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handle the numbers and more importantly local adoptions are still permitted. However, adoption is not a big part of Ethiopia’s culture and many orphans find themselves shuttled between relatives or on the streets. Ethiopia is one of the fastest growing economies in the world, but millions of people live in poverty. Although there is a fast growing safety net programme to cushion the poorest from the ravages of droughts, critics say the country simply doesn’t have the capacity to deal with the huge number of orphans. The coordinator of a children’s orphanage in Addis Ababa, who asked not to be named, said that they would find a way to look after the children in the country. «These are our children. We are already seeing many Ethiopians choosing to sponsor one child or two through their education and other needs.» «For now things are just up in the air,» she added. «But who knows, it might be reversed and these needy children will find families, here or abroad.» Source: BBC Africa 22

UGANDA

«Kids for sale: My mom was tricked» The 7-year-old girl, dressed in bright pink and holding one of her favorite stuffed animals, sees her mother for the first time in nearly a year. A brilliant smile spreads across Namata’s face, punctuating her excitement. She and her mother are speaking via Skype more than 7,400 miles apart. Namata, or Mata as she’s known, talks from the home of her adoptive parents in Ohio. Her mother watches via a laptop in Uganda, in a quiet spot away from her village. «Hello,» Mata says. «How are you doing?» Her mother laughs. She’s in awe

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InfoHub Newsletter Issue N.33 | Intercountry Adoption  

Transitioning from Intercountry Adoption

InfoHub Newsletter Issue N.33 | Intercountry Adoption  

Transitioning from Intercountry Adoption

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