Page 1

Sin Fronteras/ Sans Frontières/ Without Borders: AADS Fall 2009 Newsletter


Contents 3

Statement of Director Dr. Jean Muteba Rahier

45

Faculty and Committees

6

Statement of Director of Graduate Programs Dr. Alex Lichtenstein

46

Dr. Andrea Queeley: A Glimpse

48

Programs

51

Courses

7

Staff

53

Student Testimonials

8

AADS Faculty Assembly

54

Upcoming Events

9

It’s a Celebration: Dr. Donna Weir-Soley, Dr. Heather Russell and Dr. John Clark

11

Faculty Achievements

27

Alumni Accomplishments

29

AADS 2009-2010 Students

30

AADS welcomes new MA student: Christina Bazzaroni

31

Karell Travel Grant

32

Student Associations

33

Past Events

From left to right, Rosa Henriquez, Cheryl Johnson, Dr. Dionne Stephens, and Dr. Dawn Addy

Top: from left to right, Dr. Andrea Queeley, Angela Roe, Dr. Yvette Piggush, Dr. Stevens Blevins, Rosa Henriquez, Dr. Carlton Waterhouse, Dr. Jean Robert Cadely, Dr. Heather Russell, Cheryl Johnson. Bottom: from left to right, Dr. John Clark, Associate Dean of CAS Gisela Casines, Dr. Jean Rahier, Noelle Theard, Amy Wolfson.


Statement of Director

From left to right: Senior Associate Dean Nicol Rae of CAS, AADS Graduate Assistant Mamyrah Prosper, Dr. Jean Rahier

I am glad that we are going back to the ANWS tradition of publishing a yearly newsletter. I am very grateful to Mamyrah Prosper, AADS’ 2009-2010 Graduate Assistant, for coordinating this publication. In these newsletters, I intend to use the space given to me under this title to report about what was done in the previous year and in recent months, and to briefly announce what is to come. I hope that with time, everyone in the AADS community will feel entitled to announce in the newsletter, so that we can keep everyone informed of what we are accomplishing individually and as a Program. The newsletter should also be an excellent way to remain in touch with our alumni. Since last fall semester 2008, we have accomplished a great deal, and I am very grateful to the excellent AADS staff, and everyone in the Steering Committee, in the AADS Faculty Assembly, and among the AADS students who contributed to the successful outcome of a series of changes. These changes are aimed at better inserting the Program in the

changing university landscape characterized by budget reductions and by a reorganization of the College of Arts & Sciences (CAS) under the leadership of the new Dean, Dr. Ken Furton. One major change, fundamental for AADS, is the creation, within the CAS, of a new School of International & Public Affairs (SIPA). We are proud to be an integral part of SIPA and are grateful to its Director, Dr. John Stack, for the smooth transition and for his and the other SIPA personnel’s generous support and advice. These changes should also help AADS increase enrollment in our undergraduate and graduate certificates and in our MA Program. We relocated the AADS offices from the Biscayne Bay Campus to the university’s main Modesto Maidique Campus. We are now in the Labor Center building, sharing the third floor with the Center for Labor Research & Studies (CLRS). We are grateful to the CAS Dean’s office for all the support received. I have the feeling that we all enjoy our ne w home and I am very thankful to Dr. Dawn Addy and to the CLRS colleagues for their collaboration in the shared use of the space. In August 2008, the AADS Steering Committee voted to change the Program’s name from “African-New World Studies (ANWS)” to African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS), to better reflect the actual global research and teaching orientations of its faculty members (core and affiliate), and to better reflect their interests for both continental Africa and its Diasporas within the African continent and elsewhere in the global world. The


consensus was that “African-New World Studies” only expresses, with ambiguity, an interest for continental Africa. Moreover, it has the disadvantage of reproducing a vocabulary of “discovery,” inherited from a European or Eurocentric perspective, and at the same time, it limits the focus of research and teaching to the Americas. The new name has the ambition to include the global world in the Program’s scope, and at the same time, it makes visible the work of AADS faculty members on the African diaspora in Europe, Asia, and elsewhere, and their desire to develop a series of programs and research activities focused on continental Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, and North America.

From left to right: LACC’s Liesl Picard, Associate Director of SIPA Steven Heine, and GSS Graduate Student Angela Roe

Inspired by the university’s focus on the development of Ph.D Programs across the campus, and by a corresponding policy in the CAS, we have revised and streamlined the curriculum of the MA Program, and linked it formally to Ph.D degrees in the College. The combined MA in AADS / Ph.D in International Relations is already officially open for admission; the combined MA in AADS / Ph.D program in Global & Sociocultural Studies has been voted on positively by both AADS and GSS faculty, and should be officially open soon; and recently,

AADS and Department of History faculty voted positively for the creation of a new combined MA in AADS / PhD in Atlantic History. We have streamlined the undergraduate Certificate in AADS, and have made some notable curriculum changes, including the development of a new core course for the Certificate: AFA 2004 Black Popular Cultures, Global Dimensions. We have begun the administrative process to have that course replace the old core course (AFA 2000) in the University Core Curriculum courses list. In times of crisis such as these, it is imperative that we secure increased enrollment in the academic programs we offer. Indeed, positive quantitative data rema ins the primary focus when the higher administration evaluates the relevance of relatively small units such as ours. With that in mind, we began a series of initiatives, including the development of linkages between AADS and student organizations. AADS is now related to an AADS Graduate Student Association (AADS GSA), which has been in official existence since the beginning of this fall semester 2009. AADS is also partnering with the FIU African Student Union (ASU), which is in the process of creation and should be officially recognized by the FIU Council of Student Organizations in the spring semester 2010. In addition, we should soon be collaborating with the Black Student Union (BSU). We have also developed a Study Abroad Program in Senegal & The Gambia for the summer 2010. The program, which provides an introduction to West African cultures and traditions, and explores heritage tourism, should be of great interest to undergraduate and graduate students.


From left to right: Senior Associate Dean of CAS Nicol Rae and guest

In terms of staffing and faculty changes, the AADS office is now benefiting from the work of Cheryl Johnson, our new Program Assistant. She coordinates with, and assists the AADS Director and the AADS Graduate Director on all academic projects and issues, including admissions, enrollment, curriculum management and marketing communications. We are also delighted to have a new core faculty member, Dr. Andrea Queeley, who we were able to hire last academic year, and who shares her FIU appointment with the Department of GSS. Last but not least, I am so glad that our colleague Alex Lichtenstein (History & AADS Affiliate Faculty) has accepted to serve for two years as AADS Graduate Director. His leadership was determinant in the drawing of our newest combined MA / Ph.D degree. He was also successful in securing the Karell Travel Grant, which gives a free plane ticket to continental Africa to one graduate student or faculty member per year for three years. AADS MA student, Sarah Labbé, was granted

the 2009-2010 grant. She will go to Madagascar to conduct field research. AADS will be organizing a series of events including lectures, conferences, symposia, etc. during the academic year. Please check our website regularly for more information. We just had two major events: the whole day symposium, on October 30th , 2009 in the Graham Center Ballroom on the Modesto Maidique Campus, entitled: Globalization, the Crisis of Capitalism, and the Obama Presidency. This symposium featured Amiri Baraka, Kamari Clarke, Carlos Moore, and Abiola Irele (for more information, click here). On the evening of October 30, 2009, we also held a West African Dinner-Soirée which was very entertaining (click here for more information). On November 6, 2009, we had the 11th Eric Williams Memorial Lecture, which as always we organizedn collaboration with the Eric Williams Memorial Collection. This year, Mrs. Portia Simpson-Miller, an ex-Prime Minister of Jamaica and current Leader of the Opposition, addressed the audience with a lecture entitled: “A New Vision for a New World Reality: Prospects for the Anglophone Caribbean.” I invite everyone to consult our website, africana.fiu.edu, often so that you remain aware of what faculty and students are doing.

Jean Muteba Rahier, Director


Statement of Director of AADS Graduate Programs The AADS Graduate Program continues to prosper. In July 2009, Ava Purkiss successfully defended her thesis, “The Servant Room Blues: African American Women’s Domestic Work and Resistance Strategies (1886-1928),” directed by Professor Cornelius-Diallo. This fall she will be applying to PhD programs in history. We anticipate the completion of several other theses over the next academic year, including those by Amy Wolfson on the Haitian diaspora’s involvement in development projects in Haiti, Scott Morella on regional integration in southern Africa, Robert Fernandez on education, Noelle Theard on African diaspora photography, and Sarah Labbé on language and education in Madagascar. Sarah, who is the first recipient of the program’s Karell travel grant, funded by Karell African Dream Vacations, will travel to Madagascar to conduct her research in the spring 2010. This award, which supports travel to Africa, will be available again in 2010-11 and 2011-12. This cohort of students is joined by two new students this fall: Jameel Barnes, a returning AADS student who plans to finish his thesis on Nigerian oil politics, and Christina Bazzaroni, who brings a deep interest in the presence of African spirituality in New World cultures. We welcome them both. Expansion of student recruitment efforts should be aided by a recently approved AADS combined M.A./Ph. D. program in International relations.

Further combined programs have been approved with Atlantic History and Global and Sociocultural Studies. We hope that they will open for applications in the fall 2010. Finally, the AADS Graduate Colloquium will have several distinguished visitors this year, including art historian John Peffer, Brazilian & African historian James Sweet, sociologist Zine Magubane , and historian/filmmaker Vince Brown.

Dr. Alex Lichtenstein

--Alex Lichtenstein, Graduate Program Director


STAFF Rosa Henriquez Program Coordinator Rosa has been with African and African Diaspora Studies since 2001. She coordinates all the events for the program, including conferences, lecture series and meetings. She manages the office and assists the Graduate Director in overseeing the Graduate Program in African & African Diaspora Studies. Rosa serves as a liaison between students, faculty and administrators and is always available to help. She grew up in the Dominican Republic and is the mother of three children. She is currently enrolled in the Event and Meeting Planning Certificate in the School of Hospitality Management.

