MODEL 32B HYDRAULIC DRIVE, LIKE NEW, $300.00, (308) 772-3345 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

1120 - FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE - CIONT’D

Speidel Weed Wiper #1 Herbicide applicator for weed control. Kill rye in winter wheat, all sizes available. Recovers in stk. ATV mounting brackets & Quality Carts. 580-886-2396 • 800-544-1546 www.acrsales.com

NE - 300 GAL ELLIPTICAL FRONT MOUNT TANK AND BRACKETS FOR JOHN DEERE "10" OR "20" SERIES TRACTOR. EXCELLENT CONDITION, (308) 999-8083 1125 - AG CHEMICALS FOR SALE NE - NEBRASKALAND AVIATION, HOLDREGE, NE-HALEX GT $30.75 GAL, LUMAX $39.90 GAL, TOUCHDOWN HT $3.66 ACRE. CALL FOR PRICES ON ALL GENETICS., (308) 995-6573 ATTENTION FARMERS! Bigger and Better Yields! Better Plant Health! Stronger Plant Resistance to Drought, Frost, Hail Type Shock! Increased Herbicide Absorption! Increased Microbial Activity! Give Your Plants the Boost They Need Today! CALL CRUMM FARM’S & FERTILIZER, PH: (405) 933-0608 or email: crummtray@yahoo.com.

1130 - TRACTORS,TILL. OTHER FOR SALE NE - HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS, HOSES & PTO PUMPS, (308) 587-2344

SEED CLEANERS Clipper Super X 298 & More

515-994-2890 NE - NEW HOLLAND - MANURE SPREADER; NEW HOLLAND 116 HYDRA-SWING WINDROWER; (2) 12-ROW 30 NH 3 APPLICATORS WITH BLUE JET COULTERS; 925 JOHN DEERE GRAIN PLATFORM. CALL 308991-1451. 1201 - ENGINES/MOTORS FOR SALE NE - 2, CAT 3306 DIT ENGINES, 5, 000 HRS ON EACH, EXCELLENT. 1, 6BD1 ISUZU ENGINE 5, 000 HRS, EXCELLENT, REASONABLY PRICED CELL, 308-520-5130, (308) 387-4413 1205 - GENERATOR FOR SALE IA - WINCO PTO GENERATORS, CALL US FOR PRICE BEFORE YOU BUY! HARVEY AT EDEN SUPPLY 8AM - 10PM., (515) 679-4081 1206 - GEAR HEADS FOR SALE NE - GEAR DRIVE REPAIR- AMARILLO WARRANTY CENTER. REPAIR ALL MAKES/MODELS. 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES. CENTRAL IRRIGATION, (402) 723-5824 NE - 2 RANDOLPH 200 HP GEARHEADS, 1 HAS. . . 80 HRS. . . THE OTHER 5, 000 HRS 11-10 RATIOS. 1, 125 HP AMARILLO GEARHEAD W 5, 000 HRS 5-4 RATIO. ALL HEADS ARE IN EXCELLENT CONDITION! CELL 308520-5130, (308) 387-4413 1230 - IRRIGATION MISC. FOR SALE WI - SERVING THE MIDWEST WITH COMPLETE IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT, ALL TYPES, NEW & USED. CONTACT ROBERTS IRRIGATION COMPANY AT 1500 POST ROAD, PLOVER, WI 54467, (800) 434-5224 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE OK - REBUILT COMBINE SIEVES. NEW REEL BATS, GALVANIZED AND BLACK, (580) 3612265 OK - '86 C-IH 1660, 25' 1010 HEADER, $19,000.00, (580) 361-2265


Page 22 1301 - COMBINES AND ACCESSORIES FOR SALE - CONT’D OK - '82 GLEANER N6, 24' HEADER, $8,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - C-IH 1480, 810 24' HEAD, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - TR85 NEW HOLLAND, 3208 CAT, 24' HEADER, $5,000.00, (580) 361-2265 IA - 1-2007 9760, 4X4, 1004 SEPARATOR HRS, $175,000; 2-2005 9760'S 1254/1187 SEPARATOR HRS, $145,000/EA ALL HAVE DUALS, CM, HID, GREENSTAR, EXTENDED WEAR, HIGH RATE UNLOADS;3-635 HYDRA FLEX HEADS, NEW HIGH SPEED TRAILERS, $29,000 EACH. CALL 515-295-7947 OR, (515) 341-3188 NE - JD 4420 DIESEL COMBINE, 1497 HRS, THROUGH JD SHOP NEW RASP BARS, CLUTCH, INJECTOR PUMP, EXCELLENT SHAPE. ALSO JD444 CORNHEAD, JD 215 FLEXHEAD, BOTH EXCELLENT $15,000 PACKAGE, (308) 728-3140 KS - 2-1990 IHC 1680 COMBINES, 4WD, CHOPPER, TILT, FEEDER REVERSER, BIN EXTENSIONS, GOOD CONDITION; 25' IHC 1020 FLEX HEAD, (913) 370-3002 KS - 2007 A75 GLREANER WITH FIELD STAR II, LATERAL TILT, 250 HRS, 36' DRAPER HEAD, TRAILER, $200,000 785-973-2240; CELL, (785) 543-9339 1302 - COMBINE HEADS FOR SALE SD - WE REBUILD COMBINE & WINDROWER HEADER AUGERS TO LIKE NEW CONDITION. PONCELET'S WELDING, RAMONA, SD. (605) 480-4860 OR, (605) 482-8405 OK - MACDON 960 25' DRAPER W/IHC ADAPTER & PICK UP REEL, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 1310 - AUGERS FOR SALE NE - HUTCHINSON BIN & TRUCK FILL AUGERS WITH 1/4" SLIGHTING, (402) 6496711 1313 - GRAIN STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE NV - USED 200, 000 BUSHEL BUTLER GRAIN BIN, $45,000.00, (702) 370-0205 1315 - COMBINE TRAILERS FOR SALE SK - COMBINE TRAILERS: TRAILTECH OR JANTZ, SINGLE & DOUBLE. HYDRAULIC FOLD HEAD TRANSPORTS. FLAMAN SALES, BOX 280, SOUTHEY, SK, CANADA S0G 4P0, ASK FOR AL. EVES 306-949-8458. DAYS, (306) 726-4403 1330 - GRAIN HARVEST OTHER FOR SALE IA - MIDWEST PNEUMATIC. BRANDT, CONVEYAIR, REM, VACBOSS, HANDLAIR. NEW, RECOND, PTO OR ENG DRIVEN, PUMPS, AIR LOCKS, PIPE, PARTS, SERVICE. 5 YR LEASE OR LOAN AT 7. 1%. 40+ UNITS IN STOCK. OUR HIGH VOLUME MEANS YOUR BEST DEAL! WE DELIVER! MACEDONIA, IA, (800) 480-2487 IL - ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A MOISTURE TESTER THAT WILL GIVE YOU FAST & ACCURATE RESULTS? THEN CALL US NOW & ASK ABOUT OUR MODEL 920 & 930. SHORE SALES. MOISTURETESTERS. COM, (800) 837-0863 1406 - LAWN MOWERS FOR SALE NE - 15' RHINO BATWING FINISHING MOWER, LIKE NEW, IDEAL FOR LARGE ACREAGES, GOLF COURSES, PARKS., (402) 849-2968 1408 - DAIRY EQUIPMENT WANTED TO BUY WI - USED BULK MILK TANKS, 300 GALLON & LARGER, (800) 558-0112 1412 - SHOP TOOLS,WELDERS, ETC WANTED TO BUY NE - 110V WELDING ROD DRYING OVEN, (308) 587-2344 1430 - OTHER EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - ELSTON GOPHER MACHINE, (308) 5872344 1501 - ALFALFA HAY FOR SALE NE - HIGH QUALITY BIG ROUND & BIG SQUARE BALES. KORTY HAY. HAY ANALYSIS AVAILABLE., (888) 708-2800 OR - TEST MOISTURE. HAY, GRAIN, SILAGE, SOIL, WOOD, WINDROW TESTER. BALE STROKE COUNTER. MOISTURE READ OUT AS YOU BALE! WWW. LEHMANFARMS. NET, (503) 434-1705 MO - KANSAS ALFALFA, BROME, PRAIRIEANY SIZE BALES. DELIVERED ANYWHERE. EXPERIENCED DAIRYMAY WITH 20 YRS IN THE HAY BUSINESS. FOR HONESTY, INTEGRITY AND QUALITY, CALL LYNDELL: LAKEY & LAKEY, INC., (417) 683-6781 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

