Issuu on Google+

No.22: aug - oct 2013

A F R A A ’ S PA N A F R I C A N J O U R N A L O N A I R T R A N S P O R T

Airlines Rapidly Adopting

Mobile Technology

E-Payment

The Way Forward for

African Airlines

Interview with

TAAG

CEO


Africa’s Biggest Airline CEOs’ Conference

The African Airlines Association (AFRAA) 45th Annual General Assembly (AGA)

and African Air Transport Summit will take place in Mombasa, Kenya from 24-26 November 2013. The AGA will be hosted by KENYA AIRWAYS - The Pride of Africa. Participation is by invitation only For sponsorship and exhibition opportunities, please contact the AFRAA Secretariat for details.

African Airlines Association (AFRAA) | 2nd Floor, AFRAA Building | Off Red Cross Road South C, off Mombasa Road, Nairobi | P.O. Box 20116 – 00200, Nairobi, Kenya Tel: +254 20 2320144/8, GSM: +254 722 209708/735 337669 Email: afraa@afraa.orgWebsite: www.afraa.org


aug - oct 2013

1

foreword

A Brighter Future Beckons

T

here is great optimism about the prospects for African aviation and African development in general. It is indeed a time of some optimism for the African airline industry’s financial prospects. The outlook is telling us that airlines have made fundamental adjustments in their businesses in order to generate profits with oil expected to be $108/barrel and the global economy expected to grow by 2.2% in 2013.

We are seeing a significant increase in the load factors. This is due to the increased usage of the right aircraft for routes particularly regional types on thin routes. Airlines, through structural changes and careful capacity management, are putting more people in seats. We expect load factors to be over 70% this year, an increase from around 67% over the past few years, but still well below industry standards of about 80%. Connectivity, though still unsatisfactory continues to improve with over 25 new city-pair connections in 2012. Airlines are doing all of this with innovation and partnerships that are providing value to travelers, while improving the utilization of their assets. However, it is necessary to highlight that this is a tough industry with very poor returns. It is always a constant challenge to keep revenues ahead of costs. There are some airlines that are struggling, particularly the small resource challenged and government owned carriers. The industry on the continent is plagued by high taxes, charges and fees on passengers and fuel. But there is a core of airlines that are showing how strong performance can drive profits even in difficult circumstances. IATA recently announced that this year airlines are expected to make $12.7 billion profits on $711 billion in revenues, that’s a 1.8% net profit margin. African airlines are expected to make a profit of $100 million, up from a loss of the same amount in 2012. Very thin margins are characteristic of the airline industry. Achieving profits with the continued weakness in the global economy is a major achievement, especially in view of the well above industry costs on the continent. With fuel accounting for about a third of industry costs worldwide, in Africa it is about 50% of operating costs. The growing African aviation industry needs to be supported by a well-oiled supply chain where the costs are competitive and where revenue opportunities exist which can be facilitated by the optimal use of the latest information communication technologies, the right aircraft for the given routes and the adoption of best industry practices in safety operations, logistics, management and marketing services. The AFRAA Suppliers and Stakeholders Convention held in Nairobi on 16-18 June 2013 helped to facilitate the establishment of lasting relationships between suppliers and users, sharing ideas on establishing win-win relationships. AFRAA had identified the need for a forum, a sort of one-stop forum to bring together suppliers of services such as aircraft, engines, equipment, components, spares, ICT services, training solutions, consultancy services, financing and the various customers of these services including airlines, airports, civil aviation authorities, air navigation service providers, among

others. This Convention was critical in facilitating interaction, networking and sharing of ideas and views on how we can move our industry forward. The establishment of the trusted partnerships with entities inside and outside the continent augurs well for the smooth growth and development of a safe, secure, reliable and viable aviation industry on the continent. The growing African aviation needs support in areas such as aircraft maintenance, provision of simulators and training facilities. Africa boasts some EASA/FAA certified world class maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) and training centres. For MRO services, these include Aerotechnic Industries Maroc, Air Algerie Technics, Atlantic Air Industries Maroc, EgyptAir Maintenance & Engineering, Ethiopian Airlines, Kenya Airways Technical, South African Airways Technical and TunisAir Technics. In the provision of world class training and simulator services, you will find FAA/EASA certified providers at EgyptAir Training Centre, Ethiopian Airlines Academy, Kenya Airways Pride Centre, Royal Air Maroc Academy and TunisAir Training Centre. There is need to significantly improve the poor safety image of the continent. In the short term, this can be achieved by implementing the agreed Africa Indian Ocean (AFI) Safety Improvement Actions Plans approved by the Ministers Responsible for Aviation in Abuja in July 2012 and endorsed by Heads of States in January 2013. Implementation by the stakeholders of the agreed strategies should result in all African countries and airlines on the banned list being removed from it by 2015 and all African airlines being IOSA registered by the same year. As safety requires collaboration by various stakeholders including governments, civil aviation authorities, airlines, airports, ground handling companies and air navigation service providers, cooperation is critical. Better resourced airlines will need to assist their less endowed counterparts on the continent through, for example, assisting them with gap analysis and allowing secondment of personnel to undertake on-job-training. Currently, infrastructure in many African States is deficient and not coping with the growing airline industry. Although there are a significant number of exceptions, there is need to develop and expand airports, runways and air navigation safety facilities. Airports should be open 24 hours a day and not just during daylight hours. There is need for the relevant authorities to be proactive and plan for the expected rapid expansion of African aviation in the next fifty (50) years. The industry is behind the world in the adoption of cost effective technologies. The improvement in infrastructure can be enhanced if partners from inside and outside Africa are ready to cooperate on a build, operate and transfer (BOT) basis. Countries like the Philippines have used the BOT to motivate private sector provision of infrastructure. A similar approach can be used in Africa as the needs for infrastructure enhancement are huge and needs new innovative approaches for meeting the growing needs.

Dr. Elijah Chingosho AFRAA Secretary General


2

Africa Wings

contents

No.22: aug - oct 2013

A F R A A ’ S PA N A F R I C A N J O U R N A L O N A I R T R A N S P O R T

Airlines Rapidly Adopting

E-Payment

Technology

African Airlines

Mobile

The Way Forward for

Interview with

TAAG

CEO

afraawings22CVR.indd 1

8/7/13 2:37 PM

Publishers:

Camerapix Publishers International Limited

Editorial Director:

Rukhsana Haq

Managing Editor:

Raphael Kuuchi

Copy Editor: Senior Designer: French Translation: Production /Advertising:

Cecilia Gaitho Maureen Kahonge Sam Kimani Ephrem Kamanzi Azra Chaudhry (UK) Rose Judha (Kenya)

Africa Wings is published quarterly for Afraa by Camerapix Magazines Limited. Correspondence on editorial and advertising matters may be sent to either of these addresses:

Interview with Dr. Pimentel Araújo 4

6

Managing Aircraft Spares & Supplies Can Save Airlines Money

Camerapix Magazines (UK) Limited 32 Friars Walk, Southgate, London, N14 5LP Tel: +44 (20) 8361 2942, Mobile: +44 79411 21458 E-mail: camerapixuk@btinternet.com Printed in Nairobi, Kenya. ©2013 CAMERAPIX MAGAZINES LTD All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced by any means without permission in writing from the publisher.

The air transport in Africa is growing very fast and with it opportunities for African airlines to expand and be profitable.

The African Civil Aviation Policy (AFCAP) 8

African states should ensure that their Civil Aviation Authorities are strengthened to carry out effective regulations and safety oversight of their aviation industry.

10 12 E-payment: The Way Forward for Africa Airlines

Airlines Rapidly Adopting Mobile Technology The Airline IT Trends Survey shows an airline IT climate that is cautiously improving.

Editorial and Advertising Offices: Camerapix Magazines Ltd. PO Box 45048, 00100 GPO Nairobi, Kenya Telephone: +254 (20) 4448923/4/5 Fax: +254 (20) 4448818 or 4441021 E-mail: creative@camerapix.co.ke

Chairman and CEO of TAAG Angola Airlines and Chairman of AFRAA Executive Committee.

African airlines need to think ‘out of the box’ and take advantage of the innovations best suited to their environment.

Aircraft Analysis: MRJ90 Versus SSJ100 14

Industry analysts have shed varied opinions about these newer arrivals and how far they will penetrate the market.

Interview with Kassa Maru, President of American 16 General Supplies (AGS)

Insight on how AGS carries out inventory management training and customer support for

African airlines.

IATA Held its 69th Annual General Meeting, 18 2-4 June 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa

Strong calls for African governments to take full advantage of aviation as a catalyst for growth and development.

Montreal Convention of 1999 21

Promotion of the Convention for the Unification of Certain rules for International Carriage by air.

News Briefs 22 ASASC Special 26

What’s new with airlines in the region?

Welcome to the latest news from AFRAA.


aug - oct 2013

55

6

6

23

3


4

Africa Wings

interview

TAAG Angola is one of the successful airlines in Africa with excellent safety standards. In this exclusive interview with Africa Wings, the President and CEO of TAAG Angola - Dr. Pimentel Araújo, discusses the achievements of TAAG, safety in Africa, EU banned list of airlines, brain drain, market access and high operating cost among others.

Qatar Airways, Turkish Airlines). I strongly believe that in the current scenario there should be a transversal effort, from airlines themselves to other governmental entities, to seize this opportunity to increase market share both within and outside Africa. This would not only contribute to the development of African economies, but also to the strengthening of cultural ties between Africa and the rest of the world.

You successfully got TAAG Angola Airlines off the EU list of banned airlines. How did you do it?

Dr. Pimentel Araújo, Chairman & CEO of TAAG Angola Airlines and Chairman of AFRAA Executive Committee What is your assessment of the airline industry in Africa today? The airline industry is an important enabler to the fast-paced economic growth we are experiencing in Africa today. In fact, African economies have experienced, and will continue to experience, some of the highest GDP growth rates worldwide (e.g., Angola had approximately 8% GDP growth rate between 2011 and 2012, according to the African Economic Outlook), which alongside the strong growth forecasts for passenger traffic (e.g., IATA forecasts African passenger and cargo traffic will grow 6.9% and 4.3% respectively, vs. 5.6% and 3.4% in the rest of the world). As such, African airlines are developing rapidly to capture the upside from this growth, namely through expansion of their networks (domestic and international) and improvements in operations (e.g. delays, customer service). This is why one may see African airlines like TAAG Angola Airlines, Ethiopian Airlines and Kenya Airways starting new routes in Africa and in other continents, and many airlines are implementing ambitious transformation plans to improve performance. This opportunity is so attractive that even nonAfrican airlines are reinforcing their presence in Africa (e.g. Emirates, Lufthansa, IAG, Etihad,

TAAG was the first African Operator, I believe, ever allowed to fly to Europe after being placed in the EU safety list, then called “black list”. This was made possible by two key objectives: our successful completion of the recertification process by INAVIC (the Angolan Civil Aviation Authority) and our registration with IOSA following a successful completion of the IOSA audit, where TAAG attained a compliance rate in line with the best-in-class airlines in the world. These achievements guaranteed we were able to restore our IATA membership. Additionally, TAAG has significantly invested in the renewal of its technological infrastructure and applications during the past five years, leveling TAAG with some of the industry’s best practices. These improvements allow TAAG to maintain excellent safety standards as it can manage its fleet and crews more efficiently and to closely monitor the aircraft conditions. We were also able to increase fleet utilization levels, which are now in line with the best practices in the industry. A good illustration of the impact of our operational improvements was the quick improvement in the level of delays immediately after these changes were introduced: in the month of October 2009, 90% of our flights had a delay of 30 minutes or more, yet two years later we were able to dramatically improve this situation, resulting in only 10% of our flights having a delay of 30 minutes or more. This improvement was possible thanks to the continued commitment of all company workers that rallied to support a zero tolerance on delays program launched by the management team.

What advise will you give to States and airlines still on the EU banned list? I would advise them to promote the change within their organizations, by investing in safety and quality as the top priority. It is a long and

strenuous process, but an extremely important goal to succeed upon, and should be adhered to not only to lift the ban but primarily for the safety of passengers. After all, an airline is responsible first and foremost for ensuring the safety of its passengers.

Brain-drain is a major challenge for many airlines. How is TAAG Angola addressing this problem? In an industry with such complexity and highly technical as ours, it is only natural that we look for the best available professionals in the marketplace and young talents with high potential. The downside is that the professional development colleagues undergo at TAAG provides them with a transferrable skillset, highly desirable by other companies both in the domestic market and abroad. To ensure a high level of talent retention, we have been addressing this issue investing on in-house training and capability building. A very successful example I can share with you is an initiative we have implemented at the level of organizational excellence, where we designed an ongoing program called TAAG Corporate Academy. The TAAG Corporate Academy is an internal program of qualification frameworks, which aims to identify and develop young professionals that may assume leading positions in TAAG in the future. This program provides for the inclusion of promising talent in TAAG’s senior management team. Another successful example of a talent development effort is the on-field cross-training of several TAAG employees with other airlines with whom we maintain codeshares and other commercial agreements, helping them understand the underlying philosophies of the airline industry from a broader perspective and gaining an international standard work ethic.

Though TAAG Angola is growing rapidly, there may be some difficulties it is encountering. Can you kindly enumerate on the main challenges of the airline? TAAG has the ambition to become a flagship carrier that is the reference at a regional level, served by world class infrastructures. Only then can we rightfully call ourselves a strong driver of national economic development. In order to achieve this status, we foresee four main challenges going forward; Airport and supporting infrastructure: in the perspective of developing a relevant Hub in Luanda to serve passengers in transit (i.e.,


aug - oct 2013

5

interview

not flying to/from Angola), it is essential that we have the necessary infrastructure in place. This is challenging because such infrastructure requires sponsorship directly from the Government and several other entities, therefore not exclusively under our control; Regulatory framework: We should be working together with governmental entities to benefit from the most efficient regulation in the sector, aligned with international safety and service standards; Network: serving a wider range of destinations will be a challenging process, as we have to invest a significant amount of time and effort studying and identifying meaningful and economically sound destinations, while designing and rolling the business model to accommodate growth; Operational efficiency: the current global economic context has contributed to the rise in many of our major cost drivers (e.g. fuel). An increasing cost base implies that we pass these costs on to the consumer, that we assume a loss or that we become more efficient operationally. The first two are not options for TAAG, which is why we are very committed towards progressively improving our performance.

Market access in Angola is very restricted. Is this having any effects (positive or negative) on the operations of TAAG? Market access is a very important dimension for a company like TAAG, given the inherent international nature of our sector. On one hand, it presents difficulties, such as those posed by our immigration policies, which may contribute to a reduction in passengers who are willing to come to Angola and/or connect in Luanda to continue their journey onwards. On the other hand, the flipside of having some restrictions in market access is that there is a huge potential for growth as the country becomes more international, fostering further connectivity between markets. That is why our strategy has been to progressively adapt to the global stage as we foresee that our country is progressively becoming more international, following the trend of our neighboring countries. It is also important to notice that this market is open to various airlines from other countries, and that this access is dependent on negotiation between countries, which places TAAG in equal footing with foreign airlines with respect to access to international routes.

How can African airlines increase commercial cooperation among themselves? I believe the answer lies in economies of scale and scope. Compared to airlines outside of Africa, our airlines are relatively small in both sales and asset base. As such, we lack the strong negotiation power which some of our American, European, Middle Eastern and Asian peers benefit from, a key lever to lower our cost base. By aligning procurement needs and purchasing in bulk, expenses such as fuel, insurance, handling, equipment and perhaps even aircraft can be optimized. Additionally, African airlines should look for win-win situations within their commercial offering, such as aligning networks between themselves to provide our passengers the most complete portfolio of destinations possible through commercial agreements and equitable negotiation. Once we are able to align ourselves on both these aspects, I believe all else will naturally follow.

How are the high operating costs in Africa affecting TAAG Angola Airlines growth and profitability? The high operating costs in Africa are affecting the whole industry, and TAAG is no exception. The staggering cost base is undermining key successes we achieved over the past two years at the level of operational excellence, business strategy and customer service. In order to mitigate this effect, we have implemented a number of initiatives designed to curb excessive or wasteful spending. An example of such an initiative is our collaboration with IATA to implement FEGA (Fuel Efficiency Gap Analysis),

which attempted to (and succeeded in) control fuel consumption and related costs, resulting in USD 35 million worth of annual savings. TAAG Angola is one of the most reputable airlines in Africa and you as TAAG Chairman and CEO was elected as the Chairman of the African Airlines Association (AFRAA) Executive Committee in November 2012. What has made TAAG Angola such a respectable airline? TAAG is not as far as we would like it to be, our ambition is to be one of the most important players in the industry. However a lot has been made and we are proud that our fellow African airlines recognize our effort and accomplishments so far. Our reputation today is based on strict compliance with the international standards of the aviation industry and the company as a whole is committed to safety as priority adopting a policy of zero accidents and incidents. TAAG was just nominated a member of the IOSA Oversight Council of IATA, which means that our policies are working well in terms of quality and that our company is taking the relevant steps towards Excellency.

Finally, please tell us a bit about the man Pimentel AraĂşjo I do not like to speak about myself, but I am a hard worker in whatever I am assigned to do and I handle my tasks with utmost honesty, dedication and responsibility. I pride myself because this spirit is being spread among my team members and we are being successful. In my private life I am a simple person who enjoys reading and spending time with my family.


6

Africa Wings

organization’s success and credit worthiness

Managing Aircraft Spares & Supplies Can Save Airlines Money By Mohammed Mahmoud, President, Aero Industrial Sales, USA

is measured by how promptly it meets debt obligations. The failure to respect payment timelines tarnishes a company’s image and downgrades its credit rating. Many African airlines are oblivious of this reality of business: they do not pay their bills on time. Sometimes, there are understandable and tolerable

T

he air transport in Africa is growing

as a supplier dealing with airlines in Africa.

circumstances beyond the control of the

As an airline grows, so must its partners in

airline. These if properly communicated timely,

the business, all things being equal. The

could avert negative perception. This is why

longer the relationship between an operator

your supplier must understand your operating

and a supplier the more successful both

circumstances. There are safeguards built

become. Over time a supplier gains a deeper

in the forms of international and bi-lateral

understanding of the business dynamics of

commercial codes and agreements in order

the airlines and sees him/herself as a partner.

to assure the safety of goods and interest of

It therefore defies logic that some airlines and

the buyer: Once the order is placed and the

suppliers do not seek lasting relations. Airlines

supplier is selected by the buyer, the seller

must avoid one-off transactions as they

transfers the shipment – with the proper

tend to be more costly when compared with

paperwork – to the selected carrier at the FOB/

enduring suppliers.

FAS point, and thereby the title transfers to the

very fast and with it opportunities for

buyer absent prior negotiated arrangement.