Cheryl Johnson Program Assistant Cheryl has been with the African & African Diaspora Studies Program (AADS) since March, 2009. She coordinates with, and assists the AADS Director and the AADS Graduate Director on all academic projects and issues, including admissions, enrollment, curriculum management, student development and marketing communications. Prior to her arrival at FIU, Cheryl worked with the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, in Toronto, where she lived for 10 years. She is a graduate of the University of Toronto and Ryerson University, Toronto.

Mamyrah Prosper Graduate Assistant Mamyrah started her graduate assistantship with AADS in August of 2009. She holds a B.A. in Political Science and Africana Studies from Barnard College, Columbia University, and an M.A. in Conflict Analysis from Nova Southeastern University. Her current research interests include gender, sexuality, and race construction and performance in Haiti. She is particularly interested in how these identities intersect in Haitian Vodou culture. She is also an organizer with the community organization Take Back the Land.


AADS Faculty Assembly The AADS Faculty Assembly is comprised of all AADS Core and Affiliate Faculty, and also includes any Adjunct Faculty who actually teaches an AADS course during the semester that is unfolding when the AADS Faculty Assembly is taking place. The Faculty Assembly provides guidance in matters of overall program direction. It provides support for program activities and meets a minimum of once per semester. It mostly functions as an advisory body. Jean Muteba Rahier, Associate Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies & AADS, Director, AADS Pascale Becel, Chair and Associate Professor, Modern Languages Steven R. Blevins, Assistant Professor, English Jean-Robert Cadely, Associate Professor, Modern Languages & AADS John Clark, Professor, Politics & International Relations Alexandra Cornelius -Diallo, Assistant Professor, History and AADS Ginette Curry, Adjunct Instructor, English Lisa Delpit, Eminent Professor, Urban Education Mohamed Farouk, Associate Professor, College of Education

Jenna Gibbs , Assistant Professor, History & AADS VĂŠronique Helenon, Assistant Professor, History & AADS Tometro Hopkins, Associate Professor, English

Kingsley Banya, Professor, Curriculum & Instruction Alexander Lichtenstein, Associate Professor, History & Director of Graduate Studies, AADS Andrea Mantell-Seidel, Associate Professor Dance & Director of Academic Programs, Latin American and Caribbean Center Assefa Melesse, Associate Professor, Environmental Studies Aurora Morcillo, Associate Professor, History and Women's Studies Roderick Paul Neumann, Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies

Ulrich Oslender, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Juan Torres-Pou, Assistant Professor, Modern Languages Vrushali Patil, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies & Women's Studies Valerie Patterson, Clinical Associate Professor, Public Administration Joyce Peterson, Associate Professor, History & Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences Andrea Queeley, Assistant Professor, African & African Diaspora Studies & Global & Sociocultural Studies Heather Russell, Associate Professor, English Vicky Silvera, Head, Special Collection, Library Andre Smith, Assistant Professor, College of Law Augusto Soledade, Assistant Professor, Dance Linda Spears-Bunton, Associate Professor, College of Education Dionne Stephens, Assistant Professor, Psychology & AADS Alex Stepick III, Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Ida Tafari, Adjunct Instructo r, Global & Sociocultural Studies & AADS Chantalle Verna, Assistant Professor, History and Politics & International Relations Carlton Waterhouse, Assistant Professor, College of Law Donna Weir-Soley, Associate Professor, English Kirsten Wood, Associate Professor, History Albert Wuaku, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies


It’s a Celebration Let us congratulate the two recent tenure and promotion to Associate professor of Dr. Donna Weir-Soley in the Spring of 2008 and of Dr. Heather Russell in the Spring of 2009; and the recent promotion to Full Professor of International Relations of Dr. John Clark in the Spring of 2009.

Donna Weir-Soley Jamaican Professor Weir-Soley received her BA in English/Honors Curriculum from Hunter College in 1990. She later became a Mellon Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley where she studied under Dr. Barbara Christian and Dr. Vèvè Clarke and received her Master of Arts and Ph.D. in English . She is a tenured member of the English Department at FIU and has been an Affiliated faculty of AADS since 1999. Her core undergraduate courses are African-American Women Writers, Multi-Cultural Working Class Women's Literature, and Literature of the Harlem Renaissance Period (which is also taught as an online course). She teaches two graduate courses: Humor in Caribbean Literature and African and African Diaspora Women Writers. Professor Weir-Soley is also a fiction writer, poet and critic. Her book of poetry, First Rain, was published in

2006 by Peepal Tree Press. She is also co-editor (with Opal Palmer Adisa) of an anthology, Erotic Caribbean which features the work of Edwidge Danticat, Colin Channer, Geoffrey Philp, Heather Russell, Carole Boyce-Davies, Nancy Morejon, Jacqueline Bishop, and many other luminaries. It will be published at the end of the year by Peepal Tree Press. Her critically acclaimed scholarly text, Eroticism, Spirituality and Resistance in Black Women's Writings, was recently published by University Press of Florida.

Dr.Donna Weir-Soley

Heather Russell

Dr. Heather Russell

Dr. Heather Russell received her Ph.D. in Literature from Rutgers University in 1996. Since arriving at Florida International University in 2002, her research and teaching interests have focused on the intersections of race, gender, class, postcoloniality and genre. Her research has primarily examined narrative form and its relationship to configurations of national/racial identities. Her book, Legba’s Crossing: Narratology in the African Atlantic (2009), which pursues these scholarly concerns, has been published by the University of Georgia Press and is now


available. 2008-2009 also marked the year in which Dr. Russell was tenured and promoted to Associate Professor. She is currently at work on her second book, tentatively titled, Popular Culture, Gender and Economy in the Caribbean, which examines the consumption of western popular culture in the Caribbean, between 1960-1990. Professor Russell presents her research frequently at regional and international conferences, most recently at the Modernist Studies Association. At the

undergraduate level, Russell regularly teaches C19th and C20th African American Literatures and Major Caribbean Writers. This year she is teaching two new courses: Black History and the Fictive Imagination and Black Citizenships. For the graduate curriculum, she regularly teaches African Diaspora Women Writers and Narratives of Enslavement and Resistance. She is an active affiliated professor in African and African Diaspora Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Center and Women’s Studies.

John Clark Dr. Clark was promoted to Full Professor of Politics and International Relations in the Spring of 2009. In September 2009, Dr. Clark ga ve a paper at a conference on "Africa's International Relations" at Grand Valley State University entitled "The International Response to the Congo War."

Dr. John Clark

He is the Major Professor for Mr. Bertin Kouadio, who has defended his dissertation on November 10th on the Causes of the Civil War in Côte d'Ivoire.


Faculty Achievements Book Publications (Published) Clark, John F. (2008) The Failure of Democracy in the Republic of Congo. Lynne Rienner Publishers of Illinois Press.

Stepick, Alex. (2009). Churches and Charity in the Immigrant City. Edited by Sarah Mahler and Terry Rey. Rutgers University Press.

Neumann, Rod. (2009). The Human Mosaic: A Cultural Approach to Human Geography (with Domosh and Price) 11th edition. New York: WH Freeman

Weir-Soley, Donna Aza. (2009) Eroticism, Spirituality, and Resistance in Black Women's Writings. University Press of Florida. Weir-Soley, Donna Aza and PalmerAdisa, Opal (eds.). (2009) Caribbean Erotic. Peepal Tree Press.

Books (in Press) Helenon, Veronique . Forthcoming. Colonial Diaspora. French Caribbeans in the Colonial Administration in Africa, 1880-1939.

Rahier, Jean Muteba, Percy Hintzen, and Felipe Smith, (eds). (in press). Global Circuits of Blackness: Interrogating the African Diaspora. Urbana-Champaign: The University of Illinois Press. Rahier, Jean Muteba. Forthcoming. The Afro-Esmeraldian Festival of Kings, Ecuador. Urbana-Champaign: The University of Illinois Press.

Book Chapters (Published) Rahier, Jean Muteba. (2008). “Creolization And African Diaspora Cultures: The Case of The AfroEsmeraldian Decimas.” In The Ecuador Reader: History, Nation, and Politics: 226-236. Edited by Carlos de la Torre and Steve Striffler. Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Rahier, Jean Muteba. (2008). “National Identity and the First Black Miss Ecuador (1995-1996).” In The Ecuador Reader: History, Nation, and Politics. Edited by Carlos de la Torre and Steve Striffler, (pp. 341-349). Durham and London: Duke University Press.


Rahier, Jean Muteba. (2009). “Race, Fútbol, and the Ecuadorian Nation: the Ideological Biology of (Non)Citizenship” (pp 201-222). In Victorien Lavou Zoungbo (Ed.) Imaginaire racial et projections identitaires. Perpignan, France: Presses Universitaires de Perpignan.

Stepick, Alex and Terry Rey. (2009). “Refugee Catholicism in Little Haiti: Miami’s Notre Dame d’Haiti Catholic Church”. In Charity in the Immigrant City: Religion, Immigration and Civic Engagement in Miami. Edited by Alex Stepick, Terry Rey, and Sarah J. Mahler, (pp. 72-91). Rutgers University Press.

Smith, Andre L. (2009). “The Internal Revenue Code Don’t Care About Poor Black People”. In Katrina: America’s Unnatural Disaster. Edited by Dr. Jeremy Levitt.

