Page 1

Who Killed Det. Sean Suiter? 267 Days and Counting

PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY EDITION

Volume 127 No. 1

The AFRO Celebrates 126th Year

AUGUST 11, 2018 - AUGUST 17, 2018

Inside

Washington

Convicted Rapist, and Ex-NLF Star, Sharper Requests Early Release

DC Gears Up For Miss Black USA Contest at UDC

C1

All Politics is Local to the Black Church

D1

B4 Subscribe to the AFRO America’s Number 1 Black Newspaper

410-554-8200

afrosubs.com

Join the 680K+ members of the AFRO Facebook Family

afro.com

Your History • Your Community • Your News

The AFROAmerican Newspaper Prince George’s County Edition is Published weekly as an E-edition. Notification is sent to you via email. You can opt-out of receiving this by selecting the unsubscribe option at the bottom of each email notice.

Join the AFRO on Twitter and Facebook

Photo by James Fields Sr.

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh with The Overseas Elite, winners of the TBT (The Basketball Tournament) held at Morgan State University on August 2.

Ivy Community Charities Will Expand with Grants Gamma Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. The board of Ivy Community Charities consists exclusively of Iota Gamma Omega members, one of the AKA alumni chapters in Prince George’s County. The Ivy Community Charities of Prince Garnette served as the president of George’s County received $35,000 from Iota Gamma Omega from 1998-2001. the Prince George’s County Local The president of the chapter and Ivy Development Council (PGCLDC) Community Charities is Deidre N. and a Community Partnership Jackson. Grants for $10,000. Cheryl Prince George’s County Garnette, executive director of Council member Karen Toles Ivy Community Charities, laid (D-District 7) is a prominent out what her organization plans member of the chapter. to do with the money. Ivy Community Charities has “We are excited about a facility in Suitland – the Ivy winning the $35,000,” Garnette Youth and Family Center – that told the AFRO. “We will use it is designed to address the social, to expand our tutoring program to economic and educational needs of another school in Prince George’s families in Prince George’s County. County. Presently, we are working with Ivy Community Charities is a 501c3 the students at William Beanes Elementary organization and has a number of programs School in Suitland, Maryland.” Courtesy Photo in the areas of elementary Ivy Communities Charities Cheryl Garnette, executive director of Ivy Community engagement, a young ladies was incorporated by the State academy, parent education Charities of Prince George’s County, plans on expanding of Maryland on Dec. 29, 1986 her group’s reading program with newly received grant Continued on A2 and is affiliated with the Iota monies. By James Wright Special to the AFRO jwright@afro.com

A Diva Far Beyond Her Disability that’s where my journey began. I responded to my cancer with defiance, resilience, courage, faith and ego.” Donna Walton, the epitome of Walton suffered a life-threatening beauty, charm, and grace, is mobilizing form of bone cancer that resulted in the generations who refuse to be defined amputation of one of her legs. But she by anatomy or physical realities. At the became stronger, turning a moment into age of 18, Walton was a dancer and a movement as the founder of The Divas sophomore in college with big dreams of With Disabilities Project, (DIVAS) making it to Hollywood. Even when she which brings together women of color was diagnosed with cancer in 1975 she with disabilities throughout the world. “Together, we reject and dispel imagery that perpetuates stereotypes historically portrayed by mass media,” – Donna Walton Walton said. “Our mission shapes the perception of what said, “I kept on stepping.” “disability” looks like by highlighting That is, until she had a medical women of color through various media emergency in 1976. “My leg cracked platforms. on that bus in January of 1976,” Walton “My journey began 42 years ago. It’s said. “I had to get an amputation and not about what happens to you, it’s how By Hamil R. Harris Special to the AFRO

“I am more so much more than you can imagine. Don’t limit me by your limited expectation.”

you deal with the challenges. I knew it wasn’t all about me. I know it was God guiding my ship.” Despite losing her leg to cancer in 1976, Walton earned a bachelor’s degree from American University, a master’s degree from Syracuse and her doctorate from George Washington University. She went into education where she encourages the physically challenged and able-bodied to stand up for themselves and live the life they dreamed of having. “I don’t want to impact change, I want people’s lives to be transformed,” Walton said. “Why is my story so different? It is not the story it’s the messenger. People recover from illness all the time but what makes my story unique is that it happened during a time when cancer was death sentence and there few examples.” Walton said her motto is simple: “What’s a leg got to do with it?” Walton’s book is entitled “Shattered Dreams Broken Pieces,” and she will

Copyright © 2018 by the Afro-American Company

Continued on A2

Kennedy Center to Honor Hamilton Co-creators, Wayne Shorter By Lenore T. Adkins Special to the AFRO The John F. Kennedy Center will recognize several legends at the 2018 Kennedy Center Honors. The co-creators behind hiphopera “Hamilton” will be acknowledged with unique honors for producing a groundbreaking work. Jazz saxophonist and composer Wayne Shorter will receive the 2018 Kennedy Center Honors for his lifetime artistic achievements. Cher, country singer Reba McEntire and composer/ pianist Philip Glass join Shorter as fellow honorees. The four “Hamilton” co-creators receiving Kennedy Center Honors as innovative creators of a transformative work defying categorization are: writer and actor Lin-Manuel Miranda, director Thomas Kail, choreographer Andy Blankenbuehler, and music director Alex Lacamoire. “The Kennedy Center Honors recognizes exceptional artists who have Continued on A2

Photo by Robert Ashcroft

Jazz musician Wayne Shorter.


A2

The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018

International Film Festival Explores Black Life Around the World By Lenore T. Adkins Special to the AFRO When groundbreaking films such as “Black Panther” do well, they have the power to uplift Blacks around the world by representing a swath of the Black experience and becoming global sensations — but even they are not enough, says Diarah N’dawSpech, cofounder of the African Diaspora International Film Festival. She argues that despite the success of “Black Panther,” there’s still a critical need for Black representation beyond the AfricanAmerican experience — and that’s where her film festival comes in. ‘That’s something that’s very important because it enables folks to realize that the Black experience as lived by the African Americans is also the experience lived by Afro-French, Afro-Germans and AfroCaribbeans,” said N’daw-Spech, who was born in France to a French mother and a Malian father. “Once you make that connection, it easier to have more respect for one another.” The roster for the 12th annual festival, which will be held at the George Washington University Marvin Center from Aug. 17 through Aug. 19, will screen 16 movies, eight of which were directed by Black women — an all-time high for the event. One of those films is the hour-long documentary “Paris Noir: African Americans in the City of Life.” It explores the Black American-influence in the City of Light from World War I through the end of World War II. It dives into African-American soldiers’ contributions in the military, their

collaborations with French soldiers, the rise of jazz in Paris and Harlem Renaissance artists, intellectuals and writers including Josephine Baker, Langston Hughes and James Baldwin fleeing racism in the United States for relative freedom in Paris. It ends with African-American achievements in World War II. “It’s packed, so you come away with very, very rich information,” said Julia Browne, the film’s associate producer who was born in England, lives in Toronto and divides her time between Canada and France. “You don’t feel drowned at the end but you know you’ve gotten a lot of helpful information.” Other movies shed light on the Black immigrant experience and raise awareness pg themes that are universal to people of color worldwide. “(La Belle Vie: The Good Life” by Rachelle Salnave examines the challenges she faced growing up as a Haitian-American in Harlem. “No Shade” by Clare Anyiam-Osigwe is a romantic comedy/drama centering on colorism in the United Kingdom. Meanwhile, “Boma Tervuran: The Journey” from Francis Dujardin dives into the tragic and sometimes fatal journey that 267 Congolese men and women faced in 1897 when King Leopold II imported them to Belgium for a human zoo. Organizers have also planned two cinematic programs — one centered on African Americans in Europe and the other one focusing on Afro-Latinos. “Black Mexicans” by Jorge Pérez Solano is a Mexican drama shot in a Black Mexican community with locals that aims to give them

Courtesy photo

“Black Mexicans” is one of the films featured in the African International Diaspora Film Festival. a platform and make them visible. Lighter fare includes “Streetlight Harmonies” by Brent Wilson, which tracks the history of American popular music from Doo-wop to Motown, to the British Invasion. N’daw-Spech and her husband, Reinaldo Spech of Cuba, pick the movies every year by reviewing submissions, attending major film festivals, like Sundance and Cannes, keeping an eye on future releases and encouraging people who screened movies at other film festivals to consider showcasing their work at the African Diaspora International Film Festival.

The Spechs charge themselves with selecting films that not only offer social commentary and a high production value, but that also show how Black people live all over the world and give moviegoers something to think about. “These are films that open up a window on the American reality from a specific community,” N’daw-Spech said. “My advice, get the pass, see all the films over the weekend. Because when you do that… you kind of become like you enter into a different world…and then u start to see the connections.”

International Association of Defense Counsel Names Craig Thompson President By Carl Thomas Special to the AFRO

Craig A. Thompson

Courtesy Photo

This week, Craig A. Thompson, a partner at Venable LLP was elected to serve as President of the International Association of Defense Counsel (IADC). The election, which took place at the IADC annual meeting hosted this year in Lisbon, Portugal, ends Thompson’s one year term as Presidentelect and officially begins his one year term as the organization’s President. Thompson, who is currently a practicing partner in Venable’s Products, Liability, and Mass Torts practice, has practiced law for 23 years and is former Chair of Venable’s Diversity Committee. When asked about his preparation for the new role, Thompson said, “I have witnessed great leadership over the years, and studied the importance of

relationship building. I have also been privileged to serve many non-profit and community organizations over the years, and developed a strong desire to build our communities through servant leadership.” Fully cognizant of the significance his ethnicity brings to the position, Thompson told the {AFRO} “I believe that my experience as an African American man has strengthened my resolve to pursue big goals and withstand difficult challenges. I have been able to apply those characteristics to this position.” The IADC is the preeminent invitation-only global legal organization for attorneys who represent corporate and insurance interests, with members hailing from six continents, 51 countries/territories, and all 50 U.S. states. The Association’s core purposes

Diva

Shorter

Continued from A1 be signing copies from 6-8 p.m. Aug. 12 at Union Market in Northeast, Washington, D.C. “The most defining moment for me was when I realized that I was not my disability,” Walton said. “On page 84 of my book there is poem that says, ‘Don’t put [me] in a box.’” “I am more so much more than you can imagine. Don’t limit me by your limited expectation,” Walton said. “I always thought I was the baddest thing on this planet. I didn’t want to be ignored.” While she has taught students from elementary school to college, she still has a passion for the stage and airwaves. “I want to still find that performer in me,” Walton said “Cathy Hughes gave me my first opportunity and today I am an author, speaker, and advocate.”

are to enhance the development of skills, promote professionalism, and facilitate camaraderie among its members, their clients, and the broader civil justice community. Thompson has written two children’s books, The ABC’s of Black History and The ABCs of Black Inventors, both of which have been sold all over the world over the last 14 years. Venable LLP is an American Lawyer Global 100 law firm headquartered in Washington, DC that serves as primary counsel to a worldwide clientele of large and mid-sized organizations, nonprofits, and high-net-worth entrepreneurs and individuals. With more than 700 attorneys across the country, the firm strategically advances its clients’ objectives in the U.S. and around the globe.

Continued from A1

Courtesy Photo

Donna Walton

Ivy

Continued from A1 classes, a scholarship program for college-bound and collegeat William Beanes are two grades behind when it comes to enrolled students and holds an annual cotillion-beautillon reading and we are committed to remedying that.” event. The grants from the PCGLDC will go Garnette said there are tutoring sessions towards the Popcorn Club of the Elementary and the students who are participating in the Engagement program, a reading and educational Popcorn Club received mentors. “Reading enrichment program at William Beanes opens the window to the world to these young Elementary. people,” Garnette said. “We are committed to Garnette said the PGCLDC specifically will raising elementary school reading scores.” go to expanding the Popcorn Club to Forest Garnette said that Ivy Community Charities Heights Elementary School in Forest Heights, is not a program of the national office of – Cheryl Garnette AKA. However, she said the national office Maryland. “At Forest Heights, we will focus on does sanction programs that address students improving reading scores just as we have done at William with special needs. The Community Partnership grant will go Beanes,” Garnette said. “We have found that some students towards the operations of Ivy Community Charities.

