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October 12, 2019 - October 11, 2019 The Afro-American A3 PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY EDITION

Volume 128 No. 10

OCTOBER 12, 2019 - OCTOBER 18, 2019

Inside

Community Remembers Local Youth

A Survivor’s Survival Guide

Ford’s ‘Fences’ Reminds Audiences of Hard Truths

C2 Commentary

Debt Collectors Target Colored People

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Washington

D1 Photo by Charles Nyonga

During a candlelight vigil on Oct. 6, Phillip Brooks Sr. is joined by son Phillip Brooks Jr. and daughter Markia Abdur Rahama as they remember their loved one, Bryant Brooks, who was murdered in Oxon Hill on Sept. 30. By Charles Nyonga Special to the AFRO Over 100 friends and family gathered for a candlelight vigil mourning the loss of Bryant Brooks, the 19-year-old man who was murdered Sept. 30 in Oxon Hill. Loved ones met at Fort Foote Recreation Center Sunday evening to deal with the emotions of his passing. The outpouring of love and respect was displayed by everyone that convened at the soccer field on Fort Foote Road for a young man who was a big influence on the people around him. Laquita Brooks, Bryant’s mother, was so distraught, she couldn’t bring herself to attend. From a young age, Bryant was an ambitious entrepreneur. Phillip Brooks, Bryant’s father, described how he would watch what he did and then repeat his actions. As he matured, Bryant’s passion for money led to borrowing his father’s shovel to clear driveways in the winter and the lawnmower to cut the grass during the summer to earn extra cash. “He walked that lawnmower miles to cut grass. He wore the wheels off one lawnmower and the motor out of the other,” said Brooks. Markia Abdur Rahma, Bryant’s older sister, remembers him as a fun-loving, talented young man with a fantastic future ahead of him. “The last time I saw Bryant was June for my daughter’s graduation,” said Abdur Rahma. “We just talked and cracked jokes; it was a good vibe. He was very kind and genuine, and this was not deserved.”

“He was very kind and genuine, and this was not deserved.”

Bryant was into fashion because of his older brothers Vandy and Phillip Brooks Jr. Vandy said that Bryant would take his old shoes and clean them up so he could have them once he grew into them. He would take worn shoes, clean them up, and try to resell them. “I had him in New York,” said Phillip. “We had modeling agencies already looking at him, and this was some Nipsey Hussle stuff. People were hating on how good he was doing.” Bryant had just returned from New York and was staying with his family and was planning to head back soon. His plan was to model for Vandy’s clothing line while working in New York. Bryant was adored by everyone in his neighborhood, as well. He would stop by houses to check on his favorite people, such as Pat Courtesy Photo Johnson. She told stories of how Brooks would Bryant Brooks, 19, of come to visit her regularly, Oxon Hill, Md., was especially on his birthday. allegedly murdered by “I watched him from two young Marylanders, five-years-old until he on Sept. 30. was 12, from Fort Foote Elementary to Oxon Hill Middle,” said Johnson. Continued on A2

ACLU Challenges Police Shooting in Hyattsville By Mark F. Gray AFRO Staff Writer mgray@afro.com The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is challenging the Prince George’s County Police Department’s accounts of a fatal shooting involving a man who appeared to be dealing with mental health issues. Leonard Shand, 49, of New Carrollton, was shot to death after officers spent 28 minutes trying to bring the incident to a non lethal conclusion. Shand, who appeared to be disoriented when confronted by police, was caught on social Continued on A3

Forum Address Entrepreneurship, Reentry By Mark F. Gray AFRO Staff Writer mgray@afro.com

Despite the investments of corporations who are bringing additional revenue streams into the community, the engine that drives the economic system of Prince George’s County remains small business. However, access to funding and the proper education to understand the strategies for success as business owners for County residents remains distant.

“If you can’t find someone to hire you, hire yourself.”

Prince George’s County Council member Jolene Ivey made an attempt to break down the barriers that keep those intrepid souls with a passion for business ownership from their dreams by holding her first Entrepreneurship and Empowerment Expo for Returning Citizens at the First Baptist Church of Highland. Ivey drew inspiration to create this platform by hearing stories of returning citizens, who after release from jail, used their skills and experience to create businesses and organizations to sustain themselves, their families and their communities. “If you can’t find someone to hire you, hire yourself,” is Ivey’s mantra. The day featured conversations about resources and information to help

Copyright © 2019 by the Afro-American Company

residents interested in entrepreneurship succeed and to let them know they are welcome in the County. It was also a day for those reentering the community after being incarcerated a chance to learn strategies from several organizations. MBE Compliance Manager for the Prince George’s County Council Mirinda Jackson gave a presentation on “How to Quickly Start a Business with Minimum Resources.” During the afternoon session, there was a panel consisting of returning citizens who are business owners and advocates of minority entrepreneurship in the DMV region. One of the main themes for Ivey’s expo was to provide help for those who had previously Continued on A2


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The Afro-American, October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019

DMV HBCU Commentary

BSU Marches On, Struggles Continue for Howard, Morgan By Mark F. Gray AFRO Staff Writer mgray@afro.com BSU Defense Keys Big CIAA Road Win On a day where the offense sputtered for most of the game, Bowie State’s defense was the difference in their 23-13 win at Winston Salem State University (WSSU). The 20th ranked Bulldogs improve to 5-0 on the season (2-0 CIAA) while

Winston-Salem State falls to 1-4 overall and 0-2 in league play. BSU’s defense sacked Winston-Salem State quarterbacks four times. Laurel’s Jason Rogers had two, while Waldorf’s Jonathan Ross and Baltimore’s Joshua Pryor had one each. It was, however, their ability to keep the Rams from scoring by making two critical interceptions that sealed the Rams’ fate. Demetri Morsell of Upper Marlboro had two interceptions, including one with 2:18 remaining in the contest, killing a WSSU Rams scoring threat with BSU clinging to a three point lead late in the fourth quarter. The victory was sealed when Tevin Singleton returned a 12-yard interception with 20 seconds remaining in the game for a touchdown. The Bulldogs are now set to play CIAA rivals for the rest of the season and have remade themselves into a physical football team whose stifling defense is now their personality. NEXT: Oct. 12 vs. Chowan (Homecoming) Bowie, Md.

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Bowie State remains undefeated while Morgan State and Howard’s struggles continue on and off the field.

Local Youth

Howard Pounded In Historic Loss at Harvard Howard’s special team’s mistakes were symptomatic of a turbulent week where the program was under the glare of the national spotlight before playing on an Ivy League stage. The Bison were blasted by the Crimson 62-17, marking the second time this season they gave up more than 60 points in a loss. The Bison yielded three blocked punts and a punt return for a score as well. For a season that began with so much promise, this game symbolized how the expectations have fallen as another controversy hovers over the program. If there was a bright spot for Howard, it was the play of wide receiver Kyle Anthony, who was stellar in the first half. His four receptions for 118 yards were a game-high. The university announced last week that it has started a formal investigation into allegations that head coach Ron Prince has been verbally abusive to players. This is in response to an HBCU Gameday report where several members of the team announced they would be leaving the program with Caylin Newton after reports of verbal abuse and intimidation. Next: Oct. 12 vs. Norfolk State (Homecoming) Washington, D.C.

Entrepreneurship

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“He was cool...stayed out of the way,” said Josue Escobar who had known Brooks for nearly 12 years. “He was trying to be fly and get money, but certain people don’t like to see people get money.” The men charged with the murder, Roger Beckwith Jr., 21, and Mark

Morgan Falls To 0-5 With Loss at BethuneCookman

Morgan State running back Josh Chase rushed for a season-high 124 yards on 25 carries but it wasn’t enough against one of the MEAC’s best teams. The Bears remained winless with a 31-20 loss to Bethune Cookman in Daytona Beach. The Bears’ defense couldn’t thwart one of the conference’s best offenses as Akevious Williams threw for 156 yards and three touchdowns to Jimmie Robinson. The Williams-to-Robinson combination produced touchdowns of 70 yards and six yards,giving the Wildcats a 24-6 lead heading into the fourth quarter. Robinson had five catches for 136 yards and three scores. Next Oct. 12 vs. Delaware State (Baltimore, MD)

Continued from A1 Lechoco, 15, were arrested and charged with the alleged killing of Brooks on Sept. 29. Beckwith, of Baltimore and Lechoco, of Fort Washington, will be tried as adults. The preliminary hearing will be held at the District Courthouse in Upper Marlboro on Oct. 18.

been incarcerated with strategies to succeed after serving time in correctional facilities. Issues such as housing, employment, mental health, recovering from chemical dependency, continuing education, life skills and family reintegration were addressed by several community based organizations. Life After Release is led Courtesy Photo by formerly Council member Jolene Ivey hosted a forum to address incarcerated entrepreneurship and opportunities for returning citizens. women that provide at risk and returning ladies in the County with an opportunity to overcome the barriers that women of color face after being released from prison. Catholic Charities provided information and assistance to men and women who were previously incarcerated about their programs that are designed to help them adjust and reorient their lives. It’s “Welcome Home Reentry Program” works as a collaboration with many organizations to ensure that men and women are unconditionally welcomed back into the communities where they live. The Bridge Center at Adam’s House  is a collaboration between the  County’s Departments of Health, Corrections, Social Services, and Family Services.  They form community based partnerships by providing holistic assistance to those who were formerly incarcerated, veterans,  and  young adults between 18-24 years old and trying to stabilize themselves in the community were eligible for assistance. Unshackled Ministries, a non profit organization, used a faith based approach to help returnees develop independent survival skills. Their method is to provide each client with a case manager to oversee a comprehensive re-entry plan that structures the activities of returning citizens through services that offer a safer community for them. Perhaps the most innovative approach is being led by the The Mass Liberation Campaign (MLC). MLC is a comprehensive effort to end the criminalization of communities of color and low-income people by directly confronting and transforming the current criminal justice system. They are hoping to become a force for progressive governing power by working with social justice advocates to cut probation and parole in half by 2030.


October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019 The Afro-American

ACLU

Continued from A1 media video as the incident was unfolding. “In the 28 minutes between the first engagement and when shots were fired, officers used all non-lethal methods available to them,” said Jennifer Donelan, director of Prince George’s County Police Media Relations Division. Police reports say that Hyattsville Police Department received a call and were summoned to the scene at 7:14 a.m. from a coffee shop near Toledo and Belcrest roads on Sept. 26. Eyewitnesses said a man who had struck an employee in the head with a metal pole three days earlier was back at the shop with two knives and it was believed to be Shand. Once on the scene they met Shand outside armed with two knives, one in each hand. Hyattsville City officers immediately urged him to drop the weapons. Those officers also requested the assistance of Prince George’s County Police officers, who responded as well. An officer with Mount Rainier Police also responded to assist. For nearly 30 minutes, 10 officers worked to deescalate the situation. They tried using tasers three times over several minutes but they were not effective. Prince George’s Police said pepper spray was also used. A Hyattsville City Police officer also used a less-lethal shotgun that discharges bean bags. None of the non-lethal techniques worked to get Shand to drop the two knives. He reportedly was hit with four bean bag shots, one pepper spray and three taser rounds that didn’t subdue him.

“Poor training and systematic racism are not excuses for Maryland police agents to kill Black and Brown people at will with no accountability.”