Credibility of Supplier

While also logistical impediments and other

profitable. With many small airlines lacking

Besides its capital and manpower assets, an

hurdles, like customs clearance, cargo

in resources and capital for investment,

airline objective is to maintain adequate and

incapacity etc., create further delays, there are

taking advantage of the traffic growth would

relevant inventory for its fleet and ground

however, self-inflicted situations though. Many

require concerted support from governments

service equipment. The emphasis therefore is

African airlines mandate that the “receipt of

through progressive regulatory development

to get the optimal inputs and stocks required

the goods be confirmed at its premise and

and from suppliers of equipment, parts and

for operation, right quality, timely and at lowest

document issued by its receiving section,

components. There is also the need for access

possible price. The identification and choice of

before payment is considered.” This results

to affordable capital and above all safety in

a reliable and dedicated supplier is invaluable

in delays, strained relationships and hurts

Africa must be given greater attention.

in an airline’s effort to meet its equipment

both parties. On the contrary, there are some

A successful airline is driven by a number of

and logistics requirement. A supplier that

airlines that negotiate long-term contracts

factors. While skills, resources and shareholder

understands not just the products he sells

and initiate an agreement for a product line

support may be critical to implementing the

but the business, structure, financial situation

that creates a win-win situation for both. Once

business strategy, the establishment and

and needs of the airline is a partner in the

such a contract is in place, suppliers are

sustainability of credible and dependable

business. Such partner will place the success

dispatched upon receipt of orders in real time

partners through carefully planned supply

and profitability of the airline ahead of its own

without further unnecessary paper work. This

system is inevitable to airline success. It

margins and parochial gain.

averts undue inconvenience to operations and

is in this regard, that I decided to write this

But easy as this may sound, it is difficult

passengers in situations of AOG.

piece to share with the industry in Africa, my

to find an understanding supplier. In

successful experience and participation in

today’s debt ridden world, credit worthiness

working for African Aviation and subsequently

is essential. Now than ever before, an

African airlines to expand and be

Dispose of Excess Stocks to Save Money In general, purchasing of products and services is a major airline expense. And because of that, the CEO and CFO ought to be very vigilant during budget presentations. Rather than wait to be presented with the company’s equipment/supplies requirement budget, step out and take a walk the warehouse(s) and stores to ascertain what is in stock. Take your warehouse manager along and ask the right questions as you browse the shelves.


aug - oct 2013

7

aircraft spares & supplies

Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Commonality is beneficial: Globally there are only few complete line manufacturers of ground support equipment (GSE) with dependable after sales services. These are complemented by those with limited specialty units scattered all over. It is instructive to note that though the initial list prices of some equipment may be appealing, in the long run, it always pays to take advantage of the opportunities that come with standardization. These include commonality of spares, technical knowhow, ease of maintenance, limited number and variety of spare stock, etc. Equipment standardization has proven to always be a financially rewarding strategy in the long term. Ensure your warranty is appropriate: To the extent that the airline would like to maximize its free warranty services, the reverse is true to the warranty giver, especially OEMs and Repair Shops. Therefore, if your To your surprise you would find multiples of parts that do not manifest recent movements. You may even be unpleasantly surprised that some parts and components belong to airplanes that have long left the fleet (obsolete). A similar visit to the ground equipment maintenance area would reveal a similar site; abandoned cars, trucks, tow tractors, etc. If you demand a reason, it would be, “Lack of spare parts.” The terminal will equally sight variety of unused ground support equipment (GSE). It is important to always query the utilization of current and new equipment acquired. An inventory of premature failures, warranty cover and support services available is important in determining what equipment better serves your needs. Obsolescence of spare parts is like weeds in your garden; prevent them before they grow. Don’t wait until your spare parts are obsolete. If you no longer need them, chances are that demand exists elsewhere. So hit the iron while it’s hot! Your objective should be to get rid of unwanted stocks/equipment when you can. Consult the same supplier who sold you these items and enquire if he is willing to buy them back. Sometimes he may offer you a ridiculously lower price, but it is better than locking up capital in items you no longer need. Suppliers are better at finding buyers for unwanted stock than the airline since they have many clients. What has become obsolete to you could be a life-line for another operator. Always remember to maximize on the cost saving benefits since your expense is minimal. In other words, if the annual

airline is impacted by location, credit terms and/or lack of adequate communication with the service providers, one solution is to bridge this gap with a trusted and reliable third party supplier at a pre-determined mark-up cost. In such situations, it is advisable to get periodic reports for the performance of the latter. Expedite delivery anywhere in Africa: Sub-Saharan African airlines, like their counterparts elsewhere, need highly cost efficient and effective strategic supply partner. Fortunately, Africa now has some of its own professionals specialized in aviation spares and components’ supply. Over the years, they have gained an understanding of the needs and requirements of the African market and have served airlines and airports with commitment in both good and bad times. In the event of an AOG, it often does not matter where your aircraft is grounded as it is the efficiency and resourcefulness of your strategic supplier. From a base in New York, any part of the world can be accessed within 24 hours. In fact, dealing with reliable suppliers such as AIS ensures that you receive spares and equipment within a shorter time than a person travelling between some African cities. Besides, the terms and conditions of sale are much better than many competitors. AIS determination to help the African airlines succeed is reflected in its maxim 'Economic independence through mutual interdependence.' As a reliable and dependable supplier AIS provides free consultancy on how airlines can minimize inventory holding, maximize revenue and avoid storage of expensive components which are a drain on the limited financial resource.

sales revenue is a billion US Dollars and the margin one hundred million dollars, your ratio is 9:1. In other words, 90% of your expense yield 10% margin. Conversely, had you sold your inventory before it became obsolete, had you properly pursued your warranty repairs, repaired your GSEs on time, the ratio could have been the reversed: 1:9, in your favour.

About Mohammed Mahmoud Over the last half century, Mohammed Mahmoud has been involved in the commercial aviation industry’s materials management and supply; initially as an airline professional and later as a supplier of spare parts and equipment to airlines. He started his aviation carrier with one of Africa’s most successful airlines and had the opportunity to participate in the initial provisioning of spares for the first commercial Boeing jet aircraft that operated in the African Continent. He managed and mechanized (computerized) the airlines’ stock inventory control and headed the first independent African airline logistics office in the USA. Following this, he switched to supplying of the same products and services to the aviation industry. Mahmoud has been supplying spare parts and ground service equipment to airlines worldwide for a very long time and has gain valuable experience in the business that he freely shares with his clients.


8

Africa Wings

The African Civil Aviation Policy (AFCAP)

T

he African Civil Aviation Policy (AFCAP) is a common policy which provides a framework and the platform for the formulation, collaboration and integration of national and multinational initiatives/programmes in various aspects of civil aviation including safety, security, efficiency, environmental protection and sustainable development of air transport in Africa. The overarching framework document which has the backing of the AU Heads of States and governments enlists and consolidates the political commitment of African States to work together through an agreed roadmap with the purpose of positioning Africa’s air transport in the global economy. The policy provides appropriate empowerment of national and regional technical bodies to enable them carry out their responsibilities effectively. Aviation safety is the cornerstone of international civil aviation and an integral part of the strategic objective of ICAO. African States, like every other member State of ICAO, have statutory responsibilities to ensure and enhance aviation safety through effective implementation of Safety related Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs) and other relevant provisions of the Chicago Convention. As stated in the African Civil Aviation Policy, the objective of African States regarding Aviation Safety is “to ensure a high level of safety in civil aviation operations through compliance with ICAO SARPs”. In order to achieve this objective, it is essential for States to have effective and autonomous civil aviation authorities. However, the emerging trend is for States to optimise resources by establishing Regional Safety Oversight Organisations (RSOOs). AFCAP therefore advocates that African States should ensure that their Civil Aviation Authorities are strengthened with adequate resources, full powers and independence to carry out effective regulation and safety oversight of their aviation industry. The other strategies that will facilitate the accomplishment of the objective of ensuring a high level of safety in Africa as contained in the AFCAP include the following:

• Civil Aviation Authorities shall have oversight responsibilities on all service providers in the industry, including aircraft operators, maintenance and repair organisations, Airports/Aerodrome and Air Navigation Service Providers, Aeronautical Meteorology, Aviation Training Organisations, handling companies, aviation fuel suppliers, among others; • All aircraft operators, maintenance organisations, aviation licensed personnel, flight training organisations and airstrip/aerodrome operators/owners etc. shall comply with relevant regulations; • Civil Aviation Authorities shall work out modalities for the licensing of various categories of personnel in the industry; • The African Union and AFCAC should ensure the implementation of all safety resolutions while exploring new initiatives to enhance aviation safety in the continent; • Seminars, workshops and conferences should be organised for all stakeholders to sensitise and enlighten them on the benefits of imbibing a safety culture; • Civil Aviation Authorities of member States shall establish State safety programmes in accordance with the ICAO Safety Management Manual; • Civil Aviation Authorities of member States shall ensure that all aviation service providers have in place, Safety Management Systems; and • Civil Aviation Authorities of member States and all aviation stakeholders shall develop and imbibe a safety culture in their operations. The African Civil Aviation Policy and Guidelines for the negotiation of Air Service Agreements between AU States and the EU Commission/ EU States are available on the AFRAA website through the link: http://www.afraa.org/index.php/links/afcap


aug - oct 2013

Are slow AoG response times cAusinG you problems?

Call American General Supplies. AGS is Africa’s professional and complete one-stop resource for all things aviation related: commercial aircraft spare parts, initial parts provisioning, mechanicals, avionics, wheel and brakes, MRO services, ground service equipment, training, warehouse design, long and short term project financing and lines of credit. www.agsusa.com Phone: 1-301-590-9200 Fax: 1-301-590-3069 Email: Sales@agsusa.com AOG@agsusa.com

9

American General Supplies, Inc. Our business is to keep you flying‌

Authorized distributors for: Honeywell, eca Sinters, Malabar International, Stinar Corporation, SWITLIK, TUG Technologies, Clyde Machines and TREPEL Airport Equipment - GmbH


10

Africa Wings

Airlines Rapidly Adopting Mobile Technology

O

ver the next three years, all airlines plan to invest in IT systems which will allow them to get to know their passengers better and deliver tailored services directly to them, according to the 15th annual SITA/Airline Business IT Trends Survey – which is well established as the global benchmarking survey for the airline industry. The Airline IT Trends Survey, co-sponsored by Airline Business and SITA shows an airline IT climate that is cautiously improving. The overall impression from this year’s survey is one of an industry that is fast adopting the digital world. This is bringing many advantages in the form of automation and new services, but also challenges in making sure these technologies can be widely adopted so that passengers benefit at both ends of their journey. This year 100% of airlines surveyed plan to invest in business intelligence (BI) solutions, which allow them to know more about their customers and have better information for decision making in their operations. This is a huge jump from last year, when one in five airlines had no plans at all. By 2016, 97% also plan investments in mobile passenger services and personalization. Together these will help boost sales via direct channels, from 54% up to 67%, and change how airlines deliver services to passengers. At the launch of the 2013 Airline IT Trends Survey Results, Francesco Violante, SITA CEO, said: “All airlines are investing in

business intelligence to improve their operations and boost revenues. We see a strong desire to increase revenues using techniques borrowed from the retail industry, including personalization. Nearly three quarters of airlines rate business intelligence for sales and marketing as a high priority. The airlines’ investment plans show the future of the industry is smarter, more mobile and more personal.” The need for investment in business intelligence is evident. Only 9% of airlines currently rate data quality as meeting all their requirements, while just 7% have achieved the necessary integration of different data sources from across their company. Violante added: “Sharing and integrating data is fundamental to successful business intelligence solutions. To make it work all parties across our industry need to collaborate. By sharing data and working together, we can maximize return on investment and deliver a better passenger experience, as well as improved financial performance.”

Over the last three years, offering mobile services to passengers has topped airlines’ investment list. It retains the number one place with 97% of airlines now investing, or planning to invest, in this area in the coming three years. By 2016, nine out of ten airlines plan to sell tickets via mobile phones. They expect to be rewarded with a leap in mobile sales to more than US$70 billion by 2016, or 10% of total sales, up from just below 3% today. By using this and other channels, airlines aim to reduce their dependence on indirect sales and open up the opportunity to maximize ancillary sales. Mobile phones, kiosks and social media will represent nearly 14% of ticket sales by 2016, while indirect sales through GDSs will reduce from 46 % to just 33% of sales in the same time period. Violante said: “Mobile’s dominant role is clear. Airlines continue to focus on services available via the airline website, such as flight search and check-in. But in an effort to differentiate passenger services a new


aug - oct 2013

11

IT trends survey battleground of mobile functionality is emerging. The result will be a much deeper integration of personalized mobile services at every step of the journey for passengers on the move.” Check-in apps, for example, are already available from 61% of airlines and flight search from 65%. The focus for these airlines will now shift over the next three years to add new services, such as missing bag reporting (60% of airlines), re-booking (63%), and customer feedback (57%). Currently, 53% of airlines provide mobile boarding passes through their own airline application and this is set to rise to over 80% in 2016. Third-party travel wallets, such as the Apple Passbook, Samsung Wallet and Google Now, are also starting to feature. Today, only 21% of airlines provide boarding passes through other apps, but it will reach 62% in three years, giving passengers more choice. The main challenges airlines face when trying to implement mobile services are the pace of technology change, too many platforms and system integration. To keep up with all the changes, airlines may increasingly use APIs such as SITA’s Boarding Pass from developer.aero. This year’s survey revealed that ancillary revenue is of growing importance. Direct sales channels, such as the airline website, currently drive these revenues. Despite the fact that indirect channels account for nearly half of ticket sales, airlines earn on average nine times more ancillary revenue through direct channels. This looks set to continue, with 89% of ancillary revenues expected through direct channels by 2016, an increase from 87% today. As well as boosting ancillary opportunities, direct sales save distribution costs. Over the next three years, nearly half of the airlines (49%) plan major programs to upgrade their core passenger management systems as the shift to more direct sales across multiple channels continues. The Airline IT Trends Survey is an independent poll of senior IT personnel working within the top 200 passenger carriers. Airlines representing half of the global passenger traffic responded to this year's survey: 14% of respondents are classified as low cost carriers, and 26% are airlines carrying over 20 million passengers. At SITA we make it our business to understand the IT needs of the air transport industry (ATI). That's why we carry out a number of unique IT surveys. These have become respected sources for industry benchmarks and trends. For more information go to: www.sita.aero/surveys www.sita.aero/ittrendshub Or search the App Store for ‘SITA IT Trends Hub’


12

Africa Wings

E-payment: The Way Forward for African Airlines By Mrs. Juliet Indetie, Deputy Director, Corporate Finance and Administration - AFRAA

The norm has always been that developed economies create the model of industrial and economic progress which other countries must follow hence the concept of ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ countries. Development rest on the assumption that the West first cracked the formula for economic progress sometime in the 19th century, and the developing world has to work towards the laid down path. In banking and finance, a revolution in mobile money transfer occurred, but not in the “developed” financial centres but in Kenya. In April 2007, following a student software development project from Kenya, Safaricom launched a new mobile phone based payment and money transfer service, known as M-Pesa. M-Pesa (M for mobile, pesa is Swahili for money) is a mobile-phone based money transfer and micro financing service for Safaricom and Vodacom, the largest mobile network operators in Kenya and Tanzania. Currently the most developed mobile payment system in the world. It was a good thing that Mpesa happened in Africa as it offered a new way of thinking

about money and payments, without the legacy baggage of banks and regulations meant for another century. The powerful banking interest has been checked by the concept which has wide outreach.

Selling Features of M-Pesa With M-pesa, and without a bank account: • People can send and receive money • People can store up to $1000 in the system, creating a pseudo-savings account • There are no credit card companies involved • There are no banks involved. The service allows users to deposit money into an account stored on their cell phones, to send balances using SMS technology to other users (including sellers of goods and services), and to redeem deposits for regular money. M-Pesa users have to produce their national Identity Card or passport to deposit, withdraw, and transfer money easily with a mobile device. Users are charged a small fee for sending and withdrawing money using the service. M-Pesa spread quickly, and become the most successful mobile phone based financial service in the developing world. By 2012, about 17 million M-Pesa accounts had been registered in Kenya. The norm has always been that developed economies create the model of industrial and economic progress which other countries must follow hence the concept of ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ countries. Development rest on the assumption that the West first cracked the formula for economic progress sometime in the 19th century, and the developing world has to work towards the laid down path. In banking and finance, a revolution in

mobile money transfer occurred, but not in the 'developed' financial centres but in Kenya. In April 2007, following a student software development project from Kenya, Safaricom launched a new mobile phone based payment and money transfer service, known as M-Pesa. M-Pesa (M for mobile, pesa is Swahili for money) is a mobile-phone based money transfer and micro financing service for Safaricom and Vodacom, the largest mobile network operators in Kenya and Tanzania. Currently the most developed mobile payment system in the world.

So How Does It Work? M-Pesa relies on a network of small shop-front retailers, who register to be M-Pesa agents. Customers come to these retailers and pay them cash in exchange for loading virtual credit onto their phone, known as e-float. E-float can be swapped and transferred between mobile users with a simple text message and a system of codes. The recipient of e-float takes the mobile phone into the nearest retailer to cash in, and swaps the text message code back for physical money. There are already more M-Pesa agents in Kenya than there are bank branches. All major supermarkets also have M-Pesa outlets within their premises which ensures wide distribution networks. Airtel money has not been able to reach the penetration levels of Safaricom due to limited distribution outlets. Today, 70% of Kenyan adults have used M-PESA, which is greater penetration among


aug - oct 2013

13

technology & innovation Kenyan adults than Facebook has among US adults. The equivalent of 30% of Kenyan GDP flows through it each year.

with 28,000 Bonga points and more on their Safaricom lines earned from airtime top ups to redeem tickets for local Kenya Airways flights on either Economy or Business class tickets on any domestic route.

Relevance to Africa Africa faces the challenges, a lack of wired infrastructure and large numbers of unbanked people with access to mobile phones meant that it was a natural fit. The banked population find bank charges very punitive coupled with the inefficiencies of the banking sector. Credit cards have also not taken root in the region as compared to the other continents. Brazilian airline TAM has been able to reach the rapidly growing middle class in Brazil in innovative ways. The airline sells tickets via low-end retail chain Casas Bahia and at bus stations, lets customers pay in multiple installments, and provides ‘how to fly’ advice to first-time flyers. Rather than giving up on sophisticated economic transactions in countries with poor infrastructure, M-Banking has found a way to circumvent that infrastructure, creating a virtual, mobile one of its own. 53% of mobile users in India, Kenya, Indonesia, Ghana and Nigeria have used M-banking and payments. It’s clear that limited access to formal banks in these growth and emerging markets, along with a high penetration of mobile devices, encourages mobile finance activities. Mobiles ensure the safety and security of money, make payments more convenient and promote m-commerce opportunities for local entrepreneurs and western companies looking to move into these markets. M-Pesa works just like cash, but it is safer and more convenient to transfer. The technology is simple to use on any cellphone and there are no monthly charges or minimum balance requirements meaning the service will be accessible to everyone across the country. There is also no airtime charge for M-Pesa transactions. In East Africa, airlines such as Kenya Airways and Uganda Airlines have teamed up with mobile payment services M-PESA and Airtel Money to allow people without a bank account to purchase air tickets

Implication for African Airlines Kenya Airways since end of 2009 adopted this innovative channel for their customers to pay for e-tickets. via the airline’s website or call-centre. Kenya Airways was able to deploy an e-ticketing platform that allows customers to conveniently book, and through the partnership with Safaricom Business, also pay for their tickets via their mobile phone

using M-PESA. KQ can sell tickets up to Kshs 140,000 inclusive of all taxes through M-Pesa and Airtel Money. Uganda Airlines also accepts Airtel Money as a mode of payment.

The Impact •

Simplicity and convenience in the purchase of tickets. Customers can make bookings online and pay via their mobile phone M-PESA is the most widely available payment platform in Kenya with over 30,000 agents thus making it easy for customers to access it.

The Simplicity of Using M-Pesa in Purchasing a Ticket on Kenya Airways Customers opting to pay via M-Pesa while making reservations are given the booking reference number, ticket price in Kenya shillings and the M-Pesa SMS business number to make their payment, after which they receive a SMS from Kenya Airways containing a ticket number and an e-ticket. If the ticket price is over Ksh 70,000 (US$ 769), the payment has to be made in two M-PESA transactions. Due to the limits of amounts that can be transmitted via M-Pesa, Kenya Airways customers can only pay via M-Pesa for domestic and a number of regional routes in East Africa: Nairobi, Kisumu, Mombasa, Entebbe (Uganda), Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), Kigali (Rwanda) and Bujumbura (Burundi). M-Pesa has also signed mobile payment partnerships with local airlines Air Kenya and Fly540. British Airways customers pay for their tickets and ticket changes in Kenya through M-Pesa. The M-Pesa payment option improves customer comfort and convenience. Passengers can pay up to Ksh 140,000 (US$1,537) for a BA air ticket.