“We are excited about winning the $35,000.”

made enduring and indelible marks on our culture,” Kennedy Center Chairman David M. Rubenstein said in a statement. “The creators of Hamilton have literally and figuratively changed the face of American culture with daringly original, breathtakingly relevant work.”  The Tony Awardwinning Broadway musical has become a cultural phenomenon, and a traveling cast is now performing “Hamilton” to packed audiences at the Kennedy Center through Sept. 16. “For the board to break with its custom of honoring an individual and choosing instead to bestow this recognition on a single piece of work is humbling beyond our wildest expectations for our show,” the co-creators said in a statement. “I’m pretty sure Rita Moreno, ‘mi reina,’ snuck into their offices and stuffed the ballot box,” Miranda added in a statement. The accolades for the “Hamilton” co-creators make an unprecedented statement about an unprecedented work that “transcends cultural boundaries and tells America’s stories in a powerful and contemporary way,” Kennedy

Center President Deborah F. Rutter said. Likewise, Wayne Shorter is “a seminal artist who, as both a composer and saxophonist, has carried forward the mantle of jazz,” Rubenstein said. Shorter’s career has spanned seven decades and he’s collaborated with many heavy hitters, including Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Joni Mitchell, and Esperanza Spalding, and he is the recipient of 11 Grammy Awards and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, which he received in 2015. Shorter has performed several times at the Kennedy Center throughout his storied career, most recently in Nov. 2016. “Being inducted into the prestigious ranks of the Kennedy Center honorees will forever remain one of the great moments in my life,” Shorter said in a statement. “Guided by compassion and wisdom, I strive to create value for others and all life on this planet – not only through my art – but by igniting the glow of light that elevates the human condition to its noblest form.” CBS will televise the 41st Annual Kennedy Center Honors on Dec. 26.


August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American

A3

Garvin Rebuilds Career and Black Owned Golf Course in PG County By Mark F. Gray Special to the AFRO Each day African American Golf Hall of Famer Jimmy Garvin walks nine holes at Marlton Golf Course in Upper Marlboro. It is a personal tradition that began when he was general manager of Langston Golf Course in D.C. Come rain or shine that time of solitude gives Garvin a chance to reflect while preparing for the day to come. These days when Garvin reflects on his great accomplishments they are tempered by the memories of how what he built on `in northeast Washington was torn apart. His book “Legacy of a Common Man The Walk was Uphill” tells the story of how blind trust and greed ruined his Langston Legacy Golf Foundation and nearly destroyed his legacy. As Garvin continues to rebuild his reputation he hopes that the same magic which made him such a success at building Langston to international prominence will cultivate a new generation of minority championship golfers and collegiate student-athletes from Prince George’s County. “We can have the same impact on the kids of this

community that we had at Langston,” Garvin told the AFRO. “Our foundation is in place and we’re just getting started”. Garvin pled guilty in January 2012 to one count of misprision of a felony (theft or bribery concerning programs receiving federal funds). He was one of five people who plead guilty to charges in an investigation into activities involving former D.C. Councilman Harry L. Thomas, Jr. Thomas served 38 months after pleading guilty to charges following a federal investigation that uncovered a scheme where more than $350,000 in taxpayers’ money that was earmarked for the arts, youth recreation, and summer programs was used for his personal benefit. “He destroyed a lot,” Garvin said. “I got caught up in a web and couldn’t get out”. As general manager of Langston, Garvin was an unblemished pillar of the community. His non-profit organization - Langston in the 21st Century – established community based programs that operated youth activities such as afterschool computer literacy, mentoring, and SAT prep at Langston for kids

primarily located in Ward 5 of the District. Garvin always used “golf as the karat but education is the key” as the mantra for cultivating student-athletes who applied principles learned on the course which led to their academic success. He also tutored young people with the same tenacity of his mentor and coach former Washington Senator Chuck Hinton. Hinton, who was baseball coach at Howard University after his career, recruited Garvin from Immokalee, Florida. He coached him to play baseball but taught him life lessons through golf. “You don’t always need to tee off with the driver,” Garvin recalls. “Sometimes you’ve got to use more strategy and swing a shorter club to move the ball safely around the course”. Garvin’s programs at Langston led to more than 60 athletic scholarships for its alumni to attend and compete at major colleges around the country. His youth teams developed and competed against the best from the Bahamas and other countries and won. After more than 20 years of making a significant impact on the lives of kids in ward 5 and it was gone in an

Courtesy Photo

Jimmy Garvin

instant. “That was heartbreaking,” said Garvin. “All the progress we made was lost because the leader was no longer in place”. After being forced to resign from Langston and Golf Course Specialists Garvin brought his experience and expertise to Marlton who desperately needed a makeover. He reached into his bag once again began rebuilding the brand of a troubled course. Garvin is the architect for the club’s renovation and is overseeing everything from groundskeeping to generating new business. Marlton’s grounds have been refurbished under his care and golfers are slowly returning to book tournaments and single rounds although the industry has seen a decline nationwide. The club now features its own interpretive education programs featuring STEM and a competitive golf ministry between youth church teams from North Carolina and DC. His Jimmy Garvin Legacy Foundation will host its 17th annual tournament September to fund its travel, golf, and education initiatives that expose kid to a different sports culture.

DC Kids Spend Summer Learning Art of Fashion with the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) to make their vision come to life. “It gives you a structured and meaningful Sew N Know’s Summer Opportunity Never activity to do during the summer, which a lot Ending, known as SONE, hosted their second of times is where youth have that destructive annual Fashion Enrichment Fellowship in thought process because they have so many Washington, D.C. High hours on their hands and school students from so they get into mischief,” Wards 5, 6, 7 and 8 Director Raji Rankins told produced, marketed the AFRO. and designed their own But it was more than garments and displayed just about the clothes. The them on the runway. program allows students SONE held the fashion to find their strengths, showcase on Aug. 3 whether in front of the on the Rooftop at the camera or behind the Apollo on H Street, scenes, to get a taste of the Northeast. real-world in the fashion – Raji Rankins industry. The six-week program at University Rankins explained how of District of Columbia the 16- and 17-year-old Community College gave 65 students from students (male and female) were spread out disadvantaged communities an opportunity to into three “main tracks:” garment construction, learn, create and execute their own fashionmarketing (production, model calls, etc.), forward designs and more. SONE partnered and accessories, which involved customizing By Charise Wallace Special to the AFRO

shoes, jewelry, purses, and more. “Here, we give them a full structured day . . . so they stay inspired the whole summer and go into the school year inspired,” said Rankins. The students showed off their finished product of 38 custom-made looks. “My whole ambition is to give the youth exposure. You know, that thing that just changes them. These

are the things that kind of make them say, you know what, yeah, I’m going to really straighten up what I’m doing. When you see and feel what it is to obtain in life you have that ambition to make it happen,” Rankins said. Learn more about SONE at SewNKnow. org.

“My whole ambition is to give these youth exposure. You know, that thing that just changes them.”

Courtesy Photo

A student model struts in the culminating fashion show at the Apollo on H Street, Northeast.


A4

The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018

Steven Garrison, educator in the Prince George’s County Public School System and at Bowie State University, being presented by Toni Lewis and Harry Staley

FAME - The Foundation for the Advancement of Music & Education presented its 14th Anniversary & Awards Celebration program July 26 at the Newton White Mansion in Mitchellville, Maryland. Proceeds from the concert will support FAME’s technology, music and tutoring programs. In addition to presenting awards to several key community supporters, there were performances by The Vince Evans Band and FAME Jazz Band with Artistic Director, Dr. Clarence Knight, Jr.

Moneka Cunningham, Center, accepts the Community & Nonprofit Champion Award for Debbi Jarvis, Vice President of PEPCO Holdings, an Exelon Company Toni Lewis(left) and Harry Staley, chair, FAME

Harry Staley, Chairman, FAME Inaugural FAME Jazz Band Members Celebrating with their parents from  L to R: Ken Burnley, Nia Harris Burnley (piano), Yvonne Harris Burnley, William Porter Jr., Linda Porter & William Porter Sr. (tenor sax)

The FAME Jazz Band and Artistic Director Clarence Knight Jr., opened the program

Honorary guest emcee, Jan Fox, formerly of WUSA9 News

L-R: (Three awards were accepted by colleagues) Leon Rawlings, Gwen Hubbard Lewis, Artis Hampshire Cowan, Lionel Harrell, Denise Rolark Barnes; The Honorable Derrick Leon Davis, Event Co-Chair, A. Toni Lewis, FAME Founder/Executive Director; Steven Garrison, Howard Stone; Harry Staley, FAME Chairman; Karen Brown, Congressman Anthony Brown’s wife; Moneka Cunningham, accepting for Debbi Jarvis, and The Honorable Obie Patterson, Event Co-Chair

Brig. Gen. Jeffery Bozard, 113th Wing Commander, D.C. Air National Guard hosted the ceremony in honor of Chaplain (Col.) Myrtle Bowen to the rank of Colonel on August 3, in the 113th Wing Auditorium, Joint Base Andrews, Maryland. Bowen’s new assignment will be the Air National Guard Liaison to AFRICOM (US Africa Command) in Stuttgart, Germany. At the ceremony, Bowen was also awarded the Meritorious Service Medal (with one Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster). Bowen is also a Presiding Elder in the AME Zion Church.

Langston Hughes II is the FAME Jazz Band Captain and scholar; and rising senior at Charles Herbert Flowers High School   Lionel Harrell, Instrumental Music Supervisor

Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker (L) and his Community Liaison, LaVonn Reedy Thomas (R) present FAME CEO/Executive Director A. Toni Lewis with a Certificate of Appreciation for the outstanding work conducted by FAME in Prince George’s over the past 8 years

Chaplain, Col. Bowen giving remarks

Gen. Bozard administers the Oath of a Office to Col. Bowen

Co-Chairs for FAME’s 14th Anniversary and Awards Celebration: The Honorable Derrick Leon Davis, District 6 (L), and The Honorable Obie Patterson, District 8 Photos by Cynthia Bennett Photography

AME Zion Bishop (Ret.) Warren Matthew Brown and Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Earnest Talbert pin Col. Bowen’s new rank

Claudia Burley Aurelia Brown, Col. Bowen, Melissa Woodward and father, Walter Bowen Master Sgt. Lewis Finney presents a special award to Chaplain (Col) Bowen Edgar Brookins, AFRO Washington, D.C. General Manager and Chaplain (Col.) Bowen

Edwin Brown Jr., Air National Guard, Command Chief (Ret.) and Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Earnest Talbert

Rev. Shannon and Chaplain (Maj.) Countess Cooper

Capt. Marcus Hunt, Master of Ceremonies

Members of the AME Zion church who attended the Promotion Ceremony with Chaplain (Col.) Bowen

Bowen family members: Tracy Alford, Melissa Woodyard, David King, Harold Johnson, Lorrie Johnson and Curtis Lollar

Photos by Pamela Jenkins


August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American

Send your news tips to tips@afro.com.

Inside

NATIONAL NEWS Redefining Beauty

Baltimore’s Waller Gallery Focuses on Black and Brown Artists

C1

Courtesy Photo

Subscribe to the AFRO America’s Number 1 Black Newspaper

410-554-8200

afrosubs.com

Miss Black USA, now the biggest pageant for women of color, will crown its next national queen August 12. See story D1.