“The suspect “charged” toward the officer with both knives,” reads the Prince George County Department’s press release. “Several officers then deployed their issued firearms, and the suspect was fatally shot.” However, the ACLU questions whether law enforcement authorities exhausted all non-lethal measures in dealing with a Black suspect who could have been suffering with some form of mental health problems. “Given the pattern of Maryland law enforcement officers gunning down Black and Brown people and their selective release of information, we are challenging the officers’ narrative,” said the ACLU press release. “Their language only continues to paint victims as threats while wiping their hands clean of any wrongdoing.” However, during a community meeting held to discuss Shand’s death, Hyattsville Police Chief Amal Awad told the crowd her officers are trained in a research-based de-escalation program that aims at identifying people in distress called Integrating Communications, Assessments and Tactics. It is designed “to help officers engage in the attempt of de-escalation, where you’re trying to slow things down, create time and distance and talk through whatever the issue is,” Awad said. The ACLU alleges that Hyattsville Police are improperly trained to deal with Black suspects dealing with mental health issues. Their claim is that Shand is a victim since there was no mental health professional brought to the scene and the attempt to subdue by firing weapons using a flash-bang grenade with bean bag shotgun rounds escalated the incident. Shand is the fourth suspect who has been killed in similar incidents around the state since June 2018. “Poor training and systematic racism are not excuses for Maryland police agents to kill Black and Brown people at will with no accountability,” the ACLU statement concluded.

Courtesy Photo

The ACLU is challenging Prince George’s County Police Department after an incident that led to the killing of Leonard Shand, a 49-year-old Black man on Sept. 26.

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The Afro-American, October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019

Photos by Dwayne Mingo and Pam Jenkins Prince George’s County Association of Realtors (PGCAR) has a highly developed and successful political

affairs program with a proven track record of effectively advocating for the best interest of REALTOR® members and for the private property rights of the general public. More specifically, the REALTOR® Political Action Committee (RPAC) is the fundraising arm of the Association, which plans annual fundraisers and other events to help reach the Association’s RPAC funding goals. Recently, PGCAR hosted a Major RPAC Contributor Appreciation Event at Caruso Homes Monticello Model in Bowie, Md., which included a fun and exciting cooking class Boyd Campbell, Maryland Realtors immediate with gourmet personal chef past president and Michael Cerrito, broker and and owner Danny Boylen owner of Cerrito Realty LLC II of Cogito Ergo Sauté, the DMV’s Premier Personal Chef Service.

Gene Frazier Branch Manager Prime Lending Mortgage

Personal chef and owner Danny Boylen II of Cogito Ergo Sauté

REALTORS®, friends and colleagues turned out in great numbers to attend the Installation Ceremony of PGCAR 2020 President Yolanda Muckle, (Associated

with Long and Foster Real Estate in Mitchellville, MD). The event was held at Camelot in Upper Marlboro, MD on Sept. 19 and Triscina Grey, from WHUR Radio (96.3) was our Mistress of Ceremonies for the evening. The evening was enchanted by the wonderful sounds of the Johnny Steele Band and the room was saturated with purple and silver, Yolanda’s favorite colors. Yolanda took the helm on Oct. 1 and was installed by County Council Chairman Todd Turner. Maryland Association of REALTORS® President John A. Harrison installed the officers and directors at the event.

PGCAR President Yolanda Muckle and County Council Chair Todd Turner 2020 PGCAR Board of Directors and Mistress of Ceremony, Triscina Grey WHUR 96.3

PGCAR Executive Vice President Michael Graziano, center, with PGCAR Staff

Veera Phillips, PGCAR immediate past president

Prince George’s State’s Attorney Aisha Braveboy, PGCAR President Yolanda Muckle and Senator Douglas Peters


October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019, The Afro-American

Send your news tips to tips@afro.com.

NATIONAL NEWS

Washington

Tyler Perry’s Studio Reveal Photo by Amy Sussman/Invision/AP, File

Perry says his massive Atlanta-based studio will rival other major Hollywood studios for years to come. The actordirector-writer unveiled his Tyler Perry Studios during a star-studded grand opening on Oct. 5. By Johnathan Landrum Jr. The Associated Press

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Lawmaker Charged With Federal Wire Fraud By Brian Witte The Associated Press A Maryland state lawmaker who abruptly resigned last week is facing a federal wire fraud charge for allegedly using money she raised for her reelection campaign for her personal use, federal officials said on Oct. 7. Tawanna Gaines, a Prince George’s County Democrat who has served in the Maryland House of Delegates since 2001, allegedly defrauded her campaign and its contributors of more than $22,000 from at least January 2015 through April 2018, the Maryland U.S. attorney’s office said. Gaines, 67, did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment. She submitted her resignation to House Speaker Adrienne Jones on Oct. 4. “After much thought and consideration, I have decided to submit my immediate resignation to the Maryland House of Delegates as of

every time I pass it. The studio is a reminder as well.” Perry said his sprawling studio rivals other major Hollywood studios including Warner Bros. and Paramount Pictures. It’s considered one of the largest production studios in the country with 12 soundstages, 40 buildings on-site that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and more than 200 acres of green space. The filmmaker built the studio on a former Army base called

“...I think this brick-and-mortar of the studio speaks volumes because it’s not about my dream. It’s about all the other people that are able to come in and build dreams and share dreams and tell their stories as well.”

Tyler Perry remembered shedding tears when he saw an Atlanta highway exit bearing the name of his television and film studio for the first time. The actor-director-writer believes he might have the same emotions during the grand opening of his massive state-of-the-art Tyler Perry Studios on Oct. 5. He’s planned a star-studded unveiling of his 330-acre studio, where some big projects have already been filmed including his “Madea” films along with AMC’s “Walking Dead” and Marvel’s blockbuster hit “Black Panther.” “When I came here in 1992, I came with a dream,” Perry said in a recent interview. “I’m looking at everything I’ve dreamed and more to come to pass. It just reminds me. I just thought this was the Promised Land and that sign reminded me of that

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Celebrating Milestones, Keeping the Music Alive

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St. Elizabeths Without Water

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Mathew Knowles: ‘I Have Breast Cancer’ By Black Health Matters One night in July, entertainment executive, Mathew Knowles, peeled off his white undershirt and noticed a red dot on it. He thought it was lint. It wasn’t, but he hardly gave the speck another thought. The next night, he saw another red dot on his T-shirt. It was in the same area, near his right nipple. Although he laughs about being the kind of guy who wants an MRI to make sure a headache is only a headache, he continued to downplay it. Days later, Knowles saw it again. He mentioned it to his wife. Come to think of it, she said, she’d seen red spots on their bedsheets in recent days.

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Legislation Update City Gets $9.7 Million For Lead Paint Crisis

Courtesy Photo

Delegate Tawanna P. Gaines now faces up to 20 years in prison after being charged for federal wire fraud. Oct. 4.” Gaines, who was vice chair of the House Appropriations Committee, wrote. Since June 2002, the delegate has used a candidate committee called “Friends of Tawanna P. Gaines” to raise money for her campaigns. It was a regulated state election

Continued on B2

In this AFRO archive photo (1948), a child died shortly after eating paint from this crib (above). On Sept. 26, The Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded the city of Baltimore $9.7 million to address leadbased paint concerns in low-income communities.

On Sept. 26, U.S. Senators Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen, along with Congressman Elijah E. Cummings, Dutch Ruppersberger, and John Sarbanes announced $9.7 million in federal funding to address lead-based paint in Baltimore. The funding, awarded through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, will allow Baltimore to work to eliminate lead-based paint hazards in low-income private housing. “All children deserve to grow up in a safe and nurturing environment. Even the smallest amount of lead can harm the development of the brain and nervous system,” said Senator Cardin, a senior member of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee and Finance Health

Continued on B2

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October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019, The Afro-American

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Knowles

Continued from B1 Now Knowles was curious enough to squeeze his right nipple. Out came blood, beginning a series of events with potentially life-altering ramifications for himself and his family, including his daughters Beyoncé and Solange. Knowles turned out to be one of the rare men with breast cancer. Further testing uncovered that he has a mutation of one of the so-called “breast cancer genes,” specifically BRCA2. That discovery may explain why he developed cancer in his right breast, and it means he’s at a higher risk of developing other forms of cancer. He’s already had a mastectomy of his right breast and is planning one for the left side to be safe. Aggressive, proactive response to the risks associated with this genetic mutation became part of the national conversation years ago when actress Angelina Jolie learned that she had the BRCA1 mutation and opted for a preventive double mastectomy. She then had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to guard against ovarian cancer. The fact that Knowles has the mutation gives each of his children a 50 percent chance of having it. If any females have it, their risks increase sharply for breast cancer and ovarian cancer. As a longtime volunteer for the American Heart Association (AHA), Knowles knew he was fighting more than cancer, the No. 2 killer of Americans. Cancer patients

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can experience cardiac complications related to treatments including chemotherapy and radiation or as a result of the hormonal changes that follow procedures such as removal of the ovaries. His relationship with the AHA is why he chose to reveal what he’s been through with American Heart Association News in advance of his public disclosure Wednesday on “Good Morning America.” Knowles–who managed supergroup Destiny’s Child and cowrote their hit song “Survivor,” is sharing his story to draw attention to the links between heart disease and cancer, as well as other powerful messages: Men can have breast cancer. Genetic testing for mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene is

“I don’t want people to be worried–I want them to be proactive.” often wise for men and women of all ethnicities with a family history of breast cancer. Early detection improves the chances for a successful outcome. “I don’t want people to be worried–I want them to be proactive,” Knowles said. “The sooner you address it, the better you have a chance of having a normal lifestyle and living a normal life.” So far, so good for Knowles. Since the mastectomy, he’s been AFRO article from October 2001. exercising more, watching what he be releasing a book, album and musical eats and drinking less alcohol. He’s about Destiny’s Child. He also teaches lost 15 pounds and hopes to drop a weekly class in sports, event and 10 more. He’s also begun taking entertainment marketing at Prairie View medicine to control his blood pressure A&M University in Texas. and meditating to manage stress. “What is quality of life?” Knowles At 67, he understands that said. “It’s not just money. It starts with prioritizing his health lets him enjoy a health.” full life. In the coming months, he’ll See more on afro.com

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Gaines

Continued from B1 campaign committee with a designated bank account. Separately, federal officials say, Gaines held exclusive control over a PayPal account that was used to accept electronic donations that was not disclosed in state campaign finance filings. The indictment was announced by

U.S. Attorney Robert Hur and Jennifer Boone, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Baltimore Field Office. An initial appearance and arraignment is scheduled for Oct. 3 before U.S. District Judge Theodore Chuang in Greenbelt, Maryland. If convicted, Gaines faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in

prison for wire fraud. Jones announced, the morning of Oct. 7, that she accepted Gaines’ resignation late last week. -“As elected officials, we have an obligation to uphold the public trust, both in office and in our campaigns,” Jones said in a statement. “We cannot sacrifice that trust for personal gain for ourselves or our family members.”

Lead Paint

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Subcommittee. “These funds help to ensure that Baltimore families who rely on public housing have no reason to be concerned about this risk.” “Families shouldn’t have

to worry about their children’s exposure to lead, especially in their own homes. We know that there are no safe levels of exposure for children, and we must do more to reduce this risk. This funding will go directly to that effort and will improve the standard of living for Baltimore residents,” said Senator Van Hollen, a member of the Budget and Appropriations Committees. “I will continue working in the Senate to provide resources to support the health, safety, and well-being of our children.” “Lead poisoning is one of the most preventable environmental diseases, and tragically still far too many of our children have been affected and face a lifetime of possible health problems. For the sake of our children and generations yet unborn, we must do everything in our power to eliminate lead-based paint hazards in our community,” said Congressman Cummings. “I commend HUD for awarding this grant to Baltimore to provide the city with the resources needed to keep our city, especially our children,

safe and healthy.” “Baltimore City has nearly three times the national rate of lead poisoning, which disproportionately affects African-American children living in old, distressed housing. These grant funds are critical to ensuring our children are growing up in healthy households with every opportunity to thrive and succeed in school and in life,” said Congressman Ruppersberger. “For far too many children in Baltimore City, exposure to lead-based paint poses serious long-term health problems and can lead to developmental disabilities,” said Congressman Sarbanes. “This significant federal investment in lead-based paint remediation and hazard reduction will help improve public health across our city.” “This federal grant represents a real lifeline for some of our city’s most vulnerable residents who have been exposed to leadbased paint,” said Baltimore City Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young. “The dangers associated with lead paint are real and life-altering. The

funding secured by members of our Congressional delegation will allow us to better protect young children who are most at risk of exposure to lead.” $9.1 million of the funds were awarded through HUD’s Lead Based Paint Hazard Control and Lead Hazard Reduction Demonstration grant programs to identify and eliminate lead-based paint hazards in low- and very lowincome private housing where children under six years of age live. Baltimore was, in part, awarded the funding because it is a jurisdiction with a higher number of pre-1940 rental housing and higher rates of childhood lead poisoning cases. $600k of the funds were awarded through HUD’s Healthy Homes grant program to address housing-related hazards in a coordinated fashion. In August, the members announced $898,750 in federal funding for the Housing Authority of Baltimore City to conduct lead-based paint risk assessments, inspections, abatement, interim controls, and clearance examinations.


