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old days and make a updated album in the vein of “Mysteriis”. And we tried it out actually also, to a certain degree. We went down to Budapest for a month, rehearsing and recorded some songs. But when I listened to it, it just felt fucking wrong, hence I scrapped seven, eight songs and started over.” The Norwegian guitarist also revealed he went through an inner turmoil, as he felt he wanted to pay tribute to the work of Mayhem’s previous two guitarists, also in order to maintain the band’s signature sound intact. However, soon afterwards, Teloch felt the need to start imprinting his own identity into what would be the final set of songs on “Esoteric Warfare”: “Of course, I had to kind of try to honor both Blasphemer’s and Euronymous’ work, so I had them in mind throughout the process, at least for the first half of the album. Also the other three guys in the band had completely different visions/ideas of how this album should be. At first I listened to them, but at the end I just said “fuck it”, I do it like I want instead. The first half of the album is songs made by these “ideas” I had in my head from Blasphemer, Euronymous, Hellhammer, Attila and Necro. So it got slightly paranoid, on the second half of the album you can hear something is happening and the album takes a

new turn, that’s when I was thinking, “ fuck them”. It payed off I think. It also helped the album a great deal, because when you listen to it, you start with a certain kind of feeling, but as the album plays, the atmosphere changes, and the feeling that you end up with is a different feeling than the one you started with.” “Esoteric Warfare” also marks Attila Csihar’s third full length effort as the lead singer with Mayhem. His immediately identifiable operatic singing style carried on from “Ordo ad Chao” into the album’s ten new songs. If the music was almost entirely created by Teloch, all of the album’s lyrical direction and themes were the work of Csihar as Necrobutcher explained: “It was Attila Csihar who wrote the lyrics for this album. It deals with his interests mainly, what is on his mind, what his interests are and deals with those things in depth.” He then added that “Esoteric Warfare” ranges on a variety of subjects through Attila’s delivery: “Experimental warfare, parallel worlds, the great mysteries in lives, challenging physics, mind control research… things like this. This is what the lyrics deal with. His [Attila] inspirations refer to a lot of films and books and articles that have been published.” Teloch also developed

on his songwriting collaboration with Attila: “For the music writing, there wasn’t much working together, but we worked close together to get the vocals right. I already had a vision on how the vocals should be on the songs, and on most of the songs I also made a vocal sketch for him to try out. We worked on that a bit. The lyrics is all him, I had nothing to contribute on that.”

Recording and Artwork According to past interviews given by Blasphemer and Attila Csihar, Mayhem’s previous record “Ordo ad Chao” was not an easy record to produce, with the overall atmosphere in the studio having reached intense points during its recording. Recounting how the recording experience for “Esoteric Warfare” went in comparison to “Ordo ad Chao”, Necrobutcher revealed that “It was exactly the same. It was the same studio. The only thing that changed was that we learned something from the process, what not to do and what to do. So we altered some of the things… I don’t really want to go to the details, not to offend anyone, I would rather say that we’ve learned something from the

Profile for Against Magazine

Against Magazine #8 (April 2014)  

DOWNLOAD PDF HERE: https://www.dropbox.com/s/f99yfqzhxgr81l4/against_08_interactive.pdf

Against Magazine #8 (April 2014)  

DOWNLOAD PDF HERE: https://www.dropbox.com/s/f99yfqzhxgr81l4/against_08_interactive.pdf

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