Maryland Teen Murdered, Police Searching for Answers By Micha Green AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor mgreen@afro.com Kevin Wilson Jr., 16, died after being shot several times behind an apartment building in Takoma Park according to authorities. Police discovered Wilson suffering from several gunshot wounds in a parking lot behind the Belford Towers complex on New Hampshire Avenue after 7 p.m. He was taken to a hospital where he died a few hours later. The 16-year-old was a rising junior at Montgomery Blair High School and a talented athlete. Having

Courtesy Photo

Kevin Wilson Jr., 16, died after he was shot several times in Takoma Park according to police.

AFRAM Festival Goes Back to Being Big By Brandi Randolph Special to the AFRO The AFRAM Festival smells of second chances, first performances and summer every year. With performances by Dru Hill, Ella Mai and more, this year’s festival is expected to be big. AFRAM is Baltimore’s African American cultural heritage festival. It celebrates Black businesses, health, music, job opportunities and more. This year’s event

will take place August 11 from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m., and August 12 from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. It will be located at the historic Druid Hill Park (3001 East Drive Baltimore, MD 21217). The AFRO sat down with iconic R&B Baltimore natives, Dru Hill, who are headlining this year’s festival. When asked about how they felt when they were called to perform, Mark “Sisqó” Andrews said, “Being asked to do

Continued on B3

shown a lot of potential, Wilson was captain of the Maryland Seahawks travelling football team two years ago. Wilson’s former coach, Jarvis Thomas, said he was a wonderful athlete with a promising future ahead of him. “He played basically every position: quarterback, running back — [he] was basically one of the star players on the team,” Thomas told NBC 4 Washington. Yet Wilson did not only seek to entertain on the field, as he also brought joy to the people around him.

“Just a great young man, high spirits. Always made you laugh,” said Jarvis Thomas, Wilson’s former football coach. “That’s one thing I can say about Kevin; he always had us laughing.” Police are now investigating to find motives and suspects in the case. Detectives “are following strong leads in this case,” as they do not believe it was a random crime, according to WTOP. Anyone with potentially helpful information is encouraged to call 1-866-411TIPS for a cash reward.

Book Lays Out History of Police Violence in Black and Blue By J. K. Schmid Special to the AFRO

B1

Washington

DC Residents Remember the 1990s

D1

In a Historic Move, Sens. Booker, Harris Will Co-Chair CBCF Conference By James Wright Special to the AFRO jwright@afro.com The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Annual Legislative Conference will make history when it convenes next month because for the first time in its history, the event will be co-chaired by two U.S. senators. Sens. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) will be the honorary leaders of the event. The conference takes place Sept. 12-16 in Washington, D.C. “The Congressional

Continued on B3

“Everybody knows how hard policing is, they just don’t understand why the police are never wrong,” Matthew Horace told the AFRO. Horace, a veteran police officer and federal agent, and now security and policing expert contributor to news organizations such as CNN and MSNBC has co-authored a book with Howard University journalism professor and former AFRO Editor Ron Harris. “I was always being called on air, almost every week for another shooting of a Black man in the United States, and I started looking for a co-writer and Ron and I were brought together through our publisher and some like agents,” Horace said in a phone interview on the eve of the book’s publication. “And I knew after the first time we talked, having spoken to three or four people before him, he was the one for this job.” “The Black and the Blue: A Cop Reveals the Crimes, Racism, and Injustice in America’s Law Enforcement,” was initially proposed as a deep dive into Horace’s conceptualization of ‘coptics,’ the perception, or optics, of

Continued on B3

Courtesy Photo

Sen. Cory Booker will cochair the CBCF’s Annual Legislative Conference with Sen. Kamala Harris.

Join the 680K+ members of the AFRO Facebook Family


B2

The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018

WHAT’S TRENDING ON AFRO.COM Prosecutor in Michael Brown Case Loses By Matthew Ritchie AFRO Intern

(AP Photo/Jim Salter) Wesley Bell defeated longtime St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch in the Democratic primary. Some observers saw the race as a referendum on McCulloch’s handling of the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in 2014.

St. Louis voters took a step towards more effective social justice reform August 7. In the Democratic primary for the office of prosecuting attorney for St. Louis, Councilman Wesley Bell defeated Robert McCulloch in an upset victory, ousting the 27-year veteran prosecutor. McCulloch was the prosecutor who oversaw the grand jury inquiry of the 2014 killing of unarmed Black teen Michael Brown. Bell’s victory may have come as a shock to some, but he defeated the incumbent by more than 13 points. His victory in the primary all but guarantees him the position, as there was no Republican candidate in the race. He had gained a large amount of support from progressive Democrats, including influential endorsements from multiple political action committees concerned with social justice such as Real Justice, activist Shaun King’s organization, Democracy for America and Color of Change. McCulloch made national and international headlines with his handling of the Michael Brown case four years ago. He was criticized for how he ran the investigation of Darren Wilson, the White police officer who shot Brown after an altercation

Your History • Your Community • Your News

The Afro-American Newspapers

Baltimore Office • Corporate Headquarters 1531 S. Edgewood Street Baltimore, Maryland 21227 410-554-8200 • Fax: 1-877-570-9297 afro.com Founded by John Henry Murphy Sr., August 13, 1892 Chairman of the Board/Publisher - Frances Murphy Draper (Publisher Emeritus - John J. Oliver Jr.) President - Benjamin Murphy Phillips IV Vice President of Advertising - Kevin E. Peck Receptionist - Wanda Pearson - 410-554-8200 Director of Operations Andre´ Draper - 410-554-8200 Director of Advertising Lenora Howze - 410-554-8271 - lhowze@afro.com Director of Finance Ezra Lulandala - 410-554-8242 Director of Community & Public Relations Diane W. Hocker - 410-554-8243 Editorial Managing Editor - Kamau High - 410-554-8231 Baltimore Editor - Sean Yoes - 410-554-8289 Washington, D.C. Editor - Micha Green - 202-332-0080, ext. 1119 Editorial Assistant - Takiea Hinton - 410-554-8277 Archivist - Shelia Scott - 443-885-4627 Baltimore Circulation/Distribution Manager Clarence Massey - 410-554-8232 Production Department - 410-554-8288 Advertising Account Executives Baltimore - Robert Blount - 410-554-8246 - rblount@afro.com Washington, D.C. - Vetta Ridgeway - 202-332-0080-ext. 1104 vridgeway@afro.com

Washington Office 1816 12th Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20009-4422 202-332-0080 • Fax: 1-877-570-9297

(Washington Publisher Emerita - Frances L. Murphy II) General Manager Washington Circulation/Distribution Manager Edgar Brookins - 202-332-0080, ext. 106 Office Administrator - Brigette White - ext. 100

Customer Service, Home Delivery and Subscriptions: 410-554-8234 • Customer Service@afro.com

in the street. McCulloch neglected to indict Wilson himself, instead handing the case off to a grand jury. Wilson ended up not being indicted for killing the unarmed Black teen. This prompted a federal investigation by the Justice Department into the systematic racism of the Ferguson police department. The loss by McCulloch is seen as an indictment on his actions during the investigation. Critics believed that he “cherry-picked” evidence for the grand jury, which led to the lack of indictment. Others believed that he should have recused himself from the investigation and appointed a special prosecutor. Bell hopefully represents a step towards a new era for the St. Louis justice system. He has presented himself as a reformer for the justice system, pledging to end the cash bail system, which disproportionately targets and affects those in poverty and African Americans. He has also promised to never pursue the death penalty in criminal cases. This is in stark contrast to McCulloch, who often sought the death penalty. Bell will also carry the fight for justice reform in the form of drug offenses. During his campaign, he said he would refuse to prosecute low level, nonviolent marijuana offenses. He has said he will allow those with addictions and nonviolent drug offenses to be diverted from the path of incarceration and moved towards treatment. When Bell takes office after the November general election, he will become St. Louis’ first African-American prosecuting attorney. Michelle Obama Announces Week of Action By The Associated Press

(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Former first lady Michelle Obama is marking the 53rd anniversary of the Voting Rights Act by urging Americans to participate in a week of action to get people signed up to vote.

Michelle Obama is marking the 53rd anniversary of the Voting Rights Act by urging Americans to participate in a week of action to get people signed up to vote. The former first lady, a co-chairwoman of a nonpartisan organization to encourage voting, announced Monday that the When We All Vote Week of Action will be held Sept. 22-29. She said members of When We All Vote will be traveling the country to register voters and get them excited about the November midterm elections, when Democrats hope to capitalize on a wave of

anger against President Donald Trump and take back control of Congress from the Republicans. “With so much at stake in our country, sitting on the sidelines isn’t an option,” Mrs. Obama said in an email to supporters. Flagship events will be held in at least 12 cities, including Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Chicago and New York. The group wants volunteers to host events in other communities that week as well. Other co-chairs of the group include actor Tom Hanks; “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda; singers Janelle Monae, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw; and NBA point guard Chris Paul of the Houston Rockets. The organization said they anticipate that Mrs. Obama and other co-chairs will attend some of the events. The Voting Rights Act, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on Aug. 6, 1965, prohibits racial discrimination in voting. Mrs. Obama said it’s important to recognize the organizers, marchers and other volunteers who helped get the law passed. “We want to honor their legacy and continue their work to ensure that every eligible American cast their vote, work that is far from finished,” the former first lady said in a video.


August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American

B3

Police Violence Continued from B1

police in the digital and social media age where police misconduct can come under almost instant national scrutiny. “We couldn’t ignore the things that were happening when we were writing, and there were a lot of these incidents while we were doing the book,” Horace said. The book attempts to bring the reader to the current moment through Horace’s own and a selection of other officers’ narratives. Officers start their careers amidst an apocalyptic crack epidemic, and resort to mass arrest and incarceration against a backdrop of continuing struggles to integrate Blacks into police forces and their communities across the country. It’s a narrow, or at least focused, view that accounts for a current generation of police perspective and goes as far back as perspective of the officers who trained them. It’s a breezy, easy read starting with how Black men are seen by cops and their community-in and out of uniform, and moving on to how the shooting death of Michael Brown came at the conclusion of a long litany of injuries orchestrated allegedly through Ferguson, Missouri’s executive branch colluding with its judiciary to loot the poorest and Blackest parts of town through excessive and sometimes fabricated ticketing of residents. Taking a brief turn to New Orleans, “The

Black and the Blue” describe the start and end of the career of a police officer that was caught robbing a restaurant and murdering as many employees as she could find and the later massacre at Danziger bridge, to show U.S. policing at its worst. The book interviews former Baltimore City Police Commissioner and current Coppin State University Chief of Campus Police Leonard Hamm for insights into the police problems of Baltimore and the country at large. The interview comes prior to the trial and conviction of Baltimore’s Gun Trace Task Force. The book also concludes prior to the very public arrest of two Black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks in April, but Harris maintains that his and Horace’s book predicts how and why this happened. “They may not have even wanted to do this, so what happened: the policy, the practices, the way we do business said ‘You’ve gotta go follow this order and arrest these guys.’” Harris said. “And even if those officers see this and realize ‘You know, this is not a good look.’ That’s what they had to do.” The book finds itself somewhere between local Baltimore narratives such as police misconduct is attributable to “a few bad apples” and the opposite narrative that these abuses are an entirely structural problem. The authors place much of the burden

Courtesy photo

Matthew Horace is the co-author of a book which explores police problems in Baltimore and the country at large. on the communities being policed to begin repairing the rift, suggesting, for example, the nomination of a liaison between local leaders and the police in their neighborhood. Part of this is inspired by the realization that police cannot adequately manage problems like homelessness and mental illness.