October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019, The Afro-American

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WHAT’S TRENDING ON AFRO.COM

Rapper 21 Savage Defends Immigrants By Johnathan Landrum Jr. The Associated Press

Rapper 21 Savage believes immigrants like him who lived in America illegally as children should automatically become U.S. citizens. The Grammy-nominated artist who was held this year in federal immigration detention told The Associated Press the night of Oct. 3 that such immigrants also shouldn’t have to endure the lengthy process to obtain visas. He spoke in an interview before receiving an award from the National Immigration Law Center. “When you’re a child, you don’t know what’s going on,” he said. “Now, you grow up and got to figure it out. Can’t get a job. Can’t get a license. I’m one of the lucky ones who became successful. It’s a lot of people who can’t.” NILC honored 21 Savage for being an advocate for immigrant justice. He was arrested in February in what U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said was a targeted operation over his expired visa. He spent 10 days in a detention center in southern Georgia before being released. The Atlanta-based rapper, whose given name is She’yaa Bin Abraham-Joseph, is a British citizen who moved to the U.S. when he was 7. His visa expired in 2006, but his lawyers said that wasn’t his fault. “When you ain’t got no choice, you should be exempt,” 21 Savage said. “It’s not like I was 30, woke up and moved over here. I’ve been here since I was like 7 or 8, probably younger than that. I didn’t know anything about visas and all that. I just knew we were moving to a new place.” He said people in his WASHINGTON EDITION situation should be made STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP citizens. MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION “I feel like we should be (Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685) exempt,” he reiterated. “I feel 1. Title of Publication — THE WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN & like we should automatically THE WASHINGTON TRIBUNE, Publication No. 0276-6523 become citizens.” 2. Date of Filing — October 1, 2019 Federal immigration 3. Frequency of issue — Published weekly, 50 issues annually with officials have known 21 annual subscription price of $70.00 Savage’s immigration status 4. Location of known office of publication is 1140 3rd Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20002-6723 since at least 2017, when he 5. Location of the headquarters and general business offices of the applied for a new visa. publisher, AFRO-AMERICAN Company of Baltimore City, Inc., 1531 S. The 26-year-old rapper’s Edgewood Street, Suite B, Baltimore, Maryland 21227 immigration case still remains 6. Names and complete addresses of Publisher and Editor are: pending a hearing before a new Publisher: Dr. Francis M. Draper Afro-American Newspapers judge, according to his lawyer.

“I feel like kids who were brought here at young ages, they should automatically be like ‘Yeah, you good to stay here, work and go to college.”

1531 S. Edgewood Street, Suite B Baltimore, Md. 21227 Editor: Micha Green Afro-American Newspapers 1140 3rd Street, 2nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20002-6723 Managing Editor: Tiffany Ginyard Afro-American Newspapers 1531 S. Edgewood Street, Suite B Baltimore, Md. 21227 7. The owner is a Corporation: The AFRO-American Company of Baltimore City, 2519 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-4602. The following Stockholders own one (1) percent or more of the total amount of stock and their mailing address is above: John J. Oliver, Jr., Trustees of Carl Murphy Estate, Frances L. Murphy and Carlita Jones; Madeline W. Murphy, Arthur Murphy, Camay Murphy, Eleanor Louise Gee Murphy, David V. Lottier, Shawn P. Lottier, Sadie Smith, Virginia L. Parham, June L. Powell, Deborah Stafford, James and Robin Wood, all of Baltimore, MD; Leeland A. M. Jones, Sr., Leeland A.M. Jones, Jr, of Buffalo, NY; Charles Perkins, Carlita CMJ Perkins, of Gaithersburg, MD; George Lottier, Daniel H. Murphy, Christopher Lottier, of Atlanta, GA; Laurence Young, Grace Bruce, Madeline M. Rabb of Chicago, ILL; Susan M. Barnes of Biloxi, MS; Sharon M Smith of Oakland, CA; and Benjamin M. Phillips IV of Atlanta, GA. 8. Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or other securities — none 9. EXTENT AND NATURE OF CIRCULATION

a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run) b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail) (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and, and exchange copies) (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies) (3) Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS® (4) Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail®) c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4) d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail) (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County. Copies included on POS Form 3541 (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-CountyCopies Included on PS Form 3541 (3) Free or Nominal Rate CopiesMailed at other Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means) e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1(, (2),(3) and (4) f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e) g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3) h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) j. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100) 16. Electronic Copy Circulation a. Paid Electronic Copies b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) c. Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c x 100)

Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months

21 Savage said the process to apply for a visa discourages a lot of other immigrants who don’t have documents because it “hangs over your head forever.” “They just lose hope,” he said. “I feel like kids who were brought here at young ages, they should automatically be like ‘Yeah, you good to stay here, work and go to college.’ It should be nipped in the bud before it gets to a point before you come of age.” Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors applauded 21 Savage for becoming an advocate for social justice and for shedding light on immigrant issues for Black people. “Up until the moment when he was arrested, there wasn’t a nationally or public conversation about Black immigrants,” said Cullors, who introduced 21 Savage and handed him the Courageous Luminaries award. Her activist organization led a coalition to facilitate his release from ICE custody. “The conversation primarily revolved around Latinx immigrants,” she added. “His detention really pushed a national conversation and it made us talk about what’s happening with Black people who are undocumented. All the Black people in America aren’t just citizens.” 21 Savage was thankful for the award, but said there are countless immigrants battling to stay in the U.S. We got a fight that we need to continue in this country,” he said. “It ain’t over yet. Even after everything is cool with me, we still have to fight and help people who can’t fight for themselves.” This version corrects that Cullors said Latinx immigrants, not Latin immigrants.

Homeless Student Goes to Yale By ADW News Atlanta native Chelesa Fearce is living proof that you can rise above your circumstances and overcome the odds.

No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

3,233

2,998

741

720

380

373

1,381

1,356

0

Photo by Amy Harris/Invision/AP, File

21 Savage performs at the Voodoo Music Experience in New Orleans.

Despite battling homelessness throughout her high school years, she went on to be named valedictorian of her class, graduated from Spelman College and is now a student at Yale University, the Atlanta JournalConstitution reported. Chelesa Fearce was homeless in high school. Now she’ll be pursuing a medical degree and PhD at Yale University. Chelesa Fearce graduated at the top of her class, as her and her family dealt with being homeless. Fearce, 23, is currently pursuing her MD–PhD degree at the Yale School of Medicine; a major step towards her goal of launching a career in psychiatry. Fearce’s journey to the prestigious Ivy League school was no easy feat.

While attending Charles R. Drew High School in Riverdale, Georgia she and her family were homeless. She would often go without food and would use the stove lights at motels for her studying sessions. Despite living in those conditions, she earned a 4.5 grade point average and was named valedictorian of her class in 2013. Her academic accomplishments garnered her a full scholarship to Spelman College. After graduating from the historically Black college with a degree in biochemistry, she went on to work for a national health agency and started the next step in her academic journey at Yale last month. Fearce says her experience with homelessness instilled values that she has taken with her throughout every stage of her life. “Homelessness taught me how to work hard, always persevere and never let anything get in my way,” she told the news outlet. “It really helped show my resilience when I applied for college and medical school.” Fearce and her family have been dedicated to paying it forward and helping those in need. There was a scholarship named in her honor for homeless students determined to further their education. Her mother Reenita Shepherd has become the foster parent of four children and is currently serving as a caretaker for a former homeless shelter director.

0

2,502

2,449

240

29

240 2,742

29 2,478

481 3,223 91.2%

520 2,998 98.8%

286

274

2,788

2,723

3,028

2,752

92.0%

98.9%

10. I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. (Signed) Andrè Draper Director of Operations

Identification Statement

The Afro-American Newspapers – (USPS 040-800) is published weekly by The AfroAmerican Company, 1531 S. Edgewood St., Suite B, Baltimore, MD 21227.

Subscription Rate: 1 Year - $70.00 (Price includes tax). Checks for subscriptions should be made payable to: The Afro-American Company, 1531 S. Edgewood St., Ste. B, Baltimore, MD 21227. Periodicals postage paid at Baltimore, MD and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send addresses changes to: The Afro-American Company, 1531 S. Edgewood St., Ste. B, Baltimore, MD 21227.

Photo by: atlantadailyworld.com

Chelesa Fearce


B4

The Afro-American, October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019