Stepick, Alex, Teruyuki Tsuji and Christine Ho. (2009). “The Struggle for Civic Social Capital in West Indian Churches”. In Churches and Charity in the Immigrant City: Religion, Immigration and Civic Engagement in Miami. Edited by Alex Stepick, Terry Rey, and Sarah J. Mahler, (pp 208-230). Rutgers University Press

Stephens, Dionne. P., Phillips, L .D. & Few, A. L. (Invited Chapter- 2009). Examining African American female adolescent sexuality within mainstream Hip Hop culture using a womanistecological model of human development (pp. 160- 174). In S. Loyd, A. L. Few and K. Allen (Eds.) Handbook of Feminist Theory, Methods and Praxis in Family Studies. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. Phillips, L. D., Reddik- Morgan, K. & Stephens, Dionne P. (2008). Women can be empowered by rap music (139- 142). In K. Burns (Ed.) Rap Music and Culture- Current Controversies. New York, NY: Greenhaven Press. Stepick, Alex and Terry Rey and Sarah J.Mahler. (2009). “Religion, Immigration, and Civic Engagement”. In Churches and Charity in the Immigrant City: Religion, Immigration and Civic Engagement in Miami. Edited by Alex Stepick, Terry Rey, and Sarah J. Mahler, (pp. 1-40). Rutgers University Press

Stepick, Alex, Yves Labissiere and Ann Reeder Goraczko. (2009). “Religious Practice and Civic Social Capital among Miami Youth”. In Churches and Charity in the Immigrant City: Religion, Immigration and Civic Engagement in Miami. Edited by Alex Stepick, Terry Rey, and Sarah J. Mahler, (pp. 231-249). Rutgers University Press. Stepick, Alex, Terry Rey and Sarah J. Mahler. (2009). “Conclusions: Religious Leadership and Civic Social Capital”. In Churches and Charity in the Immigrant City: Religion, Immigration and Civic Engagement in Miami. Edited by Alex Stepick, Terry Rey, and Sarah J. Mahler, (pp. 250-272). Rutgers University Press. Waterhouse, Carlton. (2009). “Failed Plans and Planned Failures: the Ninth Ward, Hurricane Katrina, and the Continuing Story of Environmental Injustice”. In Katrina’s Aftermath: America’s Unnatural Disaster. Edited by Jeremy I. Levitt & Matthew C. Whitaker. University of Nebraska Press


Waterhouse, Carlton. (2008). “Environmental Justice”. In Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora: Origins, Experiences, and Culture Waterhouse, Carlton. (2008).”Reparations”. In Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora: Origins, Experiences, and Culture.

Waterhouse, Carlton. (2006).“Engaging Environmental Justice”. In Global Economy: Strategies for Home, Community, and World. Westminster John Knox Press

Book Chapter (in Press) Hintzen, Percy C. and Jean Muteba Rahier (in press). “Theorizing the African Diaspora: Metaphor, Miscognition, and Self-Recognition.” In Global Circuits of Blackness: Interrogating the African Diaspora. Edited by J.M. Rahier, P.C. Hintzen, and F. Smith. Urbana-Champaign: The University of Illinois Press. Neumann, Rod. (in press). “Stories of Nature’s Hybridity in Europe: Implications for Forest Science and Policy in the Global South”. In Padoch, C., S. Hecht, and K. Murray (Eds) The Social Life of Forests. Chicago: University of Chicago. Neumann, Rod. (in press). “Through the Pleistocene: Nature and Race in Roosevelt’s African Game Trails”. In Myers, Garth (Ed) Africa in Literature. Ohio University Press. Queeley, Andrea. (in press). “Somos Negros Finos: Anglophone Caribbean Cultural Citizenship in Revolutionary Cuba". In Global Circuits of Blackness: Race, Citizenship, and Modern Subjectivities. Edited by Jean Muteba Rahier, Percy C. Hintzen, and Felipe Smith, University of Illinois Press.

Queeley, Andrea. (in press). “The Passing of a Black Yankee: Fieldnotes/C liff Notes of a Wannabe Santiaguera”. In Fieldwork Identities. Edited byErin Brooke Taylor with foreword by Diane Austin- Broos, Caribbean Studies Press. Rahier, Jean Muteba Forthcoming “Afro-Ecuadorian Community Organizing and Political Struggle: Influences on, and Participation in, Constitutional Processes (1998 and 2008).” In Human Rights and Afro-Latin America: Beyond Citizenship edited by Kwame Dixon and John Burdick. Gainesville: University Press of Florida. Rahier, Jean Muteba Forthcoming “The Microphysics of Colonial Power: Violence, Intimacy, and Sexuality in Belgian Colonial Literature.” In La Présence africaine en Europe / African Presence in Europe. Edited by Bénédicte Ledent and Kathleen Gyssels. Paris: L’Harmattan.


Smith, Andre L. Forthcoming 2010. “Coaching HipHop Athletes: Confronting Double Doses of HyperMasculinity”. In Racism in College Athletics. 3rd Edition. Edited by Dr. Dana Brooks.

Stepick, Alex, Patricia Vanderkooy, and Carol Dutton Stepick. (in press). “The Relationship between the Americas”. In Diasporas: Concepts, Intersections, Identities. Edited by Kim Knott. London: Zed Books.

Smith, Andre L. Forthcoming 2010. “Introducing Asymmetrical Market Imperfections, Or How to Determine Whether the NBA Dress Code is Racist”. In Reversing Filed: Examining Commercialization, Labor, Gender, and Race in 21rst Century Sports Law. Edited by Andre Cummings.

Stepick, Alex and Patricia Vanderkooy. (in press). “Becoming American”. In Handbook of Identity, Theory, and Research. Edited by Seth Schwartz, Vivian Vignoles and Koen Luycks. Warren, Michigan: Spring Publishers.

Stepick, Alex and Terry Rey. (in press). “Visual Culture and Visual Piety in Little Haiti: The Sea, the Tree, and the Refuge ”. In Lives of Immigrant Communities in the U.S. Edited by Paul DiMaggio and Patricia Fernández-Kelly. Rutgers University Press.

Waterhouse, Carlton. Forthcoming, 2009. “King and Legal Justice” In Cambridge Companion to Martin Luther King, Jr. Cambridge University Press Weir-Soley, Donna Aza. (in press). “Dear Andy: The Jamerican Letters”. In In our own Words: A Generation Defining itself. Edited by Marlow Peerse Weaver. MW Entepris es.

Journal Publications Cadely, Jean-Robert. (2009). Haiti and its Languages in the Era of Globalization. INTED (International Technology Education and Development). IATED Publications. Helenon, Veronique . (2008). French Caribbean in Africa: The Role of the Freemasonry, 1900-1939. In Migrations and Creativity in Africa and the African Diaspora. Edited by Toyin Falola, Niyi Afolabi, & Aderonke Adesanya. Carolina Academic Press

Helenon, Veronique . (2008). Encyclopedia entries: “Aimé Césaire”, “Martinique” and “Blacks in Europe”, Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora. Edited by Carole Boyce-Davis. Oxford: ABC-Clio Neumann, Rod. (2009). “Political Ecology: Theorizing Scale. Progress in Human Geography 33(3): 398-406.


Rahier, Jean Muteba. (2008). Fútbol and the (Tri-)Color of the Ecuadorian Nation: Ideological and Visual (Dis)Continuities of Black Otherness from Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. Visual Anthropology Review 24(2) Fall: 148-182. Rahier, Jean Muteba. (2008). Race, Fútbol, and the Ecuadorian Nation: El Mundial 2006 and the Ideological Biology of (Non-)Citizenship. Emisférica, Performance and Politics in the Americas 5(2) December: 1-20. Rahier, Jean Muteba. (2008). El Mundial de Fútbol 2006 y la Selección Ecuatoriana: Discurso de Alteridad en la Internet y en la Prensa. Discurso y Sociedad. Revista Multidisciplinaria de Internet 2(3) Julio: 609-641.

Smith, Andre L. (2009). Do NFL Signing Bonuses Carry a Substantial Risk of Forfeiture within the Meaning of Section 83 of the Internal Revenue Code?, 19. Seton Hall Sports and Entertainment Law Journal 311. Thomas, T. L., & Stephens, Dionne P. (2009). Young women speak: Why we seek health care and what we need from our providers. Journal of the Florida Medical Association, 108, 18-26. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. (2009). Diverse Contexts of Reception and Feelings of Belonging. Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 10(3), Art. 15. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. (2008). South Florida’s Immigrant Youth and Civic Engagement: Major Engagement, Minor Differences. Applied Developmental Sciences, 12(2):1-9. Nicholas, Telka, Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. (November 2008). ‘Here’s Your Diploma, Mom!’ Family Obligation and Multiple Pathways to Success’. The Annals of the American Academy (AAPSS) 620: 237-252

Journal Publications (in Press) Neumann, Rod. (in press). “Race, Nature, and Nation in Roosevelt’s African Expedition: The Birth of Adventure Tourism”. In Cultural Geographies. Neumann, Rod. (in press). “Political Ecology II: Theorizing Regions”. In Progress in Human Geography.

Smith, Andre L. Forthcoming. “Does it Matter What Slaves Thought ‘Direct Tax’ Meant in the U.S. Constitution? ” Smith, Andre L. and Waterhouse, Carlton P. Forthcoming. “Reparations and Taxation”


Smith, Andre L. Forthcoming. “Formulaically Expressing 21st Century Supreme Court Tax Jurisprudence, 2006-2010”. In Afrolantican Jurisprudence. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. (in press). The Complexities and Confusions of Segmented Assimilation. Under review at Ethnic and Racial Studies. Martikainen , Tuomas, Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. (in press). The Role of Religion in European Immigrant Integration.

Waterhouse, Carlton. (2009). The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly: Moral Agency And The Role of Victims in Reparations Programs, 31. University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law. Waterhouse, Carlton. (2009). Follow the Yellow Brick Road: Perusing the Path to Constitutionally Permissible Reparations for Slavery and Jim Crow Era Governmental Discrimination, 62.Rutgers Law Review. Waterhouse, Carlton. (2009). Abandon All Hope Ye That Enter? Equal Protection, Title VI, and the Divine Comedy of Environmental Justice, 20. Fordham Environmental Law Review 51-113.

Book Reviews and Other Publications Cadely, Jean-Robert. Forthcoming, 2007. Haitian Creole-English Bilingual Dictionary, by Albert Valdman and Iskra Iskrova. Antrhopological Linguistics

Queeley, Andrea. Reading Cuba: Forecasting the Fate of Blacks ‘After Fidel’. Transforming Anthropology 2008,16(2): 165-67.

Helenon, Veronique . Forthcoming. Encyclopedia entry: “Barack Obama”, The Encyclopedia of African American History. Edited by Leslie Alexander & Walter Rucker. Columbus, Ohio: The Ohio State University

Rahier, Jean Muteba. Just Below South: Intercultural Performance in the Caribbean and the U.S. South. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2007. In Jessica Adams, Michael P. Bibler, & Cécile Accilien (Eds.) The New West Indian Guide/Nieuwe WestIndische Gids (NWIG), 83 (3&4): 143145.