Value Added Services Kenya Airways – following the success of the M-Pesa venture – partnered with Safaricom Limited to launch a platform that allows its customers to pay for tickets using loyalty points called Bonga (Talk) points. Like in Loyalty programs, customers redeem their points by acquiring tickets. This pact between Kenya Airways and Safaricom allows customers

Is Mobile Money the Solution for African Airlines? African Airlines operate under different Economic, Culture and Regulatory systems and solutions which are highly successful in one region will not necessary work in other regions. M-Pesa has completely revolutionized the financial sector in the East Africa region yet it failed to achieve the same success in the Southern Part of Africa. In South Africa, it is believed that M-Pesa did not succeed due to incorrect marketing strategy, which created misconceptions that M-Pesa was targeted at people in lower income brackets and rural areas. The South Africa market also has very strict regulatory environment, Vodacom had wanted its own banking license but was prohibited by the strict regulatory environment. A more lenient regulatory framework allowed Safaricom to obtain a banking license and it was cheap to use at particularly low levels of money transfer. Safaricom is a dominant player in East Africa unlike in South Africa where there are strong players also targeting the unbanked with other products. Fastjet, the first pan African low-cost airline, launched the mobile payment solution with Tanzania's Vodacom enabling fastjet customers to buy airline tickets using their mobile phones. Virgin Atlantic, for their flights between London and Nairobi had adopted M-Pesa. Passengers will be allowed to transfer up to Ksh. 140,000 (US$1,537) from one phone number per day. The important lesson however is that African airlines need to think 'out of the box' and take advantage of the innovations best suited to their environment. Technology and Innovation can contribute to lower operating costs for the Airlines which is important especially now when most of them are reporting losses. African Airlines based on their own unique challenges need to come up with acceptable solutions. African Airlines especially those who operate under struggling Economies with strict foreign currency restrictions should explore innovations which will not only boost their revenue base but also enhance ease of payment. The passenger should be offered an effective and efficient platform to access the airline’s services.


14

Africa Wings

A

ircraft

nalysis

MRJ90

versus SSJ100

by Keith Mwanalushi.

MRJ90

S

maller second-tier aircraft manufacturers such as Sukhoi, Mitsubishi and Comac have their work cut out. Competing against the likes of Bombardier and Embraer in the current financial environment can only be an act of bravery. However, these smaller OEMs have banked their success on one key attribute: to attract airline customers based on their significantly lower purchase costs than competing western designs, but with the required safety and performance features that were often perceived as lacking compared to western-built aircraft. Development work on the Sukhoi Superjet 100 (SSJ100) began in 2000; it was developed in three versions in the 75 – 100 seat category. Initially developed for the traditional Eastern European/CIS markets the SSJs are now marketed to a global audience. From what seems as the solution to go around the poor reputation that Soviet era aircraft had, Sukhoi teamed up with a number of international partners including Boeing and Italian aerospace company Alenia Aermacchi. The maiden flight of the SSJ took off in May 2008 and the first commercial service was with Russian carrier Armavia in April 2011. Deliveries of the SSJ100 have since extended to Yakutia Airlines (via Russia Finance Leasing Company), Laos Lao Central Airline and the largest customer to date Aeroflot with 10 units already delivered. However, the first four out of 10 Aeroflot examples were marred in some controversy as reportedly, a malfunction with the landing gear and slats had been detected on those jets leading to the four being temporarily grounded while the problem was being fixed. Clearly, technical issues are common with most new aircraft types as Igor Syrtsov, the senior VP at Sukhoi Civil Aircraft Company (SCAC) explains: “They are normal for every aircraft at any stage of its operations. We have numerous publications in the media focusing on its technical problems while at the same time aircraft

with a long-standing history may experience similar problems.” Syrtsov says Sukhoi are constantly following the situation and provide feedback to airlines on all technical issues in SSJ100 operations. “All of them have already been isolated and service bulletins have been issued for all the fleet in operation. Aircraft at the plant are improved during the production process,” he adds. Industry analysts have shed varied opinions about the ‘newer arrivals’ and how far they will penetrate the market. Paul Sheridan, a consultant at Ascend Worldwide is of the view that the regional jet market will become a lot more competitive over the next few years with Comac, Mitsubishi and Sukhoi entering to compete with Bombardier and Embraer. “History has shown that it is difficult to have more than three successful manufacturers in a size category. So Sukhoi have their work cut out to win market share,” he feels. The crash of an SSJ100 during a trade-industry flight is obviously a nightmare for any aircraft manufacturer. The crash investigation commission stated late December 2012 that the aircraft had been in good order before it crashed and a human factor was named as the reason for the air crash. It’s also worth remembering that the Airbus A320 also suffered a similar fate when it crashed in 1988 during a fly past before entering service, but today, the A320 is one of the most commercially successful airliners ever built. “I think that there is always some allowance for difficulties bedding in new aircraft programmes because airlines and other interested parties appreciate that they are likely to occur,” comments Sheridan. He adds: “The key for Sukhoi from here will be to demonstrate that they are solving any problems that arise from the earliest deliveries and that their manufacturing process runs smoothly. I don't believe that the crash of the demonstration aircraft will affect its long term prospects.” “At the moment the SSJ100 programme has successfully passed entry to the service stage,” notes Igor Syrtsov. “We know the market is watching how the aircraft behaves in operations: will it meet declared performance of fuel consumption and departure reliability, will technical issues be settled in expedient way, how fast spare parts delivery is arranged, and response of the market on SSJ100 comfort,” Syrtsov states. Mitsubishi on the other hand seems to continue to defy doubters when it comes to their MRJ90 programme (which features the smaller MRJ70 variant). At last year’s Farnborough Air Show Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation delivered the biggest surprise of that year's show: an agreement in principle with SkyWest Airlines for 100 MRJ90s. The occasion marked the first MRJ order announcement at an air show - and the type's first order in over a year. As of May 2013, Mitsubishi received 325 orders (165 firm and 160


aug - oct 2013

15

aircraft analysis

options). “The MRJ programme has been received very well in the market, and we feel that customer’ expectations are very high,” notes Hitoshi Hank Iwasa, VP, business planning at Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation. “For a regional jet before first flight, the number of orders we have received is noteworthy. The MRJ, with its operational economy and cabin comforts, will surely contribute to boosting airline competitiveness,” Iwasa assures. The SkyWest announcement was especially dramatic, as it came just two months after a Mitsubishi Aircraft announcement that the first flight of the MRJ90 would be postponed to the last quarter of 2013 from the originally planned second quarter of 2012 according to industry sources. Iwasa says commercial delivery is scheduled to start in the summer or later half of the Japanese Fiscal Year 2015 (ending 31 March 2016). Since its establishment in 2008, Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation has aggressively conducted world-wide MRJ sales campaigns focusing on the 70-100 seat regional jet market that is envisioned to exceed more than 5,000 units over the next 20 years. The MRJ90 will have a passenger capacity of 86-96 passengers and the programme will be the first aircraft in Japan to be designed locally since the NAMC YS-11 in the 1960s. In terms of the greatest market penetration for both OEMs, Paul Sheridan anticipates that the US market would still be the main market for sales of regional jets as there is a lot of potential for the replacement of 50 seat jets there. To that effect, in 2010 US-based Willis Lease Finance placed an order for up to 10 SSJ100s providing a much needed boost in confidence for the Russian airliner. “All of the manufacturers will be trying to sell their aircraft to US regional carriers. Embraer have shown that it is possible to sell aircraft to many different types of airlines, not just US based regional carriers, and I think that the other OEMs will try to replicate that success. Finally the home markets of the three new manufacturers will be key to establishing bedrock of sales and deliveries,” Sheridan says. Surprisingly, when asked where he sees the greatest penetration in terms of sales, Igor Syrtsov from Sukhoi says in long-term he expects global demand for the SSJ100 but no specific mention of the US market. “The most interest in the SSJ100 comes from airlines from Russia, the CIS, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America,” says Syrtsov.

For regional jet of the size of MRJ, Mr. Iwasa projects demand for more than 5,000 units during the next 20 years. By region, he says market analysis is 30% in North America, 20% in Europe, 20% in Asia-Pacific, with 30% in the rest of the world.“ In Europe, older regional jets such as the Fokker or British Aerospace aircraft are expected to be replaced. We are also looking at the rapidly growing Asia market for near term sales activities. A greater challenge for new regional aircraft OEMs such as Sukhoi and Mitsubishi is establishing sufficient aftermarket services. Analysts believe new entrant OEMs need to establish a global customer support network that can provide the appropriate level of support at entry into service and beyond. Sheridan agrees that this is vital for all OEMs: “Airlines will be assessing the aircraft based on their lifetime costs and on their expected in service reliability and so an OEM must demonstrate that it can support its product all over the world in a timely and cost efficient manner.” Mr. Iwasa agrees that customer support is critical for the success of the MRJ programme and “We’ve been working to supply fullysufficient support from day-one to our customers,” he says. Mitsubishi Aircraft concluded an agreement with Boeing on customer support of the MRJ in June 2011. Boeing will provide Mitsubishi Aircraft with 24/7 customer support including spare parts provisioning, service operations and field services. Interestingly, the MRJ is the launch customer for the Pure Power PW1000G engine series with Geared Turbofan (GTF)technology, but before the MRJ was launched, the industry had a great deal of concern about geared turbofans (PW1200G), which they felt would make engines more complicated. “We are proud that the GTF engine has been highly evaluated. More and more GTF engines are being adopted by the industry and the outstanding number of GTF engine orders show our decision to go with it was right and that we had foresight,” Iwasa stresses. Mitsubishi Aircraft and Pratt & Whitney have been jointly conducting sales activities, and Mr Iwasa is convinced the operator will identify that the GTF powered MRJ will be the game-changer of the regional jet market. “Recently, the first version of the GTF engine received Transport Canada certification. This is an important milestone to get more customers and more flight hours to show high reliability and to validate evidence for low fuel burn.”


16

Africa Wings

interview

Interview with AGS Kassa Maru, Chairman of the Board and President of American General Supplier (AGS), a commercial aviation spare parts supplier, discusses in this exclusive interview, how AGS carries out inventory management, training and customer support for African airlines. We are able to provide attractive lines of credit, training and facility development to all of our customers. We also appreciate our clients. As much as possible we add value into all of our arrangements. We like saying thank you to them in small ways like free training or travel arrangements when possible. Although we are maintaining a strong level of business around the world, we intend to continue to grow in Africa as it is a challenge and satisfying to see African airlines grow themselves.

Q: What is your marketing strategy when approaching new clients?

Q: Tell me a little about American General Supplies and the organization. A: American General Supplies was founded in 1982. As the company grew, we moved from one larger location to another until we eventually bought our own facility at our present location in Gaithersburg, Maryland. We have focused on being an all encompassing spare parts supplier to the commercial aviation industry. This includes aircraft parts, ground support equipment, inflight and catering supplies and a wide range of services to the industry‚ leading airlines and support organizations.

Q: The company is well established in Africa. How did that come about? A: I would say that we have had a great deal of success globally. When we started in 1982 the high percentage of our revenue was from the US, Europe and Asia. Our opportunity in Africa increased as we identified their core problems of foreign exchange scarcity, training needs and other technical support. Because we understand the needs of the African airlines and have made it our business to know what they need, we are doing more business with African airlines today than we did in 1982. In 1982 we actually had more clients in Europe and the US and steadily grew our African business. One of the biggest problems facing African airlines was difficulty in arranging financing to acquire the equipment they needed. We approached our bank, Bank of America, and they understood what those challenges were and what we were trying to do. They were very helpful in arranging very generous terms that help us and our African airline customers.

A: Like for any business, we do our homework. We know our customers and we work hard to understand their business and what their needs are. After making an initial contact, we believe in doing business face-to-face. We make the arrangements and go to our clients, we want to show them how important they are to us by coming to them and meeting with them. We consider that half of the meeting. We want our new potential clients to visit us. We want to show them what we do and who we are. Our staff is made up of experts in their fields including a number of former airline employees. All of our staff understand our business and what our clients need. We take care of our customers from start to finish and strive to take care of all of their needs. We work with them to improve all aspects of their business whether it is aircraft spares, ground support equipment or managing the excess spare parts they carry on the books.

Q: How do you help them with their excess inventory and inventory control? A: The first thing they try and do is to find a buyer for this excess material. We can help them market this excess and even give them a plan with guaranteed monthly payments for the sale of this excess inventory. Our customers trust us that we will have their best interest in our dealings. We recently had a client that acquired a 737-500. We gave them a package for full component support for all of their rotables for three years. Normally the list of parts come form the customer, but in this case since this was the first aircraft of this type for the airline, they asked us to develop the necessary parts list for the agreement and what they had to keep in their own inventory and what we could hold in the AGS inventory. Tracking large inventory is difficult as you

correctly put it. However, having ample inventory at hand is a key to the success of our business. It is the name of the game. We have a staff member who specializes in inventory to make sure that we always have what we need‚ never too much, never to little. Due to our expertise in the business, we have several ways at our disposal to have our inventory or stock level on the positive side at all times. ‚• Selecting package deals to buy the latest spare at every opportunity ‚• Approaching airlines to market their excess material • Using our strong technical capability which helps us scrutinize and purchase aircraft and engines which we disassemble, make serviceable and resell • Representing manufacturers to market their products and systems which we hold spares in our stock that adds to our inventory as it is a requirement. We give this type of business high regards and we are currently contemplating an arrangement with Honeywell to jointly set up a central distribution center in Africa at a properlyselected strategic location. It is possible that in the Honeywell distribution center, we could have as much as $10 million on hand there. We have indentified three locations for this center‚Addis Ababa, Nairobi or Johannesburg. The customs and duties regulations in these countries will be one of the major factors in making a decision. We will need a process that works quickly as when an airline needs parts it needs them quickly and not a week later. AGS specializes in setting up, developing, running and controlling inventories. We have done it for ourselves and our subsidiaries and for several airlines‚TAAG of Angola, Air Zimbabwe, Mozambique Airlines for example. In fact we had one of our employees in Angola for about one year working with the airline and setting it up for the future. We are well-versed at initial provisioning, setting up the inventory, the facility, training the personnel to manage it and establishing a control system. In fact our provisioning department sometimes acts on behalf of an airline, handling their provisioning functions or assisting the airline when asked.

Q: Are you optimistic when you look at where AGS is positioned? A: The aviation industry is dynamic. African aviation is booming and we are staying abreast of the fast changing technologies, catering to its needs with the necessary preplanning and preparation for any eventualities at all times. >>


aug - oct 2013

17

interview We are highly sensitive to the African market and pay close attention to details so that we react to fluctuations in the market and take the appropriate actions. This attention has served us well, especially in difficult economic times and we have survived without ever having to layoff a single employee. As a matter of fact, we have been hiring new employees. As a result, we are continuing to extend our partnership with manufacturers, like that I mentioned with Honeywell, and taking on additional large projects from the fastest growing African airlines that need our support more than ever before. Consequently, we are optimistic that the future is very bright for AGS. We are confident that 2013 will be great and we are targeting a sales figure close to $50 million during that period.

Q: Air Zimbabwe has had difficulties over the years. What are your thoughts regarding the airline? A: The airline will have to work its own way through their challenges. The one thing I would like to add is that we have had a relationship with Air Zimbabwe since we started in 1982 and for years they were our best customer. We have worked with them on excess material,

provisioning, we did training‚ for many years we had a contract as their exclusive purchasing agent. Before they shut down, we were working with them on a project to refurbish their hangar by bringing in a Chinese-based company. When they shut their doors, they owed us about $3 million. We didn’t‚ rush to take them to court but we made numerous trips there for meetings to try and arrange payments to bring the amount owed down. After three years of these efforts our board of directors decided that a court action was our only recourse. Although I didn't agree, with pressure from our banks, we moved ahead with the court action. Since that action, Air Zimbabwe has been paying on time with just a small balance remaining. When they are ready to relaunch, I or one of my team would visit Air Zimbabwe and see how we could help. We would certainly be interested in this and I think they would be open to it as well because of the business relations we had for many years.

Q: What are your initiatives for 2013? A: 2013 will be a very exciting year for us. As I mentioned earlier, African aviation is booming. There were a lot of backlogs that weren't filled and that unspent need is starting to see money

available to meet those needs airplanes, engines, facilities, etc. We have been preparing for this for years, knowing this need was there and would need to be met soon. We are prepared to work with these airlines. We have hired additional professionals, we have upgraded our facilities and we are looking to build an adjacent hangar. We have been preparing our employees to meet these challenges and have numerous proposals and requests for information from airlines looking to lease aircraft and engines. Perhaps another example, is that one of our customers operates Q400s and we are discussing with them to buy the aircraft and lease them back to the operator. This would be a first for us and a very big deal for our future. We are also in talks to build a hangar in Rwanda, so as you can see we are looking at make great opportunities in 2013. Our relationship with Honeywell is a source of great pride and excitement for us. We have hired several professional to work this program for us. We take our business and our clients very seriously and their success is our success. We know what their needs are because we work closely with them and believe in going to the client and seeing their operation firsthand. There were many times in 2012 that we had four or more of our staff on travel. I expect the same for 2013.


18

Africa Wings

IATA Held its 69th Annual General Meeting, 2-4 June 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa The International Air Transport Association (IATA) held its 69th Annual General Meeting (AGM) and World Air Transport Summit in Cape Town, South Africa. The meeting kickedoff with strong calls for African governments to take full advantage of aviation as a catalyst for growth and development. The IATA AGM was hosted by South African Airways and was opened with formal addresses from the Deputy President of the Republic of South Africa, His Excellency Kgalema Motlanthe and the Minister for Public Enterprise of the Republic of South Africa, Hon. Malusi Gigaba. Ag. CEO of South African Airways, Mr. Nico Bezuidenhout was elected President of the AGM in the opening session. The AGM was attended by over 800 delegates from IATA’s member airlines, industry stakeholders and industry partners. The last AGM held in Africa was in Nairobi in 1991, and it was good to have another IATA AGM in Africa. Africa has historically presented a number of significant challenges for air transport, and these were debated in depth during the panel discussions. The discussions struck a balance between both the challenges and opportunities for air transport in Africa. Key industry issues discussed at the IATA AGM focused on: Unlocking Africa’s Potential, Cost of Infrastructure, Ancillary Revenues, Achieving Carbon Neutral Growth from 2020, Crisis Communications and Social Media.

Performance of the industryand forecasts for 2013 IATA upgraded its global outlook for the airline industry to a $12.7 billion profit in 2013 on $711 billion in revenues at the IATA AGM. This is $2.1 billion better than the $10.6 billion profit projected in March of this year and an improvement on the $7.6 billion profit generated in 2012.

“Margins remain weak. On revenues that are expected to total $711 billion this year, the net profit margin is expected to be 1.8%. This small margin will make 2013 the third strongest year for airlines since the events of 2001,” said Tony Tyler, IATA’s Director General and CEO. He added that “Profitability is thin, but there is a solid performance improvement story over the last seven to eight years. More efficient use of assets is the main contributor. The industry load factor is expected to average a record high of 80.3% in 2013; 6.0 percentage points above 2006 levels. Additionally, airlines have found new sources of value that have increased the contribution of ancillary revenues from 0.5% in 2007 to over 5% in 2013.” A total of 3.13 billion passengers are expected in 2013—the first time in history that passenger numbers rise above the 3 billion mark. Yields in cargo business are expected to face a contraction of 2.0% in 2013 as capacity conditions remain much more challenging than in passenger markets. The boost in

ancillary revenues as airlines increase new ways to add value to passenger journeys will result in a significant growth in ancillary revenues in 2013. IATA reported that all regions are expected to report a profit in 2013, with some being stronger than others. Overall, a trend is emerging that sees strengthening profitability among larger or niche airlines. The profitability of many smaller airlines—without the scale economies, market diversification or niche markets—faces greater challenges from high fuel prices and weak economic performance. For African airlines, the (6.7%) passenger capacity growth forecast is expected to be outstripped by demand growth of 7.5% and this will improve load factors.