Heartland Express 1502 - PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE NE - CERTIFIED MEADOW HAY, BIG ROUND BALES, HORSES, CATTLE, MULCH, (308) 587-2344 NE - 117 BG ROUNDS, MAINLY GRASS MIX, (308) 436-5491 1503 - BROME HAY FOR SALE KS - HORSE QUALITY:3X3, WEED/MOLD FREE. APPROX 750LBS, NO SUNDAY CALLS, (785) 255-4579 1505 - STRAW FOR SALE NE - 96 BG RDS CERT WHEAT STRAW, 1000#/BL. 308-641-1240,, (308) 436-5491 1506 - CORN FOR SALE

CERTIFIED ORGANIC Corn & Oats Ph: (641) 751-8382 1507 - OATS FOR SALE NE - OATS FOR SALE, CALL, (308) 728-7294 1512 - SEED FOR SALE TX - FORAGE-TYPE TRITICALE SEED, CALL GAYLAND WARD SEEDS, (800) 299-9273 KS - SPRING BARLEY FOR SALE 785-4435911, 785-462-3008,, (785) 462-3711 1806 - GRINDER MIXERS FOR SALE NE - 414 ROTO-MIX TRAILER MIXES & SCALE, EXCELLENT CONDITION, ALWAYS SHEDDED, (308) 380-1536

W.H.O. TUB GRINDER V12-56" Mill with Truck

$30,000 Star Alfalfa Inc. • Lewis, KS

PH. 800-822-8016 1807 - HAY GRINDERS/PROCESSORS FOR SALE MN - HAYBUSTER 1150 TRUCK MOUNT GRINDERS, ENGINE GRINDERS, NEW/USED. PARTS SHIPPED DIRECT. BAKKOBROS. COM. (320) 278-3560, OR CELL, (320) 808-0471 CO - TUB GRINDERS, NEW & USED (W/WARRANTY). OPERATE WELL W/70-175 HP TRACTORS, GRINDS WET HAY, TOUGH HAY & ALL GRAINS. HIGH CAPACITY. LOW PRICE. WWW. ROTOGRIND. COM, (800) 724-5498, (970) 353-3769 1810 - MANURE SPREADERS FOR SALE NE - NEW HOLLAND - MANURE SPREADER; NEW HOLLAND 116 HYDRA-SWING WINDROWER; (2) 12-ROW 30 NH 3 APPLICATORS WITH BLUE JET COULTERS; 925 JOHN DEERE GRAIN PLATFORM. CALL 308991-1451. 1813 - FEEDERS FOR SALE NE - BULK CAKE & GRAIN FEEDERS, (308) 587-2344 1815 - WATERERS/TANKS FOR SALE MN - JUG LIVESTOCK WATERERS. THEJUGWATERER. COM, (320) 808-0471 1819 - WINDMILLS FOR SALE NE - REBUILT AIR MOTORS OR REPAIRS, (308) 587-2344 TX - VIRDEN PERMA-BILT CO. FARM & RANCH PRODUCTS: ROOF & TANK COATINGS, WINDMILL PARTS. SEND OR CALL FOR FREE CATALOG. 2821 MAYS AVE. BOX7160FR AMARILLO, TX 79114-7160 WWW. VIRDENPRODUCTS. COM, (806) 3522761 1830 - LIVESTOCK OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - 20' BULL WHIP, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", FOR FENCING CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 KS - TIRE LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS: WATER TANKS, MINERAL FEEDERS, SILAGE COVER WEIGHTS. WWW. GEETIRE. COM, (785) 231-8397 1901 - FEEDER STEERS FOR SALE MO - WE SPECIALIZE IN LOCATING "QUALITY" FEEDER CATTLE, (816) 688-7887 1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT CATTLE LOCATORS - MAX HARGROVE, (816) 6887887