While “The Black and the Blue” is a timely account of the current moment, there’s a sense that the word may come too late. “The Black and the Blue: A Cop Reveals the Crimes, Racism, and Injustice in America’s Law Enforcement” is available now.

affecting Black Americans. Popular events include the town hall meeting, the prayer breakfast and the annual dinner that has been attended by every Democratic U.S. president since the CBCF’s founding in 1976 as well as prominent entertainers and politicians. Most of the event’s activities take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in downtown Washington, D.C. There are hundreds of private parties sponsored by political, fraternal, social, and professional organizations in the District of Columbia as a result of the conference.  U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas) is the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s board of directors. Lee said this year’s conference is taking place at a critical time.

“For more than 40 years, the Annual Legislative Conference has provided an extraordinary platform for people – domestic and abroad – to come together and discuss vital issues related to social justice, leadership, economic prosperity, entrepreneurship and much more,” Lee said. A. Shuanise Washington is the president and CEO of the CBCF. Washington said the conference will take place “in a critical time where, now more than ever, diverse voices are imperative to the future of this nation.” “We must rise to meet the demands of the moment and capitalize on actionable outcomes that will advance Black Americans and this country forward,” she said.

CBCF Conference Continued from B1

Black Caucus Foundation’s Annual Legislative Conference is among the important annual gatherings of Black Americans, and I am honored to lead its 48th convening with Senator Harris,” Booker said in a statement to the AFRO. “The Conference theme, ‘The Dream Still Demands,’ presents an important opportunity for our community to lead the national dialogue on so many pressing issues, from fixing our broken criminal justice system to creating economic opportunities for communities of color. We have so many urgent challenges that must be addressed, and I’m looking forward to hearing from all of the incredible leaders who will be participating in the conference this September.” Harris added, “The Annual Legislative Conference, over nearly five decades, has

brought together some of the country’s greatest leaders, innovators, and job creators to address the most pressing issues facing Black America. This year is no exception. The conference will provide a platform to advocate for the voiceless, the vulnerable, and all who believe in fulfilling the American promise of equality and justice for all.” Historically, co-chairs of the event have been members of the U.S. House of Representatives. Booker and Harris are two of the three Black members of the U.S. Senate and both are Democrats and members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) is the lone Black Republican and is not a CBC member. The conference attracts nearly 10,000 people from all over the world and offers more than 90 forums on public policy issues

AFRAM

Continued from B1

an AFRAM performance, [I] was ecstatic,” because, “Baltimore doesn’t just give anyone a key to the city and the AFRAM is like that key.” Which is true -- we do not ask just anyone to come and rock out with our city over the AFRAM days. We ask people like Hadiya-Ayodele & Blacknotes, Jacquees, and Ella Mai to dazzle us. We bring Baltimore natives like Dru Hill and Davon Fleming to come and make us feel something with their music and entertainment. At 12 p.m. on Aug 11, Hadiya, who is a Baltimore based artist that performs an infusion of neo-soul, hiphop, gospel, will start off the performances for the festival. Jacquees, a rising R&B/hip hop artist, performs at 4:30 p.m.. Ella Mai, the newest upcoming singer/songwriter of the summer climbing the charts with her single, “Boo’d

Up,” starts at 7 p.m. Davon Fleming, a semifinalist from The Voice, is a soulful singer who goes on at 1:30 p.m. on Aug 12. Dru Hill is set to close the festival at 5 p.m. Even though, Dru Hill are Baltimore natives, performing

Identification Statement

The Afro-American Newspapers – (USPS 040-800) is published weekly by The AfroAmerican Company, 1531 S. Edgewood St., Suite B, Baltimore, MD 21227.

Subscription Rate: 1 Year - $60.00 (Price includes tax). Checks for subscriptions should be made payable to: The Afro-American Company, 1531 S. Edgewood St., Ste. B, Baltimore, MD 21227. Periodicals postage paid at Baltimore, MD and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send addresses changes to: The Afro-American Company, 1531 S. Edgewood St., Ste. B, Baltimore, MD 21227.

here feels “good, [especially being] back [in] Baltimore receiving [the same amount of love that we have for our city],” said Tamir “Nokio” Ruffin. The AFRAM festival also shines spotlights on local small businesses. One business to check out is Jasmin Manning Art and Design. The AFRO got a chance to talk to Manning, who said her business, “is a combination of art and design which includes paintings, logos, drawings and marketing materials.” Another vendor to make sure to find at the festival is the Donald Gladden

Works Studio. He makes acrylic paintings that he then imprints on objects such as leather products, homer décor, stationary, beach accessories and more. Lastly, when the heat hits the AFRAM (temperatures are expected to be in the mid-80s with scattered thunderstorms) it is essential to visit Sweet Kam’s Snowballs and Concessions. It is “a youth owned and operated business where nachos, snowballs, hotdogs, and kressles (a nonfried waffle cake filled with strawberries and apples and topped with chocolate or caramel) are sold,” Kamryn Keys told the AFRO.

THE MOVIE EVERYBODY WILL BE TALKING ABOUT THIS SUMMER GAYLE KING

SPIKE LEE’S GREATEST FILM PETER TRAVERS

JOHN DAVID

ADAM

WASHING TON DRIVER A

SPIKE LEE

L AURA

HARRIER

TOPHER

GRACE

JOINT

FROM PRODUCER JORDAN PEELE CHARLIE WACHTEL & DAVID RABINOWITZ AND KEVIN WILLMOTT & SPIKE LEE DIRECTED BY SPIKE LEE WRITTEN BY

Based on a true story. PRODUCED BY

SEAN MCKITTRICK JASON BLUM RAYMOND MANSFIELD SHAUN REDICK JORDAN PEELE SPIKE LEE WRITTENBY CHARLIE WACHTEL & DAVID RABINOWITZ DIRECTED AND KEVIN WILLMOTT & SPIKE LEE BY SPIKE LEE © 2018 FOCUS FEATURES LLC.

STARTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 10 IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATER LOCATIONS AND SHOWTIMES


A2 B4

The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018

Man at Compound Accused of Training Kids for School Attacks By The Associated Press A father arrested at a ramshackle New Mexico compound where 11 hungry children were found living in filth was training youngsters to commit school shootings, prosecutors said in court documents obtained August 8. The allegations against Siraj Ibn Wahhaj came to light as authorities awaited word on whether human remains discovered at the site were those of his missing son, who is severely disabled and went missing in December in Jonesboro, Georgia, near Atlanta. The documents say Wahhaj was conducting weapons training with assault rifles at the compound on the outskirts of Amalia, a tiny town near the Colorado border marked by scattered homes and sagebrush. “He poses a great danger to the children found on the property as well as a threat to the community as a whole due to the presence of firearms and his intent to use these firearms in a violent and illegal manner,” Prosecutor Timothy Hasson wrote in the court documents Wednesday. Authorities raided the compound Friday in an investigation that has yielded a series of startling revelations — including the discovery of the 11 children in rags and word that Wahhaj wanted to perform an exorcism on his son because he thought the boy was possessed by the devil. Prosecutor Timothy Hasson filed the court documents while asking that Wahhaj be held without bail after he was arrested last week with four other adults at the compound facing child abuse charges. Prosecutors did not bring up the school shooting accusation during initial court hearings Wednesday for the abuse suspects. A judge ordered them all held without bond pending further proceedings. In the court documents, authorities said a foster parent of one of the children removed from the compound had told authorities the child had been trained to use an assault rifle in preparation for a school shooting. Taos County Sheriff Jerry Hogrefe previously said adults at

the compound were “considered extremist of the Muslim belief.” He did not elaborate, saying it was part of the investigation. Aleks Kostich of the Taos County Public Defender’s Office questioned the accusation of a school shooting conspiracy, saying the claim was presented with little information beyond the explanation that it came from a foster parent. Kostich believes prosecutors are not certain about the credibility of the foster parent, whom he has no way of reaching to verify the claim, he said. The human remains were being analyzed by medical examiners to determine if they are those of Abdulghani Wahhaj, the missing boy. Earlier this year, his grandfather, Imam Siraj Wahhaj, posted a plea on Facebook for help finding his grandson. The elder Wahhaj heads the Masjid At-Taqwa in Brooklyn, a mosque that has attracted radical speakers over the years. He met Mahmud Abouhalima when he came to the site to raise money for Muslims in Afghanistan. Abouhalima later helped bomb the World Trade Center in 1993. In a Georgia arrest warrant, authorities said 39-year-old Siraj Ibn Wahhaj had told his son’s mother that he wanted to perform an exorcism on the child. He later said he was taking the child to a park and didn’t return. He is accused in Georgia of kidnapping the boy. The arrest warrant issued there says the missing boy has a condition caused by lack of oxygen and blood flow around the time of birth. He cannot walk and requires constant attention, his mother told police. For months, neighbors worried about the squalid compound built along the remote New Mexico plain, saying they took their concerns to authorities long before sheriff’s officials raided the facility described as a small camping trailer in the ground. The search at the compound came amid a two-month investigation that included the FBI. Hogrefe said federal agents surveilled the area a few weeks ago but did not find probable cause to

AP Photo/Morgan Lee

Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, left, sits next to public defense attorney Aleks Kostich at a first appearance in New Mexico state district court in Taos, N.M. on accusations of child abuse and abducting his son from the boy’s mother. search the property. That changed when Georgia detectives forwarded a message to the sheriff that he said initially had been sent to a third party, saying: “We are starving and need food and water.” Authorities found what Hogrefe called “the saddest living conditions and poverty” he has seen in 30 years in law enforcement. He said Wahhaj was armed with multiple firearms, including an assault rifle. But he was taken into custody without incident. The group arrived in Amalia in December, with enough money to buy groceries and construction supplies, according to Tyler Anderson, a 41-year-old auto mechanic who lives nearby.

He said he helped them install solar panels after they arrived but eventually stopped visiting. Anderson said he met both of the men in the group, but never the women, who authorities have said are the mothers of the 11 children, ages 1 to 15. “We just figured they were doing what we were doing, getting a piece of land and getting off the grid,” Anderson said. As the months passed, he said he stopped seeing the smaller children playing in the area and didn’t hear guns being fired at a shooting range on the property. Jason Badger, who owned the property where the compound was built, said he and his wife had

pressed authorities to remove the group after becoming concerned about the children. The group had built the compound on their acreage instead of a neighboring tract owned by Lucas Morton, one of the men arrested during the raid. However, a judge dismissed an eviction notice filed by Badger against Morton in June, court records said. The records did not provide further details on the judge’s decision. After the raid, Anderson looked over the property for the first time in months. “I was flabbergasted from what it had turned into from the last time I saw it,” he said.