Historic Agreement on Carbon-Neutral Growth IATA members overwhelmingly endorsed a resolution on “Implementation of the Aviation Carbon-Neutral Growth (CNG2020) Strategy". The resolution provides governments with a


aug - oct 2013

19

69th IATA AGA set of principles on how governments could establish procedures for a single market-based measure (MBM) and integrate a single MBM as part of an overall package of measures to achieve CNG2020. Environment will be at the top of the agenda for the 38th ICAO Assembly in September. The aviation industry urgently needs governments to agree, through ICAO, a global approach to managing aviation’s carbon emissions, including a single global MBM. IATA member airlines agreed that a single mandatory carbon offsetting scheme would be the simplest and most effective option for an MBM.

Support for NDC initiative by IATA Members

IATA members reaffirmed support for the New Distribution Capability (NDC) initiative at the 69th IATA AGM. This will develop an open, XML-based distribution standard for data exchange between airlines and travel agents. IATA members unanimously agreed that, “consumers will benefit from being able to make choices based on enriched content and the ability to compare and transact airline offers in a transparent fashion.” The AGM Resolution affirmed that NDC will support current shopping methods, including the ability for consumers to compare base fares and to do so without identifying themselves ('anonymous shopping'). The AGM Resolution also noted that consumers will be protected by data privacy protection laws and regulations regardless of how and where they choose to purchase air travel. Additionally, members confirmed that airlines and other industry players will be free to decide whether or not to adopt NDC to support some or all of their distribution needs, and that IATA would continue to support the existing legacy standard while demand for it exists.

Core Principles for Passenger Rights Regulation The 69th IATA AGM unanimously endorsed a set of core principles for governments to consider when adopting consumer protection regulation. The resolution addresses a proliferation of uncoordinated and extraterritorial passenger rights legislation and regulation that is the cause of confusion among passengers. The core principles call on governments to develop consumer protection regulations that: • Are clear, unambiguous, aligned with international conventions, without

extra-territorial implications and comparable with regimes in place for other modes of transport Allow airlines the ability to differentiate themselves through their customer service offerings above a basic common standard Ensure passenger access to information concerning their rights, fares, including taxes and charges (prior to purchasing a ticket), the actual operator of the flight, and regular situational updates in the case of service disruptions - Appropriate assistance for those with reduced mobility - Efficient complaint handling procedures that are clearly communicated Reflect the principle of proportionality and the impact of extraordinary circumstances when determining compensation Do not compromise the industry’s top priority of safety, and exonerate airlines from liability for safety-related delays and cancellations In the case of denied boarding and cancellations, entitle passengers to rerouting, refunds or compensation where circumstances are within the airlines’ control In the case of delays, entitle passengers to re-routing, refunds or care and

assistance; and acknowledge that when such delays or disruptions are beyond the control of airlines, market forces should determine the care and assistance available to passengers Ensure that the burden is allocated among the different service providers involved.

Appointment of Chairman of IATA BOG Richard H. Anderson, CEO of Delta Airlines, was appointed as Chairman of the IATA Board of Governors. He succeeded Alan Joyce, CEO and Managing Director of Qantas Airways. “The airline industry needs a strong voice to address the challenges that we face. Under the leadership of Director General and CEO Tony Tyler, IATA has that voice. As I take on the Chairmanship of the IATA Board of Governors, I look forward to working closely with Tony, with colleagues across our industry and with governments to promote the cause of aviation— the vitality of which is essential to the success of global trade and economic growth,” said Anderson.

Host of 70th IATA AGM The 70th IATA AGM and World Air Transport Summit will be hosted by Qatar Airways in Doha, Qatar from 13 June 2014.


20

Africa Wings

Capacity Data African Airlines

 

Other Carriers

Flights

Seats

% African Carriers

Flights

Seats

% Other Carriers

Intra Africa

71,765

7,154,033

91.63%

3,513

653,507

8.37%

 June 2013 Africa Europe

5,886

951,547

33.02%

9,335

1,930,095

66.98%

Africa - North America

281

82,126

60.64%

231

53,309

39.36%

Africa - Middle East

3,019

550,959

38.67%

4,182

873,808

61.33%

Africa - Asia

679

175,259

81.61%

156

39,486

18.39%

TOTAL

81,630

8,913,924

 

17,417

3,550,205

 

May 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intra Africa

74,559

7,345,683

95.17%

3,788

703,150

4.83% 62.56%

Africa Europe

5,607

934,241

37.44%

9,369

1,918,374

Africa - North. America

270

73,523

55.79%

214

48,799

44.21%

Africa - Middle East

2658

493085

39.84%

4,014

838,019

60.16% 18.82%

Africa - Asia

677

178,581

81.18%

157

40,891

TOTAL

83,771

9,025,113

 

17,542

3,549,233

 

April 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intra Africa

70,592

6,904,030

90.89%

3,751

691,741

9.11%

Africa Europe

5,348

874,453

32.14%

9,071

1,846,151

67.86%

Africa - N.orth America

248

65,608

59.40%

200

44,841

40.60%

Africa - Middle East

2,420

436,667

35.21%

3,836

803,623

64.79%

Africa - Asia

650

169,482

78.73%

176

45,780

21.27%

TOTAL

79,258

8,450,240

17,034

3,432,136

Top 5 city pairs for international destinations within Africa by sub-region Data for April-June 2013

Top 5 Airports - April to June 2013 by arrival frequencies (passenger flights)

Central and Western Africa Rank 1 2 3 4 5

Dep Lagos Accra Malabo Niamey Cotonou

Arr Accra Abidjan Douala Ouagadougou Abidjan

Rank

Dep Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Apt Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Apt St-denis Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Apt Kigali

Central and Western Africa Frequencies 414 353 297 245 242

Rank 1 2 3 4 5

Arrival Airport

Frequency

Rank

879

1

Dar Es Salaam

814

2

Addis Ababa

10,066

Mauritius

742

3

Dar Es Salaam

6,293

Juba

642

4

Entebbe

3,329

635

5

Kigali

2,694

Frequency 589 465 352 305

Rank 1 2 3 4

282

5

Frequency

Rank

Arrival Airport

Frequency

Gaborone

827

1

Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International

22,419

Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International

653

2

Cape Town

8,469

Maputo

646

3

Durban King Shaka International Apt

5,351

Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International Lusaka

587

4

Luanda

3,982

566

5

Harare

3,361

Lagos Accra Abuja Dakar Abidjan

Eastern Africa 1 2 3 4 5

Eastern Africa

Arr Entebbe

Entebbe

Arrival Airport Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Apt

Northern Africa Rank 1 2 3 4 5

Dep Khartoum Tripoli Tunis Cairo Tunis

1 2 3 4 5

Dep Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International Harare Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International Windhoek Hosea Kutako International Harare

Frequencies 14,215

Northern Africa Arr

Cairo Tunis Benghazi Tripoli Casablanca Mohammed V Apt

Arrival Airport Cairo Casablanca Mohammed V Apt Algiers Tunis Marrakech

Southern Africa Rank

Frequencies 8,558 4,692 4,650 3,231 2,924

Frequencies 17,271 10,353 7,623 6,618 3,844

Southern Africa Arr


aug - oct 2013

21

Montreal Convention of 1999 Promotion of the Convention for the Unification of certain Rules for International Carriage by Air carriage. As a result, there are significant efficiencies gained, including environmental benefits from eradicating the equivalent of over 80 Boeing 747 Freighters filled with paper every year from the air cargo supply chain. MC99 is a prerequisite for the industry’s e-freight initiative that aims to eradicate paper documentation from the air cargo supply. It is estimated that e-freight will deliver benefits totaling US$4.9 billion per annum. Shippers, forwarders and regulators benefit from faster and more accurate document processing, improved productivity, security, accelerated shipment times and better customs compliance.

Introduction The Montreal Convention of 1999 established a modern, fair and effective regime to govern airline liability to passengers and shippers on international flights. Almost a decade after coming into force, only 54% of Parties to the Chicago Convention have ratified it, leaving in place a complex patchwork of potentially applicable liability regimes. Universal adoption of the Montreal Convention 1999 as the single universal liability regime for international carriage by air will deliver wide-ranging benefits to passengers and shippers and provide greater certainty to the airline industry on the rules governing their liability.

Background This year over 3 billion passengers and goods worth in excess of USD 5 trillion will travel safely by air. Despite civil aviation being the safest form of transport, accidents and incidents do occur that can lead to injury or even death of passengers or delay or loss to baggage and cargo. The Montreal Convention 1999 (MC99) entered into force on 4 November 2003 and established a modern compensatory regime in respect of passengers who suffer death or injury caused by an accident during international air carriage. It provides a simplified liability regime for the destruction or loss of or damage to cargo. It also facilitates the use of electronic messaging to replace paper documents in the carriage of passengers and cargo. Whilst MC99 was envisaged as the universal

liability regime, almost a decade later, just 54% of ICAO States Parties have ratified it (The Table shows States that have ratified the Montreal Convention). A number of major aviation States do remain outside the regime. The predecessor Warsaw Convention 1929, Hague Protocol 1955, Guadalajara Convention 1961 and Montreal Additional Protocols 1975 continue to exist, creating a complex patchwork of potentially applicable liability regimes. This means that in many cases, passengers, shippers and airlines still do not enjoy the significant benefits that MC99 affords.

Benefits of Adopting MC99 Universal adoption of MC99 will deliver important benefits to all parties as explained below: Passengers MC99 replaces the arbitrarily low airline liability caps for death or injury under the previous Warsaw Convention and Warsaw/Hague liability regimes. Under MC99, passengers are entitled to claim damages up to 113,110 Special Drawing Rights (approximately US$174,000 as of January 2013) without proof of negligence or fault. If damages are claimed in excess of that, the burden of proof lies with the airline to show that it was not negligent. MC99 also offers other consumer and advanced compensation payments by airlines to victims. Shippers (cargo) MC99 facilitates the use by airlines of electronic records, including electronic air waybills (e-AWB) and other documents of

Airlines Most of today’s international airlines operate large and increasingly global route networks. However, because there has not been universal ratification of MC99, a patchwork of liability regimes continues to exist. For example, an individual flight between any origin and destination can have passengers and cargo shipments which are subject to different liability regimes. This creates complexity and confusion in determining which regime covers a particular incident or accident. The claims handling process, obtaining adequate insurance cover and litigation resulting from an accident are unnecessarily complex. Universal acceptance of MC99 will go a long way to eliminating such issues. Universal ratification of MC99 will mean that governments can truly ensure that a modern and fair liability regime would apply to passenger and cargo claims, whatever the route or destination involved. Likewise, since MC99 facilitates the use of e-AWB, universal ratification means that governments can be sure that their industry stakeholders that rely on air cargo connectivity can avail themselves of faster shipment times, the liability to track cargo and enjoy other economic benefits such as improved productivity and lower costs on global scale.

Conclusion In light of the aforementioned benefits outlined above, all States are urged to support and encourage the universal adoption of MC99. African States that have not done so are urged to become Parties to MC99 as soon as possible.

For more information visit: http://www.afraa.org/index.php/our-work/issues/montreal-convention


22

Africa Wings

News Briefs Royal Air Maroc to Commence Flights to Kenya Before End of 2013

Photo:File

Ethiopian Airlines Wins Skytrax World Airline Award for Best Airline Staff Service in Africa Ethiopian Airlines won SKYTRAX World Airline Award for Best Airline Staff Service in Africa for its outstanding customer service, in June 2013 in Paris at Le Salon du Bourget Air Show. "As a customer service organization, we clearly understand the value of high quality service delivery and accordingly we have been investing heavily in training and development of our staff on one hand and state of the art information and communication technology and fleet on the other hand" said Tewolde GebreMariam, CEO of Ethiopian, when receiving the award on 18 June 2013 in Paris at Le Salon du Bourget Air Show. Source: Ethiopian Airlines

Royal Air Maroc announced plans to begin flights between Casablanca and Nairobi, Kenya. In a statement made in Nairobi at the signing of various bilateral trade agreements between Morocco and Kenya, Moroccan Minister for Industry and Trade, Mr. Abdelkader Amara, said RAM would introduce direct flights to Nairobi "by the end of the year." While the flights are seen as a means of deepening trade between the two countries, the volume of trade between the two countries fell 80 per cent last year - the move is likely pre-emptive on Royal Air Maroc's part as it seeks to tap into the lucrative US-Kenya/Tanzanian tourist market. In another development, Royal Air Maroc announced an operating profit of USD 83million for 2012 Financial Year, with turnover for the year rising 7% to USD 1.6billion. According to the CEO of Royal Air Maroc, Driss Benhima, the success of the restructuring programme is clearly reflected in the results. He further pointed out that the airline's added value had improved 40% with overall income improving by 52% on 2011. Source: The African Aviation Tribune

SAA Achieves IATA Environmental Assessment Stage 1 Status

Kenya Airways is considering setting up a fuel procurement company as part of its new cost cutting measures. "We are looking at the possibility of starting our own fuel procurement company," KQ MD & CEO, Dr. Titus Naikuni said at an investor briefing held recently in Nairobi. Dr. Naikuni added that discussions have started on proposals for such a set up to cut the cost of fuel which is the single largest expense for the airline accounting for an average 40% of its direct costs each year. In another development, Kenya Airways Pride Centre was granted a new global certification by the International Air Transport Association. The new certification designates Pride Centre as an IATA Approved Training School, allowing it to deliver endorsed training programmes in the field of Dangerous Goods Regulations to shippers, freight forwarders, airlines and governments. This is the third certification that KQ Pride Centre has received from IATA, making it the only centre globally to have attained all three IATA certifications. “This is a huge endorsement of our efforts to deliver quality training that meets international aviation standards and recognition of KQ Pride Centre as a global training facility of excellence. We welcome individuals, organizations, airlines and governments to take advantage of our expertise to build their own competencies,” said Naikuni, Group CEO and MD of Kenya Airways. Source: Kenya Airways

South African Airways has become one of the first airlines in Africa and one of six in the world to achieve IATA Environmental Assessment Stage 1 status. The achievement comes after IATA embarked on the IATA Environmental Assessment (IEnvA), a two-year initiative to develop and establish an environmental standard and environmental management system for over 240 IATA member airlines. The aim of the two-year initiative is to create a minimum and recommended standard for airlines in areas such as general recycling, on-board recycling, efficient flight and airport operations, limiting and reducing carbon emissions, general energy efficiency as well as environmentally conscious procurement procedures. "We are very proud of being one of six global airlines to achieve IEnVA Stage 1 status. As part of SAA's Group Environment Strategy and in SAA's continuous effort to become one of the world's greenest airlines, our customers can fly SAA assured that we are taking great steps to establish ourselves as a market leader when it comes to environmentally friendly operations, efficient aircraft, green buildings and environmentally conscious employees," said SAA spokesperson, Mr. Tlali Tlali. In another development, South African Airways and Etihad Airways signed a Memorandum of Understanding allowing the two airlines to introduce a comprehensive range of codeshare and interline air services as well as explore synergy and efficiency opportunities. Initially, South African Airways will place its code on 12 Etihad Airways destinations flying from the UAE. In return Etihad Airways will place its ‘EY’ code on flights from Johannesburg to 10 SAA destinations across South Africa, Africa and South America. Source: SAA

Photo: File

Photo: File

KQ Plans to Set up Fuel Firm


aug - oct 2013

23

news briefs Air Namibia Wins Exceptional Service Delivery Award Air Namibia won an Award of Excellence and Exceptional Service Delivery at the Namibia Business Hall of Fame, Awards giving ceremony for the year 2013, at the Safari Hotel, Windhoek – Namibia in June 2013. The award serves as recognition of the airline’s level and finest customer services on its flights.

“We are service oriented company, and we ensure that we hire individuals that carry the warm spirit of Namibia, so if our cabin crew are serving our happy passengers with a smile, that’s the trade mark of Namibian hospitality and beauty, that make Air Namibia to stand out from the rest.” Mrs. Theo Namases the Managing Director of Air Namibia commended with delight on this achievement. Source: Air Namibia

RwandAir Acquires New Aircraft A second dry leased Boeing 737-700 NG new Aircraft landed at Kigali International Airport. The aircraft will replace the second Boeing 737-500 which has served for about 20 years, according to Mr. John Mirenge, CEO RwandAir. "The arrival of this aircraft means that our fleet is now standing at two owned Boeing 737 - 800NG, two owned CRJ900NG, two dry leased Boeing 737-700NG and one wet leased DASH8," Mr. Mirenge noted. He added that the aircraft will not only help consolidate the newly launched flight routes in Africa but also enable the airline to reach further places, including southern Europe. "Our vision as an airline is to make sure that we operate aircraft not exceeding six years and above," Mr. Mirenge said. Source: The New Times

Air Algérie's Turnaround Plan Begins to Bear Fruit Air Algérie's turnaround plan is beginning to pay off with the number of passengers uplifted increasing by more than 13% during the first four months of 2013. The carrier's traffic has grown by 13.61% on 2011/2012 resulting in a market share growth of 49%, CEO Mohamed Salah Boultif announced at a press conference in Algiers. "Our development plan aims to not put the company on the road to competitiveness and profitability, but also, and especially, to ensure its full and complete sustainability through a major investment program," he said. Source: Algérie Presse Service.

Air Seychelles Extends Codeshare with Etihad and Signs Codeshare with Czech Airlines Air Seychelles has extended its codeshare agreement with Etihad Airways to include new connections to Australia on Etihad flights operated via Abu Dhabi. Similarly, Air Seychelles, and Czech Airlines signed a codeshare agreement in June to link Prague and the Seychelles. The partnership allows passengers of the two airlines to book and travel between Prague and the Seychelles on one ticket, connecting in Abu Dhabi. Mr. Cramer Ball, Air Seychelles Chief Executive Officer, said: “I'm delighted to forge a partnership with Czech Airlines, an important player in the region. With this new agreement, the Seychelles has access to the city of Prague and attractive destinations beyond in Central and Eastern Europe operated by Czech Airlines, such as Russia, Belarus, Ukraine and Scandinavia. Source: Air Seychelles

Boeing and Embraer Joint Marketing Agreement

Rwandair CEO, Mr. John Mirenge, inside the new Boeing 737 Photo: Focus.rw

Boeing and Embraer have entered a joint marketing agreement for the Brazilian air framer's developmental KC-390 tactical transport. According to Boeing and Embraer, Boeing will lead sales, sustainment and training for the type in the US, UK, and select Middle East markets. The news was disclosed in a press briefing hosted by Embraer Defense & Security Chief Executive Luiz Carlos Aguiar and Boeing Vice-President Chris Raymond. The two companies are yet to disclose further details on the Middle East markets in which Boeing will lead marketing efforts and the number of KC-390 aircraft they hope to sell in each country. Embraer views the KC390 as a potential replacement for the Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules. Its maiden flight is scheduled for 2014. Source: Flight Daily News


24

Africa Wings

news briefs

.