1903 - OPEN HEIFERS FOR SALE - CONT’D NE - 2009 HEREFORD HEIFERS, BRUCELLOSIS VAC. , VAN NEWKIRK BLOOD LINE, NO IMPLANTS., (308) 587-2344 1907 - DAIRY COWS WANTED TO BUY NE - FAIMLY MILK COW, PREFER GURNSEY, BUT WILL CONSIDER OTHERS, (308) 5872344 1909 - BULLS FOR SALE NE - REGISTERED ANGUS, CELL: 308-8701119, (308) 732-3356 NE - RED EYED HEREFORD BULLS, HORNED AND POLLED, YEARLINGS AND 2 YR OLDS. ALSO HEREFORD FEMALES, LAPP RANCH, KEITH, (308) 286-3644 1916 - DAIRY HEIFERS FOR SALE WI - DAIRY EQUIP- STALLS, GATES, HEADLOCKS, TMR MIXERS, BARN CLEANERS, MANURE AUGERS/PUMPS, VENTILATION, ALLEY SCRAPERS. REASONABLY PRICE LONG LASTING EQUIP EQUALS VALUE. MEETING ALL DAIRYMEN'S NEEDS SINCE 1919. BERG EQUIPMENT CORP. WWW. BERGEQUIPMENT. COM, (800) 494-1738 1930 - CATTLE OTHER FOR SALE MO - QUALITY REPLACEMENT & BREEDING CATTLE LOCATORS, (816) 688-7887 CO - IT'S SIMPLE. . . YOU NEED SALERS. ACCORDING TO U. S. MARC, SALERS HAVE OPTIMUM BIRTH WEIGHT & GROWTH PERFORMANCE FOR CROSSING WITH ANGUS. SUPERIOR TO COMPETING CONTINENTAL BREEDS FOR MARBLING, SALERS ARE RELATIVELY EQUAL FOR YIELD. SALERSUSA. ORG, (303) 770-9292 2200 - PAPERED/REGISTERED HORSES FOR SALE NE - 2003 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, MORGAN BROOD MARE, 2004 BLACK MORGAN STALLION, 1995 MORGAN STALLION, (308) 587-2344 2202 - STUD SERVICE FOR SALE NE - MORGAN STALLION STANDING AT STUD, (308) 587-2344 2230 - HORSE- OTHER FOR SALE NE SELL-TRADE MORGAN STALLIONS:BESSIA'S, BON, ACCORD 135969; T-BONE, LAD, CLASSY, 149831; TBONE, B, CONGO, 164062, (308) 587-2344 2301 - DOGS FOR SALE NE - RED AND BLUE HEELER PUPPIES FOR SALE, (402) 469-8715 2302 - POULTRY FOR SALE PA - FREE CATALOG-CHICKS, TURKEYS, DUCKLINGS, GOSLINGS GUINEAS, BANTAMS, MOSCOVY DUCKLINGS, GAMEBIRDS, BOOKS, EQUIPMENT, HOFFMAN HATCHERY, PO BOX 129 FR, GRATZ, PA 17030 WWW. HOFFMANHATCHERY. COM, (717) 365-3694 2311 - FISH FOR SALE KS - POND STOCKING, WWW. CULVERFISHFARM. COM, (800) 241-5205 2313 - BEES FOR SALE IL - HARDEST WORKING FARM HAND ON EARTH. HONEY BEES WORK FOR ROOM & BOARD TO POLLINATE YOUR CROPS & PROVIDE YOU WITH HONEY. FOR SUPPLIES CONTACT DADANT & SONS, INC. EMAIL ADREAGE@DADANT. COM, WWW. DADANT. COM, (888) 922-1293 2501 - HELP WANTED/NEED WORK CO - EXP. FARMER NEEDED FOR BEAUTIFUL EA. COLO. WHEAT/ CORN FARM. RESPONS. INCLUDE MAKING DAILY DECISIONS W/PLANTING, HARVESTING, TRUCK DRIVING & REPAIR WK. HOUSING, UTILITIES, VEHICLES & BUS. PHONE. SCHOOL/ TOWN NEARBY. CALL CELL 970-554-0665, EVENINGS-, (970) 383-2248 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

April 15, 2010 2502 - CUSTOM WORK/SERVICES

2010 Harvesting The Combine Group

• On Time • Experienced • Never Under Bid • Fully Insured • Up to 12 Machines • New Equipment

BOOK NOW! Contact: Roger at

2618 - SEMI TRACTORS/TRAILERS FOR SALE MO - '99 IH 4900, TS, 18K FRONT, 40K LB HENDRICKSON, $26,000.00, (660) 5483804 MO - '95 CHEVY TOPKICK, 20' FLATBED & HOIST, CAT 250 HP, 8LL TRANS, 40K HENDRICKSON REARS, 14K FRONT, 190K MILES,, $19,000.00, (660) 548-3804 OK - 1998 FREIGHTLINER MID ROOF, DETROIT MOTOR, 10 SP, AIR RIDE, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - 1998 FREIGHTLINER, MID ROOF, C12 CAT, SUPER 10SP AIR RIDE, $9,000.00, (580) 361-2265 OK - 2000 VOLVO, 60 SERIES DETROIT, 10 SP, AIR RIDE, CONDO, $10,000.00, (580) 361-2265

2002 IN 9200 N14 Cummins ....$17,000

(816) 206-0009

1998 T800 Kenworth T800 13-Spd. Detroit ........................................$15,200

Call (608) 574-1083 2601 - CARS FOR SALE NE - NEW 351 ENGINE, $1,200.00, (308) 728-7294 OK - 6. 0 FORD DIESEL ENGINE, 70, 000 MILES,, $7,000.00, (580) 716-9030 2602 - PICKUPS WANTED TO BUY NE - HD COIL SPRINGS FOR 1971 3/4 TON CHEVY PICKUP, END GATE FOR 1980 GMC 3/4 TON, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - FRONT BUMPER FOR 2005 CHEVY SILVERADO, (308) 587-2344 SD - '99 FORD DIESEL 4 DR, NEW BATTERY & TRANSMISSION, (605) 695-0411 2603 - TRUCKS FOR SALE NE - 1989 IH CONVENTIONAL 250" 70" FLAT TOP 3406 15 SPEED. 1991 WILSON HOPPER 42' NO ROCK $28,000 FOR THE PAIR., (308) 414-1124 ‘01 IHC 4900 Allison ..................$12,500 ‘99 GMC 7500, SA, C&C, Allison....$11,500 FL60 24' FB, SA, 6-spd. ..............$8,500 ‘97 GMC 7500 bucket truck, Allison....$12,500 812 Jantz 5th whl. comb. trlr. ......$8,500