August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American

COMMENTARY

B5

Open Letter to Trump’s Preachers

Dear Colleagues in Christ, With heartbreak, yet hope, we reach out to you in the Name of our Lord and Liberator, Jesus, the Christ. It was unsettling and upsetting to witness the meeting with you, our moral leaders, and one of the most amoral persons to ever occupy the White House in the name of discussing prison reform. We are sure it must have been intoxicating to walk the corridors of power and sit at the table of governing authority. Unfortunately, those precincts of power have been infected by White supremacy and moral bankruptcy. Dr Cornel West is correct, “we are in the spiritual eclipse of decency, honesty and integrity” leaving our nation in the chaotic shadows of emboldened racism, ugly xenophobia, predatory patriarchy and unvarnished greed.” Given your proximity to power and your “seat at the table” in this toxic political climate it’s painfully disappointing that instead of being prophetic clergy persons you became presidential cheerleaders. We could never imagine the 8th century prophets cheering the kings of Judah and Israel who were in similar political climates. We know John the Baptist wasn’t content to cheer Herod on and express his gratitude and honor for a seat at the table, declaring that Herod was the most “pro-Jewish king in our lifetime.” We need not remind you of the posture of the Prince of Peace, our Savior from the streets, when He stood before Herod and Pilate. He didn’t even pray for them. It was errantly exclaimed that “this is probably going to be the most pro-Black president that we’ve had in our lifetime…” Were the fumes from the intoxicating toxins that strong? Was he being pro-Black while building his political platform as the number one purveyor of birtherism, which was fueled by racism? Is it pro-Black to label Black NFL players protesting racial injustice in the criminal justice system you were there to reform, “SOBs?” That’s what your pro-Black president did. Was he at his pro-Black finest and most eloquent when he referred to countries of color as “s-hole countries?” Was he being pro-Black when he equivocated during the White supremacist rally and violence in Charlottesville, that left one person dead and more than a dozen injured, declaring there were “very fine people on both sides?” Was he pro-Black when he appointed a White supremacist, Jefferson Beauregard Sessions (who was deemed too racist to be a judge by a bipartisan panel and Coretta Scott King) to serve as Attorney General? Did your cheerleading blind you to the fact that the policies of Sessions contradict and overrule the prison reform you were cheering for? Attorney General Sessions wants to stall a federal review of police departments where racial profiling, excessive use of force and racially discriminatory police practices have been exposed. During the Obama (who was disparaged during the meeting to the delight of 46-1) Administration, the Justice Department began 25 investigations into police departments and sheriff’s offices and resolved civil rights lawsuits filed against police departments in more than 15 cities. Sessions is stopping and reversing these investigations and consent decrees. Were you cheering for Trump and this Justice Department to continue to ignore the broken body of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, the last gasps of Eric Garner in New York, the slain body of Michael Brown in Ferguson, the aborted life of Tamir Rice in Ohio and so many others? We are sure you recognize the importance of judicial appointments in criminal justice and prison reform. The president you cheered for contradicts real reform with his appointments of judges. While purporting to be concerned about prison reform and the negative effects of mass incarceration on communities of color, Trump’s actions demonstrate a blatant disregard for the welfare of people of color by pushing judicial nominees with disturbing records on racial equity issues into lifetime positions as judges, which will have ramifications in the lives of people of color long after he has left the White House. Of the 87 judicial nominations Trump has made, 80 are Whites that have made careers in undermining civil rights. Only 1 is African American. We understand that the stated intent of the White House has been to focus its criminal justice reform efforts on improving reentry, rehabilitation and workforce training programs. That’s nice, but if you have a room filled with spider webs wouldn’t you clean the webs AND remove the spider? You cheered him on for removing a few webs but you didn’t prophetically challenge him to remove the spiders of sentencing

Frederick Douglass Haynes, III et al.

reform, ending the money bail system, profiteering from prisons, and the caste system Michelle Alexander insightfully deconstructs in {The New Jim Crow}. Our dear colleagues, the man you met with yesterday during his divisive and incendiary campaign asked the Black community repeatedly, “What do you have to lose?” In less than two years we’ve lost a lot and you have become his cheerleaders with a collar. Peace and Power, Dr. Frederick Douglass Haynes, III, Dr. Jamal Harrison Bryant, Bishop Rudy McKissick, Bishop W. Darrin Moore, Bishop Talbert Swan, Dr. Wendell Anthony, Dr. Traci Blackmon, Dr. Amos C. Brown, Pastor Corey Brown, Bishop John R. Bryant, Dr. Iva Carruthers, Dr. Delmon Coates, Dr. Jawanza Karriem Colvin, Dr. Marcus Cosby, Dr. Wayne Croft, Dr. William H. Curtis, Rev. Leah Daughtery, Dr. Marcus Davidson, Bishop James Davis, Rev. Jacques D. Denkins, Dr. James W.E. Dixon, II, Dr. John Faison, Sr., Drs. Elaine and Floyd Flake, Rev. Willie D. Francois, III, Bishop Sam Green, Dr. Neichelle Guidry, Dr. Cynthia Hale, Pastor Victor T. Hall, Rev. J.C. Howard, Rev. Alexander E.M. Johnson, Dr. Jeffrey Allen Johnson, Sr., Dr. Marcus D. King, Bishop Vashti McKenzie, Pastor Breonus Mitchell, Dr. Joshua L. Mitchell, Bishop Paul S. Morton, Dr. Otis Moss, III, Dr. James Perkins, Dr. Zina Pierre, President Welton Pleasant, II, Bishop Dennis Proctor, Dr. Nelson Rivers, Bishop Marvin Sapp, Drs. J. Alfred Smith Sr. and Jr., Dr. Gina Stewart, Dr. Warren H. Stewart, Sr., Dr. Alyn Waller, Dr. Lance Watson, Dr. Maurice Watson, Dr. Howard John Wesley, Dr. Ralph Douglas West, Sr.

All Politics is Local to the Black Church By now most have seen the video or photos of a meeting that took place recently at the White House, between the president and a group of primarily African American clergy. On its face what could be wrong with that? Who wouldn’t take a meeting with the President? The White House described the participants in the meeting as “inner city pastors” who were invited to discuss “prison reform.” The clergy in the room came from places such as Cleveland, Washington, DC, Arkansas, Chicago and Detroit; all cities that have a significant number of Black folks. All cities with a disproportionate number of incarcerated people of color. All cities with families that have been impacted by the prison industrial complex in America. Then there is an overwhelming number of us who have chosen to describe the gathering as nothing more than a photo opportunity for the administration. Obviously, a goal was to promote the idea that the president was concerned about people of color, concerned about the issue of mass incarceration, concerned about the Black church and interested in addressing the school to prison pipeline that has been wreaking havoc on the African American community for decades. This may be difficult for him to convey considering his body of tweets and policies that would paint a different picture. But, instead of pointing out the need to address the long overdue issues of tainted water in Flint or discussing the separation of children from their families on the border, these faith leaders went with a different game plan. What was revealed was a poor attempt at open

K. A. Slayton, Sr.

dialogue that morphed into a praise session of the President. These men and women, who represent the Christian faith, were presented the perfect occasion to address a major concern in the African American community. This was the right occasion to talk about a range of important issues impacting recidivism and the school to prison pipeline. This was the ideal occasion to discuss, not just prison reform, but sentencing reform, which would ultimately deal with the issue of mandatory sentencing and its disproportionate impact on people of color. Other issues should have included education, probation and parole. Certainly, the matter of cash bail bonds should have been an issue on the table. Then there’s the issue of the socioeconomic conditions of the communities in which poor children of color live. And let’s not forget the over policing of Black communities. Sadly, with all the issues in need of immediate discussion around the issue of prison reform, here’s what a few clergy chose to speak to the president instead: “Thank you for taking a stand for those that are disenfranchised.” (De Jesus - Chicago) “Thank you for your heart for all people” and “Thank you for being compassionate and caring about all people.” (Moody – Birmingham, Al) “We’re grateful for your heart toward the urban community” (Searcy – Montgomery, Al) You are “the most pro-black President that we’ve had in our lifetime” (Scott - Cleveland) “You’re a man of your word” and you “have an ear to hear from God, this country is in great hands.” (Freeman – Maryland)

“We really don’t need Black power when we have some green power working” (Jackson – DC/Maryland) It is true that the people are watching and all too often what they see is rather hypocritical. The church has a responsibility to be the top salesman for Christianity. Unfortunately, our church leaders have forgotten the number one key to successful sales and that is “Know Thy Product.” How can you preach faith and that God loves justice and you fail to speak truth to power? How can you preach respect for community, when you fail to do it yourself? And how can you preach political and social justice when you’ve endorsed policies and persons that make life for those in your community more difficult. All politics is local, so I’m not surprised by the actions of clergy on the national stage, neither will I be surprised when a similar group of local Black pastors in the state of Maryland stand behind the Hogan campaign. My only hope is that they will be savvy enough to get some answers and commitments for the communities they represent. It doesn’t matter if you, as a Black preacher, have a seat at the table. And the Black community in this local Maryland state-wide race should not be distracted about where Black clergy stand, but about where they stand. Dr. Kevin A. Slayton, Sr., M.Div. is the senior pastor of New Waverly United Methodist Church in Baltimore. He is also pursuing a doctoral degree from Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School in Rochester, New York.

Democrats’ Immigration Dogma is Damaging African American Communities If you’re a Democrat and you question the party orthodoxy on immigration, prepare to be excommunicated. That’s the grim lesson of a recent fracas involving Our Revolution, the progressive advocacy group founded by Senator Bernie Sanders. Our Revolution fired its “National Justice” director after she publicly pointed out that excessive immigration can hurt low-wage American workers. The staffer, Tezlyn Figaro, a woman of African American and Latina descent, took to Twitter to complain about foreigners “coming into the country and getting benefits that Americans do not get.” Figaro voiced an uncomfortable truth, and her dismissal reveals a stunning hypocrisy within modern Democratic politics. The party claims to champion the economic well-being of Black and Hispanic Americans; yet it also supports unfettered immigration, which depresses wages and reduces job opportunities for minority American workers. Immigrants -- both legal and illegal -- tend to congregate in large cities and join the unskilled workforce. In fact, in the past 20 years, immigrants who lack high school diplomas have increased the size of

Tom Broadwater

the low-skilled workforce by 25 percent. That puts them in direct competition with African Americans, who disproportionately occupy the low-wage urban labor market. Work from Harvard economist George Borjas shows that when immigration increases the size of the labor pool by 10-percent, wages for African American men drop 2.5 percent -- and their employment rate declines by 6 percent. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission Commissioner Peter Kirsanow emphasized how this competition can lock young workers out of the job market: “You eliminate the rungs on the ladder because a sizable number of African American men don’t have access to entry-level jobs.” Democrats can’t be champions for African Americans when they advocate for endless immigration amnesties. This includes their support for “sanctuary cities,” which stymie the deportation of dangerous criminals and their opposition to mandatory worker verification enforcement. In June, a number of high-profile Democratic mayors pulled out of an immigration meeting with President Trump in retaliation for the administration’s crackdown on sanctuary cities.

Pointing out the damage done by free-flowing foreign labor wasn’t always condemned by left-leaning lawmakers. Back in the early 1990s, Barbara Jordan, a civil rights icon and the first African American woman from the South ever elected to Congress, proclaimed that there was “no national interest in continuing to import lesser skilled and unskilled workers to compete in the most vulnerable parts of our labor force.” She called for cutting immigration by a third. A decade later, a Democratic senator warned that a “huge influx of mostly low-skill workers... threatens to depress further the wages of blue-collar Americans.” That senator was Barack Obama, writing in his 2006 book {The Audacity of Hope}. Democratic leaders can’t claim to care about Black and Hispanic Americans while supporting immigration policies that rob their most loyal voters of jobs and wages. Tom Broadwater is president of Americans4Work, a nonprofit that advocates on behalf of American minority, veteran, youth, and disabled workers.