Servair Restructures Mr. Michel Emeyriat, Chairman and Managing Director of Servair, has revealed the company's new structure, in place since June 2013. He reiterated that his goal is to consolidate the company's business strategy of improving its position using a high performing Parisian hub and renowned catering expertise in order to continue to grow internationally. Servair's priorities for the period from 2013 to 2015 will be to reduce costs, improve production processes, and develop new business lines. Key to implementing its strategy, Servair’s new structure involves setting up four operational centers, defined by geographical areas – Paris; France and Asia; the Americas and Caribbean; Europe, Africa, and the Middle East – each of them backed by support departments. The goal of this restructuring is to focus management on common challenges and to develop more autonomous managements for greater responsiveness. While providing greater clarity in task assignments and related responsibilities and more efficient ways of operating across management units. Source: Servair

to ets an

nt ess est

Ilyushin Finance Firms Purchase Agreement for CSeries Aircraft

African Airlines Association (AFRAA) as a full partner.

raft lessor in Russia and the certain leader in the deliveries of Russian-made civil aircraft to the ” was founded in 1999 on the principles of public-private partnership with the Government of

Bombardier announced in June 2013 that

rcraft; Ilyushin Finance has signed a firm purchase airlines to take the delivery of Russian aircraft; s, including pilot,agreement cabin crew and technical training, engineering, for 32staff CS300 aircraft and options

for 10 CS300 aircraft. TheAfrican original creasing demand for an new additional cost-effective aircraft we would be glad to assist airlines to eet planning, route analysis, deliveries, financing of aircraft and more. letter of intent was signed by IFC in 2011 and a conditional purchase agreement was announced by Bombardier in February 2013. There are currently 95 CRJ regional jets and Dash 8/Q-Series aircraft are in service, or on order, in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States. Bombardier is also offering the Q400 NextGen turboprop aircraft to airlines in the region as well. Source: Winglets

Mercator Develops a New Customer Loyalty Mobile Application Mercator has developed a new Loyalty application, enabling members of loyalty programs to accrue and redeem points faster, whether 40,000 feet in the air or on the ground. Club Premier Aeromexico, the preferred loyalty program in Mexico, became the first customer to sign up for the app. The three million plus members of Mexico's leading coalition program will benefit from being able to accrue and redeem points via their mobile devices from any place, at any time. "We are always seeking out ways to enhance our customer's experience with our products and services," said Jeremy Rabe, CEO Club Premier "It's always been our priority to reward them for choosing us over our competitors by taking the time to listen, modify, adapt and or reinvent our offer towards making their lives easier, better and more successful." he said. Source: Mercator

Moi University, the first in East and Central Africa to train students in Aerospace Sciences

Jomo Kenyatta International Airport Receives Certification Jomo Kenyatta International Airport has received the aerodrome certificate for 2013 for implementing safety measures for all operations and production of a manual detailing infrastructure and services. The certificate was issued by the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority in line with requirements by ICAO. Source: JKIA.

Moi University School of Aerospace Sciences, a faculty of Moi University, in Kenya is the first in East and Central Africa to train students in Aerospace Sciences. The school has been certified by Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA) for registration as an Aviation Training Organization (ATO) and has collaborations with East African School of Aviation (EASA) and Oklahoma State University. The first class of Bachelor of Science (Aerospace Science and Operations) students at the School of Aerospace Sciences has successfully completed the course and will graduate later this year in the following areas: Aerospace Logistics Option: This option covered courses on business administration, purchasing and supplies and aviation management courses. Aviation Security Option: Students in this option undertook courses on criminal justice, aviation security and safety and some courses on forensic sciences. Professional Pilot Option: Students in this option completed Commercial Pilot License (CPL) requirements including courses in physics and aviation management. The CVs of the graduates of this first class are available on the AFRAA website: http://www.afraa.org/index.php/about-us/careers


aug - oct 2013

25

news briefs

Dr. Titus Naikuni, receives ‘Airline Business Award’

Boeing Conducts Airline Planning Seminar for African Airlines With passenger growth expected to rise by 5.7 percent per year over the next 20 years, Africa presents an area of high opportunity for its region’s carriers. To help these airlines plan for the future, Boeing hosted a fourday planning seminar for African airlines, with the help and assistance of Kenya Airways, in Nairobi, Kenya, June 24-27. AFRAA joined in the meeting along with representatives of Air Mauritius, Ethiopian Airlines, Kenya Airways, Precision Air, and RwandAir plus government and industry advocates. The goal of the seminar was to cover and expose participants to various functional areas across an airline including airline strategies and business models, airplane economics, network and fleet planning, airplane performance, and airline financial analysis. This interactive seminar introduced attendees to a breadth of concepts and problems faced by airlines. The seminar used an interactive format to increase audience engagement and learning. Each session included one or more group activities solving real-world industry problems. Seminar participants worked on a capstone project throughout the week, allowing them to incorporate key issues from each session. The seminar, hosted by four experts from Boeing, shows the airplane manufacturer’s commitment to the industry and the success of our airline customers, said Kemp Harker, Managing Director, Latin America, Africa, and the Caribbean for Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Boeing regularly conducts these seminars at its Seattle homebase and in various locations around the world. “Our goal is to attract a breadth of customers at each seminar because participants truly benefit from discussions across the various organizations and departments represented,”Harker said. “We truly learn from each other.” Kenya Airways’ Chief Operating Officer, Mbuvi Ngunze, set a tone of cooperation for the week in his opening remarks, noting that he had attended an earlier session of the seminar in Seattle. The seminar concluded with presentations on strategic recommendations by each team for the case study to a board of directors. Rick Sine, Fleet & Asset Development director for Kenya Airways participated as one of the judges for the case study. He was impressed with what he saw: “Obviously, a great deal of learning took place,” he said. Boeing welcomes all airlines to participate in these seminars and looks forward to conducting another seminar in Africa.

Kenya Airways’ Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Titus Naikuni, received the ‘Airline Business Award’ at the Airline Strategy Awards in London in June 2013. The award recognizes individuals who have made a lasting strategic contribution to the air transport business. In the citation, the judging panel noted that: “During his 10 years at the helm, Dr. Naikuni has steered Kenya Airways on to a profitable and stable growth path and established it as one of Africa’s leading airlines.” “During the course of his tenure,

revenue has more than trebled to $1.2 billion, passenger numbers jumped to 3.6 million and the airline’s fleet has doubled to 42. Kenya Airways has totally revamped its fleet and become the first carrier in the region to join a global alliance, as well as a leading beacon of private enterprise in a region where state ownership remains the norm,” the judges added in part. Dr. Naikuni said that it was a great honour to be feted by colleagues in the aviation industry from across the world and added, “I would like to acknowledge colleagues at Kenya Airways and our customers, whose support has contributed to this recognition.” Source: JKIA.

Singapore Airlines signs Tourism Memorandum with Changi Airport Group and South African Tourism Singapore Airlines signed a memorandum of co-operation (MoC) with Changi Airport Group and South African Tourism to promote travel to South Africa. Under the agreement, the three parties will explore and implement activities jointly to promote tourist traffic to South Africa through Singapore Airlines’ services to Cape Town and Johannesburg via Singapore’s Changi Airport. The parties have agreed to invest more than S$1 million in cash and in-kind collectively over the next one year to support advertising and promotional campaigns, as well as familiarisation programmes for trade and media representatives. CAG’s Senior Vice President of Market Development, Mr Lim Ching Kiat, said: “With Changi Airport’s dense connectivity to China and Australia, as well as our award-winning airport services and facilities, we are confident that passengers on transit to South Africa will enjoy a first-class experience at Changi Airport.” South African Tourism Chief Executive Officer, Mr Thulani Nzima, explained: “We have aggressively sought tourism growth from emerging markets. Singapore is an extremely important hub for us in the Australasia region and this agreement with Changi Airport and Singapore Airlines is part of our commitment to co-operate with some of the world’s leading global tourism industry players to stimulate tourism growth to South Africa.” Source: JKIA.


26

Africa Wings

AFRAA Holds 2nd Aviation Suppliers & Stakeholders' Convention The African Airlines Association (AFRAA) successfully held the second Aviation Suppliers and Stakeholders Convention in Nairobi, Kenya, from 16-18 June 2013 at the Panari Hotel. This initiative of AFRAA, now in its second year, brought together 252 delegates comprising of suppliers, airlines, airports, Civil Aviation Authorities and ATNSs from 46 countries. The Convention was held under the theme, “Business Together” and deliberated on supply chain management issues in African aviation and how to improve service delivery in the industry.

Group Photo

The 2nd Suppliers Convention was held under the patronage of the Ministry of Transport and Infrastructure of the Republic of Kenya and the endorsement of Kenya Airways, the Kenya Airports Authority and Kenya Civil Aviation Authority. Keynote address speakers at the Suppliers Convention included: Mr. Boitshoko Sekwati, Deputy Regional Director of ICAO for Eastern and Southern Africa, Mr. Hassim Pondor - IATA Regional Manager for East Africa, Ms. Sosina Iyabo - Secretary General of AFCAC and Dr Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General. The Suppliers Convention was officially opened by the representative of the Director General of the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA) Mr. Joseph Kiptoo on behalf of the Ministry of Transport of the Republic of Kenya. In his speech, Mr. Kiptoo lauded AFRAA staging of this conference which has gathered diverse suppliers and service providers to dialogue and forge partnerships. He said the KCAA recently had its mandate expanded to broaden its capacity to better service airlines and provide oversight to operators. On assistance to facilitate local airlines access cheaper financing, Mr. Kiptoo said the Kenyan government recently domesticated the Cape Town Convention and Protocol which has enabled operators to acquire new aircraft

at reduced costs. He urged other African States that have not yet acceded to the Cape Town legislative instrument to do so to facilitate the modernization of African airlines.

Challenges in Africa In her address to the Conference, the Secretary General of AFCAC, Ms. Sosina Iyabo enumerated the many challenges confronting the African aviation industry as safety, security and liberalization. She added that, “The African air transport is still relatively underdeveloped and is characterized by weak and fragmented airlines that are faced with the common challenges of under-capitalization, difficulty in attracting finance, limited route network, ageing aircraft and lack of qualified aviation personnel due to brain-drain.” To be competitive, Ms. Iyabo said airlines must have the right equipment and tools. In this regard, AFCAC is in the forefront in encouraging States to accede to the Cape Town Convention and protocols. AFCAC is also pursuing the full implementation of the Yamoussoukro Decision to allow greater market access. Welcoming delegates to the Conference, the Secretary General of AFRAA, Dr. Elijah Chingosho observed that African aviation is growing>>


aug - oct 2013

27

ASASC 2013 and this requires collaboration between operators. “Suppliers should view themselves as an integral part of the aviation value-chain in Africa” says Dr. Chingosho. On safety, Dr. Chingosho noted that some progress has been made over the years though a lot remains to be done. According to him, IOSA registered airlines in Africa recorded zero accidents in 2012. The safety standards of AFRAA and IATA member airlines are comparable to the best in the world. He lauded African government commitment to the Abuja Declaration on safety that seeks to bring levels to world standards by 2015 as a bold and commendable step. The representative of the IATA Regional Vice President for Africa, Mr. Hassim Pondor described the Conference and an indication of the commitment of both AFRAA and IATA to the ideals of collaboration. He said, “The two Associations are closely working on a number of initiatives aimed at delivery of value to airlines.” He mentioned in particular the joint lobbying and advocacy on safety, IATF, charges and taxes, StB, regulatory and aero-political as some of the areas AFRAA and IATA are making progress with States and other stakeholders.

Supply Chain Management Growing African airlines need a well-coordinated supply system to support bringing about efficiency and cost savings. The Suppliers Convention sought to establish lasting relationships between suppliers and their customers. Delivering a presentation on Supply chain management in Africa, the Head of Supply Chain Management at Kenya Airways, Eng. Chris Oanda, noted that for African aviation to be competitive, logistics networks for airlines need to be well developed and coordinated so that they are able to respond to the evolving needs. He tasked companies to adopt automated logistics systems to ensure full support to operations. In his view, “The ability to develop logistics solutions along the way is critical for airlines’ growth and survival while undertaking all necessary audits for sustainable network partners.” The conference concluded with a call on operators to develop supply chain solutions for integrated network with a head office strategic focus. AFRAA was tasked to do more in proactively coordinating joint programmes for airlines similar to what it has achieved under the Joint Fuel Procurement Programme.

The Future of Air Travel Taking a glimpse into the future travel needs of the passenger, SITA discussed the buying behavior, expectations and self-service requirements of travelers by 2015. It emerged that web-booking is now the most preferred method for most passengers accounting for over 74% in 2012. This will further increase to 86% by 2015. SITA also discovered through their research that by 2015, most airlines and airports will be leveraging mobile technology for commerce at the airport and inflight. According to SITA Director of Sales for Sub-Sahara Africa, Mr. Sam Munda, going forward passengers will demand more personal experience and they will seek to control how services are dispersed. However, the issues of privacy remain serious concerns. The SITA study further revealed that most airports and airlines will have to deploy multiple new services beyond kiosk check-in. The mobile will be dominant though kiosk will still be relevant. 80% of youth between 18-24 years are on social media and this could influence future direction of travel decisions. It emerged that buyer behavior is set to change significantly by 2015 and customer service will use mobile and social media. Quality business and customer intelligence will be essential for success.

Addressing Skill Shortage In a discussion on addressing the critical issues of skills requirements in the industry, various speakers gave their views on how the situation can be reversed. While most speakers felt brain-drain was hurting the industry, a few saw a reversal of the trend in the form of what was termed as “brain-gain”. The proponent of this view explained that some of the skills lost in the past is now returning to Africa with more enhanced skills. They noted that the return was due to the emerging opportunities in Africa and relatively harder conditions of living in Europe and elsewhere. The conference recommended more training of personnel by the training institutions in Africa to meet the needs of the industry and for export. There was a suggestion to train more females in managerial and technical areas in aviation as they were more stable in employment than their male counterparts. Financial institutions were urged to partner with the aviation industry in training the youth who are guaranteed jobs in airlines, airports and Civil Aviation Authorities. On handing employment issues in times of restructuring, operators were advised to keep abreast with emerging labor laws across Africa to avoid conflicts and unnecessary litigations. Poorly addressed employment issues have adverse effects on staff morale and performance and could trigger brain-drain and sometimes labor unrest, according to Mrs. Aisha Abdallah, a legal Consultant at Anjarwalla & Khanna Advocates. She added that employers should note that, “No one size fits all and therefore meaningful consultation is important to addressing employment-related issues.”

Master Classes As part of the Convention, three master classes were held where cutting edge ideas, industry best practices, new opportunities and practical solutions were presented and discussed by consultants and solution experts in a lively and engaging manner with ample time for debates, case studies and group discussions. Master classes were conducted on the following topics: • Fare Management and Ancillary Revenue for airlines, facilitated by Mr. Frank Socha, Regional Director EMEA - ATPCO and Mr. David Julias, Consulting Manager – ATPCO • Fleet Planning, facilitated by Ms. Ana Carolina Lago Marketing Director, Commercial Aviation – Embraer • Route Network Coordination, facilitated by Mr. John Wickson, Consultant, Ms. Anick Léger, Head of Sales - Middle-East and Africa and Ms. Annika Akerman, Solution Partner MEA – all from Sabre Airline Solutions Each of the master class discussed areas of cooperating and support between airlines, suppliers and other partners to improve service delivery, reduce costs and enhance revenues.

Awards AFRAA awarded four aviation industry service providers at the Suppliers and Stakeholders Convention for exceptional and exemplary service delivery to the aviation industry. The winners were SITA, Servair, EgyptAir Training Centre and NAHCOaviance. SITA was presented the IT Aviation Service Provider of the Year Award. The award recognized SITA for its broad portfolio of solutions for the aviation industry, collaboration with customers to pilot emerging technologies and heavy investment in research and development of new solutions. The Aviation Catering and Inflight Service Provider of the Year Award


28

Africa Wings

ASASC 2013

was presented to Servair, a global catering service provider with presence in four continents. In Africa, Servair is present in 20 airports, offering catering to many airlines. The award recognized Servair for its commitment to capacity building, quality service delivery and use of local food products in its production process. The Third award, Training Service Provider of the Year, was presented to EgyptAir Training Centre for investment in state-of-the-art facilities, dedication to developing aviation capacity in Africa and training assistance it provides to other African aviation organisations. The Ground Handling Service Provider of the Year was awarded to the Nigeria Aviation Handling Company, NAHCOaviance, for adherence to international safety and security standards, attainment of ISAGO and investment in ground handling equipment and facilities at their bases of operation.

Exhibition of Aviation Products and Services 19 suppliers and/or service providers benefited from the outstanding visibility, networking and direct sales opportunities by displaying their products and interacting with delegates at the conference. The exhibitors included: Aero Industrial Sales, Atlantic FuelEx, Aurora Aviation S.A., EgyptAir Training/Supplementary Services, Ethiopian Airlines MRO, Flightline Training Services, FLYHT, Gulf Energy Limited, Hadid International Services, IFE Services, Kenya Airways, Mapfre Asistencia, MI Airline, NAHCOaviance, SITA, Smart4Aviation, South African Airways Technical, TCR International N.V. and Wirecard Technologies GmbH.

Keynote Speakers

Mr. Joseph Kiptoo, KCAA Director Corporate Services makes a keynote address speech on behalf of the KCAA DG. He opened the event on behalf of the Guest of Honour from the Ministry of Transport of the Republic of Kenya.

Sponsors The Suppliers and Stakeholders Convention was proudly sponsored by the following industry players. AFRAA is grateful for their sport that led to a successful event.

Platinum sponsors:

At the opening ceremony of the Suppliers Convention 2013, from L- R: Mr. Hassim Pondor, IATA Area Manager East Africa / Head Nairobi Mission, Ms. Sosina Iyabo, AFCAC Secretary General, Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA secretary General, Mr. Boitshoko Sekwati, Deputy Regional Director, ICAO Regional Office for Eastern and Southern Africa and Mr. Joseph Kiptoo, Kenya Civil Aviation Authority Director Corporate Services.

Diamond sponsors:

Bronze sponsors:

website: http://www.afraa.org/

Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General makes his welcome address at the event.


aug - oct 2013

29

ASASC 2013 Photo Gallery

Mr. Sam Munda, Sales Director, Sub-Sahara Africa SITA receives the Aviation IT Service Provider of the Year Award on behalf of SITA presented by Ms. Sosina Iyabo, AFCAC Secretary General.

Mr. Eric Rouvillois, General Manager NAS Servair and Ms. Lucy Osoro, Catering Operations Manager receive the award for Servair, presented by AFCAC Secretary General.

Mr. Gofwan Gordon Paul and Mr. Oyebola Olatunde Cornelius receive the award for NAHCOaviance presented by Ms. Sosina Iyabo, AFCAC Secretary General.

Mr. Abiodun Adewuni Customer Relationship Manager (Africa) - NAHCOaviance (L) receives a token of appreciation for Bronze sponsorship presented to NAHCOaviance by Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Mr. Andy Smith, Sales Director, Atlantic FuelPlus (L) receives a token of appreciation for Platinum sponsorship on behalf of Atlantic FuelEx presented by Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Mr. Derek Taylor, FLYHT Sales Director (L) and Mr. David Connolly FLYHT Sales Director receive a token of appreciation for Bronze sponsorship presented to FLYHT by Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Ms. Sosina Iyabo, AFCAC Secretary General presents the award to EgyptAir.

Dr. Mahmoud Dachach, President - Aurora Aviation SA (L) receives the token of appreciation for Platinum sponsorship and sponsorship of the welcome cocktail presented by Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Ms. Mercy Awori, Head of Air Transport, Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (L) receives a token of appreciation for Diamond sponsorship presented to Kenya Civil Aviation authority by Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Ms. Selina A. Gor, Corporate Affairs and Communication - Kenya Airports Authority (L) receives the token of appreciation for Diamond sponsorship presented to Kenya Airports Authority by Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Mr. Dominic Persad, Group COO - Linkham Services (L) receives a token of appreciation for Bronze sponsorship presented to Linkham Services by Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

And not to forget the event MC, Ms. Phyllis Wakiaga, Head of Policy, Research and Advocacy at the Kenya Association of Manufacturers (L) for a wonderful job. Ms. Wakiaga receives a token of appreciation for moderating the event from Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.


30

Africa Wings

ASASC 2013 Photo Gallery

Dr. Mahmoud Dachach, President - Aurora Aviation SA makes a welcome speech at the welcome cocktail. Aurora Aviation SA sponsored the welcome cocktail.

Mr. Andy Smith, Sales Director, Atlantic FuelPlus makes a presentation on Fuel management the most important component of running an airline operations.

Ms. Aisha Abdallah, Partner Anjarwalla & Khanna Advocates makes a presentation on Handling critical employment issues during airline restructuring.

Panel discussion 2 panellists at the podium eager to speak. From L-R: Ms. Lucy Mbugua, General Manager Marketing & Business Development - Kenya Airports Authority KAA, Dr. Gideon Kaunda, Executive Chairman, Pangaea Securities (EA) Ltd, Ms. Sonal Sejpal, Legal Consultant, Anjarwalla & Khanna Advocates and Ms. Jackie Odudoh, HR/Administration Manager, Kenya Association of Tour Operators (KATO).