MT SALES Goodland, KS • m-tsales.net

785-821-2300 2605 - STOCK TRAILERS FOR SALE • ‘89 GUTHRIE 48'

102W CATTLE POT $12,000 or Best Offer • ‘89 GUTHRIE 50'

102W CATTLE POT $12,000 or Best Offer

• ‘84 BOBCAT WALKING FLOOR VAN TRAILER $10,000 or Best Offer Star Alfalfa Inc., Lewis, KS

800-822-8016 2607 - FLAT BEDS & UTILITY TRAILERS WANTED TO BUY NE - FLATBED W/HEAVY DUTY AXLES, METAL FLOOR AND WIDE ENOUGH TO HOLD A PICKUP, (308) 587-2344 2612 - CAMPERS FOR SALE NE - STARCRAFT 2006 CAMPER TRAVEL STAR 19SD, SLEEPS 6. GREAT CONDITION. $12,500. 308-440-3590. 2615 - AIRPLANES FOR SALE CO - CHAMP, 7FC, 1959, 2197 TT, CONT 0200, 736 HRS,, (719) 263-5156 2616 - TIRES WANTED TO BUY NE - HOT PATCH VULCANIZING PATCHES, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE NE - 15" SPLIT RIMS, 8 HOLE, 750 MUD/SNOW, (308) 587-2344 2617 - VANS FOR SALE SD - '99 FORD CONVERSION VAN WITH TV/VCR, RAISED ROOF, NEW TIRES, (605) 695-0411 www.myfarmandranch.com

KS - 8000 GALLON ALUMINUM TANKER TRAILER, (785) 871-0711 2630 - TRANSPORTATION OTHER FOR SALE NE - TRANSMISSION, GENERATOR, STARTER, REAR AXLE REMOVABLE CARRIER DIFFERENTIAL UNIT. FITS 1946 CHEVY 2 TON TRUCK, (308) 587-2344

NEW ENGINE Long Block GM 6.5 Diesel

515-994-2890 2803 - DIRT SCRAPERS WANTED TO BUY MO - WE BUY & TRADE USED HYDRAULIC EJECTION SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 FOR SALE MO - NEW & USED SCRAPERS- EJECTION & DUMP, ANY SIZE, (660) 548-3804 MO - NEW TOREQ BY STEIGER & LEON SCRAPERS, (660) 548-3804 MO - USED SOIL MOVER 925, (660) 5483804 MO - USED TOREQ 10 YD DIRECT MOUNT, EXCELLENT, (660) 548-3804 MO - USED TOREQ 13 YD, EXCELLENT, (660) 548-3804 2804 - MOTOR GRADERS FOR SALE KS - CAT 120 ROAD GRADER. $15,500, (785) 871-0711 2807 - GENERATORS FOR SALE MN - AUTOMATIC GENERATOR SETS 15KW500KW, NEW & USED, LOW TIME GEN SETS. REMOTE WELL GENERATORS. SERVING FARMERS SINCE 1975. STANDBY POWER SYSTEMS, WINDOM MN, MON-SAT 9-5., (800) 419-9806 2821 - CRAWLERS FOR SALE WI - UNDERCARRIAGE REPAIR. NEW, USED & REBUILT PARTS. ALSO TRACK PRESS SERVICE. M & R TRACK SERVICE., (800) 564-0383 2822 - SKID STEER LOADERS WANTED TO BUY NE - 66" BUCKET FOR 1835C CASE SKID STEER, 10. 00X16. 5 TIRE-WHEEL, PLUS OTHER ATTACHMENTS, (308) 587-2344 FOR SALE WI - SKID STEER ATTACHMENTS: BUCKETS, FORKS, GRAPPLES BUNKER FACERS, FEED PUSHERS, BALE SPEARS, BELT & TIRE SCRAPERS, BACKHOE, 3PT-DRAWBAR, LIFT & PTO UNITS., (715) 556-1400 2824 - MATERIAL HANDLING EQMT FOR SALE OK - PETTIBONE, 30' LIFT, $3,500.00, (580) 361-2265 2840 - OTHER CONST. EQUIPMENT FOR SALE NE - SHAVER HD-10 POST DRIVER, 3-POINT MOUNT IN EXCELLENT CONDITION, HAVE OWNERS MANUAL, PICTURES AVAILABLE $2350.00 OBO PHILIP @, (402) 380-4500 NE - 8N FORD TRACTOR WITH 8' MOUNTED TRENCHER, NEW REARS, RESTORED, SHEDDED, NICE, (308) 826-4481 www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com


April 15, 2010 3002 - ANTIQUE TRACTORS FOR SALE MN - ANTIQUE TRACTOR COLLECTORS! BIEWER'S TRACTOR & MACH. SALV. SPECIALIZES IN 1920-85 TRACTOR PARTS. FREE NATIONWIDE LOCATING. BARNESVILLE, MN. SEARCH PARTS & SEE OVER 100 ANTIQUE TRACTORS PICTURED AT SALVAGETRACTORS. COM, (218) 493-4696 NE - TRACTOR PARTS FOR SALE. NEW AFTERMARKET PARTS FOR MOST MAKES OF TRACTORS. FRONT END PARTS, 3 PT HITCH PARTS, RADIATORS, SEATS, STEERING WHEELS, BATTERY BOXES, PTO PARTS, DRAWBARS, WATER PUMPS, DECALS & MORE. CLASSIC AG, AINSWORTH, NE., (800) 286-2171 MN - 1977 ALLIS-CHALMERS 175 DIESEL, 504 ACTUAL HRS, 3 PT, 2 HYDRAULICS, FENDERS, EXCELLENT CONDITION, $10,000.00, (952) 240-2193 3003 - ANTIQUE VEHICLES FOR SALE OK - 1959 EDSEL 4 DR RANGER, ALL ORIGINAL, DRIVE ANY WHERE, SHEDDED $3750 CALL OFFICE 918-967-4773 OR CELL, (918) 448-0621 3004 - ANTIQUE MACHINERY FOR SALE OK - 2-24' OBECO GRAIN BEDS, RED W/SIDE BOARDS-EXTRA NICE, NO LIFTS OFFICE 918-967-4773 OR CELL, (918) 448-0621 3005 - FENCING MATERIALS FOR SALE NE - SUCKER ROD 5/8", 3/4", 7/8", 1", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 NE - PIPE 2 3/8", 2 7/8", 3 1/2", 4 1/2", 5 1/2", CALL MY CELL: 308-870-1119, CALL FOR PRICE, (308) 732-3356 BARBWIRE FENCE BUILDERS: Removal, construction and repairs. PH: (785) 625-5819; PH: (800) 628-6611; Cell: (785) 635-1922.