WHAT’S TRENDING ON AFRO.COM

Pioneer Actress Diahann Carroll Dies

the role after the intended lead actress, Diana Sands, became recalls when she was around three or four, her parents took sick and insisted her to an aunt in her friend take the North Carolina Diahann role (Sands died in and left her in the Carroll, 1973). But Carroll care of her aunt, the Oscarsaid those behind without notice, for nominated the movies did not a year She said it actress and see her in the role took a long time singer who because of her work to forgive her won critical in Julia and made her audition without makeup. parents, though she eventually did, and was there for them in acclaim as “Give me a chance. Just give me the opportunity to their later years. the first Black show you that I understand,” she recalled telling them in an “It happened, it’s over, it’s done. A mature person finds woman to interview with the National Visionary Leadership Project. a way to let go of that,” she told OWN’s “Masterclass in star in a non“I’m an actress, singer, from New York City, from the streets servant role of New York, and I pride myself on my work ... I would like in a TV series to be given the opportunity to stretch my wings.” as “Julia,” has She would end up being nominated for her Oscar, and she died. She was recalled the filming a magical experience. 84. “I had such a good time, I almost told them you don’t Carroll’s need to pay me,” she added. daughter, In the 1980s, she joined the long-running prime-time soap AP Photo/Jean-Jacques Levy, File Susan Kay, told opera “Dynasty” as Dominique Deveraux, the glamorous Singer and actress Diahann Carroll, in The Associated half-sister of Blake Carrington; her physical battles with 1972, at her home in Los Angeles after a Press her Alexis Carrington, played by Joan Collins, were among fan long bout with cancer. mother died on highlights. Another memorable role was Marion Gilbert, as Oct. 4 in Los the haughty mother of Whitley Gilbert (played by Jasmine Angeles of cancer. Guy) on the TV series “A Different World.” During her long career, Carroll earned a Tony Award for “Diahann Carroll you taught us so much. We are stronger, the musical “No Strings” and an Academy Award nomination more beautiful and risk takers because of you. We will for best actress for “Claudine.” forever sing your praises and speak your name. Love Love But she was perhaps best known for her pioneering Love, Debbie,” wrote actress, dancer and director Debbie work on “Julia.” Carroll played Julia Baker, a nurse whose Allen, who was a producer on “A Different World.” husband had been killed in Vietnam, in the groundbreaking More recently, she had a number of guest shots and small situation comedy that aired from 1968 to 1971. roles in TV series, including playing the mother of Isaiah “Diahann Carroll walked this earth for 84 years and broke Washington’s character, Dr. Preston Burke, on “Grey’s ground with Anatomy” every footstep. and a stretch An icon. One on the AP Photo/ Douglas Pizac, File of the allTV show This Sept. 20, 1987 file photo shows actress Diahann time greats,” “White Carroll at the Emmy Awards in Los Angeles. director Ava Collar” as DuVernay the widow wrote on June. an interview a few years ago. “They did a lot of wonderful Twitter. “She She also things. They lived, gave me everything they possibly could, blazed trails returned to and they passed on.” through dense her roots in She began her career as a model in a segregated industry; forests and nightclubs. she got much of her work due to publications like the black elegantly left In 2006, she magazine Ebony. A prize from “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent diamonds made her Scouts” TV show led to nightclub engagements. along the path first club In her 1998 memoir “Diahann,” Carroll traced her for the rest of appearance turbulent romantic life, which included liaisons with Harry us to follow. in New Belafonte, Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Sammy Davis Jr., Extraordinary York in four Sidney Poitier and David Frost. She even became engaged to life. Thank you, decades, Frost, but the engagement was canceled. Ms. Carroll.” singing at An early marriage to nightclub owner Monte Kay resulted Although Feinstein’s in Carroll’s only child, Suzanne, as well as a divorce. She she was not at the also divorced her second husband, retail executive Freddie the first Black Regency. Glusman, later marrying magazine editor Robert DeLeon, woman to star Reviewing who died. in her own TV a return Her most celebrated marriage was in 1987, to singer Vic show (Ethel engagement Damone, and the two appeared together in nightclubs. But Waters played in 2007, a they separated in 1991 and divorced several years later. a maid in the New York After she was treated for breast cancer in 1998, she spoke AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File Times critic 1950s series out for more money for research and for free screening for “Beulah”), she (left to right) Diahann Carroll, John Forsythe, Linda Evans and Joan Collins from wrote that women who couldn’t afford mammograms. was the first to “Dynasty” cutting a cake to commemorate the production of 150 episodes of the show she sang “We all look forward to the day that mastectomies, star as someone in Los Angeles in 1986. “Both Sides chemotherapy and radiation are considered barbaric,” Carroll other than a servant. Now” with “the reflective tone of a woman who has survived told a gathering in 2000. NBC executives were wary about putting “Julia” on the many severe storms and remembers every lightning flash and Besides her daughter, she is survived by grandchildren network during the racial unrest of the 1960s, but it was an thunderclap.” August and Sydney. immediate hit. Carol Diann Johnson was born in New York City and It had its critics, though, including some who said attended the High School for the Performing Arts. Her father Carroll’s character, who is the mother of a young son, was was a subway conductor and her mother a homemaker. She not a realistic portrayal of a Black American woman in the 1960s. “They said it was a fantasy,” Carroll recalled in 1998. “All of this was untrue. Much about the character of Julia I took from my own life, my family.” Not shy when it came to confronting racial barriers, Carroll won her Tony portraying a high-fashion American model in Paris who has a love affair with a White American author in the 1959 Richard Rodgers musical “No Strings.” Critic Walter Kerr described her as “a girl with a sweet smile, brilliant dark eyes and a profile regal enough to belong on a coin.” She appeared often in plays previously considered exclusive territory for White actresses: “Same Time, Next Year,” “Agnes of God” and “Sunset Boulevard” (as faded star Norma Desmond, the role played by Gloria Swanson in the 1950 film.) “I like to think that I opened doors for other women, although that wasn’t my original intention,” she said in 2002. Her film career was sporadic. She began with a secondary role in “Carmen Jones” in 1954 and five years later appeared in “Porgy and Bess,” although her singing voice was dubbed because it wasn’t considered strong enough for the Gershwin opera. Her other films included “Goodbye Again,” “Hurry Sundown,” “Paris Blues,” and “The Split.” The 1974 film “Claudine” provided her most memorable role. She played a hard-bitten single mother AFRO Archieves of six who finds romance in Harlem with a garbage In Nov. 2007, Diahann Carroll was interviewed by the AFRO about her breast cancer survival story. man played by James Earl Jones. Carroll says she got By Nekesa Mumbi Moody The Associated Press

“She blazed trails through dense forests and elegantly left diamonds along the path for the rest of us to follow. Extraordinary life. Thank you, Ms. Carroll.”


October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019, The Afro-American

B5

COMMENTARY

Baltimore Must Change

“… [people of African ancestry]…are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word ‘citizens’ in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States. On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.” Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice, United States Supreme Court, March 1857, Dred Scott vs. Sanford

Charlene Crowell

The United States of America was birthed in White supremacy, which, for the greater part of U.S. history, was affirmed again and again through law and custom. That contradiction – “land of the free, home of the enslaved” – was also evident in Baltimore, a city – like the rest of the country – of racial disparities, including: African-American citizens being disproportionately victims of traffic stops, jail sentences, and use of force by police; African Americans carrying disproportionately more debt, including school loan debt; Housing segregation – and development to affordable housing – remains a seemingly intractable issue, stifling opportunities for asset development in Baltimore’s African American communities. It is almost cliché at this point to continue sharing racialized disparities – because so many people either know or live them – or to offer theories of change. Many Baltimoreans are jaded, having seen change efforts come and go. Along with jadedness, however, there is also hope and resolve. That is what Associated Black Charities continues to see in its partners and within Baltimore communities. ABC works with individuals and institutions that refuse to accept less than a vision of a Baltimore that includes everyone; where everyone has equitable opportunities to thrive; and where all our communities are not only valued but invested. Because of this, ABC’s agenda incorporates both transactional and transformational strategies. Many agencies and nonprofits focus on transactional strategies: those that meet immediate and concrete needs of individuals, families, and communities. These are the strategies that are funded by foundations and donors; the types of strategies that are well-understood and easily explainable and that offer “proof of works” (“..we fed 3,000 people this year…”; “we provided housing for 1,200 families…”; or “we trained 600 people who now have jobs…”). Transactional strategies are fundable because donors can immediately see the impacts and outcomes of their financial support. However, transactional strategies often bypass the transformational by maintaining and sustaining the status quo: current structures and systems and money and services. Transactional strategies serve a variety of purposes: meeting the basic needs of enough individuals to keep citizens from even more social unrest; giving financial supporters an outlet for charitable giving (and tax write-offs); and keeping social justice movements within the prescribed parameters of comfort of the monied class in exchange for grants/ donations. They keep a lid on social movements that look to address root causes; that serve to disrupt the way things are to create a more inclusive vision of equity that would essentially decrease the need for transactional programs. ABC, while recognizing the need for transactional strategies that assist individuals and communities with current needs, also realizes that in order to achieve a more equitable society, we must address the root causes that create racialized inequities. Because of this, ABC also focuses on transformational strategies, using a Racial Equity Lens that acknowledges the structural and institutional race-based barriers that continue to operate in American society. We recognize that “silver rights” are just as important as Civil Rights and pursue an agenda to stabilize and expand economic viability in African-American communities in Baltimore. This includes:

Educational advocacy regarding the use of a Racial Equity Lens in policy. ABC understands that policy has never been “universalist” – assuming that everyone has equal access and opportunity – but has always been race-based, damaging not only those specific racial groups for whom policy has erected barriers, but also racial majority populations by generating losses on economic and material productivity, Institutional support regarding the use of a Racial Equity Lens. The workforce in Maryland for workers 40 and under is now close to “majority-minority.” For businesses to thrive in Maryland, they must have more of an understanding of barriers facing workers of color, as well as opportunities for growth and productivity that those workers can afford them. ABC’s charge is to change the future. Transactional strategies alone will only serve to support our present. Baltimore – and the state -- must look ahead to transform our policies and practices if our children are going to thrive in the 21st Century, and ABC is there to lead and assist in those conversations and that work.

Speaking Truth to Power About the Cost of Our Medicines

Even as Washington remains captivated by the deeply troubling actions of the President of the United States, we must never forget the plea of a wonderful neighbor whom I met last year at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Tears in her eyes, “Mrs. Johnson” confided to me that the doctors had saved her life for the moment – but that she “could not afford the cure.” Mrs. Johnson could not afford to prolong the life that had been restored to her because of the skyrocketing cost of the miracle medicines that were preserving her health. Even as we in Congress must perform our constitutional duty to investigate the President, we also must respond far more effectively to Mrs. Johnson’s struggles – challenges that are shared by far too many other Americans. We must defend our Constitution and the rights it protects. The oath of office that we take demands no less. Yet, we also have been entrusted by the American People to further their march toward a more just and equitable society. When so many of our countrymen and women are in peril, we have no time to delay. This is why, as the Chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, I made certain that our first hearing last January challenged the unjustified (and one might legitimately say “predatory”) price spikes that the prescription drug industry has been foisting on the American People, our government and employers alike. It also is why I have sponsored and co-sponsored legislative proposals that are calculated to limit and bring down these far too often unaffordable and life-endangering healthcare costs. Although the most committed supporters in Washington for these cost-limiting proposals are Democrats, even Republicans like President Trump and Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa have publicly recognized that the unaffordable cost of far too many of our life-

Congressman Elijah Cummings

preserving medicines is a challenge that our federal government must overcome. This is the political context in which the prescription drug industry (“Big Pharma”), through its lobbyists and their Republican allies in Congress, is attempting to stave off federal negotiations to lower prescription drug costs. Their arguments, closely examined, are flawed. For example, the American People should be asking: “Why shouldn’t Medicare be allowed to negotiate the price of our massive purchase of medicines on behalf of senior citizens in the same manner as are Medicaid and the VA – federal programs that obtain these same drugs at significantly lower costs?” Those who resist reforms to mandate such negotiations as “government intrusion in the free market” fail to acknowledge that our governments, both federal and state, are among the largest purchasers of prescription drugs (i.e., through Medicare, Medicaid, the VA and the Children’s Health Insurance Program). Reforming current federal law to require Medicare to negotiate lower prices for these medicines would not be a violation of the free market, as “Big Pharma” argues. To the contrary, it would be a critically needed reform that would create a more accurate, more affordable free market price. Consider, in this regard, the Sept. 25 testimony of Professor Gerard F. Anderson, Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Hospital Finance and Management, in a hearing of the House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee (available at https:// energycommerce.house.gov). Professor Anderson’s team focused upon the 79 brand name prescription drugs that, collectively, are responsible for more than one-half of Medicare Part D spending. They compared the prices that American patients and their government paid with the cost of these same drugs in Canada, the United Kingdom and Japan. The Johns Hopkins experts concluded that, on average, we in the

United States are paying three-four times as much for the same brand name medicines at the center of our prescription drug cost debates as are patients in comparable countries. The Johns Hopkins’ findings also debunked the claim of “Big Pharma’s” lobbyists that the drug companies’ massive, multi-billiondollar annual profits are required to “finance innovation” and the development of new, life-saving drugs. Professor Anderson’s experts found that our nation’s taxpayers, through the National Institutes of Health, pay for most of the world’s basic biomedical research – the very research that leads to the development of life-preserving drugs. Contrary to their lobbyists’ claims, “Big Pharma’s” research and development costs are less than 20 percent of the cost of operating these drug companies, a lower percentage than these companies are spending for marketing and advertising. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Democrats in the House of Representatives are determined to make the miracle medicines that can preserve our lives more affordable for every American. We are moving forward with several reforms, including those proposed in H.R. 3, H.R. 275, H.R. 448 and H.R. 1046) that will be consolidated into our final proposal to the Senate, the President and the American People. Our message in fighting for these reforms is clear. As an ethical, humane society, we cannot – and must not – perpetuate a healthcare system in which any American “cannot afford the cure.” Congressman Elijah Cummings represents Maryland’s 7th Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives. He serves as Chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