Neumann, Rod. (2009). Reference Essays: “Biodiversity” and “Political Ecology”. In International Encyclopedia of Human Geography. Oxford: Elsevier. Neumann, Rod. Imagining Serengeti: A History of Landscape Memory in Tanzania from Earliest Times to the Present, by Jan Bender Shelter. African Studies Review 52(1): 208-210.


Rahier, Jean Muteba. November 2008: Globalization and Race: Transformations in the Cultural Production of Blackness, by Kamari Maxine Clarke and Deborah A. Thomas (Eds.). Durham: Duke University Press, 2006. The Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology 13(2): 471-473.

Gioioso, Richard, Hansing, Katrin, & Stepick, Alex. ’Son como fantasmas, estàn pero no se ven’: Central American Arts and Artists in Miami. Report for the Centro Cultural Español (CCE) as part of a multi-country study entitled “Mirando al Sur.” Waterhouse, Carlton. (2009). The Reformation of Rights: Law, Religion and Human Rights in Early Modern Calvinism. American Journal of Legal History.

Recognition Stephens, Dionne P. Blackboard Greenhouse Exemplary Course Award for SOP 3742: Online Psychology of Women (August 2008), Blackboard Inc. & Blackboard Learning Systems.

Funding/Grants Stepick, Alex. Fulbright Fellow, Institut für Europäische Ethnologie, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany, 2008-2009.

Conference Presentations Cadely, Jean-Robert. "Haiti and its Languages in the Era of Globalization." Paper presented at INTED 2009 (International Technology, Education and Development Conference), Valencia (Spain), March, 2009.

Clark, John F. "Electoral Autocracy and Electoral Violence in Africa". Presented at a conference on Electoral Violence in Africa, United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC, June 2009.

Clark, John F. "Political Culture and Violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo." Presented at the Conference on Post-Colonial Wars: Current Perspectives on the Deferred Violence of Colonialism, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Cambridge, MA, October 31, 2008.

Helenon, Veronique. “Managing Race Within the Empire the case of Caribbean colonial administrators in Africa 18801940”. Paper presented at Caribbean Philosophical Association Annual Meeting, August 2009


Helenon, Veronique. “The Obama Phenomenon in France”. Paper presented at Symposium: Race, Gender and Politics in the Twenty-First Century, Barry University, April 2009

Neumann, Rod. “Narratives of Nature, Landscape, and Identity in an Expanding European Union”, Annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Las Vegas, NV, March 17-22, 2009.

Helenon, Veronique. Chair of the panel “Music, Resistance, and the Caribbean’s Calypso Legacy”. Roundtable: Calypso Dream, Florida University, March 2009.

Rahier, Jean Muteba. Perspectiva General de las Independencias Africanas. Invited Participant in the Simposio Principal of the VII Congreso Ecuatoriano de Historia & IV Congreso Sudamericano de Historia entitled Las Independencias: Un Enfoque Mundial organized to celebrate the Bicentenario de la Revolución de Quito (10 de agosto de 1809), July 29, 2009.

Helenon, Veronique. “In the Name of Hip Hop? Banlieue Culture and Riots in France”. Paper presented at Colloquium: Project Banlieue: French Peri/Urban Cultures and Crises, University of Southern California, March 2009 Helenon, Vero nique. Presentation of the Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora, ABC-Clio. Broward Library, February 2009 Helenon, Veronique. "La Diaspora africaine à l'épreuve de la colonisation. Le cas des administrateurs coloniaux antillais en Afrique 1880-1940". Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, February 2009 Helenon, Veronique . “Race, Racism and the Academe: Black FrenchSpeaking Scholars in the American and French Academe”. American Historical Association Annual Meeting, January 2009 Helenon, Veronique. “Anti- Black Racism in France”. Paper presented at Global Anti-Black Racism, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme- Paris, France, June 2008. Helenon, Veronique. “Race, Identity and Poetics in French Rap”. Paper presented at France Noire – Black France: The Poetics and Politics of Blackness, Columbia University Institute for Scholars, Reid Hall- Paris, France, June 2008

Rahier, Jean Muteba. Roundtable “On the Usefulness of the Concept of ‘Diaspora’: Perspectives on Studying Blackness, Africa, and Contemporary Formations in the 21st Century”. Organizer and Chair of the Invited Roundtable at the American Anthropological Association annual meeting in San Francisco, California, November 22, 2008 Rahier, Jean Muteba. Economic Marginality and Adaptation from Esmeraldas to San Lorenzo: The Relevance of Norm Whitten’s 1960s and 1970s’ Work for African Diaspora Studies. Paper presented at Symbolic Affinities, Pragmatic Engagements: Shaping Latin American Ethnology through the Collaborative Work of Norman and Dorothea Scott Whitten, November 23, 2008 Rahier, Jean Muteba. Beyond the Port of Antwerp, the Savages and their Women: The Violence, Intimacy, and Sexuality of Colonial Power in the Belgian Congo. Panel “Gender and Empire” (II) of the Third Chimalpahin Conference 2008L Colonial and PostColonial Remembering and Forgetfulness, Mexico City (Hotel Catedral), October 17, 2008


Rahier, Jean Muteba. Discussant of double session “Racismo y luchas por la ciudadanía en el sistema educativo ecuatoriano”. The Latin American Studies Association (LASA)Ecuatorianistas bi annual meeting in FLACSO-Ecuador, July 18, 2008 Rahier, Jean Muteba. Beyond the Port of Antwerp, the Savages and their Women: The Violence, Intimacy, and Sexuality of Power in the Belgian Congo. Participant in Seminar “Transoceanic Dialogues” chaired by May Joseph, which took place during the Cultural Studies Association Sixth Annual Meeting, hosted by the Department of Art and Public Policy of the Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, May 22-24, 2008 Rahier, Jean Muteba. Football and the (Tri-)Color of the Ecuadorian Nation: The (Dis-)Continuities of Black Otherness from Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. Paper presented at Blackness in Latin America and the Caribbean organized by the Center for Latin American Studies at Indiana University, April 4-5, 2008 Stephens, Dionne P. (2009, March). The influence of parental skin color messaging on emerging adult Hispanic women’s self identity. Paper presented for the Southwest Council of Latin American Studies Annual Conference. Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Stephens, Dionne P., **Aguilar, E., & **Hernandez, A. (March 2009). Emerging adult Hispanic women’s beliefs about skin color’s values. Paper Presentation for the Anything but Safe: Sex, Sexuality, and Gender Conference. University of South Florida- Tampa, FL.

Few, A. L., & Stephens, Dionne P. (2008, September). African American female adolescent sexuality through an ecological- womanist lens. Paper presented at the 2008 Institute for Society, Culture, and Environment Summit, Societal and Individual Transformation: Building CrossNational Research Capacity in Human Development. Riva San Vitale, Switzerland. Stephens, Dionne P. (2008, July). Beyond the Bells and Whistles: Exemplary courses and best practices for Psychology of Women. Paper presented at BbWorld- Black Board Greenhouse Annual Conference. Las Vegas, NV. Stephens, Dionne P. & Phillips, L. D. (2008, May). Womanist approach to understanding African American women’s sexuality in mainstream Hip Hop culture. Paper presented at the Globalizing Hip Hop Conference: Personhood, Policy & Place. FIU African & African Diaspora Studies and the Wolfsonian Museum Educational Program. Miami, FL. Stepick, Alex. “Here’s Your Diploma, Mom!” Paper presented at IMISCOE (International Migration, Integration and Social Cohesion) conference in Bilbao, Spain, September 9-13. Stepick, Alex. Commentator on papers presented in a panel: “Immigrant Children and Youth at the Generations” in Flux conference, Helsinki, Finland, October 21, 2008. Stepick, Alex. Chair of Panel “Axes of Difference: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in South Florida” at the Race, Ethnicity and Place in Miami conference, U Miami, November 5, 2008.


Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “The Haitian Diaspora and Development”. Haiti Workshop, Caribbean Studies Center, London Metropolitan University, November 14, 2008. Stepick, Alex. “Segmented Assimilation: A Critique”. Paper presented at a panel on Ra ce and Membership in Europe, Collegium for African American Research, Bremen, Germany, March 27, 2009. Stepick, Alex. “Critiquing Segmented Assimilation”. Paper presented at the panel Integration of Theory and Policy at the conference sponsored by the Centre for Research on Nationalism, Ethnicity and Multiculrualism (CRONEM) and the AHRC Diasporas, Migration and Identities Programme, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK, June 11 12, 2009. Stepick, Alex. Commentator on panel “City Matters”, Centre for Research on Nationalism, Ethnicity and Multiculrualism (CRONEM) and the AHRC Diasporas, Migration and Identities Programme, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK, June 11 12, 2009.

Waterhouse, Carlton. Invited Panelist. “Complex Racial Equality”, Southeastern Association of Law Schools Annual Meeting, West Palm Beach, Florida, August 2009 Waterhouse, Carlton. Invited Panelist. “The Challenges of Denominational Representation”, National Bar Association, San Diego, California, August 2009 Waterhouse, Carlton. Invited Panelist. “The Victim’s Perspective in Reparations Programs”, Southeastern Association of Law Schools Annual Meeting, West Palm Beach, Florida, July 2008 Waterhouse, Carlton. “No Reparations Without Taxation”. Paper presented at Critical Race Theory at 20, University of Iowa Law School, Iowa City, Iowa, April 2009

Waterhouse, Carlton. “Why President Elect Obama is Wrong About Reparations ”. Paper presented at Florida Junior Faculty Forum, Stetson University College of Law, St. Petersburg, FL, November 2008

Invited Addresses Queeley, Andrea. “Between Blockades: Logistical Challenges, Socio-Political Taboos, and Being “North American” in Revolutionary Cuba”. Invited Paper presented at the New Academy of Sciences sponsored by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and Anthropology Section, New York, NY, January 26, 2009.

Queeley, Andrea. “Somos Negros Finos: Anglophone Caribbean Cultural Citizenship Across Cuba’s Tumultuous 20th Century”. Invited Paper presented for the Graduate Student Colloquium, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, Fall 2008.