Ms. Mercy Awori, Head of Air Transport, Kenya Civil Aviation Authorit (L) receives a token of appreciation from Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Mr. Cornwell Muleya, Chief Executive Officer - Air Uganda (R) receives a token of appreciation from Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Mr. Sanjeev S. Gadhia - C.E.O - Astral Aviation Ltd (L) receives a token of appreciation from Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Mr. Mpho Phillip Sekhamane, Head of Department: Global Operations Control Centre, Global Operation Control Centre - South African Airways (L) receives a token of appreciation from Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Mr. Bruno Boucher, Associate Partner Africa Lufthansa Consulting makes a presentation on Air freight business opportunities in Africa.

Mr. Djibril B. Taboure, President VP Middle East and Africa - APG Central & West Africa (L) receives a token of appreciation from Dr. Elijah Chingosho, AFRAA Secretary General.

Ready for the questions from the audience! From L- R: Eng. Chris Oanda, Head of Supply Chain, Kenya Airways, Mr. Sam Munda, Sales Director, Sub-Sahara Africa SITA and Dr. Mahmoud Dachach, President - Aurora Aviation SA.


aug - oct 2013

31

ASASC 2013 Photo Gallery


Ailes d'Afrique N o.22: a oû t - oct 2013

Le magazine panafricain de l’AFRAA sur le transport aérien

Les compagnies adoptent rapidement la technologie mobile

Mode de paiement électronique: la voie à suivre pour les compagnies africaines

Entretien avec le PDG de TAAG


La plus grande conférence des

DG des compagnies africaines

La 45ème Assemblée générale annuelle (AGA) de l’Association des compagnies aériennes africaines (AFRAA), Sommet du transport aérien africain, aura lieu à Mombasa, Kenya du 24 au 26 novembre 2013. Les assises de l’AGA seront abritées par Kenya Airways - Fierté de l’Afrique. La participation est sur invitation seulement Pour des opportunités de parrainage et d’exposition, veuillez contacter le Secrétariat AFRAA pour de plus amples détails. African Airlines Association (AFRAA) | 2nd Floor, AFRAA Building | Off Red Cross Road South C, off Mombasa Road, Nairobi | P.O. Box 20116 – 00200, Nairobi, Kenya Tel: +254 20 2320144/8, GSM: +254 722 209708/735 337669 Email: afraa@afraa.orgWebsite: www.afraa.org


Août-Oct 2013

1

foreword

L'avenir s'annonce radieux Le monde affiche beaucoup d'optimisme quant aux perspectives de l'aviation africaine et au développement de l'Afrique en général. L'heure est en effet à l'optimisme pour l'essor de l'industrie du transport aérien africain. Selon différentes prévisions, les ajustements fondamentaux que les compagnies aériennes ont effectués dans leurs activités permettront de générer des profits vu que le prix du pétrole ne devrait pas dépasser 108 dollars le baril et que l'économie mondiale progressera de 2,2% en 2013. Nous assistons à une importante augmentation du coefficient de remplissage en Afrique. Cela est le résultat de l'utilisation accrue des avions adaptés aux routes exploitées, notamment des appareils de type régional sur les liaisons à faible trafic. Grâce aux reformes structurelles et à une gestion judicieuse de la capacité, les compagnies remplissent davantage leurs avions. Il est prévu que les coefficients de remplissage dépasseront 70% cette année, soit une progression d'environ 67% au cours de ces dernières années, qui restent néanmoins bien en deçà des normes de l'industrie, soit environ 80%. Les liaisons, même si elles sont encore insuffisantes, continuent de s'améliorer, avec plus de 25 nouvelles paires de villes lancées en 2012. Les compagnies aériennes agissent avec innovation et à travers des partenariats qui offrent davantage de valeur aux voyageurs, tout en améliorant l'utilisation de leurs appareils. Cependant, il convient de rappeler que le transport aérien est un secteur difficile, dont les marges bénéficiaires sont très faibles. Faire en sorte que les recettes l'emportent sur les dépenses est toujours un défi. Certaines compagnies sont en difficultés, en particulier les petits opérateurs étatiques à faibles ressources. Le transport aérien africain est en proie à des taxes et redevances élevées pour les passagers et le carburant. Cependant, il y a un groupe de compagnies aériennes qui continuent de démontrer qu'une performance robuste permet de générer des profits même en temps de crise. IATA a récemment annoncé que selon ses prévisions, cette année les compagnies aériennes enregistreront un bénéfice de 12,7 milliards de dollars sur un chiffre d'affaires de 711 milliards de dollars, soit une marge nette de 1,8% . Quant aux compagnies africaines, leur bénéfice sera de 100 millions de dollars, une progression par rapport à la perte du même montant enregistrée en 2012. L'industrie du transport aérien est caractérisée par de faibles marges bénéficiaires. Réaliser un bénéfice dans le contexte actuel de la crise économique est un exploit, notamment compte tenu des coûts évoqués ci-haut qui prévalent en Afrique. Alors que le carburant représente environ un tiers des coûts d'exploitation au plan mondial, en Afrique il représente 50%. L'industrie aérienne africaine en pleine croissance doit être appuyée par une chaine d'approvisionnement bien rodée permettant des coûts compétitifs et des opportunités de revenus accrus grâce à une utilisation optimale des technologies de l'information, des avions adaptés au réseau exploité et à l'adoption des meilleures pratiques en matière de sécurité des opérations, de logistique, de gestion et de marketing. La conférence des fournisseurs et des parties prenantes de l'industrie organisée par l'AFRAA à Nairobi du 16 au 18 juin 2013 a facilité un échange d'idées et l'établissement des relations durables et gagnantgagnant. L'AFRAA avait constaté le besoin d'un forum, une sorte de forum à guichet unique, rassemblant d'une part différents fournisseurs d'avions, de moteurs, de matériels, de composantes, de pièces détachées, de services TIC, de solutions de formation, de services conseils, de services financiers, et différents clients dont les compagnies aériennes, les aéroports, les autorités aéronautiques, les

prestataires de services de navigation aérienne, etc. d'autre part. Cette conférence s'est avérée utile dans la mesure où elle encourageait l'interaction, le réseautage et l'échange d'idées sur le développement de notre industrie. L'établissement de partenariats de confiance avec des acteurs africains et non africains est de bon augure pour le développement harmonieux d'une industrie aéronautique sécurisée, sure, fiable et viable sur le continent. L'aviation africaine en pleine croissance a besoin d'appui dans des domaines tels que l'entretien des avions, la mise en place des simulateurs de vol et d'autres installations de formation. L'Afrique compte des centres de maintenance, réparation et révision (MRO) et de formation de classe internationale certifiés EASA/FAA. Pour les services MRO, il s'agit notamment de Aerotechnic Industries Maroc, Air Algérie Technics, Atlantic Air Industries Maroc, EgyptAir Maintenance & Engineering, Ethiopian Airlines, Kenya Airways Technical, South African Airways Technical et TunisAir Technics. Pour les services de formation et de simulateurs, vous trouverez des prestataires certifiés FAA /EASA tels que EgyptAir Training Centre, Ethiopian Airlines Academy, Kenya Airways Pride Centre, Royal Air Maroc Academy et le Centre de formation de Tunisair. Il est nécessaire d'améliorer de manière significative la mauvaise image de la sécurité aérienne du continent. À court terme, cela peut être réalisé par la mise en œuvre du plan d'action stratégique pour l'amélioration de la sécurité dans la région AFI approuvé par les ministres chargés de l'aviation à Abuja en juillet 2012 et entériné par les chefs d'Etat en janvier 2013. La mise en œuvre par les parties prenantes des stratégies convenues devrait permettre le retrait de tous les pays et transporteurs aériens africains de la liste noire d'ici 2015 et l'obtention du certificat IOSA par toutes les compagnies africaines. Comme la sécurité nécessite la collaboration de divers intervenants, notamment les gouvernements, les autorités aéronautiques, les compagnies aériennes, les aéroports, les sociétés d'assistance en escale et les prestataires de services de navigation aérienne, la coopération est essentielle. Les compagnies aériennes africaines mieux nanties devront aider leurs homologues moins dotés en ressources, par exemple à mener une analyse des faiblesses ou en leur permettant de leur envoyer leurs employés pour un perfectionnement sur le tas. Actuellement, les infrastructures de nombreux États africains laissent à désirer et sont à la traine par rapport au transport aérien en pleine croissance. Bien qu'il y ait plusieurs exceptions, il est nécessaire de développer et d'élargir les aéroports, les pistes d'atterrissage et les installations de sécurité de la navigation aérienne. Les aéroports devraient être ouverts 24 heures par jour et pas seulement pendant la journée. Il est nécessaire que les autorités compétentes élaborent des plans proactifs face à l'expansion rapide attendue du trafic aérien africain au cours des prochains cinquante ans. L'aérien africain est à la traine par rapport au reste du monde dans l'adoption des nouvelles technologies efficaces. L'amélioration des infrastructures peut s'accélérer si les partenaires de l'intérieur et de l'extérieur de l'Afrique sont prêts à coopérer selon la formule construction - exploitation - transfert (Build - Operate - Transfer: BOT). Les pays comme les Philippines ont utilisé la formule BOT pour motiver le secteur privé à concourir à la mise en place des infrastructures. Une approche similaire peut être utilisée en Afrique où les besoins en infrastructures améliorées sont énormes et nécessitent des méthodes novatrices pour faire face à la demande croissante.

Dr. Elijah Chingosho AFRAA Secretary General


6

Ailes d'Afrique

Tous droits réservés. Aucune parrtie de ce magazine ne peut être reproduite sans la permission écrite de l'éditeur ©2013 CAMERAPIX MAGAZINES LTD

Les brèves 18 Carnet de bord de l'AFRAA 22

Tenez-vous informés des dernières nouvelles de l’AFRA.A Quoi de neuf chez les compagnies aériennes africaines ? les opportunités d'expansion et de rentabilité pour les compagnies aériennes africaines.

La gestion des pièces détachées et fournitures pour avions peut permettre aux compagnies aériennes d'économiser de l'argent Le transport aérien en Afrique connait une croissance très rapide en même temps que

Le marché africain en recul 16

Raphael Kuuchi, Directeur, Affaires Commerciales, Services généraux et Relations avec l'Industrie

Les analystes du secteur ont une diversité d'opinions sur les "nouveaux arrivants" et leur capacité à pénétrer le marché.

Analyse comparative des avions MRJ90 et SSJ100 14

Les États africains devraient veiller à ce que leurs autorités aéronautiques soient renforcées pour appliquer la réglementation et assurer la supervision de la sécurité de leur industrie aéronautique.

13 La politique de l’aviation civile africaine (PACA)

The air transport in Africa is growing very fast and with it opportunities for African airlines to expand and be profitable.

12 La Convention de Montréal de 1999

l'assistance à la clientèle pour les compagnies aériennes africaines.

Entretien avec Kassa Maru, Président de American General Supplies (AGS) Mieux comprendre comment AGS effectue la gestion des stocks, la formation et

10

K

CMY

innovations les mieux adaptées à leur spécificité.

CY

La voie à suivre pour les compagnies aériennes africaines Les compagnies aériennes africaines devraient " sortir des sentiers battus" et profiter des MY

8

CM

L Y

timidement.

Qui transporte le trafic africain?

de l'AEA pour 2011 placent Turkish Airlines en tête comme l'un des nouveaux venus sur le marché africain, mais aussi l'un des plus agressifs affichant une croissance rapide. En effet, en 2011 Turkish a enregistré une croissance de 35,9%. Les autres compagnies aériennes européennes qui ont affiché une croissance significative en 2011 sont: Lufthansa 15,5%; Brussels Airlines 13,7% et Air France 6,1%. Au Moyen-Orient, Emirates, Ethihad et Qatar Airways ont réalisées des chiffres de croissance impressionnants du même ordre en 2011. Les 6 principales destinations passagers en Afrique sub-saharienne pour les transporteurs européens et moyen-orientaux avec plus de 500.000 passagers par an sont: Johannesbourg, Lagos, Le Cap, Nairobi, Dakar et Accra. Ensemble, les compagnies européennes ont transporté à destination/en provenance de ces villes plus de 5 millions de passagers en 2011. Les opérateurs du MoyenOrient ont également transporté à destination/ en provenance de ces villes plus de 3,2 millions de passagers au cours de la même année. Le total de passagers transportés par les compagnies aériennes européennes et du Moyen-Orient depuis ces 6 villes est presque équivalent au nombre de tous les passagers intercontinentaux transportés par toutes les compagnies aériennes africaines en 2011. En outre, les transporteurs nord-américains, qui jusqu'en 2006 n'étaient pas présents sur le marché africain, contrôlent aujourd'hui 52% de la capacité totale entre l'Amérique et l'Afrique. 23 pays africains ont jusqu'à présent signé des accords "ciel ouvert" avec les États-Unis, bien qu’ environ 6 aéroports africains seulement Entretien avec le PDG de TAAG

M

L’enquête Airline IT Trends Survey révèle un environnement informatique qui s'améliore

Les bénéficiaires de la croissance de l'aviation africaine sont des compagnies non-africaines, en grande partie d'Europe, du Moyen-Orient et plus récemment d'Amérique du Nord. Selon le site internet de l'Association des compagnies aériennes européennes (AEA), les 5 plus grandes compagnies aériennes européennes en Afrique en termes de passagers-kilomètres transportés en 2011 sont les suivantes: Air France, British Airways, KLM, Lufthansa et Virgin Atlantic. Air France exploite 270 vols par semaine vers diverses destinations africaines avec une capacité de 59.590 sièges, soit 15% de la capacité de l'ensemble des transporteurs européens en Afrique. Ensemble, les transporteurs européens exploitent 2001 vols par semaine avec 397.249 sièges entre l'Europe et l'Afrique par rapport aux 479 vols et 119.563 sièges offerts par toutes les compagnies aériennes africaines opérant en Europe. South African Airways (SAA) est en train d'être évincée de son propre marché par les compagnies aériennes étrangères. En tant que seul opérateur africain intercontinental entre l'Afrique du Sud et l'Europe, SAA a dû rivaliser avec 8 compagnies européennes opérant à Johannesbourg et au Cap, certains utilisant des avions A380. Actuellement SAA opère 30 vols par semaine avec 8.114 sièges sur l'Europe contre 79 vols et 26.626 sièges par semaine offerts par des concurrents européens. Concernant les transporteurs européens les plus dynamiques en Afrique, les statistiques

Mode de paiement électronique: la voie à suivre pour les compagnies africaines

N o .2 2 : a o û t - o ct 2 0 1 3

e marché africain du transport aérien devrait connaître une croissance de plus de 5,2% par an d'ici 2030. Selon certaines prévisions, 150,3 millions de passagers seront transportés par voie aérienne à l’horizon 2030 contre 56 millions en 2011. Le volume de fret devrait également progresser de 5,3% par an d'ici 2030. Mais ces statistiques de croissance impressionnantes ne reflètent pas la situation réelle des transporteurs du continent, dont la plupart ont du mal à survivre et à faire face aux coûts d'exploitation toujours croissants. La capacité, mesurée par le nombre de sièges offerts par les compagnies aériennes africaines sur les routes européennes, moyen-orientales et nord-américaines, a systématiquement baissé depuis 2002, lorsque les transporteurs aériens africains contrôlaient 58% de la part de marché. En 2012, la capacité des compagnies africaines avait baissé pour tomber à 22%, en dépit du taux moyen annuel de croissance du trafic passagers de 6,8% au cours des 10 dernières années. L'Afrique est ainsi devenue la seule région du monde où le transport de la plus grande proportion du trafic aérien intercontinental est assuré par des opérateurs étrangers. Le coefficient de remplissage moyen des transporteurs de la région est resté largement en dessous de 70% , alors que le coefficient moyen mondial est de plus de 75%. N'est-il donc pas étrange que la plupart des compagnies aériennes de la région doivent se battre pour survivre dans un environnement caractérisé par une croissance rapide du trafic et des recettes unitaires élevées?

Imprimé à Nairobi, Kenya.

Camerapix Magazines (UK) Limited 32 Friars Walk, Southgate, London, N14 5LP Tel: +44 (20) 8361 2942, Mobile: +44 79411 21458 E-mail: camerapixuk@btinternet.com Editorial and Advertising Offices: Camerapix Magazines Ltd. PO Box 45048, 00100 GPO Nairobi, Kenya Telephone: +254 (20) 4448923/4/5 Fax: +254 (20) 4448818 or 4441021 E-mail: creative@camerapix.co.ke Toute correspondance relative à la rédaction et aux annonces peut être envoyée à l'une des adresses suivantes: Africa Wings est publié trimestriellement par Camerapix Magazines Limited pour le compte de l'AFRAA Production /Publicité: Azra Chaudhry (UK) Rose Judha (Kenya) Traduction française: Ephrem Kamanzi

Concepteur principal: Sam Kimani

Réviseur: Cecilia Gaitho Maureen Kahonge

Rédacteur en chef: Raphael Kuuchi

Directeur de la rédaction: Rukhsana Haq

Editeur: Camerapix Publishers International Limited

Les compagnies adoptent rapidement la technologie mobile

Le magazine panafricain de l’AFRAA sur le transport aérien

Ailes d'Afrique 2

C

Entretien avec Dr. Pimentel Araújo 4 Les compagnies aériennes adoptent 6 rapidement le numérique

PDG de TAAG Angola Airlines et Président du Comité exécutif de l’AFRAA.

Ailes d'Afrique

Sommaire


5

may - july 2013 Août-Oct 2013

3

Aéroport Changi de Singapour Nous desservons une grande partie de l'Asie du Nord-Est

Japon

Corée

Taïwan

Chine

136 vols hebdomadaires

76 vols hebdomadaires

En moyenne, l'Aéroport Changi de Singapour assure une correspondance vers l'Asie du Nord-Est toutes les 15 minutes, soit un total de 723 correspondances par semaine vers 34 capitales et villes secondaires en Chine, au Japon, en Corée et à Taiwan. Toutes ces destinations sont desservies par une vaste sélection de compagnies aériennes, depuis Pour développer l'activité de votre compagnie en Asie, veuillez nous écrire à l'adresse changi.marketing@changiairport.com ou visitez le site changiairportgroup.com/partenariat

55 vols hebdomadaires

456 vols hebdomadaires


4

Ailes d'Afrique

Entretien

TAAG Angola est l'une des compagnies aériennes les plus réputées en Afrique avec un excellent niveau de sécurité. Dans cet entretien exclusif avec Ailes d'Afrique, le président directeur général de TAAG Angola, Dr Pimentel Araújo, aborde les réalisations de sa compagnie et les défis de l'industrie du transport aérien africain en général.

Vous avez réussi à faire retirer TAAG Angola Airlines de la liste communautaire des compagnies aériennes interdites dans l'Union Européenne. Comment avez-vous fait?

Dr Pimentel Araújo, président directeur général de TAAG Angola Airlines et président du Comité exécutif de l'AFRAA. Quelle est votre évaluation de l'industrie du transport aérien en Afrique aujourd'hui?

L'industrie du transport aérien est un facteur important de la croissance économique rapide à laquelle nous assistons aujourd'hui en Afrique. En fait, les économies africaines ont connu et continueront à enregistrer, les taux de croissance du PIB les plus élevés au monde (par exemple, entre 2011 et 2012, l'Angola a vu son PIB progresser à un taux d'environ 8%, selon African Economic Outlook), en plus des prévisions d'une forte croissance du trafic passagers (par exemple, l'IATA prévoit que le trafic passagers et fret en Afrique progressera de 6,9% et 4,3% respectivement, contre 5,6% et 3,4% pour le reste du monde). Par conséquent, les compagnies aériennes africaines se développent rapidement pour exploiter cette croissance, notamment en passant par l'expansion de leurs réseaux (nationaux et internationaux) et l'amélioration de leurs opérations (par exemple, les retards, le service à la clientèle,). C'est pourquoi les compagnies aériennes africaines comme TAAG Angola Airlines, Ethiopian Airlines et Kenya Airways sont en train de lancer de nouvelles liaisons en Afrique et vers d'autres continents, et que beaucoup de transporteur sont en cours de mise en œuvre des plans ambitieux de transformation pour améliorer les performances. Cette opportunité est si intéressante que même les compagnies aériennes non-africaines renforcent leur présence en Afrique (par exemple, Emirates, Lufthansa, IAG, Etihad, Qatar Airways, Turkish Airlines). Je crois fermement que dans le contexte actuel, il devrait y avoir un effort transversal, venant des compagnies aériennes elles-mêmes aux entités gouvernementales, pour saisir cette occasion et accroître les parts de marché tant à l'intérieur qu'à l'extérieur de l'Afrique. Cela permettrait non seulement de contribuer au développement des économies africaines, mais aussi de renforcer les liens culturels entre l'Afrique et le reste du monde.