Debt Collectors Target Colored People In the wake of the 152th Morgan State University’s (MSU) Homecoming, several students and alumni across HBCU campuses in the state of Maryland met to reflect upon the history of HBCUs in the country since the 1837 opening of Cheyney University in Pennsylvania. This happened before the Civil War, for the purpose of providing Black youth opportunity to become teachers or tradesmen. Students and alumni not only reflected on the legacy of HBCUs in Maryland, but also the history of MSU (1867) starting as a Centenary Biblical Institute by the Baltimore Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church and its rich student legacy of civil rights. Also, the discussion took place in the wake of the 400th anniversary of the first recorded forced arrival of Africans in the U.S. in Virginia since 1619. The resurgence of racial and discriminatory tension during the era of Former President Barack Obama and now President Donald Trump, but most importantly, in the midst of the

Kevin Daniels

current unresolved HBCU Coalition for Equity and Excellence in Maryland Higher Education Case that has lasted over a decade. This case has brought nationwide attention since U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake ruled the actions of the state indeed perpetuated segregation, and then the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled “the case can and should be settled.” The students and alumni were asked, “Why does this matter to them?” For many, tears began to well up in their eyes as they went on to state that, “after many centuries and years of discrimination, even currently mobilizing other HBCU students in Maryland, community, faith leaders, fraternities, sororities, and protesting concerning this current case in court and Annapolis, it leaves them “exhausted that the struggle continues.” The struggle “to validate the authenticity and genius of Black lives in this country and now state.” Many stated that “they felt like this is not just a current issue but an ancestral issue that finally needs to be atoned for in this state.” They stated that “the stats

have been laid out concerning who attends HBCUs, GPAs, test scores, financial income status, the need to expand international and diversity presence, and funding formulas for HBCUs as compared to PWIs; this case has been litigated in public and private modalities from news media to our very own President David Wilson, and regardless of the angle, it still leaves the state liable.” However, the students and alumni stated with great resolve that, “In the spirit of our ancestors, they are up for and in the struggle for equity not only in this country but also in the state because the lives of those attending HBCUs still need to matter.” Dr. Kevin Daniels is Professor of Social Work at Morgan State University and is Chair of the Civic Action and Social Concerns Committee (Minister’s Conference Baltimore/Vicinity).

The opinions on this page are those of the writers and not necessarily those of the AFRO.

Send letters to The Afro-American • 1531 S. Edgewood St. Baltimore, MD 21227 or fax to 1-877-570-9297 or e-mail to editor@afro.com


B6 The Afro-American, October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019

September 14, 2019 - September 20, 2019, The Afro-American

A3

Perry

Continued from B1 Fort McPherson, which is south of downtown Atlanta, after purchasing the land in 2015. “I gave them the absolute best,” he said. “I built the absolute best I could. We perform and run this place like a top. We have excellent service and everything you would expect to have in a major film television studio. People are glad to shoot here. A lot of them want to return because of the way we handled it.” Perry went from being homeless to become a force as a filmmaker to now being honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, which he received on Oct. 1. His career has been built on the success of his “Madea” stage play tours and movies along with his “Why Did I Get Married?” films. He recently partnered with Viacom to launch the BET Plus streaming service, which debuted last month. He’ll also have two new drama series, “The Oval” and “Sistas,” set to premiere on BET this month. But with all his accomplishments, Perry said Hollywood still has a hard time understanding the value of his content, which has gotten what he calls

“undying” support from African Americans. He said the industry also struggles to realize the “power of the Black dollar” and the amount of work he’s put into each project. “Nobody in Hollywood believes that I’m sitting around and writing seven series by myself,” he said. “I have no writer’s room because nobody else is writing anything. I’m writing everything. There’s nobody else directing any of the shows. I’m on (the) set directing every show. That’s so rare for the town. They can’t even wrap their brains around it. On these TV shows, they shoot three, four or five pages a day. I’m shooting 90 pages a day. It’s very difficult for them to even wrap their brains around that to understand. So I feel like they don’t get it. If they did understand, they would realize

Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

The 330-acre studio is considered one of the largest studios in the country with 12 sound stages, 40 buildings onsite that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and over 200 acres of green space.

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Free admission after 5pm as part of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts’ Free Fall Baltimore celebration

Learn more at aqua.org/youraquarium Blackout dates apply. Programs and dates subject to change. Some programs require advance registration.

that there’s a lot to Hollywood that could change or should change.” One place Perry believes he can continue to make a difference is through his

studio to become a beacon to inspire other filmmakers with the hope of keeping it in the family. “I think they will go hand in hand,” Perry said of his

“We have excellent service and everything you would expect to have in a major film television studio.” studio. He’s known for creating opportunities for African Americans and other people of color to work on his sets since opening a 200,000-square-foot studio in 2006. He sold that studio a few years ago after he moved to his current location. Perry believes his films and owning a studio could have a lasting impact on his legacy. But he wants the

filmmaking career and studio ventures. “But I think this brick-and-mortar of the studio speaks volumes because it’s not about my dream. It’s about all the other people that are able to come in and build dreams and share dreams and tell their stories as well. I hope it lives on forever and ever. And if my son wants to take it over, that would be even better.”


October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019, The Afro-American

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OWN to Release New Holiday Movies

By AFRO Staff

Oprah Winfrey’s heart and creative instincts inform the brand and the magnetism of the channel of the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN). The first and only network named for, and inspired by, a single iconic leader, OWN launched on Jan. 1, 2011. The TV network is a joint venture between Harpo, Inc. and Discovery, Inc. The venture also includes the award-winning digital platform Oprah.com. The leading destination for premium scripted and unscripted programming

from today’s most innovative storytellers, OWN recently announced its first foray into TV movies with three new original holiday movies set to air over three consecutive Fridays in November beginning with “One Fine Christmas” premiering Nov. 15 at 9 p.m.The movie stars Rick Fox and his daughter Sasha Fox – their first time acting together. “We are excited to bring holiday movies to OWN,” said Tina Perry, president, OWN. “This special time of year is about spending time with the ones you love, and we think our viewers are going to enjoy watching these movies together throughout the season.”

One Fine Christmas The father/daughter duo, Rick and Sasha Fox, join beloved actress Marla Gibbs and fan favorite Vanessa Williams in the ensemble cast. The families on Christmas Street have been busy with their dayto-day lives that they lose sight of the importance of family during the holiday season. Haley (Sasha Fox) comes home for the Christmas holiday, but home has not been the same since her family split up. Haley’s mother Susan (Williams) is working on a new work deal with her client (Rick Fox) which causes her to hardly have time for Haley or her mother Alice (Gibbs). Al (Mark Christopher Lawrence) is too preoccupied with work that he overlooks his wife Matty (June Carryl). Meanwhile, Bob (Rodney Van Johnson) and Diana’s (Eva La Dare) son Jesse (Alfonso Torres Caballero) comes home for Christmas with a very special surprise. This “slice of life” holiday tale shares the individual stories of these neighbors as they celebrate Christmas Eve and Courtesy of OWN/Lisa Rose find themselves unexpectedly united for the holiday “One Fine Christmas”: (l to r) Alfonso Torres Caballero, Kirsten Leigh, Rodney Van Johnson, Eva La Dare, Vanessa season. Williams, Rick Fox.

Carole’s Christmas Carol’s Christmas premieres Friday, Nov. 22 at 9p.m. Starring acclaimed actresses Jackée Harry and Kimberly Elise, “Carole’s Christmas” tells the story of Carole Jordan (Elise), an overworked businesswoman who learns the meaning of “be careful what you wish for” after she off-handedly wishes she had taken another path in life. When Carole’s wish is granted, her world is turned upside down and the only person she can confide in is Iris (Jackée Harry), a woman she recognizes from her “past life.” Carole no longer has time for the things that mattered most to her - family, friends and her annual Christmas party. She quickly learns how grateful she was for the previous life she was living. “Carole’s Christmas” also stars Cayden K. Williams (star of OWN’s “David Makes Man”), Bianca Buck and Anthony Montgomery. Courtesy of OWN/Lisa Rose

“Carole’s Christmas” (l to r) Jackée Harry, Kimberly Elise

Baking Christmas Baking Christmas premieres Friday, Nov. 29 at 9 pm When Patty (Aloma Wright), the founder of the town’s most popular and successful bakery, announces her plan to retire at the end of the year, her children step up to take over the family business. Patty and Phillip’s (Tim Reid) children, Jennifer (Khalilah Joi), Angela (Leigh-Ann Rose) and Anthony (Arnell Powell), are qualified – and eager – to run the enterprise, and each has their own ideas for writing the bakery’s next chapter. There is only one way to ensure the shop ends up in the right hands and that is a Christmas cake bakeoff. The gloves come off and the frosting flies as the siblings vie for control of the bakery in an unforgettable competition to create the best-ever Christmas confection. “Baking Christmas” also stars Yohance Myles from OWN’s “Ambitions.” The movies are produced for OWN by Hybrid, LLC in association with Harpo Films.

Courtesy of OWN/Lisa Rose

“Baking Christmas” (l to r) Leigh-Ann Rose, Khalilah Joi, Arnell Powell


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The Afro-American, October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019

A Survivor’s Survival Guide For the entire month of October, the AFRO celebrates all breast cancer survivors and encourages them to share their stories and top tips for surviving cancer with our readers. Survivors, Pearl B. Spencer and Marnita Coleman, share their tips and other insight from their personal battles with breast cancer. By Pearl B. Spencer Special to the AFRO

Do your research, develop a plan and stick with it. July 1990 will always remain green in my memory. That was the day my doctor told me that the lumps in my left breast were cancerous. My journey started 29 years ago, and thanks be to God, I am still cancer free. On reflecting, I recall how I found the lumps in my left breast. One night I had a dream where I saw my deceased grandmother all dressed in white trying to warn me about something, but I could not figure out what it was. I woke up scared, crossed my hands on my breasts and I felt the lumps. The next day I called my family doctor who ordered a biopsy. When the results came in, my doctor requested my presence as soon as possible. Immediately, I became very nervous, and could not drive, so I had someone take me there. I knew it was not pleasant. I was even more nervous the moment that she told me it was cancerous and had to take a mammogram, although I had one that was negative a few months before. I had surgery twice to make sure there was no cancer left around the two lumps. This was followed by 45 days of radiation and chemo. After the second round of chemo, my hair started to drop in the shower, but I was ready and bought a wig before that happened. I did some research about cancer and decided to fight this disease, so I drank lots of green teas. From then on, I tried to avoid fried foods and ate lots of fruits and vegetables with my meals. I also drank some aloe vera juice now and again and during radiation I rubbed the aloe vera gel on my breast which stopped the burning. I had stopped drinking regular milk and switched to soy milk, instead, for a few years. I still get nauseated sometimes, but I suck on candy or chew gum which helps. Most importantly, I still have a lot of support from family and friends. I try to get some exercise and thank God every day for what He is doing for me and all cancer survivors. I do believe that my guardian angel came to me in that dream. I have to stay positive and examine my breasts every month to make sure there are no lumps. Sometimes I get paranoid and feel all over for lumps. I also make sure that I get a mammogram and blood test yearly before seeing the oncologist. Since I have retired, I have joined the mall walkers at the Mall of Prince George’s County to get my daily walk. I feel so blessed to survive this deadly disease for 29 years, and I will continue to praise the Lord for all He is doing for us.

By Marnita Coleman Special to the AFRO

Set your mind on the promise, not the process, and go all the way through. ‘Wow, breast cancer. Is this really happening? I didn’t see it coming. But, what do I do from here?’ Those were a few of my thoughts. I knew I had to win this battle, so I buckled up and set my mind on the result I wanted to experience. I decided against focusing on breast cancer statistics. I believed God would heal me based on His word from the bible. But, I also knew that I had to pair practical steps with my faith. In other words, I had to do my part. I went to a prayer meeting two days after my diagnosis. The pastor interrupted the service and said there were people in the meeting who had received a bad report from the doctor. He asked that they come forth, to the altar, so that he could pray for them. He had not planned a healing session, but felt strongly that it was God’s doing. He proclaimed healing and I rejoiced.