Queeley, Andrea. “Movement as Text: The African Diaspora in Latin America”. Invited Presentation for Teacher’s Summer Workshop sponsored by the Latin American Resource Center, Tula ne University, New Orleans, LA, July 10, 2008. Rahier, Jean Muteba. July 27-31, 2009 Invited Participant in the Simposio Principal of the VII Congreso Ecuatoriano de Historia & IV Congreso Sudamericano de Historia entitled Las Independencias: Un Enfoque Mundial organized to celebrate the Bicentenario de la Revolución de Quito (10 de agosto de 1809). Title of presentation: Perspectiva General de las Independencias Africanas, presented on July 29, 2009. Rahier, Jean Muteba. Keynote Speaker. “Afrodescendientes e Indígenas en el Ecuador Postcolonial: Del Mestizaje Monocultural al Multiculturalismo (y PostMulticulturalismo). LASAEcuatorianistas bi-annual meeting in FLACSO-Ecuador, July 17, 2008 Stephens, Dionne P. “Dime Pieces for Dollars: Hip Hop music videos’ influence on the commercialization of black womanhood.” Invited address for the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters’ Black Music & Commercialism Symposium. Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton FL, February 2009. Stephens, Dionne P. “Freaks, Gold Diggers, Divas & Dykes: Framing black female sexual risk outcomes.” Invited address for the Department of African American Studies Research Seminar Series. The University of Houston, Houston, TX, February 2009.

Stephens, Dionne P. “The socio historical construction of African American womanhood in Hip Hop culture and its impact on sexual identity. ” Invited address for the Sexuality Studies Program Lecture Series- Department of Women’s Studies, and Department of Sociology. York University, Toronto, ON, November 2008. Stephens, Dionne P. “Tuning In, Turning it On: Constructions of women’s bodies across the media.” Invited Speaker for Love Your Body Day hosted by the National Organization of Women- Florida International University Chapter. Florida International University, Miami, FL October 2008. Stephens, Dionne P. (2008, September). Frameworks of Hispanic women in reggaeton and their relationship to sexual identity development. Lambda Upsilon Lambda Fraternity Speakers Series- Florida International University Chapter. Florida International University, Miami, FL. Stepick, Alex. “US Immigration and the 2008 Election” conference on the 2008 US Elections, The Hungarian Fulbright Commission, the U.S. Embassy in Budapest and the Budapest College of Communication and Business, Budapest, Hungary, October 13-16, 2008. Stepick, Alex. “Religion and Immigration in the U.S”. Abö University, Turku, Finland, October 18, 2008. Stepick, Alex. “Contemporary Trends in Immigration and Religion”. Abö University, Turku, Finland, October 19, 2008. Stepick, Alex. “Immigration and Religion” for the Lord Mayor of Helsinki and the Minister of Immigrant Integration for the government of Finland, October 20, 2008.


Stepick, Alex. “The Contributions of Alejandro Portes to the Knowledge of Immigration”. Science, Data and Immigration panel, Race, Ethnicity and Place in Miami conference, University of Miami, November 5, 2008. Stepick, Alex. “La Segunda Generacion y su Educacion”. La Coruña University, La Coruña, Spain, November 29, 2008. Stepick, Alex. Two days of lectures on Immigration Theory to Masters students in International Migration Masters Program, La Coruña University, La Coruña, Spain. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “Segmented Assimilation: A Critique”. The Integration of the European Second Generation conference, Amsterdam, December 12, 2008. Stepick, Alex. The American Construction of Race colloquium of the Institute of European Ethnology, Humboldt University, January 6, 2009. Stepick, Alex. Discussant on “Comparative Perspectives of Immigrants in Europe and the US”, Metropolitan Center of the Technical University of Berlin, January 15, 2009. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “Mixed Methods in Immigration Research”. Institute for Methodological Research, Goettingen University, Germany, January 19, 2009. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “Churches and Charity”. Center on Nationalism, Ethnicity and Multiculturalism (CRONEM), University of Surrey, Guildford, UK, February 9, 2009.

Stepick, Alex. “Segmented Assimilation: A Critique” Centre d’Etudes de l’Ethnicité (CEDEM), University of Liege, Belgium, March 12, 2009. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “Churches and Charity”. Diasporas, Migration and Identities Program, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, March 20, 2009. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “Immigrant Religion and Civic Social Capital”. Religionswissenschafliches Seminar and the Kultur- und Socialwissenschaftliche Fakultät at the Zentrum für Religion, Wirtschaft und Politik at the Universität Luzern, April 1, 2009. Stepick, Alex. Master class of Immigration and Religion for Ph.D. and Master’s students, Zentrum für Religion, Wirtschaft und Politik at the Universität Luzern, April 2, 2009. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “Immigration, Religion, Education & Identity”. American Studies conference, Thuringia, Germany, and US Consultate, Leipzig, Germany, April 23. Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “Culture Clash? How to Improve Immigrant-Established Residents’ Interactions: Examples from the U.S.” Institute for American Studies, Leipzig University, April 27, 2009. Stepick, Alex. “Improving InterEthnic Relations”. Paper presented to the Psychology, Political Sciences and Sociology Departments, University of Tallinn, Estonia, May 26


Feldman, Marcos, Stepick, Carol Dutton, & Stepick, Alex. “Local Policy Responses on Integration: A Translatlantic Knowledge Transfer Project”. Convened by the Swiss Forum for Migration and Population Studies of the University of Neuchatel with support from the German Marschall Fund, June 4-5, 2009.

Stepick, Alex. Intersection of Ethnicity, Race and Nationality, European University Institute, Florence Italy with Carol Dutton Stepick, June 9, 2009. Waterhouse, Carlton. Featured Speaker. “From Integration to Reparations ”, Dickstein & Shapiro, Wash., D.C., Feb 2008

Editorial Boards Neumann, Rod. Editor, Political Geography.

Stepick, Alex. Finnish Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.

Neumann, Rod. Editor, Annals of the Association of American Geographers. Rahier, Jean Muteba. Member of the editorial board of the Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology.

Stepick, Alex. Human Organization, published by the Society for Applied Anthropology

Films/Media Cadely, Jean-Robert. Interview on Literacy in Haiti with Kenny Malone on National Public Radion (NPR), October, 2008. Stephens, Dionne P. Interview with Njeri Santana for Urbanplaydates.com [live call- in online radio urban parenting issues program], broadcast on Blog Talk Radio, October, 16, 2008. Topic: Parents responding to images of African American women in Hip Hop culture.

Stephens, Dionne P. Interview with Paula Powell for Real Talk, Real Issues [live call- in radio Black issues program] broadcast on WMBM Radio AM 1490, October 11, 2008. Topic: The impact of negative images of African American women on their relationships with Black men. Stepick, Alex. Interviewed by numerous people making films on Miami, Haitians, and/or Cubans. Stepick, Alex. Appeared on Finnish Television, October 2008.

International Service Helenon, Veronique . Member of the Advisory Committee of The Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora, ABC-Clio, 2008.

Helenon, Veronique . Reviewer of Les Africains et leurs descendants en Europe avant le XXe siècle, MAT Editions, Toulouse, 2008


Stepick, Alex. Reviewed 29 applications to the German Fulbright Diversity Institute and the 2009 Summer Institute for Outstanding European Students in Education, April 6, 2009.

Stepick, Alex. Recommended reading on immigrants in Germany for Fulbright Teaching Fellows in Germnany 2009-10

National Service Queeley, Andrea. Board Member, The Historic Lower 9th Ward Council for Arts and Sustainability, New Orleans, LA, 2008-present Queeley, Andrea. Coordinator, Lower 9th Ward Living History and Culture Exhibit, The Sankofa Marketplace, New Orleans, LA, 2008-2009

Queeley, Andrea. Advisor, Oxfam Gulf Coast Research Project, New Orleans, LA, Fall 2008-Spring 2009 Queeley, Andrea. Volunteer, The Porch 2008 Summer Arts Program, Seventh Ward, New Orleans, LA, Summer 2008

Community Service Helenon, Veronique . Co-Organizer of the “Global Dimensions of Hip Hop: Place. Policy, and Personhood” Conference at the Wolfsonian-FIU, May 2008. Neumann, Rod. Member, Faculty Senate, FIU. Neumann, Rod. Member, University Core Curriculum Oversight Committee, FIU. Stephens, Dionne P. Member, MiamiDade County Equal Opportunities Board Stephens, Dionne P. Volunteer, Hands on Miami

Stephens, Dionne P. (2008, October). “Am I ready for Graduate School? Preparing You to be Strong Applicant for Psychology Graduate Programs”. Department of Psychology Research & Careers Conference. Florida International University, Miami, FL Stepick, Alex. Nominated to Board of Advisors, Hatian American Leadership Organization (HALO) Stepick, Alex. Planning Committee member for Florida Humanities’Council 500th anniversary celebration of Ponce de Leon's landing in Florida.


South Africa Trip During the summer of 2009, Dr. Alex Lichtenstein spent 6 weeks teaching South African history at the University of Cape Town. Ironically, about 1/2 of his students were Americans on study abroad programs. Set on a stunning site on the flank of Table Mountain, the University looks over an area called “the Cape Flats.”

The Flats is where “Coloured” and African residents of central Cape Town were forcibly removed to by the apartheid government (1948-1994) during white minority rule. These neighborhoods share the barren yet beautiful landscape with “townships” established in the 1950s and 1960s for migrant workers with limited residential rights in the Cape Town area, mostly Xhosa-speakers from the Eastern Cape.

About 30 miles west of Cape Town one finds the Lwandle Migrant Labour Museum. Set in an African “township” near the seaside resort of Strand, under apartheid Lwandle was established as a migrant labour community for the nearby fruit canneries and wineries. Now one of the migrant hostels is part of this small but vibrant community museum. After seeing the museum, visitors can go on a walking tour through the township. Follow me….


The former hostels for migrant laborers have been converted into blocks of small flats for township residents.

Township residents are extraordinarily able to adapt whatever materials they can find to making the best of their difficult circumstances. This shipping container has been converted into a hair salon.