3007 - PIPE FOR SALE MO - GOOD USED RR TANK CAR SHELLS FOR CULVERTS (7-10' DIAMETER)(30'-55' LONG), ALSO GOOD USED STEEL PIPE, 8 5/8" DIAMETER THRU 48" DIAMETER, 20', 30', 40' & 50' LENGTHS. CALL GARY AT GATEWAY PIPE & SUPPLY, (800) 489-4321

Heartland Express 3009 - FUEL TANKS FOR SALE NE - NEW 5000 GALLON HEAVY DUTY TANKS, $3950. OTHER SIZES ALSO, (402) 563-4762 3010 - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES CO - RED TEK 12A REFRIGERANT, MEL BROWN, (970) 667-8988 3011 - HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS WANTED TO BUY NE - REAR TINE ROTO TILLER, (308) 5872344 FOR SALE MO - OUTSIDE WOOD FURNACE $1545. CHEAP SHIPPING. EASY INSTALL. FORCED AIR. 100,000 BTU. HOUSES, MOBILES. WWW.HEATBYWOOD.COM, (417) 581-7755 3016 - BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES FOR SALE KY - KENTUCKY BUILDINGS, LLC. ALL STEEL STRUCTURE. PACKAGES FROM 24' TO 75' WIDE. WE SELL COMPONENTS, SLIDING AND ROLL-UP DOORS, INSULATION, WINDOWS, SHEET METAL, TRIM, AND STEEL FRAMING. KYBUILDINGSLLC. COM, (606) 668-3446 3028 - FIREWOOD FOR SALE WI - BIG OUTDOOR WOOD STOVE, 3/8 INCH THICK FIREBOX, 57" DEEP, 40" INCH TALL DOOR. WEIGHS 1. 5 TONS. WHOLESALE PRICE $5,999., (715) 556-1400 3030 - OTHER WANTED TO BUY NE - SCRAP BATTERIES- WE WANT 'EM! WE ALSO BUY STEEL CASE & GLASS PACK. CALL FOR DETAILS! ALLEN'S NEW & USED BATTERIES. BUY/SELL, NEW/USED. WE CARRY ALL KINDS!! ALLEN FELTON, OWNER. LINCOLN, NE., (402) 467-2455 FOR SALE NE - REASONABLY PRICE MECHANICS GLOVES, WARM GLOVES, MITTENS & OTHER GLOVES., (308) 587-2344 NE - PROPANE REFRIGERATOR FOR REMOTE CABIN, COMBINA TION WOOD-PROPANE, COOKING-HEATING RANGE; WATER COMPARTMENT, (308) 587-2344 DE - BIG BUD BOOK-THE INCREDIBLE STORY OF THE BIGGEST, MOST POWERFUL TRACTOR EVER BUILT. BOOK IS 12"X9" - PACKED WITH PICTURES, SIGNED BY AUTHOR, ONLY $37.47 PLUS $5 S&H. CLASSIC TRACTOR FEVER, BOX 437, ROCKLAND, DE 19732. CLASSICTRACTORS.COM OR CALL US, (800) 888-8979

5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE KS - IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR GRASS, CRP OR FARMLAND, GIVE ME A CALL. NEED NEW LISTINGS. BERRY REALTY, VERL SHEEN CELL 620-385-0140 OR, (620) 3852590 FOR SALE IA - NATIONWIDE - 1031FEC - PAY NO TAX WHEN SELLING-EXCHANGING REAL ESTATE, EQUIPMENT, LIVESTOCK. FREE BROCHURE/CONSULTATION. VIEW EXCHANGE PROPERTIES AT WWW. 1031FEC. COM OR CALL, (800) 333-0801 CO - IRRIG. FARM NW OF SIDNEY, NE. 465+/- ACRES, 409. 8 CERT. IRRIGATIBLE ACRES W/PIVOTS, 2 WELLS, NEARLY ALL LOAM SOILS (ROSEBUD, ALLIANCE, KUMA & SIDNEY) MOSTLY LESS THAN 3% SLOPE, NO BLDGS, 1/2 MINERAL RIGHTS, 7 M E & 3 M N OF POTTER, LES GELVIN, $1,100,000.00, (970) 221-2607 NE - 520 ACRES JEWELL COUNTY KSEXCELLENT HUNTING GROUND W/CROP & PASTURE LAND. TRACT LIES CONTIGUOUS. SELLER WOULD CONSIDER DIVIDING. CALL JOHN BUHL 402-649-3750 STOCK REALTY & AUCTION CO. WWW. STOCKRA. COM, (800) WES-ELL8 CO - FOR SALE BY OWNER: 3000 ACRES KANSAS DRY LAND IN THOMAS & SHERMAN COUNTIES, AVAILABLE IN TRACTS. CALL JOHN AT, (303) 683-9044 KS - SW/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 22, RANGE 43, WEST OF 6TH PM, HAMILTON COUNTY, KS $600/ACRE, SAME PRICE AS OTHER REAL ESTATE SOLD IN THAT SECTION. IN CRP, CONTRACT EXPIRING IN 2012. $20,000 DOWN, WILL FINANCE BAL. @ 5% INT. ON BAL. FOR 10 YEARS. (620) 384-6853

AGRI ENTERPRISES, INC.

Real Estate • Fort Collins, CO www.agrienterprises.com +/- 6,280 AC. OF EXC. NATIVE GRASS PASTURE, 6,080 ac. deeded, 640 state lease, 560 Federal lease (all contiguous), Weld Co. CO, SE Cheyenne, Wyoming, NE of Greeley, Colorado. The ranch is nestled up against scenic chalk bluffs, with huge rolling grasslands and a few rock outcroppings. Numerous wells, water tanks, a spring, good fences, $2,495,000. Office 970-221-2607 Les 970-214-6139 • Greg 970-218-5911

Page 23 5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE - CONT’D IA - NATIONWIDE - 1031FEC - PAY NO TAX WHEN SELLING-EXCHANGING REAL ESTATE, EQUIPMENT Clark County, Kansas 2,022 acres of farm ground, 1,471 acres of dry crop, 520 acres of irrigated land. See website for more details

5000 - FARM REAL ESTATE FOR SALE - CONT’D FLINT HILLS RANCH 4,500 Ac. Greenwood Co., KS 38 Miles east of Wichita. Good water, all native grass, all contiguous, 100% minerals.