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Sincerely, A Survivor

To me, that meant that God had granted my prayer request. In all seriousness, I really wanted a supernatural encounter where I would wake up the next day and feel a change in my body and go to the doctor to discover the lump was gone. Sounds amazing right? However, that was not the way God did it. I contacted my doctor to discuss the plan of action. He suggested a couple of scenarios and I decided to go the mastectomy-with-chemo route. The choice wasn’t easy, but with prayer and research, it seemed best for me. The surgery and reconstruction would be done at the same time. It was a 13 hour process altogether. When I woke up, I was happy to be alive and see my beautiful family. I thought it was over, but much to my dismay, we were just getting started. I was immediately placed in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in a heat chamber, where the temperature was a minimum of 110 degrees. It was so hot that my body stayed wet with perspiration. When visitors came, they peered in through the glass window because it was almost unbearable to be in that room. You don’t always know how much you can take until you go through something that’s seemingly extreme and come out on the other side. My desire to live was greater than the pain, the heat, and the inconvenience of the disease. I had great doctors and they became my family. The nurses and interns were pretty decent too. The care was so excellent that I kept calling the hospital a hotel. (Side bar: my plastic surgeon was single and very handsome. I always knew when he was headed to check in on me because the nurses would bombard my room so that they could all be in there when he arrived. That always made me laugh.) After surgery, we followed up with adriamycin chemo. Yuck, yuck, yuck! The only good thing about chemo was I didn’t have to tweeze or wax for a while because all of my hair fell out. I shouldn’t make light of it, but it was a blessing to me, haha. My trek to recovery included a dreadful drain implanted in my breast during reconstruction. When that didn’t work effectively, they used the ancient method of leech therapy to suck the excess blood. Doctors and nurses came from all over town to see this treatment because it was rare and they had only read about it in textbooks. I had multiple surgeries and a wound vac that put me in so much pain that the doctors gave me morphine. I pressed the button to release the morphine every two minutes, if it were not in restricted doses, I would have overdosed. And it didn’t stop there. I had to be rehabilitated and learn to walk again because I was

Photo courtesy Bing Images

bedriddened. Oh, did I mention the reconstruction failed and was surgically removed, Yup, I was taken into surgery for what was suppose to be a nip and tuck, and came out without a boob. I hesitated sharing these details because it was a hard time in my life. In fact, this is the first time ever. I blocked this entire episode out of my mind. I didn’t think about it, nor did I allow anyone to photograph me during the process. What’s also incredible is I still haven’t told it all. The survivor’s survival tip that I would like to share is to set your mind on the promise, not the process and go all the way through. Remember, the pastor spoke healing over me (and others at the altar). I held onto that promise and kept speaking it over myself. When I couldn’t move my legs, I declared that I was healed. When I developed a frozen shoulder, that could not be rehabilitated without surgery, I saw myself doing jumping jacks, and again, declared that I was healed. It is strange to me that so many people that have the same diagnosis can have completely different results. I lost my mom to breast cancer. I lost a dear friend to breast cancer, yet, someone else I know is celebrating over 20 years as a survivor. I cannot explain it. I believe the reason that I made it through was by faith in God and His grace and tender loving kindness. I had two kids at home, and I didn’t want them to grow up without me. They were my driving force. As we continue the discussion of breast cancer awareness, I urge every woman to continue with monthly self exams. According to MedlinePlus.com, about three to five days after your period starts is the best time to check, because your breasts are not as tender or lumpy. Women over 40 years old with a family history of breast cancer should schedule an annual mammogram until age 55, then every other year. For more information, see the American Cancer Society guidelines for breast cancer. Sincerely, A Survivor

“My desire to live was greater than the pain, the heat, and the inconvenience of the disease.”

Photo courtesy Bing Images


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Superior Court of the District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2019ADM681 Arnold Godfrey Taylor Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Lilian Bedinger Taylor, whose address is 507 3rd Street, SE Washington, DC 20003, was appointed personal representative of the estate of Arnold Godfrey Taylor, who died on March 20, 2019 with a will, and will serve with without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . 20001, on or before January 26, 2020. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before January 26, 2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: July 26, 2019 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Lilian B Taylor Personal Representative

TRUE TEST COPY

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Superior Court of the District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2019ADM000991 Vera M. Silver Decedent Paul D Hunt 717 D. Street Suite 300 Washington, DC 20004 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Vera M. Silver , whose address is 5093 Sands Road, Lothian, MD 20711 appointed personal representative of the estate of Vera M Silver , who died on June 22, 2019 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . 20001, on or before April 4, 2020. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before April 4, 2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Barbara E. Johnson Personal Representative October 4, 2019 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS

Superior Court of the District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2019ADM979 Bertha Elizabeth Harris AKA Bertha E Harris Decedent William A Bland 80 M Street SE #330 Washington,DC 20003 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Teresa L. Rhone, whose address is 12825 Dunkirk Drive, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Bertha Elizabeth Hsarris AKA Bertha E. Harris , who died on May 16, 2019 with a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . 20001, on or before April 4, 2020. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before April 4, 2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: October 4, 2019 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Teresa L Rhone Personal Representative

REGISTER OF WILLS AIRLINE MECHANIC REGISTER OF WILLS TRAINING-Get FAA 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/19 certification to fix planes. 07/26, 8/2, 8/9/19 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/19 Financial Aid if qualified. TYPESET: Wed Oct 09 16:08:59 EDT 2019 TYPESET: Wed Oct 09 16:08:02 EDT 2019 Approved for military TYPESET: Wed Oct 09 15:59:41 EDTCOPY 2019 benefits. Call Aviation TRUE TEST REGISTER OF WILLS Superior Court of Institute of Maintenance Superior Court of the the 866-823-6729. Superior Court of 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/19 District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. MEDICAL LEGAL 20001-2131 Administration No. SERVICES 2019ADM000945 Elizabeth C. Stamp Lung Cancer? And Age Decedent NOTICE OF 60+? You And Your FamAPPOINTMENT, ily May Be Entitled To NOTICE TO Significant Cash Award. CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO Call 844-591-5210 for UNKNOWN HEIRS information. No Risk. No Willie D. Stamp , whose Money Out of Pocket. address is 7002 5th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20012 was appointed personal representative REAL ESTATE of the estate of Elizabeth C. Stamp AKA Elizabeth , who died on FebDelaware New Move-In Stamp ruary 7, 2018 with a will, Ready Homes! Low and will serve without Taxes! Close to Beaches, Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs Gated, Olympic pool. whose whereabouts are Homes from low $100’s, unknown shall enter their No HOA Fees. Brochures a p p e a r a n c e i n t h i s proceeding. Objections Available 1-866--629to such appointment (or 0770 or www.coolto the probate of decedent´s will) shall be branch.com filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . SERVS. MISC. 20001, on or before March 27, 2020. Claims Increase your customer against the decedent base and get great results shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy by placing your ads in to the Register of Wills or the MDDC – Classified filed with the Register of Advertising network! Call Wills with a copy to the today 410-212-0616 Ask undersigned, on or before March 27, 2020, or for Multi-Media Special- be forever barred. Perist -Wanda & watch your sons believed to be heirs or legatees of the deresults grow. cedent who do not receive a copy of this notice SAVE loads of money by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall with your advertising so inform the Register of BUDGETS; CONWills, including name, address and relationNECT with the Multiship. Media Specialists of Date of Publication: the MDDC Advertising September 27, 2019 Name of newspaper: Networks; GET Bulk Afro-American Advertising Opportunities Washington NOW;CALL TODAY; Law Reporter Willie D Stamp With One Call; With One Personal Ad Placement & One Representative

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District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2019ADM712 Lyndell J Sanders Decedent Kerri M Castellini Esq Price Benowitz LLP 409 Seventh Street, NW Suite 200 Washington, DC 20004 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Shaneika L Sanders, whose address is 1702 17th Street, SE, Apasrtment 6, Washington, DC 20020, was appointed personal representative of the estate of Lyndell J Sanders, who died on February 2, 2019 withouta will, and will serve without) Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before January 26, 2020. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before January 26, 2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: July 26, 2019 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Shaneika L. Sanders Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 07/26,8/2, 8/9/19

the District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2018ADM000365 Orlean A Ward AKA Orlean Ward AKA Orlean Agnes Ward Decedent Theresa Owusu 1775 Eye Street, NW, Suite 1150 Washington, DC 20006 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Maurice Ward, whose address is 3808 Owens Mills , was appointed personal representative of the estate of Orlean A Ward Aka Orlean Ward AKA Orlean Agnes Ward, who died on September 30, 2017 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before April 11, 2020. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before April 11, 2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: October 11, 2019 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Maurice Ward Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/19

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TYPESET: Wed Oct 09 16:05:37 EDT 2019 Superior Court of the District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2019ADM000933 Norene A Glushko Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Andrea K Hollinshead, whose address is 2543 W a t e r s i d e D r. , N W Washington DC 20008 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Norene A Glushko , who died on November 1, 2017 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . 20001, on or before April 4, 2020. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before April 4, 2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: October 4, 2019 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Andrea L Hollinshead Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/19

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TYPESET: Wed Oct 09 15:59:19 EDT 2019

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY REQUEST FOR COMBINED QUALIFICATION STATEMENTS ANDTECHNICAL PROPOSALS BASIC ORDERING AGREEMENT SUBSURFACE UTILITY ENGINEERING 1 (DCFA #507)

The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water) requests the submittal of Qualification Statements for the performance of professional architectural/engineering and related services for DC Water infrastructure under the proposed Basic Ordering Agreement - Subsurface Utility Engineering 1 with task orders assigned on an as needed basis. The selected firm will provide Subsurface Utility Engineering (SUE) in accordance with ASCE 38 (latest version). Anticipated services include coordinating with utility owners, researching utilities, locating and designating existing utilities using surface geophysical methods (including electromagnetic, magnetic, elastic wave, and other methods), conducting minimally intrusive excavation (test holes), conducting topographic survey, preparing 3D model of existing utilities using AutoCAD Civil 3D, preparing base maps documenting quality level, preparing a utility report stamped by a professional engineer licensed in the District of Columbia, acquiring permits needed for SUE activities, providing recommendations to DC Water listing utilities needing a ”quality level upgrade” based on the preliminary design, and documenting cost benefit of the SUE efforts. Projects may be located in the water distribution and sewer collection systems throughout the District. DC Water will award one agreement from this procurement. The agreements resulting from this request for qualifications statements will be subject to a Fair Share Objective for Minority and Women Business Enterprises participation in this work of 28% and 4%, respectively. The program requirements are fully defined in the EPA’s Participation by Disadvantaged Enterprises in Procurement under EPA Financial Assistance Agreements, May 27, 2008.

Interested firms should contact Ms. Senail Manley by email at senail. manley@dcwater.com to obtain a more detailed Request for Qualifications Statements. Request must refer to DCFA #507-WSA. Qualifications Statement are due Wednesday, November 20, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. EST. Submit Qualification Statements to Ms. Senail Manley on the 5th Floor of COF at Blue Plains, 5000 Overlook Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20032. Firms are invited to attend an outreach meeting on Wednesday, October 30, 2019 from 9am-11am. Reservations are required no later than noon on Monday, October 28, 2019. In the RSVP include the full name of attendee(s), company name, phone number, and email address. RSVP to the A/E Coordinator, Ms. Senail Manley, by e-mail senail.manley@dcwater.com.