Alumni Accomplishments Khatundi Nabwala-Manda, AADS 2007 “I am the Program Director for the Yayaz Project, an empowerment camp for young women in western Kenya aged 14-18. The project aims to create a space where young women can gather to share their stories, build friendships and learn. There are a number of challenges facing young women in Kenya today that make it difficult for them to succeed. Some of these challenges include teenage pregnancy, high HIV/AIDS transmission rates, and sexualized violence. In order for us to deal with these rising challenges it is important for us to work in a non reactionary manner and begin to work within a preventative framework with the hope of preparing these young women for their futures.

The project is comprised of a camp where our participants can strengthen their critical thinking skills, embolden their life vision and talents, and build their esteem. Our goal is to allow young women an opportunity to cultivate a strong sense of self so they can make good life choices. We successfully completed our pilot program in August and had 25 girls in attendance from three local high schools. We are extremely encouraged by our results and feel privileged to have a positive influence in their lives. For more information about the Yayaz Project, please visit our website at www.nabutilufoundation.org/yayaz.html and support our work�


Ava Purkiss, AADS 2009 semester at Xavier University of Louisiana studying African American history and literature through an exchange program, she decided to dedicate the rest of her academic career to the research of African American women’s history. Upon the completion of her B.A., she returned to Miami to pursue a M.A. degree in African and African Diaspora Studies at Florida International University.

Ava Purkiss was born in Kingston, Jamaica and immigrated to Miami at the age of four. Seeking a liberal arts education, she attended Dickinson College and majored in Psychology. After studying for a month in Yaoundé, Cameroon and spending a

Ava's thesis, titled “The Servant Room Blues: African American Women’s Domestic Work and Resistance Strategies,” examines the working conditions and resistance strategies of African American women who performed paid and unpaid domestic labor in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She earned her M.A. degree in August 2009 and is apply ing to PhD programs in History for fall 2010 admission. She is currently developing an FIU online course titled “African American History from the Late 19th Century to the Present” and working as an elementary and middle school tutor on Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation.

Marissa Thomas, AADS 2004 “I still live in Trinidad and I am in my 3rd year of the Phd in Cultural Studies. My thesis

supervisor is Dr. Brader Brathwaite. I'm working with the Institute for Gender Studies as an ethnographer, under the guidance of Rhoda Reddock. We're conducting a study called Building Responsive Policy: Gender, Sexual Culture and HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean. In addition, I’m currently an intern at CCNAPC. I'm conducting research here and assisting with the planning of our AGM, which is in Grenada. Here's our site: http://www.ccnapc.org/index.php?option=com_f rontpage&Itemid=1”


AADS 2009-2010 GRADUATE STUDENTS Continuing Students Roberto Fernandez – rfern013@fiu.edu -who is finishing up his thesis on teacher perception of student motivation Sarah Labbe (TA) – sarah.labbe@fiu.edu -who will continue her research on culture and development in Madagascar Scott Morella (TA) – smorrell@fiu.edu - whose work focuses on the construction of regional space and identity in southern Africa. Noelle Theard – noelletheard@gmail.com - who continues her work on the culture of the African diaspora. Amy Wolfson (TA) – amy.wolfson@fiu.edu -who will be wrapping up her thesis on development and the Haitian diaspora with Dr. Rahier, Dr. Verna, and Dr. Cadely. New Students- MA Jameel Barnes(re-admission) - barnesjameel@aol.com -who wants to complete a thesis on Nigerian oil politics in the Clinton-Abacha years. Christina Bazzaroni (TA) - serpentempress@yahoo.com -who wants to study African spirituality in the Atlantic World New Students- Certificate Francisca Aguilo-Mora - quetaguilo@hotmail.com -who comes to us from Spain, will study postcolonial identity and gender in the Caribbean, beginning Spring 2010. Mamyrah Prosper-who is doing a PhD in Comparative Sociology in the Department of Global & Sociocultural Studies Angela Roe-who is doing a PhD in Comparative Sociology in the Department of Global & Sociocultural Studies Sedrick Sexton- sextons@fiu.edu -M.Ed; Coordinator of Education Media & Communications/Instructional Designer at FIU


Christina Bazzaroni Africa & African Diaspora Studies program, she has chosen to focus her research interests toward another passion: the intersections of spirituality within hip hop culture and how these expressions are manifest.

Originally from Northern California, she relocated to Miami in 2007 after having completed the Florida International University summer intensive program in Haitian Creole. After successful completion of the seven week immersion program, she travelled to Haiti and upon returning decided to make the move South East. Having experienced performing Haitian folkloric dance, and an interest in Afro-diasporic dance and healing practices, Christina identified Miami as the appropriate place to center herself in order to further this study. Christina's research interests are varied, and include questions which look at the healing aspects of African and African diasporic dance as employed for the achievement of spiritual empowerment within the individual and community. As a first year Master's student in the

Christina will strive to understand how hip- hop as a cultural expression is used as a vehicle for advancement and cultivation of the spirit by looking at spiritual teachings and how they are promoted and propagated within the this culture. This inquiry will view the combining of sacred teachings with hiphop culture, to include (physical) movement and oration, as a function of spiritual growth by looking at elements of performativity and healing in ritual through dance and oral tradition, and its correspondence in hip- hop culture through dance and lyricism. In addition to the work Christina continues to do with African diasporic folkloric dance forms, she is also in the process of establishing a Not for Profit organization with the help of a Miami based hip-hop artist, for the express purpose of bringing awareness, education, and resources to at-risk youth within the community. Christina also enjoys photography and is intent on developing her photographic eye and skills to assist in the documentation of the aforementioned research. To provide a visual component of her inquiry will serve to illustrate more fully the beauty and richness of this emerging global culture.


Karell Travel Grant AADS student Sarah Labbé awarded the first Karell Travel Grant

AADS student, Sarah Labbé, has been awarded the Karell Travel Grant. Labbé, the first recipient of the Grant, is a second- year student in the African & African Diaspora Studies M.A. Program. She will use the grant to travel to Madagascar in the Spring of 2010 to conduct fieldwork for her thesis, titled: Linguistic Collision: The Choice of the Language of Instruction and its Implications for Secondary School Students' Identification Processes in Coastal Madagascar. “It is my hope that this research will contribute to the gathering of useful knowledge for the improvement of education in Madagascar,” states Labbé. The Karell Travel Grant was made possible through a generous gift from Norman and Craig Pieters of Karell's African Dream Vacations , a familyowned travel agency that specializes in travel to the African continent. The Grant helps make Africa-bound academic travel possible for AADS M.A. students and faculty, by providing one round-trip ticket from Miami to any point in Africa per year. “I am extremely grateful to have been awarded

this grant. Without the help of Karell Travel, I would not have been able to realize my goal of travelling abroad to conduct field research. I consider this opportunity to be of great importance not only for completing my thesis but I also believe that it will significantly contribute to my professional development and personal growth, ” says Labbé. For more information on the Karell Travel Grant, please visit our web site at Africana.fiu.edu


Student Associations African Student Union ASU (African Student Union), a student organization at Florida International University, was reinstated in the fall term of 2009. Aida Sock functions as the Interim President until the upcoming spring 2010 elections. The organization’s mission is to inform the FIU community about the presence of Africa at FIU through a series of lectures, events, and celebrations. Some members of the organization are themselves from different regions and countries of Africa, interested in sharing their experiences and cultures with other students. Others are students interested in learning about the different cultures and histories of the African continent. Students do not have to be from Africa to be part of the organization. We welcome any and all students. Look out for ASU! **********************************

AADS Graduate Student Association The mission of the African and African Diaspora Studies Graduate Student Association is to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and knowledge among students, faculty, and community members who have an interest in African and African Diaspora Studies as well as to address and foster understanding of issues related to this field of study. The Association was created this Fall 2009. • • • •

Amy Wolfson: President Scott Kristopher Morrella: Treasurer and CSO representative Sarah Labbé: Secretary and website administrator 23 general members


Past Events “Welcome Back Reception” Fall 2009

Top: from left to right, Dr. Andrea Queeley, Angela Roe, Dr. Yvette Piggush, Dr. Stevens Blevins, Rosa Henriquez, Dr. Carlton Waterhouse, Dr. Jean Robert Cadely, Dr. Heather Russell, Cheryl Johnson. Bottom: from left to right, Dr. John Clark, Associate Dean of CAS Gisela Casines, Dr. Jean Rahier, Sharon Placide, Amy Wolfson.

Present at the reception were the Senior Associate Dean of Arts and Science Nicol Rae, Associate Director of SIPA Steven Heines, the Office of Education Abroad’s Director Liza Carbajo, the Director of Center for Labor Research Studies Dawn Addy, Associate Dean of CAS Gisela Casines, and Associate Director of LACC Liesl Picard.

From left to right: Dr. Dionne Stephens and Dr. Andre Smith

From left to right: Dr. Heather Russell and Dr. Stevens Blevins


Faculty, students, and friends of AADS gathered to bring in the new academic year and to officially recognize AADS’ presence on the Modesto Maidique Campus and to celebrate its inclusion in School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA).