TAAG a été le premier opérateur africain, je crois, jamais autorisé à voler en Europe après avoir été placé sur la liste de l'UE, alors appelée «liste noire». Ceci a été possible grâce à la poursuite de deux principaux objectifs: l'obtention de la recertification par INAVIC (l'Autorité de l'aviation civile angolaise) et de la certification IOSA qui a permis à TAAG d'atteindre la conformité aux normes des meilleures compagnies aériennes au monde. Ces actions nous ont permis de regagner notre qualité de membre de l'IATA. En outre, TAAG a considérablement investi dans le renouvellement de ses infrastructures technologiques et dans de nouvelles applications au cours des cinq dernières années, adoptant ainsi les meilleures pratiques de l'industrie. Ces améliorations permettent à TAAG de maintenir d'excellentes normes de sécurité car elle peut gérer sa flotte et ses équipages plus efficacement et surveiller de près les conditions de ses avions. Nous avons également réussi à augmenter les niveaux d'utilisation de la flotte, conformément aux meilleures pratiques de l'industrie. Une bonne illustration de l'impact de nos avancées opérationnelles a été l'amélioration rapide du niveau des retards immédiatement après l'introduction de ces changements: au mois d'octobre 2009, 90% de nos vols accusaient un retard d'au moins 30 minutes, mais deux années plus tard, nous avons pu améliorer considérablement cette situation. En effet, seulement 10% de nos vols enregistrent un retard d'au moins 30 minutes. Cette amélioration a été possible grâce à l'engagement indéfectible de tous les collaborateurs de l'entreprise qui se sont mobilisés pour soutenir notre programme de tolérance zéro des retards, initié par l'équipe de direction.

Quels conseils donneriezvous aux États et compagnies aériennes qui sont toujours sur liste de l'UE?

Je leur conseillerais de promouvoir le changement au sein de leurs organisations, en investissant dans la sécurité et la qualité comme priorité absolue. C'est un processus long et pénible, mais un objectif extrêmement important à atteindre pour réussir, et qui devrait être réalisé non seulement pour lever l'interdiction, mais surtout pour garantir la sécurité des passagers. Après tout, la première responsabilité d'une compagnie aérienne est de veiller à la sécurité de ses passagers.

La fuite des cerveaux est un défi majeur pour de nombreuses

compagnies aériennes. Comment TAAG Angola traite-t-elle de ce problème?

Dans une industrie si complexe et très pointue comme la nôtre, nous devons naturellement rechercher les meilleurs professionnels disponibles sur le marché et les jeunes talents à fort potentiel. L'inconvénient est que le perfectionnement professionnel que mes collègues reçoivent à TAAG leur procure des compétences transférables, très recherchées par d'autres sociétés à la fois sur le marché national et à l'étranger. Pour garantir un niveau élevé de rétention des talents, nous avons affronté ce problème en investissant dans la formation interne et le renforcement des capacités. L'exemple d'un programme très réussi que je peux partager avec vous est une initiative que nous avons mise en place au niveau de l'excellence organisationnelle, où nous avons conçu un programme permanent appelé TAAG Corporate Academy. La TAAG Corporate Academy est un programme interne de qualification, qui vise à identifier et développer de jeunes professionnels qui peuvent assumer des postes de leadership au sein de la compagnie à l'avenir. Ce programme prévoit l'inclusion de talents prometteurs dans l'équipe de direction de TAAG. Un autre exemple de réussite d'une initiative de développement des compétences est le programme d'échange d'employés avec d'autres compagnies avec lesquelles nous entretenons des partages de codes et d'autres accords commerciaux. Ce programme les aide à comprendre les philosophies sous-jacentes de l'industrie du transport aérien à partir d'une perspective plus large et de s'imprégner d'une éthique professionnelle de niveau international.

Bien que TAAG Angola se développe rapidement, il se pourrait qu'elle rencontre quelques difficultés. Pourriez-vous nous énumérer les principaux défis de la compagnie?

TAAG a l'ambition de devenir un transporteur phare, une référence au niveau régional, s'appuyant sur des infrastructures de classe mondiale. Ce n'est qu'à ce moment que nous pourrons alors nous considérer, à juste titre, comme un puissant moteur du développement économique national. Afin d'atteindre ce statut, nous entrevoyons quatre principaux défis à l'avenir: Les infrastructures aéroportuaires et de soutien: dans la perspective de mettre en place un Hub adapté au niveau de Luanda, pour servir les passagers en transit (c-à-d qui ne voyagent pas en provenance/à destination de l'Angola), il est essentiel que nous disposions d'infrastructures nécessaires. C'est difficile parce que ces infrastructures nécessitent l'intervention directe de l'État et de plusieurs autres acteurs, donc pas exclusivement sous notre contrôle;


Août-Oct 2013

5

Entretien

Cadre réglementaire: Nous devrions travailler ensemble avec les instances gouvernementales pour élaborer la réglementation la plus efficace dans le secteur, répondant aux normes internationales de sécurité et de service; Réseau: desservir un large éventail de destinations sera un processus difficile, car nous devons investir beaucoup de temps et d'efforts pour étudier et identifier les destinations importantes et économiquement viables lors de la conception et du déploiement du modèle commercial pour répondre à la croissance; Efficacité opérationnelle: le contexte économique mondial actuel a contribué à l'augmentation de plusieurs de nos coûts (par ex. le carburant). Face à une augmentation des coûts, nous avons le choix de les répercuter au client, d'enregistrer une perte ou de devenir plus performant sur le plan opérationnel. Les deux premières options ne sont pas viables pour TAAG. C'est pour cette raison que nous sommes engagés à améliorer progressivement nos performances.

L'accès au marché angolais est soumis à beaucoup de restrictions. Cette situation a-telle une incidence (positive ou négative) sur l'exploitation de TAAG?

L'accès aux marchés est une dimension importante d'une compagnie telle que TAAG, compte tenu du caractère international inhérent de notre secteur. D'une part, il présente des difficultés, telles que celles causées par nos politiques d'immigration, qui peuvent provoquer une réduction du nombre de passagers désireux de visiter l'Angola et/ou transiter par Luanda vers d'autres destinations. D'un autre côté, certaines de ces restrictions à l'accès au marché permettent d'exploiter l'énorme potentiel de croissance du pays au fur et à mesure qu'il assume de l'importance sur le plan international, encourageant davantage la connectivité entre les marchés. C'est pourquoi notre stratégie a consisté à nous positionner progressivement sur la scène mondiale, parce que tout laisse prévoir que notre pays deviendra progressivement davantage un

acteur international, suivant la tendance que l'on observe dans les pays voisins. Il est également important de noter que ce marché est ouvert à différentes compagnies aériennes d'autres pays, et que cet accès dépend des négociations entre les pays, ce qui place TAAG à pied d'égalité avec les compagnies étrangères en ce qui concerne l'accès aux liaisons internationales.

dépenses excessives ou inutiles. L'exemple d'une telle initiative est notre collaboration avec l'IATA à mettre en œuvre le programme FEGA (programme d’analyse des écarts de rendement énergétique de l’IATA), qui a tenté et réussi à maitriser la consommation de carburant et les coûts connexes, permettant une épargne annuelle estimée à 35 millions de dollars.

Comment les compagnies aériennes africaines peuvent augmenter la coopération commerciale entre elles?

TAAG Angola est l'une des compagnies aériennes les plus réputées d'Afrique et son président directeur général, en votre personne, a été élu président du Comité exécutif de l'AFRAA en novembre 2012. Qu'est-ce qui a fait de TAAG Angola une compagnie si respectable?

Je crois que la réponse réside dans les économies d'échelle et d'envergure. Par rapport aux transporteurs étrangers, nos compagnies aériennes sont relativement faibles en termes de ventes et d'actif. Par conséquent, nous n'avons pas le même pouvoir de négociation dont jouissent certains de nos concurrents américains, européens, du Moyen-Orient et d'Asie, qui serait un levier important pour réduire nos coûts. En harmonisant nos besoins et en procédant à des achats groupés, les coûts tels que ceux du carburant, de l'assurance, des services en escale, du matériel et peut-être même des avions peuvent être optimisés. En outre, les compagnies aériennes africaines devraient rechercher des opportunités gagnant-gagnant dans leurs offres, comme l'harmonisation de leurs réseaux pour offrir à nos passagers la gamme la plus complète possible de destinations grâce à des accords commerciaux et des négociations équitables. Une fois que nous sommes capables d'harmoniser ces deux aspects, je crois que tout le reste suivra naturellement.

Quelle est l'incidence des coûts d'exploitation élevés en Afrique sur la croissance et la rentabilité de TAAG Angola Airlines? Les coûts d'exploitation élevés touchent l'ensemble de l'industrie, et TAAG n'est pas une exception. Les coûts exorbitants inversent les réalisations accomplies au cours des deux dernières années en ce qui concerne l'excellence opérationnelle, la stratégie commerciale et le service clients. Pour atténuer cet effet, nous avons mis en place un certain nombre d'initiatives visant à réduire les

TAAG n'est pas encore ce que nous voudrions qu'elle soit. Notre ambition est d'être l'un des acteurs les plus importants de l'industrie. Cependant, beaucoup a été fait et nous sommes fiers que les compagnies africaines sœurs reconnaissent nos efforts et nos réalisations. Notre réputation repose aujourd'hui sur le strict respect des normes internationales de l'industrie aérienne et notre société dans son ensemble s'est engagée à respecter la sécurité comme priorité en adoptant une politique de zéro accident et incident. TAAG vient juste d'être nommé membre du Conseil de supervision IOSA de l'IATA, ce qui signifie que nos politiques sont judicieuses en termes de qualité et que notre compagnie prend les mesures appropriées pour atteindre l'excellence.

Enfin, parlez nous un peu de votre personne, M. Pimentel Araujo

Je n'aime pas parler de moi-même, mais je suis un gros travailleur et je fais mon travail avec la plus grande honnêteté, dévouement et responsabilité. Je suis fier parce que cet esprit est en train de faire tache d'huile parmi mes collaborateurs et que nous marquons déjà des points. Dans ma vie privée, je suis une personne simple qui aime la lecture et passer du temps avec ma famille.


6

Ailes d'Afrique

Les compagnies aériennes adoptent rapidement la technologie mobile

A

u cours des trois prochaines années, toutes les compagnies aériennes prévoient d'investir dans les systèmes informatiques qui leur permettront de mieux connaître leurs passagers et de leur offrir des services sur mesure directement, selon la 15ème édition de l'enquête SITA/Airline Business IT Tremds qui est bien établi comme étude comparative mondiale pour le secteur du transport aérien. La Airline IT Trends Survey, enquête sur les tendances technologiques co-parrainée par Airline Business et SITA, révèle un environnement informatique qui s'améliore timidement. L'impression d'ensemble qui ressort de l'enquête de cette année est que l'industrie adopte rapidement le numérique. Cela procure de nombreux avantages sous forme d'automatisation et de nouveaux services, mais pose aussi des défis d'une large adoption de ces technologies, afin que les passagers en bénéficient aux deux bouts de leur voyage. Cette année 100% des compagnies aériennes projettent d'investir dans des solutions d'intelligence commerciale, qui leur permettront d'en savoir plus au sujet de leurs clients et de disposer de meilleures informations pour la prise de décisions dans leur exploitation. C'est un bond considérable par rapport à l'année dernière, où une sur cinq compagnies aériennes n'avaient aucun projet du tout. En 2016, 97% prévoient également des investissements dans les services mobiles aux passagers et la personnalisation. Ces services aideront à stimuler les ventes via des canaux directs, passant de 54% à 67%, et à changer la façon dont les compagnies aériennes offrent des services aux passagers. Lors du lancement de la Airline IT Trends Survey édition 2013, Francesco Violante, PDG de SITA, a déclaré: "Toutes les compagnies investissent dans l'intelligence commerciale pour améliorer leurs opérations et accroître les revenus". Nous voyons un fort désir d'accroître

les recettes en utilisant des techniques empruntées à l'industrie de vente au détail, notamment la personnalisation. Près des trois quarts des compagnies aériennes considèrent l'intelligence commerciale pour les ventes et le marketing comme une grande priorité. Les plans d'investissement des compagnies aériennes montrent que l'avenir de l'industrie sera plus intelligent, plus mobile et plus personnalisé. La nécessité d'investir dans l'intelligence commerciale est évidente. Seuls 9% des compagnies aériennes considèrent que la qualité des données est à la hauteur de tous leurs besoins, tandis que 7% ont assuré l'intégration nécessaire des différentes sources de données au sein de leur société. Violante a ajouté que le partage et l'intégration des données sont un facteur fondemental à la réussite des solutions d'intelligence commerciale. Pour réussir toutes les parties de l'ensemble de notre industrie doivent collaborer. En partageant les données et en travailler ensemble, nous pouvons maximiser le retour sur l'investissement et offrir une meilleure expérience au passager, tout en améliorant nos performances financières. Depuis trois ans, l'offre de services mobiles aux passagers arrive en tète de liste des investissements consentis par les compagnies. Elle conserve la première place pour 97% des compagnies qui investissent actuellement, ou projettent d'investir, dans ce domaine au cours des trois prochaines

années. En 2016, neuf sur dix compagnies aériennes envisagent de vendre des billets via le téléphone mobile. Elles s'attendent à être récompensés par une hausse des ventes par mobile à plus de 70 milliards de dollars en 2016, soit 10% des ventes totales, contre un peu moins de 3% aujourd'hui. En utilisant le mobile et d'autres canaux, les compagnies aériennes cherchent à réduire leur dépendance à l'égard des canaux de ventes indirectes et d'ouvrir la possibilité de maximiser les ventes auxiliaires. Les téléphones portables, les bornes libre-service et les médias sociaux représenteront près de 14% des ventes de billets d'ici 2016, tandis que les ventes indirectes à travers les GDS baisseront de 46% à 33% au cours de la même période. Violante dit: " le rôle prédominant du mobile est évident. Les compagnies aériennes continuent à se concentrer sur les services disponibles via leurs sites internet, tels que la recherche de vols et l'enregistrement en ligne. Mais dans le cadre de proposer des services innovants aux passagers, un nouveau champ de bataille pour la fonctionnalité mobile est en train de s'ouvre déjà. Le résultat sera une intégration plus profonde des services mobiles personnalisés à chaque étape du voyage du passager en déplacement. Les applications mobiles d'enregistrement


Août-Oct 2013

7

Enquete sur les tendances technologiques en ligne, par exemple, sont déjà disponibles sur 61% des compagnies aériennes et 65% pour la recherche des vols. Ces compagnies, au cours des trois prochaines années, vont plutôt mettre l'accent sur l'offre de nouveaux services, tels que le rapport en ligne de bagages perdus (60% des compagnies aériennes), le re-booking (63%), et les commentaires des clients (57%). Actuellement, 53% des compagnies aériennes émettent des cartes d'embarquement mobiles via leurs propres applications en ligne et ce chiffre progressera pour atteindre 80% en 2016. Les portefeuilles électroniques de voyage des tiers, tels que Apple Passbook, Samsung Wallet et Google Now, commencent également à être utilisés. Aujourd'hui, seulement 21% des compagnies aériennes émettent des cartes d'embarquement via d'autres applications tierces, mais elles atteindront 62% en trois ans, donnant aux passagers plus de choix. Les principaux défis auxquels les compagnies aériennes sont confrontées lorsqu'elles tentent de mettre en œuvre des services mobiles sont le rythme du changement technologique, la multitude de plates-formes et l'intégration des systèmes. Pour faire face à tous ces changements, les compagnies aériennes peuvent utiliser davantage les interfaces de programme d'application (API) comme la carte d'embarquement SITA à partir du site developer.aero. L'enquête de cette année a révélé que l'importance des recettes auxiliaires s'accroit progressivement. Les canaux de ventes directes, tels que le site internet de la compagnie aérienne, génèrent actuellement ces recettes. Malgré le fait que les canaux indirects représentent près de la moitié des ventes de billets, les compagnies aériennes gagnent en moyenne neuf fois plus de recettes auxiliaires via les canaux directs. Cela devrait se poursuivre, avec 89% des revenus auxiliaires attendus via les canaux directs d'ici 2016, soit une augmentation de 87% par rapport à aujourd'hui. En plus du renforcement des possibilités de recettes auxiliaires, les ventes directes permettent de réduire les coûts de distribution. Au cours des trois prochaines années, près de la moitié des compagnies aériennes (49%) prévoient d'importants programmes pour améliorer leurs principaux systèmes de gestion des passagers au fur et à mesure qu'elles génèrent un plus grand volume de ventes directes à travers des canaux multiples. Airline IT Trends Survey est une enquête indépendante qui cible les responsables informatiques des 200 premiers transporteurs aériens de passagers. Les compagnies aériennes représentant la moitié du trafic mondial de passagers ont répondu à l'enquête de cette année: 14% des répondants sont des transporteurs à bas coûts, et 26% des compagnies aériennes transportant plus de 20 millions de passagers. A SITA, nous attachons beaucoup d'importance à la compréhension des besoins informatiques de l'industrie du transport aérien. C'est pourquoi nous réalisons des enquêtes uniques dans le domaine de la technologie de l'information. Elles servent de base pour les benchmarks et tendances de l'industrie. Pour de plus amples renseignements, visitez: www.sita.aero/surveys www.sita.aero/ittrendshub ou cherchez 'SITA Trends IT Hub' sur l'App Store.


8

Ailes d'Afrique

La voie à suivre pour les compagnies aériennes africaines Par Mme Juliet Indetie, Directrice adjointe, finances et administration - AFRAA

La règle a toujours été que les pays développés créent le modèle du progrès industriel et économique que les autres pays doivent adopter, d'où la notion de "pays développés et pays en développement ". Le développement repose sur l'hypothèse que l'occident a été la première à déchiffrer la formule du progrès économique au cours du 19è siècle, et que le monde en développement doit suivre la voie tracée. Dans le secteur bancaire et financier, une révolution en matière de transfert d'argent par téléphone portable s'est produite, pas sur les places financières "développées" mais au Kenya. En avril 2007, à la suite d'un projet de développement de logiciel d'un étudiant du Kenya, Safaricom a lancé un nouveau service de paiement et de transfert d'argent par téléphone mobile, connu sous le nom de M-Pesa. M-Pesa (M pour mobile, Pesa pour argent en swahili) est un service de transfert d'argent et de micro financement par téléphone portable de Safaricom et Vodacom, les plus grands opérateurs de réseaux mobiles au Kenya et en Tanzanie. C'est actuellement le système de paiement par téléphone mobile le plus développé au monde. Le fait que M-Pesa ait été conçu en Afrique est une bonne chose, car il a offert une nouvelle façon de penser argent et paiements,

sans le bagage traditionnel des banques et règlements hérité d'un autre siècle. Le puissant système bancaire a été défié par ce concept d'une grande portée.

Atouts commerciaux de M-Pesa Avec M-Pesa, et sans compte bancaire: • On peut envoyer et recevoir de l'argent. • On peut garder jusqu'à 1.000 $ dans le système, créant un pseudo-compte épargne. • Il n'y a pas de compagnie de cartes de crédit impliquée. • Il n'y a pas de banque impliquée. Le service permet aux utilisateurs de déposer de l'argent dans un compte enregistré sur leurs téléphones cellulaires, envoyer le solde à d'autres utilisateurs par texto (y compris des vendeurs de biens et de services), et échanger les dépôts contre de l'argent comptant. Les utilisateurs de M-Pesa doivent produire leur carte d'identité nationale ou passeport pour déposer, retirer et transférer de l'argent facilement avec un appareil mobile. Les utilisateurs doivent payer un petit montant pour pouvoir envoyer et retirer de l'argent par ce service. M-Pesa s'est rapidement propagé pour devenir le service financier par téléphone mobile le plus réussi dans le monde en développement. En 2012, 17 millions de comptes M-Pesa environ avaient été enregistrés au Kenya.

