Issuu on Google+

A TRIP TO ENGLAND


ENGLAND GEOGRAPHY


ENGLAND GEOGRAPHY •

England is made up of about 65% of the island of Great Britain. 

England covers approximately 130 410 square kilometres and has a  population of just under 60 million people.

 England can be divided into: 1. The Highland Zone This zone is characterised by rocky, rugged hills and eroded mountain  faces, interrupted by valleys and extensive plains.  2. The Lowland Zone This zone experiences less rain and more sunshine than the highlying regions. 


ENGLAND’ S CLIMATE 

England’s climate is described as being “temperate maritime”. 

Winter temperatures seldom plummet below zero degrees Celsius, while summer highs can reach about 30 degrees Celsius. January and February are the coldest months and usually experience snowfall.

July is the hottest month.

England is a relatively wet country due to its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean.


THE ENGLISH FLAG


THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND Romans Saxons Vikings

Normans Tudors

Victorians

WW ll

43

1066

1837

1939

450

793

1485


POLITICAL SYSTEM 

Great Britain (UK) is a parliamentary democracy with a  constitutional Monarch as Head of State 

The people elect Members of Parliament (MPs).

Parliament is made up of three parts:

The Queen

The House of Lords

The House of Commons

The British government runs the UK. The leader of the  government is the Prime Minister 


ROYAL FAMILY 

Queen Elizabeth II 

Prince Charles 

Prince William 

Prince Harry 

Princess Anne 

The Duke of Edinburgh (The  Queen's husband) 

Prince Andrew

Prince Edward, 


Buckingham Palace 

Buckingham Palace is where the Queen lives.

  It has been the Queen's official and main royal London home since  

   1837. 

The Royal Flag


THE HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE    Old English (450-1100 AD) 

    The invading Germanic tribes spoke similar languages, which in  Britain developed into what we now call Old English.     Middle English (1100-1500)

     English became dominant in Britain again, but with many French  words added.  Modern English Early Modern English (1500-1800)      The invention of printing brought standardization to English. Spelling  and grammar became fixed, and the dialect of London, became the  standard.  

    Late Modern English (1800-Present)

      Late Modern English has many more words, arising from two  principal factors: firstly, the Industrial Revolution and technology  created a need for new words; secondly, the British Empire at its  height covered one quarter of the earth's surface, and the English  language adopted foreign words from many countries.


THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

English is spoken as a first language by around 375 million speakers and    around 750 million are believed to speak English as a foreign language

One out of four of the world's population speak English to some level of  competence and demand from the other three-quarters is increasing.

English is the main language of books, newspapers, airports and air-traffic  control, international business and academic conferences, science,  technology, diplomacy, sport, international competitions, pop music and  advertising. 

Over two-thirds of the world's scientists read in English. 

Three quarters of the world's mail is written in English. 

of the world's Eighty per cent (80%) electronically stored information is in  English. Of the estimated 200 million users of the Internet, some thirty-six per  cent (36%) communicate in English 


ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Old English (Anglo-Saxon Period)

           

Caedmon and Cynewulf.

1200-1500: Middle English Period  Geoffrey Chaucer's 


ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1500-1660: The English Renaissance 1500-1558: Tudor Period (Humanist Era)  Sir Thomas More John Skelton 

       1558-1603: The Elizabethan Age 

                             William Shakespeare                               Christopher Marlowe Sir Walter Raleigh  

        

1603-1625:The Jacobean Age  John Donne   Francis Bacon   Thomas Middleton 

       1625-1649: The Caroline Age  

     

John Milton  John Ford 

       1649-1660: The Commonwealth Period  ( Puritan & Baroque and 


ENGLISH LITERATURE 1660-1800: The Neoclassical Period 

 

The Restoration (1660 – 1700) John Milton  John Dryden John Wilmot 2nd Earl of Rochester 

The Eighteenth Century (1700 – 1800)    Alexander Pope    Jonathan Swift Samuel Johnson  Henry Fielding 

  


ENGLISH LITERATURE   1785-1870: Romanticism

   

William Wordsworth 

   

S.T. Coleridge  George Gordon Byron

   1870-1914: Victorian Period

     

Charles Dickens  George Eliot Robert Browning 

1914-1945: Modern Period     George Bernard Shaw  William Butler Yeats     D.H. Lawrence     T.S. Eliot 

 1945- Postmodern and Contemporary Period

    Virginia Woolf  Adams  Aldiss


Popular Classic English Literature Books


EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM •  Nursery School / Kindergarten •  primary, 

Compulsory (5 – 16 Years old)

•  secondary    

•  secondary studies (2 years)

•  higher education

Bachelor's Degree

Master's Degree

School Categories  

A level qualification

Doctor’s Degree

Local authority maintained schools (State Schools)  Free to all children between the ages of 5 - 16   Independent schools. (Private/Public Schools)    Parents pay for their children's' education.


EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM ďƒ˜ England universities, colleges and schools are amongst the best and most prestigious for international students.

ďƒ˜ All of the universities are fully accredited and recognised as Highly Trusted Sponsors by the UK Border Agency.


ENGLISH THEATRES 

Theatre plays an important part in British culture, and the  countries that constitute the UK.

  Theatre was introduced from Europe to what is now the United  Kingdom  by the Romans.

  By the medieval period theatre had developed to a form of  early street theatre associated with the Morris dance .

The reign of Elizabeth I in the late 16th and early 17th century  saw a flowering of the drama and all the arts.  