From left to right: Dr. Andrea Queeley and Dr. Jean Robert Cadely

From left to right: Senior Associate Dean of CAS Nicol Rae and guest

From left to right: Sharon Placide and Amy Wolfson


Does it Matter what   Slaves Thought?    The Curious Nexus Between   Scalian‐ Textualism & Pre‐Colonial   African Tax Experiences     

Andre L. Smith, Assistant Professor   Florida International University College of Law   

2009- 2010 Faculty Works in Progress Series

Friday September 11, 2009  Labor Center LC309  ●  12pm‐ 1pm 

AADS BROWN BAG EVENT  Please bring your lunch & join our discussion 


From left to right: Cheryl Johnson, Mamyrah Prosper, and Rosa Henriquez

Professor Amiri Baraka

Professor Carlos Moore

From left to right: Scott Morella and Sheila Sutton

Professor Kamari Clarke

Professor Abiola Irele


West African Masquerade Society

West African Masquerade Society and Dean of CAS Ken Furton

Senegambian Dance Troupe

From left to right: Senegambian Dance Troupe’s Mariama Jaiteh, Dr. Jean Rahier, and Interim ASU President Aida Sock


Dr. Carol Boyce-Davis and Mrs. Portia Miller

Mrs. Portia Miller and Senior Associate Dean of CAS Nicol Rae

Mrs. Portia Miller and Erica Williams From left to right: Dr. Carol Boyce-Davis, guest, Mrs. Portia Miller, Dr. Althea Silvera, Dr. Linda Spears-Bunton, Dr. Ida Tafari

Dr. Jean Muteba Rahier Mrs. Portia Miller


Faculty and Committees Core Faculty: Jean Muteba Rahier, Associate Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies & AADS, Director, AADS Jean-Robert Cadely, Associate Professor, Modern Languages & AADS Véronique Helenon, Assistant Professor, History & AADS

Alexandra Cornelius -Diallo, Assistant Professor, History and AADS Dionne Stephens, Assistant Professor, Psychology & AADS Andrea Queeley,Assistant Professor, African & African Diaspora Studies & Global & Sociocultural Studies

Affiliated Faculty: Pascale Becel, Chair and Associate Professor, Modern Languages Steven R. Blevins, Assistant Professor, English John Clark, Professor, Politics & International Relations Ginette Curry, Adjunct Instructor, English Lisa Delpit, Eminent Professor, Urban Education Mohamed Farouk, Associate Professor, College of Education

Jenna Gibbs , Assistant Professor, History & AADS Tometro Hopkins, Associate Professor, English

Kingsley Banya, Professor, Curriculum & Instruction Alexander Lichtenstein, Associate Professor, History & Director of Graduate Studies, AADS Andrea Mantell-Seidel, Associate Professor Dance & Director of Academic Programs, Latin American and Caribbean Center Assefa Melesse, Associate Professor, Environmental Studies Aurora Morcillo, Associate Professor, History and Women's Studies Roderick Paul Neumann, Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Ulrich Oslender, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies

Juan Torres-Pou, Assistant Professor, Modern Languages Vrushali Patil, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies & Women's Studies Valerie Patterson, Clinical Associate Professor, Public Administration Joyce Peterson, Associate Professor, History & Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences Heather Russell, Associate Professor, English Vicky Silvera, Head, Special Collection, Library Andre Smith, Assistant Professor, College of Law Augusto Soledade, Assistant Professor, Dance Linda Spears-Bunton, Associate Professor, College of Education Alex Stepick III, Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Ida Tafari, Adjunct Instructor, Global & Sociocultural Studies & AADS Chantalle Verna, Assistant Professor, History and Politics & International Relations Carlton Waterhouse, Assistant Professor, College of Law Donna Weir-Soley, Associate Professor, English Kirsten Wood, Associate Professor, History Albert Wuaku, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies

Steering Committee: Jean-Robert Cadély Alexandra Cornelius-Diallo Véronique Helenon Tometro Hopkins Alex Lichtenstein

Valérie Patterson Andrea Queeley Jean Rahier Dionne Stephens Albert Wuaku


A Glimpse: Andrea J. Queeley, Ph. D. Assistant Professor, AADS, GSS

Though I was born and raised in Berkeley, California, my parents came from someplace else and, in turn, their parents came from someplace else. And, in the case of my Montserratian paternal grandfather, at least one of his parents came from someplace else. In part as a result of being the product of migrations Great and small, I developed an intellectua l interest in the experience of dispersal, displacement, self- making and survival. When I take a moment to reflect, MOVEMENT, with all of the fractures, (re)constructions, and continuities that it entails, has emerged as a sort of magnet towards which my life and work have been attracted. My first move was from Berkeley to Providence, RI to earn a B.A. in Psychology and Afro-American Studies at Brown University. As an undergraduate, I imagined that my

“career” would be in psychology and that I was taking classes in the AfroAmerican (am I dating myself?) Studies Program to study black psychology, not to mention to combat the personal and intellectual isolation I felt in my “mainstream” major. I took courses with Karen Wyche, Paget Henry, Selwyn Cudjoe, and Anani Dzidzienyo, who encouraged me to study abroad at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, which I did. While this experience was pivotal in the development of my understanding of and relationship to Diaspora, it did not lead me into the folds of an Africana Studies graduate program. Rather, I returned to the San Francisco Bay Area to begin putting my psychology degree to work as a community mental health and substance abuse treatment provider. At this stage of my life, my interest in black movement turned to the study of Afro-Haitian dance and Capoeira Angola rather than any structured academic endeavor. It was also during this time that I took an interest in Cuba, traveling there twice and encountering, among other things, Cubans of English-speaking Caribbean origin. As the granddaughter of Caribbean immigrants who traveled to the U.S. instead of Cuba during the early part of the 20th century, I was compelled by the question of what fate I had eluded by their decision to follow a more northern course. After moving to Brooklyn, New York to pursue a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology at the City University of New York, this personal query transformed into a dissertation project in which I examined the evolution of English-speaking Caribbean


identity from the early twentieth century through Cuba’s Special Period. In part, I was trying to understand why, nearly 70 years after the last immigrants arrived in Cuba and nearly 50 years of a revolution that stressed cultural homogeneity in the service of national unity, would groups of West Indian descendants move to revitalize the social and cultural institutions of their forbearers? This project led me to Santiago and Guantánamo, Queens, Washington Heights, and Broward and Miami- Dade counties, as well as to the realization that I am a scholar/student of the African Diaspora. I am principally concerned with how displacement, migration, and facets of globalization de- and reconstruct racialized social categories articulated through practices of belonging. Situating the se processes within the specificities of national and international political moments, I look at questions of social hierarchy, cultural hybridity, and diversity within the ‘black’ racial category. Importantly, FIU played a critical role in my process of embracing this academic identity. After returning from the field in 2005, I participated in the ‘Interrogating

the African Diaspora Graduate Student Summer Seminar’. Located on the BBC campus, sponsored by FIU’s African and African Diaspora Studies Program (formerly Africa New World Studies), and funded by the Ford Foundation, this seminar brought together graduate students from across disciplines, regions, and continents to develop our own work, critique that of our peers, and engage with senior and junior scholars in the field. This experience not only further embedded me within African Diaspora Studies but also won me over to FIU. A combination of the campus, climate, and camaraderie left me with a positive impression of the institution that endured through the completion of my dissertation and a two-year post-doctoral teaching fellowship at Tulane University in New Orleans. Thus, I am excited to be here as a new faculty member, particularly at a time when the program is in a period of growth and trans ition. It is my hope that I will contribute to making AADS an even more dynamic and engaging program that proves to be of tremendous value to students, the College, the university, and the larger South Florida community.


AADS Programs Masters of Arts in African & African Diaspora Studies The M.A. degree in African & African Diaspora Studies provides interdisciplinary, graduate level education that draws faculty whose scholarly expertise focuses on various aspects of the African continent and its diaspora. Its diverse faculty members include scholars in a variety of disciplines including Global and Sociocultural Studies, Politics and International Relations, History, Education, English, Modern Languages, Law and others. The M.A. degree aims to develops scholars with specific skills, research methodologies, principles, and knowledge which simultaneously prepare graduates for professional positions in a range of fields and for further study at the Ph.D. level. The M.A. Program should attract those who are interested in subjects as diverse as—non exhaustively—national and transnational policy analysis, cultural studies, international relations with and within continental Africa, African and African diaspora gender constructs and sexualities, African and African diaspora literatures, the history and contemporary experiences of descendants of Africans in the United States, pre- national, national, transnational, and post-national processes such as pre-colonial African history and the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, and African diasporic formations globally.

Combined MA in African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS) /PhD in International Relations The combined African and African Diaspora Studies MA/International Relations PhD program allows qualified graduate students to pursue both degrees at the same time. To be accepted into this program, students must simultaneously submit applications for the MA in African and African Diaspora Studies and the PhD in International Relations.

Combined MA in African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS)/PhD in History This program will train doctoral students within the discipline of Atlantic History while giving them area studies expertise in African and African Diaspora Studies in order to help them stay competitive in seeking careers with an international focus in today’s global cultural and intellectual environment. In tandem, these two programs can offer students an unusually close fit and remarkably beneficial synthesis in interdisciplinary approaches to both the Atlantic world and the African diasporic experience.

For more information, please visit our website at Africana@fiu.edu, or contact the AADS Office at Africana.fiu.edu, or 305-348-6860


Certificate Programs AADS offers an undergraduate certificate, a fully online undergraduate certificate, and a graduate certificate. The certificate programs provide students with the opportunity to study the global, economic, cultural, and historical experiences of people of African descent from an interdisciplinary approach. They are designed to complement students’ work in the major fields of study at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, while fostering greater understanding of traditionally marginalized topics. The certificate programs emphasize African and African diasporic cultural expressions in all their regional, temporal, and socioeconomic diversities, while offering insights into the ongoing challenges black communities face locally and globally. The programs also focus on the ways in which continental African and African diasporic communities and individuals have developed strategies for survival in the midst of, and resistance to, racism and subsequent political, economic, and social oppression. The programs offer students the flexibility to choose courses that will allow them to focus more specifically on either US-born African Americans, Continental Africans, or communities of the African diaspora internationally. African & African Diaspora Studies Graduate Certificate Program Designed to complement students’ work in their major fields of study, the program consists of a total of 18 credit hours of coursework. Students must complete the required course AFA 5005 African and African Diaspora Studies Theory. The 15 remaining credit hours may be drawn from courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences listed on the website. African & African Diaspora Studies Undergraduate Certificate Program The certificate provides a grounding in Africana studies and offers excellent preparation for graduate study and professional development. The program consists of 15 credit hours of coursework. Students must complete the core requirement AFA 2004 Black Popular Cultures: Global Dimensions. The remaining 12 credits must come from courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences already approved by the program. Fully Online Undergraduate Certificate in African & African Diaspora Studies Like the undergraduate certificate, the online certificate is designed to give students a solid background in African Studies with the added flexibility of a fully online learning environment. The online certificate may be awarded to students in any field.