WATER & CATTLE 65 mi. south of Dodge City 9,615 +/- total acres, 8,599 +/- acre feet of water, 2,900 +/- acres under pivot, 4 wells rated at 4,000 +/- gpm, excellent hunting, (NEW PRICE!) DOUG WILDIN & ASSOCIATES RANCH BROKERS

HUTCHESON Real Estate & Auction Co.

(620) 355-7991 www.hutchreal.com

620-662-0411

www.wildinranchbrokers.com PRICE REDUCED - WOW! 8,599 ACRE FEET OF WATER Large Irrig.Farm & Ranch Operation • Located 65 Mi. South of Dodge City, KS, 7 Mi. North and 3 Mi. West of Laverne, OK • Big Water (8,599 Acre Feet) • 2,900 +/- Acres of Irrigated Farm Ground • 4,300 +/- Deeded Acres of Grass plus State Leased Grass • Four Irrigation Wells Capable of Pumping 4,000 GPM Each

KEARNY COUNTY NE ¼ 20-24-36, 1 mile north of Lakin golf course. 2,500 Plus sq. ft. home, horse barn and pens. All fenced ................$375,000 South of Garden City, KS Owner says, offers will be considered. 400 Acres, home, storage, rolling stock, seed cleaning facility–turn key operation. 2 Sprinkler irrigated quarters in alfalfa CRP; Small lateral sprinkler system ................................$1,980,000 HAMILTON CO–PRICE REDUCED Section 2-26-39 approx. 386 acres, 473 acres of CRP, balance in native grass. Home and outbuildings ..........$550,550 Jon Fort, Owner/Broker Email@jfort@arcrealestate.com 1145 E. Kansas Plaza Garden City, KS 67846 PH (620) 275-8200 • PH (800) 222-2048 FAX (620) 276-2681

See Our Website for More Info.

HUTCHESON Real Estate & Auction Co. (620) 355-7991 www.hutchreal.com Co-Brokered with Donna Hutcheson

First National Bank in Altus

580-480-4217 email: dhunter@fnbaltus.com FARM & RANCH REAL ESTATE LOANS Available In Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona

✶ PRICED REDUCED ✶

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Specializing in large financing packages. Purchase, refinance, convert from variable to fixed rate, FSA-Farm ownership guaranteed loans. For friendly, knowledgeable service. Contact: DERYL HUNTER

VIEW ALL OF OUR LISTING WITH PICTURES & DETAILS ON OUR WEBSITE

2,280 ac. include: Irrig. farmland, 2 homes, feedlot, native pasture, 765 ac. irrig. authority, no pumping limits. 6,500 Hd. feedlot permit, current capacity 2,500 hd., new 32,000 bu. bin; 80,000# trk/lvstk. scales. 770 Ac. deeded, 1,500 ac. State Lease. Beautiful area, abundant wildlife. For Sale By Owners: $2,600,000. PH (520) 824-3646

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Buying • Selling • Ranches • Water Rights

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WANTED TO RENT KS - YOUNG FARMER LOOKING FOR LAND TO RENT, CUSTOM FARM OR PLANT IN SHERMAN & CHEYENNE COUNTIES. DAN SHIELDS FARMING, (785) 821-0804

Midlands Classified Ad Network CHASE COUNTY SCHOOLS HAS A 7-12 MATH OR SCIENCE VACANCY FOR 2010-11. COACHING AVAILABLE. SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION AND HAVE CREDENTIALS FORWARDED TO MATTHEW FISHER, SUPT., PO BOX 577, IMPERIAL, NE 69033. EOE ELECTRO-MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN (ELECTRONIC CONTROL SYSTEMS, PLCS ETC) WORK W/TEAMS IN MAJOR REPAIR FACILITY TO SUPPORT CUSTOMER LOCOMOTIVE FLEET. MILITARY EXP OR DEGREE PREF NOT REQ. CALL MARIAN: (866) 4783754X409. PSYCHIATRIC NURSE: THE REGISTERED NURSE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR PROVIDING NURSING CARE OF PATIENTS IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES ASSUMING RESPONSIBILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY FOR NURSING ACTIONS. PSYCHIATRIC EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. THE APPLICANT MUST HAVE A CURRENT NEBRASKA LICENSE TO PRACTICE AS A REGISTERED NURSE. CRISIS PREVENTION INTERVENTION AND BASIC LIFE SUPPORT CERTIFICATIONS PREFERRED. CONTACT: THE RECRUITMENT DEPARTMENT, 601 WEST LEOTA, NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101. EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM. 308-696-8888 OR 800-543-6629 FAX: 308-696-8889 CHECK US OUT AND APPLY ONLINE AT GPRMC.COM CLINICAL NUTRITION SUPERVISOR IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL FUNCTIONS RELATED TO THE CLINICAL ASPECTS OF THE NUTRITION SERVICES DEPT., OVERSEEING PLANNING AND DELIVERY OF NUTRITION CARE TO PTS, ALSO WORKS AS A CLINICAL DIETITIAN ON INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM. BA DEGREE IN FOOD & NUTRITION OR EQUIV. COMMISSION ON DIETETIC REGISTRATION REQUIRED. NE LICENSE TO PRACTICE AS A MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPIST. CONTACT: THE RECRUITMENT DEPARTMENT, 601 WEST LEOTA, NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101. EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM. 308-696-8888 OR 800-543-6629 FAX: 308-696-8889 CHECK US OUT AND APPLY ONLINE AT GPRMC.COM DECISION SUPPORT ANALYST: DECISION SUPPORT ANALYST PARTICIPATES IN PROVIDING AN ALYTI-

