Issuu on Google+

Summer Learning Summit Strengthening Out-of-School Learning Outcomes

Wallace Foundation Greater New Orleans Afterschool Partnership National Center for Summer Learning April 6, 2009


Our Mission: To ensure that young people in high-poverty communities have access to high-quality summer learning programs.


The Need for High-Quality Summer Learning Programs All young people experience learning losses when they do not engage in educational activities during the summer.


The Need for High-Quality Summer Learning Programs Elementary students lose most in spelling and math skills. Average loss in math over the summer is about 2.6 months of grade level equivalency.


The Need for High-Quality Summer Learning Programs • Youth from disadvantaged backgrounds are impacted by losses in reading (2-3 months loss). • Cumulative summer learning losses may explain as much as 50%-67% of the widening of the achievement gap.


Summer of Reading Achievement Trajectories

Middle-Income Students no summer school

3rd

www.summerlearning.org

4th

Summer

2nd

Summer

1st

Summer

K

Summer

Low-Income Students no summer school

Summer

Average Reading Achievement Level

Summer Learning & the Achievement Gap


SCHOOL YEAR CUMULATIVE GAINS 190

190

140

140

90

90

40

40

-10

1

2

3

4

Disadvantaged, by Year

-10

5

1

3

4

5

Better-Off, by Year

SUMMER CUMULATIVE GAINS

190

190

140

140

90

90

40

40

-10

2

1

2

3

Disadvantaged, by Year

4

-10

1

2

3

Better-Off, by Year

Sources: Doris Entwisle, Karl Alexander, and Linda Olson, Children, Schools, and Inequality, 1997, Table 3.1

4


What We Know About Summer • Obesity • Access to food • Access to technology • Risky behaviors

 Center for Summer Learning 2008


Characteristics of Effective Programs Approach to Learning 1. Intentional focus on accelerating learning 2. Firm commitment to youth development 3. Proactive approach to summer learning Program Infrastructure 4. Strong, empowering leadership 5. Advanced, collaborative planning 6. Extensive opportunities for staff development 7. Strategic partnerships 8. Rigorous approach to evaluation and commitment to program improvement 9. Clear focus on sustainability and cost effectiveness

ď›™ Center for Summer Learning 2008


What do summer learning programs impact? •Educational achievement •Health & safety •Social & emotional development •Self-sufficiency Child Trends 10/06


Vision for Summer Programming     

Duration and intensity Participation Blended approach Partnerships Planning, infrastructure, data collection, accountability


Federal Priorities Education  Childcare and child development  Health and nutrition  Employment development and service learning


Opportunities  Change the way summer looks  Strengthen critical partnerships and collaboratives Develop systems of support and braided funding streams


Actions for You!  Johns Hopkins University Out-of-School Time Certificate  National Conference Chicago, Illinois April 15 - 17, 2009


Contact Information Jennifer Brady jbrady19@jhu.edu www.summerlearning.org


/SummerChangesEverything