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no farmer associations exists, information and awareness creation about the technology, and training and capacity building. The second module involves link to the input providers who supply improved seeds and plantlets, fertilizers, credit etc. The third module involves increased crops productivity through good agronomic practices and ensuring that the costs of production are lowered and the yield is increased significantly. The fourth module involves training and capacity building for post-harvest handling and marketing linkages. These are achieved through strengthening of the value chain stakeholders, crop collection centers, value adding, grading, quality control, price negotiations and actual marketing of the produce through traders who deliver the product to the target markets The technology deployment program has worked well for TC banana, and the farmers can now sell their bananas by weight rather than the conventional approach, where bananas did not have a standard measurement for fair pricing. The collection centers are attracting bulk buyers who offer better prices to the farmers. Farmer organizations are also able to settle on better prices, preventing exploitation by buyers, who traditionally played off one farmer against the other. The same approach is being applied to the Gadam and other varieties of sorghum project, where Africa Harvest has strengthened the value chain by collaborating with Equity Bank to provide input-financing and thereby increase the production levels of sorghum as a staple food. Africa Harvest is also working with breweries in Eastern Africa to provide a sustainable market for sorghum,. This ensures that the farmers can access a robust market for their produce. Other markets for sorghum include animal feed and flour milling food industries. The success of technology deployment is best measured by the rising production of both banana and sorghum by smallholders. More details of these projects are given below. (i) TC Banana Project The deployment of disease-free, high-yielding Tissue Culture (TC) banana began in 2002 with a pilot project targeting 400 farmers in Maragua, Murang’a and Kirinyaga areas of Kenya and later saw a significant uptake with the support of Rockefeller Foundation, AGRA and DuPont Pioneer. Africa Harvest is currently working in over 30 districts of Kenya. These projects have so far seen over 250,000 households plant over one million TC banana plantlets. Africa Harvest has enabled farmers to access the banana plantlets, which are virus-indexed to eliminate the infection that reduce banana productivity. Africa Harvest has built the capacity of farmers to use good agronomic practices that increase the productivity and uniformity of bananas and ensure that they can be harvested more or less at the same time. Training was also offered to farmers on post-harvest handling of bananas to reduce losses and increase the quality of bananas that reach the market. The final product is therefore produced faster at a lower cost and of a higher quality. The skills learnt included record-keeping, group dynamics, orchard establishment and the management of major pests and diseases, all to support the concept of farming as a business enterprise. The success of TC banana and the agronomical support provided by Africa Harvest have seen the income of farmers increase significantly with farmers reporting an income of KES. 60,000 (USD 725) from 0.75 acres of land, where previously the income was less than KES. 5,000. These successes have seen the demand for the TC banana plantlets outstrip the supply. Africa Harvest is working to build the capacity of African scientists and infrastructure to support the production of TC bananas and other biotechnological solutions. The whole value chain approach has increased the avenues for value addition, with bananas being used to produce banana wine, banana chips and canned baby food. The success of the technology deployment is best measured by the growth in production of both banana and sorghum by smallholders, which has raised their family incomes, food security, and levels of nutrition. (ii) Trees for Energy Project The trees for energy project (TEP), sponsored by the Kenyan Ministry of Energy and implemented by Africa Harvest, aims at reducing deforestation while providing a viable source of energy for resource-poor rural farmers. These two objectives can be conflicting as the primary source of energy in the rural setting is firewood. Increasing population pressure on productive land has led to rapid deforestation of forests, and depletion of water bodies (rivers) that feed the agriculturally productive lands. Africa Harvest set out to increase the capacity of the rural, resource-poor farmers to use these forests sustainably. The program rehabilitated riverine areas to safeguard the cleanliness and sustainability of river water sources. The project also trained charcoal merchants on efficient methods that increased the conversion of wood to charcoal from 12% to 35%.

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Africa Harvest Strategic Plan 2012–2022

Africa Harvest 10 year strategic plan  

Africa Harvest 10 year Strategic plan

Africa Harvest 10 year strategic plan  

Africa Harvest 10 year Strategic plan

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