CAL DATA IN ORDER TO EVALUATE NEW AND EXISTING PRODUCT LINES AND SER VICES WITHIN THE HOSPITAL. ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR MAINTAINING ACCURATE DECISION SUPPORT AND COST ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS AND PREPARING RE PORTS FOR MANAGEMENT. BACHELOR DEGREE IN ACCOUNTING OR FINANCE FROM AN ACCREDITED COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY IS REQUIRED. CONTACT: THE RECRUITMENT DEPARTMENT, 601 WEST LEOTA, NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101. EMAIL: RECRUITER@MAIL.GPRMC.COM. 308-696-8888 OR 800-543-6629 FAX: 308-696-8889 CHECK US OUT AND APPLY ONLINE AT GPRMC.COM DIRECTOR OF FINANCE: NORTHWEST COMMUNITY ACTION PARTNERSHIP IS SEEKING A DIRECTOR OF FINANCE FOR CHADRON, NE. MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT WWW.NCAP.INFO. POSITION IS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. ONE BED/BATH CONDO FIVE MINUTE WALK TO MEMORIAL STADIUM, MINUTES TO DOWNTOWN, CAPITOL AND RETAIL. USED AS HOME OFFICE AND GAMEDAY RETREAT. 402-420-0518 GOSHEN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 1, WWW.GOSHEN.K12.WY.US CURRENT SALARY RANGE $41,000 - $74,250; COMPREHENSIVE BENEFIT PACKAGE; 100% TEACHER RETIREMENT (11.25 %) PAID BY DISTRICT. TORRINGTON, WY CURRENT VACANCIES FOR 2010-2011: DISTRICT WIDE- SPECIAL EDUCATION DIRECTOR; DISTRICT ELEMENTARY READING INTERVENTION TEACHER. TORRINGTON SCHOOLS: ELEMENTARY TEACHER – 5TH GRADE; MATH TEACHER – MIDDLE SCHOOL; SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER – HIGH SCHOOL; ENGLISH TEACHER – HIGH SCHOOL; SCIENCE TEACHER – HIGH SCHOOL; SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS – 2 ELEMENTARY, 1 HIGH SCHOOL. LINGLE FT. LARAMIE SCHOOLS: SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER – 1 ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOL (K-8); SCIENCE TEACHER W/ PHYSICAL EDUCATION – HIGH SCHOOL; ENGLISH TEACHER – HIGH SCHOOL. SOUTHEAST SCHOOLS: BUSINESS TEACHER – HIGH SCHOOL. HIGH SCHOOL COACHING VACANCIES FOR 2010-11 HEAD GIRLS

BASKETBALL & ASSISTANT VOLLEYBALL – LFLHS; ASSISTANT FOOTBALL & ASSISTANT GIRL’S BASKETBALL – THS. *** $3,000 SPECIAL EDUCATION HIRING BONUS *** ALL ADMINISTRATOR, TEACHING, AND COACHING POSITIONS REQUIRE CURRENT WYOMING CERTIFICATION WITH APPLICABLE ENDORSEMENT(S). ALL REQUIRED APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT WWW.GOSHEN.K12.WY.US. CALL 307-532-2171 OR EMAIL LFRITZLER@GOSHEN.K12.WY.US FOR MORE INFORMATION. GCSD#1 IS AN EOE. ATTENTION CAR ENTHUSIASTS!!! IF YOU HAVE A 1960 OR OLDER CAR, WE WOULD LIKE TO WELCOME YOU TO ENTER THE SUGAR VALLEY RALLY. FOR INFORMATION, 877-632-3381 OR SUGARVALLEYRALLY.COM WORK FOR DEPT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES. VIEW CURRENT JOB OPENINGS AT WWW.DHHS.NE.GOV ALLIANCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS FOR THE 2010-11 SCHOOL YEAR: 7TH GRADE LANGUAGE ARTS; SPEECH PATHOLOGIST; SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. PLEASE SUBMIT LETTER OF APPLICATION, APPLICATION FORM, RESUME, TRANSCRIPTS AND CREDENTIALS TO DR. DAN HOESING, SUPERINTENDENT, ALLIANCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1604 SWEETWATER, ALLIANCE, NE 69301; OR EMAIL TO JBOTTGER@APS.K12.NE.US. APPLICATION CAN BE DOWNLOADED AT W W W.APSCHOOLS.SCHOOLFUSION.US. POSITIONS ARE OPEN UNTIL FILLED. SIDNEY PUBLIC SCHOOLS HAS THE FOLLOWING OPENINGS FOR THE 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR: SECONDARY ENGLISH; SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES. SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME, AND CREDENTIAL FILE TO JAY EHLER, 1101- 21ST AVE., SIDNEY, NE 69162. APPLICATION AVAILABLE AT WWW.SIDNEYRAIDERS.ORG. EOE MORRILL PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN MORRILL, NE IS SEEKING APPLICANTS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: 7-12 ENGLISH TEACHER; (COACHING AVAIL.). WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL FILLED.

INTERESTED APPLICANTS ARE REQUESTED TO SEND A LETTER OF APPLICATION, RESUME AND CREDENTIALS TO: STEVE OSBORN, MORRILL PUBLIC SCHOOLS, PO BOX 486, MORRILL, NEBRASKA 69358. GERING PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS SEEKING QUALIFIED CANDIDATES FOR THE 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST- (THIS POSITION REQUIRES AN EDS IN PSYCHOLOGY.) (CONSIDERATION MAY BE GIVEN TO AN INTERN PARTICIPATING IN AN APPROVED SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM.) INTERESTED CANDIDATES ARE REQUESTED TO APPLY VIA OUR WEBSITE WWW.GERINGSCHOOLS.NET CURRENT OPEN POSITIONS ARE LISTED ON OUR WEBSITE. EOE ALLIANCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS FOR THE 2010-11 SCHOOL YEAR: MIDDLE SCHOOL LANGUAGE ARTS; MIDDLE SCHOOL VOCAL MUSIC; HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH I & II; HIGH SCHOOL P.E./HEALTH; SECOND GRADE; HIGH SCHOOL RESOURCE; SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. PLEASE SUBMIT LETTER OF APPLICATION, APPLICATION FORM, RESUME, TRANSCRIPTS AND CREDENTIALS TO DR. DAN HOESING, SUPERINTENDENT, ALLIANCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1604 SWEETWATER, ALLIANCE, NE 69301; OR EMAIL TO JBOTTGER@APS.K12.NE.US. APPLICATION CAN BE DOWNLOADED AT WWW.APSCHOOLS.SCHOOLFUSION.US. POSITIONS ARE OPEN UNTIL FILLED. AMERICAN SHIZUKI CORPORATION (ASC), A LEADING MANUFACTURER OF ELECTRICAL CAPACITORS, IS LOOKING FOR A CALIBRATION TECHNICIAN. THIS POSITION IS LOCATED IN OGALLALA, NE HOME TO BEAUTIFUL LAKE MCCONAUGHY, NEBRASKA’S LARGEST RESERVOIR. THIS POSITION REQUIRES AN ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE IN ELECTRONICS OR ELECTROMECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY. KNOWLEDGE OF PLC’S AND AUTOMATION CONTROLS A PLUS. UNDER LIMITED SUPERVISION, POSITION WILL TEST, CALIBRATE, AND PERFORM REPAIRS AND ADJUSTMENTS ON ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRONIC MEASURING, RECORD-