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Superior Court of the District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2019ADM000953 Ronald Bobby Gray Sr. Decedent Tyler Jay King 700 12th St. NW Suite Washington, DC 20005 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Victoria Gray, whose address is 3941 Polk Street, #16, Riverside , CA 92505 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Victoria G r a y, w h o d i e d o n January 22, 2019 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before March 27, 2020. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before March 27, 2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: September 27, 2019 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Victoria Gray Personal Representative

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October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019, The Afro-American

WASHINGTON CLASSIFIEDS Continued from C3

TYPESET: Wed Oct 09 16:00:04 TYPESET: Wed 2019 Oct 09 16:06:02 2019 TYPESET: Wed Oct 09 16:07:34 EDT 2019 LEGALEDT NOTICES TYPESET: Wed Oct 09 16:14:42 2019 LEGAL NOTICES LEGALEDT NOTICES LEGALEDT NOTICES SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA NOTICE OF PENDING EVICTION ACTION Edgewood Management vs. Michael Yancy Case No.: 2019 LTB 0019206 600 Kenilworth Terrace, NE #329, Washington DC 20019 Court Date October 01, 2019 at 9:00 AM The object of this suit it to obtain possession of the residential real property set forth above. Any person who claims an interest in said real property, or the contents therein, shall appear at the DC Superior Court, Landlord & Tenant Branch at 510 4th Street, NW, Building B, Room 109, Washington DC 20001 at the date and time set forth above. All contacts regarding this matter should be directed to: Mark R. Raddatz, Esq. Raddatz Law Firm, PLLC 7921 Jones Branch Drive, #200, McLean VA, 22102 (202) 466-8001 and to the Court at 510 4th Street, NW,Building B, Room 110, Washington DC 20001 (202) 879-4879. Dates of Publication: 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/19

Superior Court of the District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2019ADM001019 Charligna Calhoun Daniel Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Gia G Daniel , whose address is 3318 12 Banneker Drive, NE, Washington, DC 20018 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Charligna Calhoun Daniel , who died on August 3, 2019 withouta will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before April 11, 2020 . Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before April 11,2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: October 11, 2019 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Gia G. Daniel Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS

Superior Court of the District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. Dorsey Battle Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Reginald Battle , whose address is 514 12th Street NE, Washington, DC 20002 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Dorsey Battle, who died on with a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . 20001, on or before February 23, 2020. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 23, 2020, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 23, 2019 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Reginald Battle Personal Representative

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2019ADM001022 Estate of Barnett Lee Schank Deceased NOTICE OF STANDARD PROBATE Notice is hereby given that a petition has been filed in this Court by Aaron P Maier, Creditor for standard probate, including the appointment of one or more personal representative. Unless a complaint or an objection in accordance with Superior Court Probate Division Rule 407 is filed in this Court within 30 days from the date of first publication of this notice, the Court may take the action hereinafter set forth. 0 in the absence of a will or proof satisfactory to the Court of due execution, enter an order determining that the decedent died intestate 0 appoint Patrick T. Hand, Esq, a disinterested member of the Bar, to serve as the personal representativeof this Estate Register of Wills Clerk of the Probate Division Date of First Publication October 4, 2019 Names of Newspapers: Washington Law Reporter Washington AFRO-AMERICAN Russell Drazin 4400 Jenifer Street NW Ste 2 Washington, DC 20015 Signature of Petitioners/Attorney 10/4, 10/11/19

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The Afro-American, October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019


October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019, The Afro-American

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WASHINGTON-AREA

St. Elizabeths Without Water

Theatre Review

Ford’s ‘Fences’ Reminds Audiences of Hard Truths

By AFRO Staff

Patients and staff at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, the District’s public psychiatric hospital, have been without drinking water for an extended

“What is happening at St. Elizabeths right now is a crisis.” period. This issue was discovered during a routine scheduled watertesting where the hospital is located on the east campus. Upon discovery, the leadership at St. Elizabeths Hospital was advised by a private inspection contractor to use water for purposes other than drinking until further assessments were completed. Ward 7 Councilmember and Committee on Health Chair Vincent C. Gray has been working with the D.C. Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) leadership and expects this issue to be completely resolved within the next few days followed by a 48-hour testing period after treatment. According to DC Water the issue of no drinking water and contamination is confined to the specific parcel where the hospital is located, rather than the entire St. Elizabeths campus. In response to the Continued on D2

Courtesy Photo

Fences, by August Wilson and directed by Timothy Douglas, will play at Ford’s Theatre until Oct. 27.

By Micha Green AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor mgreen@afro.com

Are fences used to keep people in or keep other factors out? Audiences are left begging this question throughout the Ford’s Theatre production of Fences by August Wilson and directed by Timothy Douglas. In one of the most popular and widely known of Wilson’s 10 decades play cycle, the Ford’s Fences reveals how societal expectations and institutionalized racism have historically played a major role in “fencing in” Black people and keeping them out from

White spaces. In showing the negative and generational effects of discrimination, Fences offers a lesson of doing what you love, because as ominous as it sounds- you can’t hide from death. While the cast was warming up and still working out their kinks in the Oct. 2 media night production, the beauty and truth of Wilson’s words, the bold acting choices of the performers, and the strong design elements make for Ford’s Fences to be a worthy trip for theatre lovers and novices alike. In a day and age where a large, hypermasculine, super-opinionated, multiple baby-mama having man holds the role of President of the

United States, audiences at Ford’s Fences, are given a peak into a relatable male lead with the same brutish description in Troy Maxson (Craig Wallace). Besides the fact that Wallace depicts a loud, knowit-all, always gets his way father and husband, he is no Trump; but rather, Troy is a former Negro League player, sanitation worker, lowermiddle class man who lives in 1957 Pittsburgh. For those that have seen Denzel Washington’s Troy (either on Broadway, or film or both like this reporter) it is very important that

Celebrating Milestones, Keeping the Music Alive

gathering place for locals, tourists and international audiences alike. Moran explained that part of the jazz program’s growth is remembering its Twenty years ago Jason roots. Moran’s jazz trio, The “My predecessor Dr. Billy Bandwagon wowed audiences Taylor, was from D.C. and with their unique sound and also a serious historian, a artistic mash-ups, and for serious activist and also a eight years the Kennedy serious educator. So that was Center’s jazz programming the kind of programming he has been under his tutelage. set up even before I got there. With such a seasoned career And once he passed, I felt in jazz, Moran, 44, took a like it had to continue to be moment to reflect on his the duty to make sure the jazz music, role at the Kennedy programming had a breadth Center and overall duty as of understanding of how it an artist to contribute to the got to where it is. And we growth of jazz in the District can’t isolate traditions- from and beyond. Ragtime to Avant Garde and “Every season at the Free Jazz, but that is also Kennedy Center we have an aspect of America that a real duty to recognize America has to confront too,” how the music has been Moran said. developed and also a keen The 44-year-old musican Courtesy Photo responsibility to mark how it Musician and the Kennedy Center’s Artistic Director for Jazz, Jason Moran, sat said that jazz has the ability is changing, because jazz is a down with the AFRO for an exclusive interview about his career and what’s to to serve as the thermostat for rare American gem- meaning come. the status of America’s health. born on the shores here- and it “The music always someway takes a different documentation,” Moran told jazz legacy, while also bringing a newness forecasts and gives a temperature reading of the AFRO. of sound and artistry to the beloved artistic Continued on D2 By Micha Green AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor mgreen@afro.com

In his eighth season as the Kennedy Center’s Artistic Director for Jazz, Moran is continuing to uphold the institution’s

Continued on D3

From City Council, to Prison, to Airwaves

ByLauren Williams Special to the AFRO

The District’s airwaves just got a little more political with the addition of the “Michael Brown Show,” a new podcast airing Monday nights. According to a press release, Brown’s show will cover a variety of topics ranging from politics to sports and entertainment. “I hope to help educate our audience on politics and a host of other issues of the day,” Brown told the AFRO in an email on October 7. “As well as voice my opinions on the latest topics.” This is not Brown’s first time in the media. He is most known for his time in D.C. Council from 2009 -2013 and his federal conviction for bribery in 2014. Brown served time from 2014 to 2016. According to his show’s press release, Brown is “turning his sights back to being in the public eye.” Brown has also had stints on Fox News, TVOne, and HLN. He will bring all this experience to listeners in the nation’s capital. According to Brown, upcoming guests for the show will include Members of Congress, local political leaders, and experts in law, medicine, and sports and entertainment. Brown’s show will air on WLVS Radio. According to the station’s site, WLVS Radio is the largest live streaming, online station in the United States, broadcasting in all 50 states and more than 135 countries. Brown is now one of more than 70 on-air personalities. The “Michael Brown Show” airs form 6 to 7:00 p.m. EST on Monday nights. The first show aired on Sept. 23.

Courtesy Photo

Former District of Columbia Vice Chair Michael Brown (20092013), after serving time for a federal bribery conviction from 20142016, is now coming back in the public eye with a new podcast called the, “Michael Brown Show,” on WLVS radio on Monday evenings.


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The Afro-American, October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019

The Art of Human Care By Nyame-kye Kondo Special to the AFRO

Renowned surgeon and author, Dr. Hassan Tetteh, recently released his book “The Art of Human Care” and held a book signing on Sept. 26 at TheArc in Southeast, D.C. The piece is a narrative that “combines the healing power of art and compassion, and personifies the human condition through compelling stories,” according to MadMimi.com. Tetteh’s book is a reflection of both his life work and the experiences that inspired him to become a doctor. The current chief medical informatics officer for the United States Navy, Tetteh, is a certified heart and lung surgeon, as well as a former combat surgeon. Dr. Tetteh believes that art and science are hand-inhand when it comes to a patient’s healing. “Without health, leaders cannot lead, artists cannot create, teachers cannot teach, and soldiers cannot battle for our freedom. Health empowers people to do the things that matter,” he said. Reading excerpts from his book, Dr. Tetteh also shared the space with the performance troupe, Poet Life, and the D.C. based nonprofit, Miriam’s Kitchen. All proceeds from the book are donated to the organization, and the featured performers are also clients of the Kitchen and will benefit directly from Dr. Tetteh’s efforts. “Dr. Tetteh’s, generous donation will support our Studio program, which is a therapeutic, safe space for guests to freely express themselves through painting, drawing, jewelry making, sculpting, writing and more,” said Mei Powers, chief development officer of Miriam’s Kitchen. Dr. Tetteh’s book directly correlates with the program by exploring themes of rehabilitation, and art therapy while in the midst of an experience that changed his life and altered his thinking long before be became a doctor. His book “shares how his own life-altering, near-death experience profoundly affected his approach to health care and ultimately lead to his development of ‘The Art of Human Care’ theory,” notes his website. This juxtaposition and understanding has enabled Dr. Tetteh to use his knowledge as both a patient and a doctor to heal others. “It is essential to recognize that greatness in a society depends on its capacity to cultivate and respect compassion, to appreciate the beauty in art, and to realize that those two capacities are bound together in the human spirit. ‘The Art of Human Care’ aspires to remind us of this fundamental insight,” Tetteh said.

Courtesy Photo

Heart and Lung surgeon Dr. Hassan Tetteh spoke on his new book “The Art of Caring” at The Arc Theater. Proceeds go to Miriam’s Kitchen to help fight homelessness, and to create a safe art studio for its artistic clients.