The opinions on this page are those of the writers and not necessarily those of the AFRO. Send letters to The Afro-American • 1531 S. Edgewood St. Baltimore, MD 21227 or fax to 1-877-570-9297 or e-mail to editor@afro.com


B6

The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018


August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American

C1

ARTS & CULTURE

HBO’s ‘Random Acts of Flyness’ Is a Fantastic Voyage By Nadine Matthews Special to the AFRO

The promotional material for HBO’s “Random Acts of Flyness” says it is “a mix of verité documentary, musical performances, surrealist melodrama and humorous animation where themes as ancestral trauma, history, death, the singularity, romance and more are woven together creating a television show like nothing seen before.” The late night series, which runs through September 7, is definitely all of the above. “Random Acts of Flyness” is evocative of pleasantly surprising experimental programming that only seems to come once in generation. For those who became fans of the show’s creator Terence Nance through his equally unique, surrealist opus on romance, obsession, and relationships, “An Oversimplification of Her Beauty,” it will delight. “Random Acts of Flyness” also centers Blackness on TV in a way that it ironically hasn’t been seen since the dawn of the hophop era. In one segment there was footage of the late Fred Hampton’s girlfriend, present at the time of his murder. Though not the most well-known footage, it is presented without benefit of explanatory lower third information. You must be familiar with the history. One segment, called “Black Thoughts” poses the question of when restrooms will start carrying shea butter lotion.There are afros,

Courtesy Photo

Filmmaker, Actor, Host of HBO’s Random Acts of Kindness Terence Nance braids, dreads, and knots in abundance. The animations are an impasto of rich browns. The format of “Random Acts of Flyness” defies any common categorization. It looks like what a Sun-Ra composition sounds like. To Dallas, Texas born and raised Nance, the show is an, “Amalgamation of concepts and feelings and tones and rhythms that are in

the show and as opposed to post formulaic TV experience at the intersections of a lot of cultural idioms that are in the zeitgeist. That could be sexuality or White supremacy, etc.” The show’s premiere last week featured Jon Hamm (“Mad Men”) and Lakeith Stanfield (“Atlanta,” “Sorry To Bother You”). Future guests include Dominique Fishback (“The Deuce,” “Night Comes On”), Whoopi Goldberg (“Sister Act”), Natalie Paul (“The Sinner”) among others. If the first episode is any indication, there may or may not be a couch for them to sit on and be interviewed. Like Stanfield and Hamm, they may be cast as characters in one of the wacky yet cerebral segments of the show. Nance, who films much of the show out of his studio in Brooklyn, has been compared to the likes of actor, director Donald Glover. “It’s an honor to just be making art right now in this sort of generation with all my peers, Donald included because it’s so impactful what he’s doing aesthetically and politically. It’s an honor to be mentioned with him and people like Issa Rae and Justin Simien,” he tells the AFRO. A Guggenheim fellow who professes strong admiration for filmmakers such as Wes Anderson, Alfonso Cuaron and Satyajit Ray, Nance’s film sensibilities were formed spending time at the movies with his family growing up. “My parents would always take us to see really good stuff,” he remembers. “Movies like “Daughters of the Dust,”

“Sankofa,” Spike Lee’s films, independent films that you couldn’t really find. I think that laid the foundation.” Still Nance considered himself more of a visual artist and was majoring in Visual Art at NYU when he made “An Oversimplification of Her Beauty” which received overwhelming positive reception at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. Nance thought of it as more of an art piece than film per se, as he was making it. “I never thought of it as being in theaters or anything. I didn’t have that awareness when I was making it. So when it was actually out and people were seeing it as more like a movie where you go to the theater and watch, it taught me how expansive the idea of a movie is.” Creativity was the order of the day in Nance’s household. His mother is an actress and relatives included musicians and photographers. He says, “It was a really profound privileged to be born into the family I was born into because it wasn’t strange for art to be like the center of my life. It was the center of everybody’s life around me. Making art was not exceptional.” “Random Acts of Flyness” is a family affair. “I have three brothers and sister and I still get a lot of inspiration from them. They all work on the show. My mother does too. It’s like my first band, you know what I mean? It’s just a great environment.”

Baltimore’s Waller Gallery Focuses on Black and Brown Artists By Lisa Snowden-McCray

Special to the AFRO Joy Davis, the woman behind the Waller Gallery (2420 North Calvert St., wallergallery. com) art museum which opened its doors this past April, says it was all her mother’s idea. “I took the idea and ran down the street with it, with both hands with full force. And if a wall was in front of me I would have just ran right through the wall,” she says laughing. She and her mother live in the upstairs part of the gallery, which occupies a rowhome in the Barclay neighborhood. The gallery is where the living room would be. Davis says that the idea of a museum as a space to live and work in was born out of necessity. Retail spaces are expensive. But she also says that it means that the museum feels like something that is really hers – that she helped build from the ground up. “This was all plaster,” she says, referencing the main exhibit space. “Me and my boyfriend, we chipped away and hauled out about 3,000 pounds of plaster out of here. We had people do the walls because we ran out of time, but we probably would have done the walls too, to be honest with you, to both save money and [because] we just wanted it to be ours essentially.” After she got the issue of the physical space sorted out, Davis thought about the people she

to her mother, and to the other women in her wanted the museum to serve. family. “I was thinking about…our mission. Like, “Waller is my mom’s maiden name. It’s my who are we trying to reach out to? That means grandmother’s name. My family is built on a not only people coming into the space, seeing matriarchy, entirely. Like the way our family the artwork, but the artists. What artists are we functions, and I think it functions surprisingly really reaching out to? I decided that we were well considering families don’t always do going to work with people of color,” she says. “Overall I would like to focus on Black and Brown folks because they just don’t get as many opportunities. Not just in the city but it’s a global problem.” Waller is from Howard County, but frequented Baltimore to visit family and because her mother always made sure that she was exposed to as much arts and culture as she could. “It was always important for me to see the ballet, and that could have been the community (Photo by Lisa Snowden-McCray) center ballet it did not matter. Joy Davis (right) and her mother Sandra McMillan (left) at For me to go to museums, the Waller Gallery. for me to go to galleries, for me to take cultural trips of any kind,” Davis that, is based on the rubric and the platform says. “She really instilled that within me as that they’ve built,” she says. “They are always important and anytime that any of that related about learning, always about teaching, they are to blackness in any way then it was doubly always about uplifting, so that’s all embedded important to go.” in that in Waller Gallery.” The name of the museum is an homage Davis attended the University of Maryland,

Baltimore County where she studied media and history and then moved to Baltimore to work. She also attended the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York where she earned a Master’s Degree in fashion and museum studies. “I grew up in the arts community here, but I grew up in the arts community that was very White here. Like, all the mainstream artists, the artists that were getting write-ups were White, but I was in that community. I was going to the shows, I dabbled in event photography for a hot second and so like doing all of that stuff it really taught me now I could run spaces and later would inspire me to do this.” She says that even though the museum hasn’t been open very long, she’s always thinking of ways to open it to more people, to make it accessible to everyone. She says that she hopes to grow, but to always approach her work carefully and with a mission in mind. “I don’t know if here’s going to be a ‘finished’ version,” she says.” Like I said, I grew up in the art community that yes was very white but now it’s the same arts community but it’s blacker and I really appreciate that. There’s a gift in using small resources but applying it intentionally and I know that’s one of the things that I can be confident about. Applying intention with small resources.”

SPORTS

Convicted Rapist, and Ex-NFL Star, Sharper Requests Early Release By By Perry Green AFRO Sports Editor

pgreen@afro.com Former NFL star safety Darren Sharper is trying to get out of prison early after serving just two years of the 18-year sentence he received for drugging and raping at least 16 women across four different states, according to reports. Per the Los Angeles Times, Sharper’s legal team filed a 50-page memorandum this week in U.S. District Court in New Orleans, claiming their client was not properly advised by his former legal team on a plea deal the former pro athlete took back in 2016. According to the LATimes.com report, the memorandum also argues that the trial and court that convicted Sharper had made errors during its ruling. Sharper initially took a plea deal that carried a nine-year sentence, but a U.S. Court judge reduced it, saying it was too light a punishment. He then doubled the sentence. Sharper’s lawyers said Sharper deserves more credit for being fully co-

operative with prosecutors. “Mr. Sharper intended, and still intends, to accept responsibility for his behavior,” Sharper’s lawyers said in court filings, as reported by the LA Times. “He does not seek to escape blame in this matter.” Prosecutors, reportedly, have until August 27 to respond. A 14-year veteran of the NFL, Sharper retired in 2011, just a year after helping the New Orleans Saints win a Super Bowl. Sharper became a studio analyst for NFL Network, and with his resume as a NFL 2000s All-Decade Team member, the 42-yearold was destined to make the Pro Football Hall of Fame. That is, until reports surfaced of his arrest in 2014 for drugging women to have sleep with them. According to police reports, Sharper and a friend would meet women at the club and invite them back to their hotel rooms, where they would drug their drinks. He reportedly did this to women in Miami, Fla., New Orleans, La., Los Angeles, Calif., and Las Vegas, Nevada.

(Bob Chamberlin/Los Angeles Times via AP)

Darren Sharper, the disgraced former NFL star, has renewed efforts to get a reduction in his 18-year federal sentence for drugging and raping women


CLASSIFIED

Sma

l ad

Payment Policy for legal notice advertisements. Effective immediately, The Afro American Newspapers will require prepayment for publication of all legal notices. Payment will be accepted in the form of chwecks, credit card or money order. Any returned checks will be subject to a $25.00 processing fee and may result in the suspension of any future advertising at our discretion. AD NETWORK AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV’S. LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your donation helps local families with food, clothing, shelter, counseling. Tax deductible. MVA License #W1044. 410-636-0123 or www. LutheranMissionSociety.org

BUSINESS SERVICES/OPPT.

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

s

202-332-0080 410-554-8200

Buy it • Sell it Swap it • Lease it Rent it • Hire it

Washington SAMPLE

A F R O

l

C2 The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018

results

1 Col. Inch Up to 20 Words

AFRO Classified minimum ad rate is $26.54 per col. inch (an inch consists of up to 20 words). Mail in your ad on form below along with CHECK or MONEY ORDER to: WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN CO. 1816 12th ST., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20009-4422 Attn: Clsf. Adv. Dept.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

NAME: ________________________________________________ ADDRESS: _____________________________________________ PHONE NO.:____________________________________________ CLASSIFICATION: ______________________________________ (Room, Apt., House, etc.) INSERTION DATE:_________________

Bulk advertising at its best: advertise in over 70 newspapers and reach millions of readers with ONE call. Broaden your reach and get results for pennies per reader. Call Wanda at 410-212-0616 or email wsmith@md

WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPER

Place a business card ad in the Regional Small Display 2x2/2x4 Advertising Network – Let MDDC help you grow your business! Call TODAY at 410-2120616 to increase your customer base and get results.

Legal Advertising Rates PROBATE DIVISION (Estates) 202-332-0080 PROBATE NOTICES

a. Order Nisi $ 60 per insertion b. Small Estates (single publication $ 60 per insertion c. Notice to Creditors 1. Domestic $ 60 per insertion 2. Foreign $ 60 per insertion d. Escheated Estates $ 60 per insertion e. Standard Probates

EDUCATIONAL/ CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING-Get FAA certification to fix planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military benefits. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-8236729.

CIVIL NOTICES a. Name Changes 202-879-1133 b. Real Property

$180.00 per 3 weeks $180.00 per 3 weeks $180.00 per 3 weeks $360.00 per 6 weeks $125.00 per 2 weeks

$ 74.00 $ 245.00

FAMILY COURT 202-879-1212 DOMESTIC RELATIONS 202-879-0157

HELP WANTED EARN $500 A DAY: Lincoln Heritage Life Insurance Wants Insurance Agents* Leads, No Cold Calls*Commissions Paid Daily*Agency Training*Life Insurance Required. Call 1-888713-6020

a. Absent Defendant b. Absolute Divorce c. Custody Divorce

$ 220.00 $ 220.00 $ 220.00

To place your ad, call 1-800-237-6892, ext. 262, Public Notices $50.00 & up depending on size, Baltimore Legal Notices are $24.84 per inch. 1-800 (AFRO) 892 For Proof of Publication, please call 1-800-237-6892, ext. 244

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

LEGAL NOTICES

Delaware New MoveIn Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes from low $100’s. No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com.

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

SERVS. MISC.

YOU KNOW YOU’RE IN THE KNOW...WHEN YOU READY THE AFRO

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

To advertise in the WASHINGTON AFRO

Call 202-332-0080

Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-212-0616 Ask for Multi-Media Specialist -Wanda & watch your results grow.


August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

To advertise in the WASHINGTON AFRO Call 202-332-0080

LEGAL NOTICES

•Your History •Your Community • Your News

LEGAL NOTICES

afro.com

LEGAL NOTICES

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

SUPPORT OUR ADVERTSERS

LEGAL NOTICES

C3


CLASSIFIED

DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV’S. LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your donation helps local families with food, clothing, shelter, counseling. Tax deductible. MVA License #W1044. 410-636-0123 or www. LutheranMissionSociety.org

Payment Policy for legal notice advertisements. Effective immediately, The Afro American Newspapers will require prepayment for publication of all legal notices. Payment will be accepted in the form of chwecks, credit card or money order. Any returned checks will be subject to a $25.00 processing fee and may result in the suspension of any future advertising at our discretion. LEGAL NOTICES

BUSINESS SERVICES/OPPT.