Study Abroad Program

African & African Diaspora Studies

School of International and Public Affairs | College of Arts and Sciences

Senegal & The Gambia Traditions, Globalization, and Tourism in West Africa Senegal & The Gambia: Traditions, Globalization, and Tourism in West Africa is a five-week program designed to provide students with an introduction to West African cultures and traditions. The program explores the growing centrality of tourism—particularly “cultural and heritage tourism”—as an increasingly significant sector of the global economy. Students will be introduced to West Africa’s largest ethnic groups, and will gain rudimentary understanding of the Wolof language and culture.

Summer A 2010 COURSES WOL 1998 Introduction to Wolof I ANG 6472 Anthropology of Globalization (graduate section) ANT 4473 Anthropology of Globalization (undergraduate section) CREDITS 3-6 CREDITS DATES Miami- Modesto Maidique Campus: May 10 – May 14 Dakar, Senegal: May 16 – May 30 Banjul, The Gambia: May 30 – June 12 HOUSING In Dakar, Senegal, students will be housed in a rented residential house. In Banjul, The Gambia, students will be staying in duplex apartments. In both locations, they will be provided with three meals per day and laundry facilities.

SCHOLARSHIPS

COST The estimated cost of the program is $4,813.00. The cost includes airfare, AVAILABLE accommodation, three meals per day, laundry facilities, guided tours and activities, and local transportation. The program cost does not include FIU instructional fee, and study aboard non-refundable fee ($175), which includes mandatory health insurance. For more information, please contact the AADS office or visit our website (contact details below).

Contact Information African & African Diaspora Studies School of International and Public Affairs Florida International University 11200 SW 8th Street, LC 304 Miami, Florida 33199

T: 305-348-6860 F: 305-348-3270 E: africana@fiu.edu educationabroad@fiu.edu W: Africana.fiu.edu educationabroad.fiu.edu


African & African Diaspora Studies Fall 2009 Course Schedule Modesto Maidique Campus UDERGRADUATE Class Number

Course Prefix /Number

Section #

Course Title

Times

Days

Instructor

2pm-3:15pm 10-10:50am 11-11:50am 11-12:15pm 2-3:15pm 2-3:15pm 1-1:50

T TH MWF MWF T TH T TH T TH MWF

Russell Girard Queeley Clark Soledade Soledade Pierre

2-4:45pm

W

Cornelius Diallo

2-3:15pm

T TH

Verna

6:25-9:05 5-6:15pm

T T TH

Russell Wuaku

2-3:15pm

T TH

Patil

87970 83474 95548 95221 81886 82214 86722

AML 4606 ANT 3451 ANT 4340 CPO 3204 DAA 1341 DAA 2333 HAI 3213

U01 U01 U01 U01 U01 U01 U01

86250

HIS 4935

U01

95290

INR 3246

U01

88978 87260

LIT4930 REL 4370

U03 U01

95833

WST 4252

U01

C19th Afr Amer Lit: Narrat. of Enslav. & Resistance ANT of Race and Ethnicity Cultures of the Caribbean African Politics African Diaspora Dance I African Diaspora Dance II Accelerated Haitian Senior seminar: The "Long" Civil Rights Movement International Relations of the Caribbean Special Topics: Black Hist & the Fictive Imagination African Religions Border Crossing: Race & Gender in Historical and Transnational Perspective

95376

AFH 5905

U01

Readings in African History

5-7:40pm

Th

Lichtenstein

Periods in Amer. Lit- Piracy or Commerce Approaches to Area Studies

6:25-9:05pm 5-7:40pm

Th T

Piggush Clark

5-7:40pm

T

Kriegel

Rasta, Vodoo and Santeria Develop. & Post Develop.

5-7:40pm 5-9:05pm 11-1:45

T W T

Cadely Wuaku Tardanico

Border Crossing: Race & Gender in Historical and Transnational Perspective

2-3:15pm

T TH

Patil

11-12:15pm 12-12:50pm 12:30-1:45pm

T Th MWF T Th

Weir Soley Cubas Tafari

2-3:15pm

T Th

Weir Soley

6:25-9:05pm

F

Weir Soley

88956 95835

AML5505 INR 5017

U01 U01

89374

HIS5289

U01

95496 83114 95617

LIN 6990 REL 5384 SYP 5447

U01 U01 U01

95910

WST 5253

U01

GRADUATE

Comparative Imperialism: the Civilizing Mission Seminar in Language, Race, Identity, Nation & Power

BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS UNDERGRADUATE 95090 86860 95550

AML 4624 ANT 3451 ANT 4340

B51 B51 B51

95454

LIT 4536

B51

African American Women Writers ANT of Race & Ethnicity Cultures of the Caribbean Multi-Cultural Working Class Women in Literature

Pines Center 96375

AML 4612

P80

Literature of the Harlem Renaissance

ONLINE COURSES 95456

AFA 2004

RVC

Black Popular Culture: Global Dimensions

online

Rahier

87570

ANT 3451

RVC

ANT of Race & Ethnicity

online

Girard

95455

ANT 4396

RVC

online

Rahier

96300

PHC 6763

RVC

online

Gasana

95024

WOH 4230

RVC

Africa & Africans in Films Global perspective of Environmental Health in the Caribbean & Ltn Am. The African Diaspora & the Atlantic Slave Trade

online

Sordo

For more information call (305) 348-6860 or visit our website africana.fiu.edu


African & African Diaspora Studies Spring 2010 Course Schedule Modesto Maidique Campus UNDERGRADUATE Class Number

Course Prefix /Number

Section #

24895

AFA 2004

U01

24896

AFA 4340

U01

Course Title

Black Popular Culture: Global Dimensions Health, Society and Culture in the African World

Times

Days

Instructor

11-11:50am

MWF

Queeley

9-9:50am

MWF

Tafari

11-11:50AM

MWF

Russell

1-150pm

MWF

Girard

5-740pm

M

Lavander

17556

AML 4607

U01

15290

ANT 3451

U01

15340

ANT 3451

U02

20th Century African American Literature Anthropology of Race and Ethnicity Anthropology of Race and Ethnicity

25298 12654

ANT 4340 DAA 2333

U01 U01

Cultures of the Caribbean African Diaspora Dance II

1-1:50pm 2-3:15pm

MWF T Th

Queeley Soledade

10374 17058 17060 24804

DAA 3344 HAI 3213 HAI 3214 HAI 3500

U01 U01 U01 U01

2-3:15pm

T Th

Soledade

10-10:50 12-12:50 5-7:40

MWF MWF W

Pierre Pierre Cadely

25104 19174

INR 3253 LIT 4192

U01 U01

1-1:50pm TBA

MWF

Clark TBA

25081

LIT 4930

U05

2-4:45pm

W

Russell

15266

REL 3383

U01

African Diaspora Dance III Accelerated Haitian Accelerated Intermed. Haitian Haiti: Culture & Language International Relations of Sub-Saharan Africa Major Caribbean Authors Special Topics: Black Citizenships Caribbean Religions

3-3:50

MWF

Wuaku

5-7:40pm

W

Cadely

5-7:40

W

Cadely

2-4:45pm

T

Stack

10-12:50

W

Stepick

11-12:15pm

T Th

Weir Soley

12-12:50pm

MWF

Cubas

5-7:40pm

M

Weir Soley

6:25-9:05pm

W

Russell

GRADUATE 25402

AFA 5932

U01

24805

HAI 5235

U01

18802

INR 5087

U01

25381

SYD 6705

U01

Special Topic: Haiti Language, Culture & Society Creole Seminar Ethnicity & the Poltics of Development Comparative Analysis of Race & Ethnicity

Biscayne Bay Campus 25168

AML 4612

B51

15310

ANT 3451

B51

24948

LIT 5934

B51

Literature of Harlem Renaissance Period Anthropology of Race & Ethnicity Special Topics: African & African Diaspora Literature

Pines Center 25974

AML 4607

P80

20th Century African American Literature

ONLINE COURSES 26094 26092

AFH 2000 AMH 4573

RVC RVC

AML 4612

RVC

16426

ANT 3451

RVC

26093

REL 3383

RVC

24004

PHC 5415

RVC

26134

African Civilization Afro American History II Literature of Harlem Renaissance Period Anthropology of Race & Ethnicity Caribbean Religions Public Health in Minority /Urban Population

online online

Rahier TBA

online

Weir Soley

online

Girard

online

Wuaku

online

Devieux

For more information call (305) 348-6860 or visit our website africana.fiu.edu


Students Testimonials “The AADS appealed to me because, first of all, the certificate program. Earning a certificate in African New World Studies allowed me in my undergrad studies to focus on a field of study that very much appealed to me on a personal level. Even before my university studies I was always reading Malcolm and Black Panther literature and very involved in that thought, and I was never aware that one could study that in school. Aside from that, I enjoyed all the professors which I received classes from.” Neftali Mora AADS Undergrad Certificate (2008)

“Being a student in the African New World Studies Program has really opened my eyes to my history. Some of FIU's best and most passionate professors can be found in this program. I'm a child of Haitian parents and I find it fascinating how people of African decent all over the planet have such similar immigrant stories. It truly connects us as a people in spite of our various languages and histories”. Katiana S. Saintable AADS Undergraduate Certificate (2008)

“I choose the African Studies Certificate because I would like to work in the field of International Development. I believe more study, in general, need to be concentrated within the African continent”.

“I enrolled in the African Diaspora Studies program to expand and cultivate my mind on issues of Diversity. The program took me ABROAD, above and beyond all my expectations. The theories I learned in the classroom have become practical in my personal life”.

David Black AADS Undergrad Certificate (C urrent)

Myron Davis AADS Undergraduate Certificate (2007)


Upcoming Events February 1- March 15, 2010 “Talking Chairs: A Mosaic of the Black Atlantic�, Expose of D.D. Devylder Opening Reception on February 4, 2010 at 6:30pm

February 11, 12, and 13, 2010 AADS Film Festival

March 9, 2010 "Madona, Oprah and Angelina: Gender and the Politics of Celebrity Activism in Africa" talk by Dr. Zine Magubane, Boston College

March 25, 2010 "Herskovita at the Heart of Blackness" film and lecture by Dr. Vincent Brown, Harvard University

April 1, 2010 "Chris Gray Memorial Lecture" by Ambassador James McGee

Sin Fronteras/Sans Frontières/Without Borders  

AADS Fall 2009 Newsletter

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you