St. Elizabeths Continued from D1

drinking water emergency at Saint Pennsylvania Ave., SE. I join Dr. all necessary steps to quickly transfer Elizabeths Hospital, Council Bazron in expressing appreciation to current St. Elizabeths patients to member Gray released the following the hospital’s staff who steadfastly other local health facilities until the statement: continue to provide quality health water problem is resolved, starting “I have been in constant care for the patients during this with the most vulnerable patients as communication with leadership difficult time,” continued Gray. identified by the health-care staff of at DBH. According to the hospital.” updates received from The ACLU-DC also DBH, a solution has been has recommendations implemented to address the for the City Council to bacteria issue as it relates do further investigating to drinking water at St. Courtesy Photo of St. Elizabeths water Elizabeths Hospital,” stated Patients and staff at St. Elizabeths in Ward 7 have not had crisis and troubleshoot drinking water for an extended period. Councilmember Gray. any further issues. “More importantly,” said “In addition to Gray, “DBH expects the drinking “We are receiving daily updates removing patients from the hospital water issue to be resolved completely on conditions at the hospital and look while the water supply is fixed, the within seven days followed by a forward to receiving a comprehensive ACLU-DC calls on the D.C. Council 48-hour testing period as required report on what triggered this problem to hold a public oversight hearing after treatment. DBH has also and how this can be prevented in the to fully examine how the hospital’s continued with emergency measures future,” concluded Gray. water supply became contaminated, to ensure the safety and hygiene of Despite District officials assuring what emergency protocols DBH its 273 patients, including installing residents the issue will be addressed, had in place to protect patients and portable showers, providing plenty of the ACLU of the District of staff, and what steps the District will bottled water, body wipes and hand Columbia is calling for D.C. Mayor take to ensure this life-endangering sanitizers.” Muriel Bowser to relocate residents situation does not happen again,” “I intend to address this issue during the water crisis. the ACLU-DC statement said. during my upcoming oversight “What is happening at St. “In addition, given the recurring hearing in Ward 7 on the Department Elizabeths right now is a crisis,” said problems with St. Elizabeths, the of Behavioral Health,” Gray Monica Hopkins, Executive Director, Council’s Committee on Health added. “The hearing will be held ACLU-DC in a statement sent to the should require regular reporting from on Wednesday, Oct. 23, at 5:30 AFRO. “We call on Mayor Bowser DBH on the physical condition of the p.m., at the Pennsylvania Avenue to put an immediate halt to new hospital’s infrastructure.” Baptist Church, located at 3000 admissions to the hospital and take

Music

Continued from D1 where the country is. How sick or how well it is,” Moran explained. Through his artistic curation of performances for The Kennedy Center, Moran hopes to expand the breadth of jazz music to which audiences are exposed. “This year we’re bringing the art ensemble of Chicagoa pioneering group [celebrating] their 50th anniversary. Here’s an ensemble that’s been around for 50 years and have never played the Kennedy Center,” Moran said with both surprise and a hint of disappointment. “So there’s still these gaps of programming that I try to make sure we acknowledge as an institution.” The musician, artistic director and entrepreneur, who co-owns YES RECORDS with his wife, mezzo-soprano Alicia Hall Moran, hopes that through the artistry coming to the Kennedy Center, ‘that [people] kind of wake up to what [Americans] have not been dealing with.” As Moran enters his eighth season with the Kennedy Center, he also celebrates the milestone of 20 years of his jazz trio, The Bandwagon. Two decades ago, Moran, who has seamlessly meshed Hip-Hop, rap and jazz, had no idea he’d be part of an-award winning jazz trio. The group was actually part of the rhythm section of another band, yet “we had the best chemistry,’ said Moran. After 20 years of creating with The Bandwagon, Moran also has seen the changes in jazz and its role in feeding the souls of music lovers throughout the world. “[Twenty years ago], much of [the music] sounded like dinner jazz- like you hear at a restaurant, meant to help you digest food,” Moran said only mildly jokingly. He explained that he and The Bandwagon wanted to get as far away from that kind of jazz music as possible. “So we started building on the language…but also worked with repertoire that dealt with where Black music is- and for many decades, not just the recent ones,” he said. “And then I think overtime it started to form and change where we would position ourselves-whether it was with an art museum or a dance company, or whether it was with a poet. You might hear the band anywhere, in any kind of setting that was more provocative,” Moran added. “As we grew, after 20 years we know a lot about each other. We’re also aging so we’re continuing to figure out what the chapters are to hold. I

think a lot of our future continues to revolve around collaboration because that’s what, I think, helps to propel the band.” With Moran as the institution’s artistic director for jazz, the trio will be showcasing 20 years of making music and will continue to collaborate with other artists in this season’s programming at the Kennedy Center. “In a few months we have Ingrid Laubrock, and we’re going to dedicate it to a record we made with a saxophone master called Sam Rivers. But Ingrid will play his part now that he’s passed on. Then finally we’re bringing in Cassandra Wilson… They’re work is groundbreaking and sometimes subtle, and sometimes forceful. And they are forces to be reckoned with that I think The Bandwagon can learn from, and we look forward to learning their music.” With the addition of The Reach, a new multipurpose arts space part of The Kennedy Center, Moran is excited about the potential of expanding artistic programming and introducing new audiences to the world of jazz. “The possibilities of the way I consider the institution can breathe now, is like a gill on a fish. It has a new way to get oxygen, Moran said. “I’m excited about really curating films for jazz, that covers jazz history, that I think we should be able to see more frequently. I’m loving that we have a space that audiences can stand up and dance, and it’s dedicated to that-- with Studio K-- and that we can continue to build a more chorus way for the institution to work.” He hopes that through intersectional and educational jazz programming at The Reach, fresh ears can learn the beauty of jazz music. “I think it’s around intersection. Would you just jump on the jazz highway, and get in the third lane and go fast? There has to be an on ramp,” Moran explained. One form of intergenerational programming offered at The Reach will be a Jazz Doodle Jam with Jason Moran & The Bandwagon and host Mo Willems in mid-March. “Parents and children can come and draw for an hour as we lead them through exercises with art and sound. And I think those entry points are really important for us to magnify,” he told the AFRO. The 2019-2020 jazz season kicked off on Oct. 4 with Joe Chambers’ M’boom, and continues until June 6, with programming featuring local, national and international musicians within spaces at The Kennedy Center and The Reach. Jason Moran & The Bandwagon’s next performance at The Kennedy Center is scheduled for Nov. 9 with Ingrid Laubrock in the Family Theater. For more information on jazz programming at The Kennedy Center visit https://www.kennedy-center.org/ calendar/genre/JAZ and to keep up with all things Jason Moran check out his website, http://www.jasonmoran. com.


October 12, 2019 - October 18, 2019, The Afro-American

D3

‘Fences’

Continued from D1 before going to see the show to know that Wallace is no Washington. They don’t look alike, they make different acting choices and they process differently on stage. For this reporter, that’s what’s most refreshing- to see how Wallace personalized the character, bringing his own life experiences, disappointments and struggles to honor the truth and challenges of Troy Maxson. In Wallace’s Troy, audiences see a Black man’s frustration with feeling stifled. His reticence to complete the fence, which is more clear through his acting choice than even Wilson’s words, becomes a symbol of Troy’s ultimate fears and goals all at once. Wallace, a veteran on D.C. stages, embodies Troy in a way that shows his pain, the secrets he holds and even a semblance of his former self- as a retired athlete. No movement was made or word was uttered without clear intentions, which allowed for moments where lines were fumbled or stepped on to seem quite real and honest to the narrative. Wallace’s chemistry with his stage wife Rose (Ericka Rose) is one of the strongest and most believable aspects of the acting in Ford’s Fences. Wilson doesn’t write a lot of women, so when he does, they’re strong, welldeveloped and offers doses of morality and truth that can shake audiences to their cores. Rose, a powerful performer with a stage presence that lingers even once she’s gone, does justice to the character of Rose (what a name coincidence) in a way that leaves audiences begging hard questions about love and loyalty. Through

challenges in Rogers’ Lyons, which becomes clear and earned by the end of the play. In contrast to Troy’s relationship with Lyons, his relationship with youngest son Cory is far more abrasive. A refreshing choice in comparison to other portrayals of Cory, Weaks does not act as if he is afraid of his father. There is a healthy level of father and son respect, but Weaks’ emphasis is on his own goals- leaving the house and not being under his father’s rule. At times it seems as if Weaks plays Cory a bit younger than a high school senior, yet the naivete becomes a good dichotomy, to the Cory seen at the end of Courtesy Photo the play. Further, Weak’s Justin Weaks (left) portraying Cory Maxson and Craig Wallace (right) portraying Troy portrayal of Cory serves as Maxson in Fences. background for Troy. “Perhaps he wasn’t always so mean” or “Maybe he was a fun dad at one time,” audiences wonder when seeing how Weaks interacts with Wallace. Once the football player aspect to Cory meshed with Weaks body, the more believable the character became. Further, once Weaks fully warmed up into the character of Cory his energy left audiences wanting more of the wood chopping, smart-mouthed boy on stage. The partner work clearly done between Wallace and Weaks allows for audiences to understand how like-minded and liketempered Troy and Cory truly are. From all the actors’ choices the larger messages of the play shine. The characters’ challenges showcased the difficulty, not only in the 1950s, but to this day, in thriving as Black people in America. “The Fence” becomes a metaphor for institutional structures that Courtesy Photo stop Black people from Ericka Rose portraying the character of Rose in Fences. succeeding. Moreover, the Rose’s acting and movement, she is able to showcase the generational damage of complicated layers of love and humanity. In a time where institutionalized racism women were left to simply keep the house and cater to becomes apparent.- Troy their husband’s needs, even with a traditional man’s man being held back, resulted as a partner, Rose’s Rose is the boss and seems to keep in him hindering his up with the men in wit, interests and bossiness. For sons (particularly Cory). Rose’s portrayal of Rose, it’s far more than happy wife, What’s most rattling for happy life; she requires Wallace’s Troy to step up to the modern audiences is that proverbial plate- an appropriate metaphor as baseball these systems, cycles and analogies are used throughout the play. Rose is a force on roadblocks prevail to this stage and was a standout in Ford’s Fences. day for African Americans. While audiences watch the husband and wife dynamic, Ford’s Fences will be they are also treated to the best friend and father and running until Oct. 27. For son duos between Troy and Bono (Doug Brown), Troy more information and and Lyons (Kenyatta Rogers) and Troy and Cory (Justin tickets to Fences at Ford’s Weaks). visit https://www.fords.org/ Watching Brown’s honest portrayal of Bono is like performances/current-andseeing a fish swim in water- it was just natural. Brown upcoming/fences/. and Wallace’s onstage chemistry was also beautiful to witness and when the moment comes when it is clear he can no longer be the friend he had been to Troy, his acting and processing is relatable and heartbreaking all at once. Brown’s internal acting shines on stage and shows a man battling fun, responsibilities, priorities and moving beyond his own setbacks. The Lyons and Troy relationship is also one that requires good acting and backstory. It is clear from both Rogers and Wallace’s portrayals that Troy was not the best dad to Lyons. Although Wallace remains hard on his son, he gives him a pass that others don’t seem to get from Troy, and Music by Giuseppe Verdi that is made apparent not Libretto by Arrigo Boito, based on Shakespeare’s Othello only through text, but acting In Italian with Projected English Titles as well. While Lyons is written as the starving artist Groups call (202) 416-8400 who is always begging for Kennedy-Center.org money from dear old dad For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, Sat, Oct 26th • 10am-1pm (202) 467-4600 call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540 and reimburses with his 1725A 28th Pl SE wife’s pay, Rogers makes Major support for WNO is provided by Jacqueline Badger Mars. Generous support for WNO Italian Opera is provided by 2 & 3 BD condos for sale, new construction. Daniel and Gayle D’Aniello. the oldest son a person David M. Rubenstein is the Presenting Underwriter of WNO. $200K-$341K. Only $500 down. Families of 2+. Additional support for Otello is provided by the WNO acknowledges the longstanding generosity of Dallas Morse Coors Foundation for the Performing Arts with whom audiences can Life Chairman Mrs. Eugene B. Casey. and the Dr. M. Lee Pearce Foundation, Inc Must meet DC Habitat program WNO’s Presenting Sponsor empathize. There was a requirements. Call 202-882-4600 x230 looming sense of further

His deadliest enemy is his jealous heart.

Otello

Photo by Cade Martin

October 26–November 16 | Opera House

OPEN HOUSE

Profile for The AFRO American

PG County 10-11-2019  

PG County 10-11-2019