HELP WANTED EARN $500 A DAY: Lincoln Heritage Life Insurance Wants Insurance Agents* Leads, No Cold Calls*Commissions Paid Daily*Agency Training*Life Insurance Required. Call 1-888713-6020

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Delaware New MoveIn Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes from low $100’s. No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com.

SERVS. MISC.

SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS

Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-212-0616 Ask for Multi-Media Specialist -Wanda & watch your results grow.

Sma

410-554-8200

Buy it • Sell it Swap it • Lease it Rent it • Hire it

results

1 Col. Inch Up to 20 Words

AFRO Classified minimum ad rate is $26.54 per col. inch (an inch consists of up to 20 words). Mail in your ad on form below along with CHECK or MONEY ORDER to: BALTIMORE AFRO-AMERICAN CO. 1531 S. Edgewood Street Suite B Baltimore, Md. 21227 Attn: Clsf. Adv. Dept.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

NAME: ________________________________________________ ADDRESS: _____________________________________________ PHONE NO.:____________________________________________ CLASSIFICATION: ______________________________________ (Room, Apt., House, etc.) INSERTION DATE:_________________

BALTIMORE AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPER Legal Advertising Rates

Effective October 1, 2008

PROBATE DIVISION (Estates) 202-332-0080 PROBATE NOTICES

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING-Get FAA certification to fix planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military benefits. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-8236729.

To advertisein the BALTIMORE AFRO Call

EDUCATIONAL/ CAREER TRAINING

410-554-8200

Bulk advertising at its best: advertise in over 70 newspapers and reach millions of readers with ONE call. Broaden your reach and get results for pennies per reader. Call Wanda at 410-212-0616 or email wsmith@md Place a business card ad in the Regional Small Display 2x2/2x4 Advertising Network – Let MDDC help you grow your business! Call TODAY at 410-2120616 to increase your customer base and get results.

s

BALTIMORE CAREER CORNER

a. Order Nisi $ 60 per insertion b. Small Estates (single publication $ 60 per insertion c. Notice to Creditors 1. Domestic $ 60 per insertion 2. Foreign $ 60 per insertion d. Escheated Estates $ 60 per insertion e. Standard Probates

CIVIL NOTICES a. Name Changes 202-879-1133 b. Real Property

$180.00 per 3 weeks $180.00 per 3 weeks $180.00 per 3 weeks $360.00 per 6 weeks $125.00 per 2 weeks

$ 74.00 $ 245.00

FAMILY COURT • 202-879-1212 DOMESTIC RELATIONS • 202-879-0157 a. Absent Defendant b. Absolute Divorce c. Custody Divorce

$ 220.00 $ 220.00 $ 220.00

To place your ad, call 1-800-237-6892, ext. 262, Public Notices $50.00 & up depending on size, Baltimore Legal Notices are $24.84 per inch. 1-800 (AFRO) 6892 For Proof of Publication, please call 1-800-237-6892, ext. 244 CAREER CORNER

YOU KNOW YOU’RE IN THE KNOW...WHEN YOU READ THE AFRO

AD NETWORK AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS

l ad

Baltimore SAMPLE

A F R O

l

C4 The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018


August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

C5


C6

The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018

YOU’RE ALWAYS A WINNER WHEN YOU PLAY RESPONSIBLY.

Playing the Maryland Lottery is fun, but please play within your limits. For confidential help with gambling problems, please visit mdgamblinghelp.org or call 1-800-GAMBLER. You must be 18 to play.


Send your news tips to tips@afro.com.

August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American

WASHINGTON-AREA

DC Gears Up for Miss Black USA Contest at UDC

The (Howard) Doctor Is In

By Lenore T. Adkins Special to the AFRO

Current Miss Black USA Daphne Lee will pass on her crown this weekend during the Miss Black USA 2018 pageant in the nation’s capital. A professional ballerina, graduate student and ambassador to the Republic of Sierra Leone, Lee previously held the title of Miss Black New Jersey before winning the historic, national competition. Unlike other pageants, Miss Black USA is a scholarship pageant focused on redefining beauty and highlighting the diversity of women of color. It was founded in 1986 to showcase Black women and support them in their pursuit of higher education. “Growing up I often read about the protracted stories of AfricanAmerican she-roes, and I was inspired by them to use whatever talents I had to give back,” Karen Arrington, founder and CEO of the Miss Black USA pageant, told the AFRO. “But as I watched mainstream media I didn’t see positive images of women who looked like me. So, I thought that creating a pageant could be a great platform to celebrate the achievements of AfricanAmerican women who had been disproportionately represented in mainstream media.” Today, Miss Black USA is the largest national pageant for women of color and, according to the pageant’s website, the “largest single source of scholarship funding for Black women” with more than $500,000 in scholarships awarded. Contestants range from college students and graduate students to professional women. The Maryland-based nonprofit organization has also expanded to include additional competitions for teens and older women. “Miss Black USA has changed greatly since we started,” Arrington told the AFRO. “Among many things, we now have a library named in our honor at the Lower Basic Primary School in the Gambia, West Africa. Miss Black USA gets to travel there and read to students while representing our organization.” During what the organization calls her “year of service,” Miss Black USA also travels nationally for the Heart Continued on D2

D1

DC Council

White Helps Ward 8 Students Get Ready for School By James Wright Special to the AFRO jwright@afro.com

AP Photo/Marcos Moreno

Howard University is America’s No. 1 institution for producing Black applicants to U.S. medical schools, according to data from the Association of American Medical Colleges. “Howard University prepares more African American pre-med students to apply to medical school and enrolls the most African American students in our own esteemed medical school because we are committed to our mission to diversify the workforce with an infusion of talented, wellprepared scholars,” said President Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick in a statement.

Metro: No Special Trains for White Civil Rights Rally Attendees By Micha Green AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor mgreen@afro.com White supremacists and the standard open-minded citizen are like water and oil- they just don’t mix- which is why Metro Board Chairman Jack Evans (D- Ward 2) had previously considered running a separate train for those marching in the “Unite the Right” White civil rights rally on August 12. Despite the inherent discord and rising concerns with the Black Lives Matter and Shut it Down DC counter-protest on the same day, Evans decided to not have separate trains for the White nationalists. “Metro will not be providing a special train or special car for anyone next

Sunday,” Evans said, according to The Washington Post. When initial word about the separate trains began to spread, there was immediate outrage for giving the supremacists “special treatment” of any sort. “We’re not trying to give anyone special treatment,” the Ward 2 Council member said. “We’re just trying to avoid scuffles and things of that nature.” For now no solid safety strategies have been revealed and the police likely will not relay their plans until the day before the event, according to The Washington Post. In the meantime Metro and the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) are working together in an effort to prevent a replay of the violence that

Workers’ Co-Op Comes to Ward 8 By James Wright Special to the AFRO jwright@afro.com

An organization dedicated to the empowerment of people of low and working income levels has re-located its headquarters to Ward 8. Cooperation DC, a project of ONE DC Black Workers and Wellness Center, held a cookout for the community at its new home on 2500 Martin Luther King Jr., Ave., S.E. on Aug. 4. About 35 people came to the site to have a meal and learn about Cooperation DC and what a workers’ co-op that focuses on the needs of Ward 8 residents and African-American workers in general could mean for the community. “We want to talk to you about what a cooperative is,” Will Cochrane, who ran the event, said. “We want to let you know what it means to have a cooperative like this in Southeast. We have Continued on D3

took place in Charlottesville, Virginia last year. Jason Kessler, who organized the rally in Charlottesville, is also behind the upcoming one in D.C. “Transit Police are engaged in ongoing discussions with MPD, the lead agency for the August 12 event, as well as Virginia State Police and others as to how to keep everyone safe on that day,” Stessel told The Washington Post. “While details of the plan are security sensitive at this stage, I can tell you that it has not been finalized.” Before the decision was made not to separate the trains for the “Unite the Right” rally, the Amalgamated Transit Unit (ATU) Local 689 refused to provide services for a group that champions Continued on D2

By James Wright Special to the AFRO jwright@afro.com The 1990s is remembered by residents of the District of Columbia as a time of change in the city that still had a sense of community, regardless of where one lived. Talk around the 1990s has risen since WETA released its show, Washington in the 90s, hosted by Channel 4 News anchor Doreen Gentzler. The show was screened for District residents Aug. 1 at the Anacostia Smithsonian Museum in Southeast. Ferne Barrow, WETA’s senior director of outreach and community engagement, was the facilitator of the discussion. “A lot of interesting things happened in Washington during the 1990s,” Barrow said to an audience of 55 in the museum’s meeting room. “This show is a reflection of what happened during that decade.”

– Chris Stukes Courtesy Photo

Continued on D2

DC Residents Remember the 1990s

“It was a fun time to be in Washington.”

Raheem Anthon and Serita El Amin are both active with ONE DC.

D.C. Council member Trayon White kicked off the efforts in his ward and throughout the District of Columbia to get students, parents, and the community ready for school. White, a Democrats who represents Ward 8, held a “Back to School Bash” at Garfield Elementary School in Southeast on Aug. 4. “In addition to giving out free book bags to the students, we have booths that deal with health disparities, the fact that the ward is a food desert, educational inequities, and economic empowerment,” White told the AFRO as he looked at the dozens of vendors and scores of people on Garfield’s playground. Vendors such as Martha’s Table and City First Bank talked about the programs they offer residents of the ward in addition to handing out trinkets and literature. Free haircuts were performed by Donovan Brown, a freelance barber who works with the non-profit, Open Arms Mentoring Group. “I am doing my part to help the

The late D.C. Mayor and council member Marion Barry was prominent in the show, with footage of his controversial arrest in the Vista Hotel in 1990, his decision not to run for reelection later that year, the trial and time spent incarcerated for his crime, the comeback to politics winning the Ward 8 council seat in 1992, his re-election as mayor in 1994, and his decision not to seek a fifth term as mayor in 1998. “Marion Barry was the most dominant figure in D.C. at that time,” Barrow said. Other events such as Sharon Pratt’s rise and fall as mayor, the Mount Pleasant riots, the successful Million Man March in 1995, the Blizzard of 1996, the opening of the then MCI Center in 1997, the Control Board and Anthony Williams as mayor are also discussed during the show. Debra Paschall attended the airing of “Washington in the 90s” and had some issues with it. “There was no mention of Cathy Hughes when she was running WOL,” Paschall said, referring to Hughes who owned WOLAM talk radio when it was on H Street N.E. Hughes is presently the founder of Urban One, a Black-oriented media company that has its hands in television and other multi-media platforms. “I used to listen to WOL on a daily basis.” Chris Stukes was a youngster during Continued on D2


D2

The Afro-American, August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018

Taste of Tennis a Platform for Top Chefs By Lenore T. Adkins Special to the AFRO

“For Warren Brown, serving up his small bites at the inaugural Taste of Tennis charity event on July 30 at The Hamilton was a no brainer. Brown, a Petworth resident, owns CakeLove, a business he launched 16 years ago that bakes packaged goods and snacks out of Alexandria, Virginia. “My business was founded in D.C. and it’s important for me to be able to make the efforts that I can to just be in Courtesy Photo touch with the D.C. Maryland native and rising community to make sure tennis star Frances Tiafoe poses that they know that I’m at the Taste of Tennis. here, you know?” Brown told the AFRO. “And I like to support D.C. in lots of different ways and this is one way that we can — it’s a fun way that we can.” He pushed two products at the event. CakeLove in a Jar, an indulgent snack of flavored cream cheese icing and cake that he sells at major retailers in 10 states and the District of