TOP ENGLISH THEATRES Shakespeare's Globe

Theatre Royal, Newcastle

Liverpool Empire Theatre

London Palladium

The Royal Shakespeare  Theatre

Theatre Royal, London


Music in Britain from 1920s to the Present Day 

1920s - Young people listened to ragtime and jazz.

1930s - Swing became popular.  Jazz continued to be popular.

1940s - The Second World War brought fast, frantic (and often American) dance  music - boogie-woogie or jitterbug. 

1950s - Rock and Roll became very popular. 

1960's - The Beatles began their career. They leapt to fame in 1963 and continued to  dominate the decade, becoming the most influential band of all time.

1970s - The first big new sound of the 1970s was “Glam Rock”, the main figures of  this were David Bowie, Elton John and of course Gary Glitter

1990s - Britpop This was the general name given in the 1990s to a new wave of  successful British bands who made a big impact in the United States and Europe, as  well as in England. The most successful have been Radiohead, Oasis, Blur, Pulp,  Massive Attack and The Spice Girl


THE MEDIA Newspapers in England


English radio stations


ENGLISH TRADITIONS AND CELEBRATIONS

GURNING

Maypole Dancing

Cheese Rolling at Cooper’s Hill

Pearly King and Queen


Guy Fawkes Night

Bog Snorkeling

Ascot Ladies Day Guy Fawkes Night

Straw Bear

Worm Charming


SPORTS England's national sport is cricket .  Football is the most popular sport. 

Some of England's football teams are world famous, such as Manchester United, Arsenal and Liverpool.

Other sports: ● ●

  ● ●

 ●

RUGBY TENNIS NETBALL HORSE RACING BADMINTON UNIVERSITY BOAT RACE FISHING DARTS


The magic of the cups

The FA Cup The best places to watch the  Cup Final day.

Test Match at Lord’s Discover the Home of Cricket  on a day out at Lord's.


Famous athletes


WHAT ARE HOUSES IN ENGLAND LIKE? 

Most houses in England are made of stone or brick from the local  area where the houses are built. The colours of the stones and  bricks vary across the country.


TYPES OF HOUSES IN ENGLAND 

The main types of houses in England are: – – – –

Detached (a house not joined to another house) Semi-detached (two houses joined together) Terraced (several houses joined together) Flats (appartments)


Typical modern houses

Houses over 600 hundred years old (they were built  during the Tudor times)


Semi detached houses


Terraced houses

Appartments


FOOD   The traditional food of England has long been recognised for its simplicity of 

     ingredients and flavour. 

   People from all over the world have settled in this country, bringing with them

     flavours and techniques and  over time, these foreign influences have       permeated the English cuisine, creating a more multifaceted food culture  than      ever before. 


MEALS and MEAL TIMES  Breakfast - between 7:00 and 9:00,

Lunch - between 12:00 and 1:30 p.m.   Tea - anywhere from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m  Dinner (sometimes called Supper) - The main meal. Eaten  anytime between 6:30 and 8:00 p.m. (Evening meal) 

On Sundays the main meal of the day is often eaten at midday  instead of in the evening. This meal usually is a Roast Dinner  consisting of a roast meat, Yorkshire pudding and two kinds of  vegetables.


PUBS 

The word pub is short for public house.

There are over 60,000 pubs in the UK (53,000 in England and Wales, 5,200 in Scotland and 1,600 in Northern Ireland).

One of the oldest pubs, Fighting Cocks in St. Albans, Herts, is located in a building that dates back to the eleventh century.


CASTLES 

A castle is a type of fortified structure, developed in Europe during  the middle Ages. 

The first castles appeared in England during the 11th century.    Whilst a few important castles, such as the White Tower in the Tower of  London, were built of stone, most early castles were mote and bailey castles  of earthwork and timber, which could be constructed very quickly. 


Warwick Castle


Tower of London


Bodiam Castle


Windsor Castle


Stokesay Castle


Lincoln Castle


LANDMARKS   England is a land of ancient cities, royal palaces,  massive cathedrals, Mighty castles and legendary sites. 


STONEHENGE


KINGS COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE King’s College, founded in 1441 by Henry VI, is a constituent college of the University of  Cambridge. The chapel, is home to the world-famous Choir.


LONDON LANDMARKS 

Buckingham Palace


The Palace of Westminster


Tower of London


The London Eye


St Paul's Cathedral


MUSEUMS  

London is a real treat for museum lovers.  There are hundreds to choose from, including the British Museum, the Science Museum and the Natural History Museum. 


British Museum


Design Museum


London Transport Museum


Museum of London


Natural History Museum


Madam Tussauds Museum


REASONS TO VISIT LONDON


HAVE

A NICE TRIP !


ΓΥΜΝΑΣΙΟ - ΛΤ ΚΟΙΛΑΔΑΣ ΣΧ. ΕΤΟΣ 2013-14 Επιμέλεια:  Β’ γυμνασίου Ανδροβιτσανέας Ρήγας Βλησαρούλη Αθανασία Δράκου Παναγιώτα Χονδρού Αικατερίνη Στάθη Εύα Νατσίδη Μαρία Πατσιούρα Κρυσταλλία Μπούτλας Θεόδωρος Σούλα Οδυσσέας Σαρούδη Δανάη Α’ λυκείου Πατσιούρα Αικατερίνη Παπαδοπούλου Σεβαστή Β’ λυκείου Τοπαλσάββα Ελένη

Υπεύθυνοι καθηγητές: Κομιώτου Ανθή Κιάτος Γιάννης Νάστου Αγλαϊα


A trip to england final presentation1