ING AND INDICATING INSTRUMENTS. CALIBRATION TECHNICIAN WILL ENSURE CONFORMANCE TO PROPER USE OF STANDARDS, PROCEDURES AND PERFORMANCE TESTS. WILL ALSO MAINTAIN RECORDS OF CALIBRATION AND SUBMIT STANDARDS FOR CALIBRATION BY OUTSIDE LABORATORIES .ASC OFFERS A COMPETITIVE WAGE BASED UPON QUALIFICATIONS, ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE RIGHT INDIVIDUAL AND A FULL BENEFITS PACKAGE INCLUDING HEALTH AND DENTAL INSURANCE, VACATION, HOLIDAY, 401 K RETIREMENT PLAN WITH COMPANY MATCH, COMPANY PAID LIFE INSURANCE, VOLUNTARY LIFE INSURANCE AND SUPPLEMENTAL INSURANCE. QUALIFIED CANDIDATES MAY APPLY ONLINE AT WWW.ASCAPACITOR.COM; SUBMIT A RESUME FOR REVIEW TO 301 WEST “O” STREET, OGALLALA, NE 69153 OR FAX TO 308-284-4905. ASC IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. CHIEF FLIGHT NURSE NEEDED FOR START UP OF AN IFR MEDICAL HELICOPTER SERVICE. IF INTERESTED, PLEASE CONTACT TAMI AT (402) 4666866. ESU #13 HAS THE FOLLOWING JOB OPENINGS FOR THE 2010-11 SCHOOL YEAR: 1. MULTI-CATEGORICAL SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER FOR MERIDIAN SCHOOL; 2. LIFELINK NEBRASKA TEACHER, SPECIAL EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT REQUIRED; 3. JOB COACHES, 2 POSITIONS. SUBMIT A LETTER OF INTEREST AND RESUME (TEACHING CANDIDATES NEED TO SUBMIT OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS AND PROOF OF LICENSURE) TO: ESU #13, HUMAN RESOURCES, 4215 AVE. I, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE 69361 OR EMAIL TO: MHARDY@ESU13.ORG. ST. AGNES SCHOOL SCOTTSBLUFF IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR POSITION OF PART-TIME KINDERGARTEN TEACHER. PLEASE SEND LETTER OF APPLICATION & RESUME TO: SUE GERDAU, 205 E. 23RD, SCOTTSBLUFF, NE. 69361

www.myfarmandranch.com www.myfarmandranch.com

MORE THAN JUST SPRAYERS!

Call Tim or Eric

Check With Us First For Parts

and let advertising in the

Heartland Express work for you!

Toll Free:

1-800-658-3191

Box 277 • Central City, NE 68826

Livestock Mixing & Feeding Equipment Commercial Manure Spreaders • Electronic Scales Tom Pullen Bill Pullen Sales Representative

WATS: 1-800-658-4375 Bus. (308) 946-3068 or 946-2224 Fax (308) 946-2672 • Res. (308) 946-2152 www.billsvolume.com

• Banjo Valves, Strainers and Fittings • Hypro. and Ace Pumps and Parts • Teejet Nozzle Bodies • Turbo Drop Nozzles • Fertilizer Orifices • All Sizes of Hose

Select Sprayers, LLC

4319 Imperial Ave., East Hwy. 30, Kearney 42710

or call

308-338-8006

42855


Page 24

Heartland Express

WHOLESALE AG. CHEMICALS Delivered to your door!

April 15, 2010

TireTown Inc. Ostermeyer Hay Equipment Shelton, NE 308.467.2341

800/70R38 Factory Irregular . . . .$2,000

31/13.50-15 Rib . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$100

600/65R28 Irregular 100% . . . . . .$925

600/65R28 Irregulars 100% . . . . .$925

295/75R22.5 Hwy. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$180

295/75R22.5 Hwy. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$180

14.9R46 New 7150 lbs. . . . . . . . .$1,100

20.8-38 New 10-ply . . . . . . . . . . . .$798

710/70R38 80% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$850

480/70R28 (16.9) Full Tread . . . . .$700

18.4-38 New 6-ply USA . . . . . . . . .$625

480/80R50 100% Tread . . . . . . .$1,500

14.9R34 Fwd., 80% . . . . . . . . . . . .$400

19-16.1 Rib, 10-ply . . . . . . . . . . . .$185

• Nationwide Shipping • Special Prices • • New & Used • All Sizes • Major Brands • We Deal •

Morris Grain

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800-444-7209 • 800-451-9864

43608

1121 Atlantic Ave. • Morris, MN 56267

www.morrisgrain.com (320) 589-4050 • 1-800-872-2501 43295

Upcoming Special Sections April 29 ........................................FFA, Showpig Shootout May 13 ....Beef, NE Ranch & Home Expo, Nebraskaland Days May 27 ....................Sandhills Ranch Expo, Hay & Forage June 10 ............................................County Fairs, Rodeo

Call Now to Reserve Your Space!

(308) 236-5024 or Toll Free: 1-800-658-3191 Send your stories to news@agnet.net

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Delivering wet grain to town can mean TOO MUCH SHRINK & TOO MUCH DRYING CHARGE. The EconoDri concept puts the same idea to work as when standing crops dry naturally on low humidity fall days. The unique, patent-pending EconoDri construction effectively: • • • • •

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So Whether . . . ✔ Your drying bin equipment is down and can’t get repairs ✔ You’re thinking that typical bin drying is taking TOO MUCH PROFIT ✔ You’d value a multi-use heat/dry system that can serve you at your bin site, shop, calving barn, squeeze chute, mobile repairs and more, after drying needs are met Order your EconoDri plus radiant heaters from

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