Columbia. It comes in several flavors, including key lime, red velvet, coco piña and salty caramel. Meanwhile, Spark Bites is a healthy snack a lot like granola. They’re are made from oats, black seeds, millet, rice, agave syrup smashed together and baked with a little bit of spice, a touch of salt and some “heat.” “(It’s) not trying to be like anything, except a really damn good snack,” said Brown, author of four cookbooks. Taste of Tennis was an evening of chef demonstrations, cocktails, glamour and socializing paired with tennis, as it coincided with the weeklong Citi Open tennis tournament, which ended Aug. 5. It drew tennis player Naomi Osaka, 20, who did a cooking demonstration with Chef Edward Lee, culinary director of the Succotash in D.C. and Maryland. The Japan native, and third seed, would go on to lose in the second round of the tournament. Maryland native and rising tennis star Frances Tiafoe, 20, was also in the building. While he was ousted in the third round of the Citi Open in singles, he made it to the doubles semifinals. Like the Citi Open, the $200 per person party raised money for the Washington Tennis & Education Foundation, which helps low-income kids learn tennis and shows them how to succeed in the classroom. “I’m always looking for creative ways to help to give back and then at the end of the day, I’m a chef at heart so I love sharing my cuisine with the world,” celebrity television chief Jernard Wells told the AFRO as he whipped up a barbecued pineapple smoked chicken bruschetta on a toasted waffle. “I’m from Atlanta and this was a creative way to be

Metro

Continued from D1 White nationalism. “More than 80% of Local 689’s membership is people of color, the very people that the Ku Klux Klan and other white nationalist groups have killed, harassed and violated. The union has declared that it will not play a role in their special accommodation.” Jackie Jeter, president of ATU Local 689, said “Local 689 is proud to provide transit to everyone for the many events we have in D.C. including the March [for] Life, the Women’s March and Black Lives Matter,” said Jeter. “We draw the line at giving special accommodation to hate groups and hate speech.” Former U.S. attorney, Tim Heaphy, who did an independent study of the first “Unite the Right” rally and counter-protest in Charlottesville last year, said that Metro was doing “the right thing” when considering separating the White nationalists. “It’s absolutely paramount when you’re trying to balance both public safety and free speech to enforce separation,” he said according to The Washington Post. “If they’ve decided that there’s a basis for a permit, then they have an obligation to do everything they can to keep everyone safe.”

Students

Continued from D1 community,” Brown told the AFRO as he cut a Coordinating Council’s Health, Wellness and youngster’s hair. Back to School Festival will have their event In the table next to Brown’s, nails were on Aug. 18 at the Ferebee Hope Recreation being painted for girls. A few feet away, five Center. tables had numerous book bags for the young Dawn Bedminster is the president of people to choose and take away for no cost. Garfield’s PTA and agreed with Edwards but The AFRO was told by a White staffer that had a concern. more than 800 bags were given away. “This is good for the neighborhood and the There were moon bounces and a deejay communities, but I wish that more families playing the latest had turned out for songs over the this,” Bedminster loud speaker, told the AFRO. “We “We need to do more events like and hotdogs, need to do more potato chips, this in the school and the commu- events like this in cookies and the school and the nity.” bottled waters community.” – Dawn Bedminster were available for While White was students. aiding students in The District’s his ward, there have public schools extended school programs been published reports that he may soon be a beginsAug. 13 and the traditional opening student himself. takes place on Aug. 20. D.C. public charter DCist, an online news publication, posted schools start at various times, depending on in its July 31 editions that White is set to be the institution. a student at the Regent University School of Ward 8 had other “Back to School” Law this fall. However, White told the AFRO events such as Bellevue’s Sixth Annual Bash he hasn’t made a final decision on whether he held Aug. 8 near the Bellevue branch of will attend that school, or any other. the District’s public library. The Anacostia

a part of the Taste of Tennis because I’m a big fan of tennis players as well.” Wells has appeared on multiple Food Network programs, including “Chef Wanted,” “Food Network Star” and “Comeback Kitchen,” which he won twice. Other Black culinary stars showcasing their cuisine were chefs Shorne Benjamin and Ron DuPrat. DuPrat was on “Top Chef” and specializes in French Caribbean cuisine. The event’s organizers said it would be several months before they know how much money the sold-out event raised.

Photo by Lenore Adkins

Warren Brown, founder of CakeLove.

According to The Washington Post, Heaphy felt the best plan would be to have the White nationalists meet military or police escorts at an undisclosed location outside of D.C. and then be taken by bus to Lafayette Square. Despite supporting the separation he contends Metro workers are well within their right to refuse assisting in ensuring their safety. “Law enforcement has this professional obligation to protect speech, regardless of how hateful it is,” Heaphy said, “but transit workers don’t sign up for that.”

Miss Black USA Continued from D1

Truth campaign empowering women to take care of their heart health. Arrington continued, “Wherever there is an issue affecting our community, that’s where Miss Black USA will be.” Looking to win the 2018 title are 38 contestants from across the country, according to Arrington. They will compete in four competitions: 1) Onstage Question, 2) Talent, 3) Evening Gown, and 4) Lifestyle and Fitness. On hand to judge this year’s competition are Dr. Myla Bennett, a celebrity doctor and philanthropist seen on Bravo’s Real Housewives of Atlanta; Thomas W. Dortch. Jr., Chairman of the Board of Directors for The National Black College Alumni Hall of Fame; and Ocielia Gibson, a former Miss Black USA, author, and speaker. The event’s host will be Stevie Baggs Jr., a former NFL athlete, who previously starred as the bachelor on WE-TVs Match Made in Heaven. Finals for the Miss Black USA 2018 pageant take place August 12 at the University of the District of Columbia.

DC

Continued from D1 the 1990s but remembers it vividly. “I remember when Marion Barry came back from prison and there was a big, big celebration,” Stukes said. “I also remember the Million Man March and there were lots of people on the National Mall.” Jonathan Hutto Sr. is a community organizer for Empower DC, an organization seeking to make low and working-class District residents more economically and politically viable. Hutto told the AFRO that he liked the show but disagreed with some of its content. “Overall, I thought it was a decent presentation, but it should have shown more of the activity that was taking place among grassroots activists,” Hutto, who served as president of the Howard University Student Association from 1997-1998, said. “One thing I didn’t like was the way the show portrayed the control board. The control board was portrayed as a good thing and I don’t agree with that.” In general, audience members said while the District had its challenges; it was a good place to be. People were friendlier and there was a strong sense of pride in being in “Chocolate City.” “It was a fun time to be in Washington,” Stukes said.

Courtesy Photo

In and out of office, Marion Barry was a dominant figure in the 1990s.


August 11, 2018 - August 17, 2018, The Afro-American

D3

Ajani Amiri Thomas Named DC’s Filmmaker of the Month By Hamil R. Harris Special to the AFRO

Calling him “bold, motivated, and unafraid to tackle true stories,” the DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music, and Entertainment is recognizing Ajani Amiri Thomas as the August 2018 Filmmaker of the Month. The son of a physician and a lawyer, Thomas has followed a childhood passion to make movies on the backlot of Universal Studios, where at 12 years old, he was filming and editing in Hollywood. He developed artistic skills at Duke Ellington School for the Arts and Howard University where he is a senior majoring in TV and Film. “I want to tell bold stories that reflect the times that we are in now,” said Thomas, 21. “I just want to tell stories and stay true to the realities of the people who inspire them. I see film as a surreal art. If the work isn’t bold, then it hasn’t gone far enough.” Thomas produced, wrote, and directed a short-film called “Crispus”. The film is based on the life story of Kalief Browder, a teenager falsely accused of stealing a backpack and thrown into solitary confinement in New York’s infamous Riker’s Island Prison where longing “to remember the sound of his mother’s voice” he committed suicide. “A year later his mother died of a broken heart.” Thomas claims Spike Lee as his inspiration and said after graduation he plans to work on a film called “Kings of Babylon,” which will focus on the real story of a confrontation between the Black Panthers and the KKK in 1970. Thomas said, “The Trump era is forcing artists of color to dig deeper to find a response to the troubling news of today and the goal of myself is to be the mouthpiece for the people to tell the stories that have been silenced over the years. “Its kind of crazy. I didn’t realize until a few days ago that the same White supremist group in Charlottesville is coming to Lafayette Park. It’s kind of surreal because a couple years

ago during the Obama era I was an idealist before the American dream became a nightmare.” Herbie Niles, associate director of OCTFME, said, “OCTFME is proud to have the opportunity to shine the light on the talents and achievements of District resident filmmakers on the rise like Ajani,” Niles said. “Ajani is an incredible talent with boundless potential, and OCTFME’s filmmaker of the month initiative is the perfect platform for letting the local and national film community learn more about an emerging talent like Ajani.” His project, “Crispus”, recently earned him honors at the Equal Justice Society’s Annual Gala. The film premiered at the Kennedy Center as part of the Safe Streets Foundation’s Prison Art Show. Thomas used the District’s Correctional Facility at Lorton, Va. as a backdrop for his film project. After decades of problems, the facility closed in 2001, and now the grounds are converted into an artist’s space, part of the Workhouse Arts Center. Thomas’ film is scheduled to be shown at the former prison following its Kennedy Center debut. At Howard, Thomas is a founding member of the Sesh Art Collective, a group of artists who meet regularly at an

Workers’

Continued from D1

cooperatives across the city.” ONE DC is a non-profit with its mission to preserve economic and racial equity in the Shaw neighborhood in Northwest. It has been vocal in trying to keep people in their homes despite escalating rents and fighting poverty and income inequality in the District. ONE DC is non-partisan but is a progressive institution that promotes social entrepreneurship, openly questions capitalism and believes in the collective use of resources. The location of Cooperation DC to Ward 8 is no accident. Even though the District is experiencing relatively low unemployment rates at this time, 5.6 percent, the unemployment level for Ward 8 is 11 percent, according to the D.C. Department of Employment Services. Cochrane and his colleague with Cooperation One, Raheem Anthon, explained to the gathering how worker cooperatives could lower the jobless

“We want to talk to you about what a cooperative is.” – Will Cochrane numbers. “We can be a resource for Black workers to come and raise their voices about their working conditions,” Anthon said. “We can be the resources where they can share their stories about what they face on the job.” Cochrane explained that worker cooperatives are owned and managed by the workers. When the worker cooperative makes money, it is distributed among its member-workers where as in a private company, profits go to the owners and employees get their agreed upon salaries and benefits only. “Worker cooperatives are an excellent example of workplace democracy,” Cochrane said. Anthon said something must be done to get unemployed people in Ward 8 working.“We are the alternative to D.C. government’s programs,” he said. “We have found those programs aren’t beneficial to the people. With member-led working cooperatives, the people are in charge.” Anthon told the AFRO that cooperatives in general are nothing new to African Americans. “People of African descent have worked together for centuries, they just didn’t call it cooperatives,” he said. In a related issue, Cooperation DC bought the building from the United Black Fund that was co-founded by the late Calvin Rolark and his wife, Wilhelmina Rolark, who served on the D.C. Council representing Ward 8 for many years. When the purchase came through late last year, Calvin Rolark’s name was erased from the building and that has upset some residents. Cochrane said that ONE DC is still talking to Denise Rolark Barnes, the daughter of Rolark and publisher of the Washington Informer, about whether the name will stay on the building.

art space on U Street. Thomas says, in terms of success, one can’t progress alone. “It takes a lot of people to [make] your dreams come true,” Thomas said. “Listen to people and be open to people and it works.” In addition to his school work, Thomas runs a workshop for aspiring screenwriters. Thomas’ advice for aspiring filmmakers is simple. Find “your group of collaborators that you know really care about you and that you really care about eventually you’ll get there.”

PG-County 8-10-2018  
PG-County 8-10-2018