Alors, comment fonctionne-t-il? M-Pesa s'appuie sur un réseau de petits détaillants, qui s'inscrivent pour devenir des agents de M-Pesa. Les clients se présentent à ces détaillants et leur paient en espèces en échange de crédit virtuel chargé sur leurs téléphones, connu sous le nom d'e-float. L'e-float peut être échangé et transféré entre

utilisateurs de mobiles par un simple texto et un système de codes. Le bénéficiaire du transfert d'e-float se présente avec son téléphone portable chez l’agent le plus proche pour encaisser l'argent, et échange le code du texto contre de l'argent comptant. Il y a déjà plus d'agents M-Pesa au Kenya que de succursales de banques. Tous les grands supermarchés ont aussi des points de vente de M-Pesa dans leurs locaux; ce qui assure un large réseau de distribution. Airtel Money, le concurrent de M-Pesa proposé par Airtel, n'a pas été en mesure d'atteindre les niveaux de pénétration de Safaricom en raison du nombre limité de points de distribution. Aujourd'hui, 70% des kenyans adultes utilisent M-Pesa, un plus grand taux de pénétration parmi les adultes kenyans que celui de Facebook parmi les adultes américains. L'équivalent de 30% du PIB du Kenya circule par M-Pesa chaque année.

Pertinence pour l'Afrique Les défis auxquels les Africains sont confrontés tels que le manque d'infrastructures filaires et une large population non bancarisée mais ayant accès aux téléphones mobiles rendaient le choix naturel. La population bancarisée trouve les frais bancaires, auxquels s'ajoute l'inefficacité du secteur bancaire, très punitifs. De plus la carte de crédit n'a pas été adoptée à grande échelle dans la région comparativement aux autres continents. La compagnie aérienne brésilienne TAM est parvenue, par des moyens novateurs, à atteindre la classe moyenne en pleine expansion au Brésil. La compagnie vend des billets d'avion par l'intermédiaire de Casas Bahia, une chaîne de magasins de distribution bas de gamme, et de gares routières, permet


Août-Oct 2013

9

technologie et Innovation aux clients de payer en plusieurs versements échelonnés, et fournit des conseils sur "comment voyager en avion" à ceux qui voyagent pour la première fois. Au lieu de renoncer aux transactions économiques sophistiquées dans les pays à infrastructures inadéquates, la banque mobile a trouvé un moyen de les contourner, créant une véritable infrastructure mobile qui lui est propre. 53% des utilisateurs de téléphonie mobile en Inde, au Kenya, en Indonésie, au Ghana et au Nigeria ont effectué des paiements par services bancaires mobiles. Il est clair que l'accès limité aux banques officielles au sein de ces marchés en croissance et émergents, ainsi qu'une forte pénétration des appareils mobiles, encouragent les activités financières mobiles. Les mobiles garantissent la sureté et la sécurité des fonds, rendent les paiements plus commodes et promeuvent des opportunités de commerce mobile pour les entrepreneurs locaux et les entreprises occidentales qui envisagent de s'installer sur ces marchés. M-Pesa fonctionne juste comme l'argent en espèces, mais il est plus sûr et plus pratique à transférer. La technologie est simple à utiliser sur n'importe quel téléphone cellulaire et libre d'exigences telles que frais mensuels ou solde minimum; le service est donc accessible à tous à travers le pays. En outre, les transactions de M-Pesa ne sont pas soumises aux frais de communication. En Afrique de l'Est, les compagnies aériennes comme Kenya Airways et Uganda Airlines se sont associées avec les services de paiement par mobile M-Pesa et Airtel Money pour permettre au public non bancarisé d'acheter des billets d'avion.

Implications pour les compagnies aériennes africaines Depuis la fin de 2009, Kenya Airways a adopté ce canal novateur qui permet à ses clients d’acheter des billets électroniques via le site internet ou le centre d'appels du transporteur. Kenya Airways a déployé une plate-forme de billetterie électronique qui permet aux clients de faire des réservations facilement, et également grâce au partenariat avec Safaricom Business, de payer leurs billets avec M-Pesa via leur téléphone mobile. KQ vend des billets d'un montant ne dépassant pas 140.000 Kshs (1.537$) toutes taxes incluses par M-Pesa et Airtel. Uganda Airlines a accepté également Airtel Money comme mode de paiement.

L'impact Simplicité et confort pour l'achat des billets • Les clients peuvent effectuer leurs réservations en ligne et payer via leurs

téléphones mobiles. • M-Pesa est la plateforme de paiement la plus largement répandue au Kenya avec plus de 30.000 agents, ce qui en facilite l'accès aux clients.

La simplicité d'utilisation de M-Pesa pour l'achat d'un billet de Kenya Airways Les clients qui optent de payer par M-Pesa reçoivent, lors de la réservation, un numéro de référence, le prix du billet en shillings kenyans et un numéro M-Pesa SMS Business pour effectuer leur paiement, après quoi ils reçoivent un texto de Kenya Airways contenant un numéro de billet d'avion et un billet électronique. Si le prix du billet dépasse 70.000 Kshs (769$), le paiement par M-Pesa doit être effectué en deux transactions. En raison des limites imposées aux montants qui peuvent être transmis via M-Pesa, les clients de Kenya Airways ne peuvent payer via M-Pesa que pour des vols intérieurs et quelques vols régionaux en Afrique de l'Est : Nairobi, Kisumu, Mombasa, Entebbe (Ouganda), Dar Es Salaam (Tanzanie), Kigali (Rwanda) et Bujumbura (Burundi). M-Pesa a également signé des accords de partenariat de paiement par mobile avec des compagnies aériennes locales telles que Air Kenya et Fly540. Les clients de British Airways paient aussi leurs billets et changements de billets au Kenya par M-Pesa. L'option de paiement par M-Pesa améliore le confort et la satisfaction du client. Les passagers peuvent payer jusqu'à 140.000 shillings pour un billet d'avion de BA.

Services à valeur ajoutée Suite au succès du projet M-Pesa, Kenya Airways en partenariat avec Safaricom Limited a lancé une plate-forme qui permet à ses clients de payer leurs billets d'avion avec des points de fidélité appelés Bonga points. (Bonga signifie Parler en swahili) Comme dans les programmes de fidélité, les clients échangent leurs points contre des billets. Cet accord entre Kenya Airways et Safaricom permet aux clients qui ont au moins 28.000 Bonga points qu'ils ont gagné en rechargeant leurs lignes, de les échanger contre des billets de classe économique ou affaires pour des vols locaux de Kenya Airways sur toutes les routes intérieures.

L'argent mobile représente-t-il une solution pour les compagnies aériennes africaines ? Les compagnies aériennes africaines opèrent dans des contextes économiques, culturels et réglementaires différents, et les solutions qui réussissent très bien dans une région ne marchent pas nécessairement dans d'autres

régions. M-Pesa a complètement révolutionné le secteur financier dans la région d'Afrique de l'Est et n'a pas pourtant réussi à atteindre le même succès dans la partie australe de l'Afrique. En Afrique du Sud, il semble que M-Pesa n'a pas réussi à cause d'une mauvaise stratégie de marketing, qui a créé l'impression que M-Pesa était destiné aux populations à faible revenu et aux zones rurales. Le marché d'Afrique du Sud a également un environnement réglementaire très strict. Vodacom a essayé d'obtenir son propre agrément bancaire mais s’est heurté contre la rigueur de la législation, alors que un cadre réglementaire plus clément a permis à Safaricom d'obtenir une licence bancaire et de l'exploiter bon marché notamment à des niveaux très bas de transfert d'argent. Safaricom est un acteur dominant en Afrique de l'Est contrairement à ce qui se passe en Afrique du Sud, où il y a de forts protagonistes qui visent également la population non bancarisée avec d'autres produits. Fastjet, la première compagnie aérienne panafricaine low-cost, a lancé une solution de paiement par mobile avec Vodacom de Tanzanie, permettant aux clients de Fastjet d'acheter des billets d'avion en utilisant leurs téléphones mobiles. Avant la cessation de ses opérations au Kenya, Virgin Atlantic, sur ses vols entre Londres et Nairobi avait adopté M-Pesa. Les passagers étaient autorisés à transférer jusqu'à 140.000 Ksh. (1.537$) à partir d'un numéro de téléphone par jour. Ce qu'il faut retenir cependant c'est que les compagnies aériennes africaines devraient " sortir des sentiers battus" et profiter des innovations les mieux adaptées à leur environnement. La technologie et l'innovation peuvent contribuer à maitriser les coûts d'exploitation pour les compagnies aériennes; ce qui est particulièrement important aujourd'hui quand la plupart d'entre elles connaissent des pertes. Face à leurs uniques défis, les compagnies aériennes africaines doivent trouver des solutions acceptables. Les compagnies aériennes africaines, notamment celles qui opèrent dans des économies en difficultés avec des restrictions strictes sur le change, devraient explorer des innovations qui, non seulement stimuleraient leurs revenus mais aussi assoupliraient davantage leurs modes de paiement. Le voyageur devrait bénéficier d' une plate-forme efficace pour accéder aux services de la compagnie aérienne.


10

Ailes d'Afrique

Entretien

avec Kassa Maru, Président du Conseil d'administration et Président de American General Supplies (AGS), fournisseur de pièces détachées pour l'aviation commerciale. Dans cette interview exclusive, il explique comment AGS effectue la gestion des stocks, la formation et l'assistance à la clientèle pour les compagnies aériennes africaines de crédit intéressantes, des programmes de formation et l'expansion des installations à tous nos clients, envers lesquels nous sommes également très reconnaissants. Autant que possible nous ajoutons de la valeur à l'ensemble de nos accords. Nous leurs disons souvent merci par de petits gestes tels qu'une formation gratuite ou un voyage quand c'est possible. Bien que nous ayons une activité florissante dans le monde, nous voulons poursuivre notre croissance en Afrique car c’est à la fois un défi et une satisfaction de voir les compagnies aériennes africaines progresser.

Q : Quelle est votre stratégie de marketing pour approcher de nouveaux clients?

Q : Parlez-moi un peu d'American General Supplies R: American General Supplies a été fondée en 1982. Avec la croissance de l'entreprise, nous nous sommes déplacés d'un emplacement plus large à un autre jusqu'à ce que nous ayons finalement acquis nos propres locaux à Gaithersburg, au Maryland, siège actuel de la société. Notre objectif était de devenir un fournisseur global de pièces détachées pour l'industrie de l'aviation commerciale. Ceci inclut les pièces détachées pour avions, les matériels de servitude au sol, les approvisionnements de bord et de restauration, ainsi qu'une grande variété de services aux grandes compagnies aériennes et organismes d'appui.

Q : L'entreprise est bien établie en Afrique. Comment avez-vous réalisé cela? R: Je dirais que nous avons eu beaucoup de succès à l'échelle internationale. Lorsque nous avons commencé en 1982, la plus grande partie de nos recettes venait des Etats-Unis, de l'Europe et de l'Asie. Nos opportunités en Afrique se sont accrues au fur et à mesure que nous identifiions leurs problèmes fondamentaux de pénurie de devises, besoins en formation et autres formes de soutien technique. Etant donné que nous comprenons bien les besoins des compagnies aériennes africaines et que nous nous sommes faits un devoir de mieux les connaitre, nous faisons beaucoup plus d'affaires avec les compagnies aériennes africaines aujourd'hui qu'en 1982. En 1982 nous avions effectivement plus de clients en Europe et aux Etats-Unis, mais nous avons développé notre portefeuille africain de manière consistante. L'un des plus grands problèmes auxquels les compagnies aériennes africaines faisaient face était la difficulté d'obtenir des financements pour l’acquisition de matériel dont elles avaient besoin. Nous avons présenté le projet à notre banque, la Bank of America, et elle a bien compris ces défis. Elle nous a proposé des conditions extrêmement généreuses qui nous avantagent ainsi que nos client d’Afrique. Nous sommes en mesure de fournir des lignes

R: Comme pour toute entreprise, nous faisons une recherche fouillée. Nous connaissons nos clients et nous mettons tout en œuvre pour comprendre leur activité et la nature de leurs besoins. Après le contact initial, nous préférons traiter en personne. Nous nous organisons et allons à la rencontre de nos clients. L’objectif de ces rencontres est de leur montrer qu'ils comptent beaucoup pour nous. Jusque-là la démarche est faite à moitié. Nous voulons également que nos nouveaux clients potentiels nous rendent visite. Nous voulons leur montrer ce que nous faisons et qui nous sommes. Notre personnel est composé d'experts dans leurs domaines respectifs, dont un certain nombre d'anciens employés de compagnies aériennes. Tous nos collaborateurs comprennent la nature de nos activités et ce dont nos clients ont besoin. Nous nous occupons personnellement de nos clients du début à la fin et nous nous efforçons de répondre à tous leurs besoins. Nous travaillons avec eux pour améliorer tous les aspects de leurs activités, que ce soit les pièces détachées, les matériels de servitude au sol ou la gestion de pièces de rechange excédentaires qui apparaissent dans leurs livres de comptes.

Q : Quelle assistance leur apportezvous en ce qui concerne leurs surplus et contrôle des stocks? R: La première chose qu'ils essaient de faire est de trouver un acheteur de cet excédent de matériel. Nous pouvons les aider à commercialiser ce surplus et même leur donner un plan de paiements mensuels garantis pour la vente de cet excédent de stock. Nos clients ont confiance en nous et savent que nous avons à cœur leurs meilleurs intérêts dans nos relations. Nous avons récemment eu un client qui avait acquis un 737-500. Nous lui avons offert une formule d'appui tout compris en matière de pièces détachées pour tous leurs besoins en pièces remplaçables de façon périodique, sur trois ans. Normalement, la liste des pièces est générée par le client, mais dans ce cas-ci comme c'était son premier avion de ce type, il nous a demandé d’élaborer la liste des pièces nécessaires dans le cadre de l'accord, celles qu'il doit garder dans son propre stock et celles que nous pouvions garder dans les stocks d'AGS.

Assurer le suivi d’un grand stock n'est pas une tâche aisée comme vous le dites à juste titre. Cependant, avoir un grand stock à portée de main est essentiel au succès de notre activité. C'est la règle du jeu. Nous avons un collaborateur spécialisé en gestion des stocks qui veille à ce que nous ayons toujours tout ce dont nous avons besoin, jamais trop, jamais pas assez. En raison de notre expertise dans ce domaine, nous avons plusieurs moyens à notre disposition pour nous assurer que notre inventaire ou stock reste positif à tout moment. • Choisir des contrats globaux pour pouvoir acquérir les pièces détachées les plus récentes à chaque occasion • Approcher les compagnies aériennes pour leur proposer de commercialiser leur excédent de matériel • Exploter nos fortes compétences techniques pour examiner et acheter des avions et des moteurs que nous démontons, réparons et revendons • Représenter des fabricants pour commercialiser leurs produits et systèmes, pour lesquels nous conservons des pièces détachées dans notre stock, qui s'ajoutent comme requis à notre inventaire. Nous accordons une importance considérable à ce type d’activité et nous envisageons actuellement un accord avec Honeywell en vue de mettre sur pied conjointement un centre de distribution en Afrique dans un emplacement stratégique bien choisi. Il est possible qu'au centre de distribution de Honeywell, nous ayons à notre disposition un stock d’une valeur allant jusqu'à 10 millions de dollars. Nous avons identifié trois emplacements pour ce centre: AddisAbeba, Nairobi ou Johannesbourg. Les législations douanières de ces trois pays seront un facteur déterminant dans la prise de décision. Il nous faudra un mécanisme qui fonctionne rapidement car lorsqu'une compagnie aérienne a besoin de pièces, elle en a besoin rapidement et pas une semaine plus tard. AGS se spécialise dans la mise en place, le développement, l'exécution et le contrôle des stocks. Nous l'avons fait pour nous-mêmes et nos filiales ainsi que pour plusieurs compagnies aériennes, à titre d'exemple TAAG d'Angola, Air Zimbabwe et Mozambique Airlines. En effet, un de nos collaborateurs a passé une année environ en Angola travaillant avec la compagnie angolaise pour l'aider à tout mettre en place pour le futur. Nous maitrisons bien l’installation du dispositif d'approvisionnement initial, la mise en place du stock et des installations, la formation du personnel chargé de les gérer et la mise en place d'un système de contrôle. En fait, notre département d'approvisionnement parfois agit au nom d'une compagnie aérienne, s'occupant de ses fonctions d'approvisionnement ou leur portant assistance si besoin est.

Q : Êtes-vous optimiste quant au positionnement actuel d'AGS? R: L'industrie de l'aviation est dynamique. L'aviation africaine est en plein essor, et nous nous tenons informés de la rapide évolution des technologies, pour répondre à ses besoins


Août-Oct 2013

11

Entretien avec une préplanification adéquate afin de parer à toute éventualité à tout moment. Nous sommes très sensibles aux besoins du marché africain et nous accordons une attention particulière au détail, afin que nous puissions réagir à ses fluctuations et prendre les mesures appropriées. Cette attention nous a bien servi, surtout en ces temps de conjoncture économique difficile et nous avons survécu sans jamais avoir eu à licencier un seul employé. En fait, nous avons embauché de nouveaux employés. De ce fait, nous continuons à renforcer nos partenariats avec les constructeurs, comme celui que j'ai mentionné avec Honeywell, et à initier d'autres grands projets avec des compagnies aériennes africaines connaissant la croissance la plus rapide et qui ont besoin plus que jamais de notre soutien. Par conséquent, nous sommes optimistes que l'avenir est très prometteur pour AGS. Nous sommes convaincus que nous ferons de bonnes affaires en 2013 et nous visons un chiffre d'affaires d’environ 50 millions de dollars au cours de cette période.

Q : Air Zimbabwe connait des difficultés depuis quelques années. Que pensez-vous de cette compagnie? R: Elle devra trouver ses propres solutions à ses défis. La seule chose que je voudrais ajouter est que nous avons des relations avec Air Zimbabwe depuis nos débuts en 1982 et que pendant des années, elle était notre meilleure cliente. Nous avons eu une bonne collaboration en matière de gestion

d'excédent de stock, d'approvisionnement et de formation. Pendant de nombreuses années nous étions leur fournisseur exclusif. Avant qu'ils ne ferment boutique, nous travaillions sur un projet de rénovation de leur hangar en collaboration avec une entreprise basée en Chine. Quand elle a fait faillite, elle nous devait à peu près 3 million de dollars. Nous ne nous sommes pas empressés de les poursuivre en justice, mais nous avons effectué de nombreux déplacements et tenu des réunions afin d'essayer de convenir d’une formule de remboursement permettant d'alléger la dette. Après trois ans d'efforts notre conseil d'administration a décidé que l'action en justice était notre seul recours. Malgré que je n'étais pas d'accord, sous la pression de nos banques, nous avons dû engager une action judiciaire. Depuis lors, Air Zimbabwe paie à temps et s'est presque acquitté de la totalité de la dette. Lorsqu'elle sera prête à reprendre les activités, moi-même ou un de mes collaborateurs visiterons Air Zimbabwe pour voir comment nous pourrions l'aider. Certes, nous serions intéressés à reprendre cette collaboration, et je pense qu'ils seraient également ouverts à l'idée grâce aux relations d'affaires que nous avons entretenues pendant de nombreuses années.

Q : Quelles sont vos initiatives pour 2013? A: 2:013 sera une année passionnante pour nous. Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, l'aviation africaine est en plein essor. Il y a eu des retards accumulés et des fonds nécessaires pour répondre à ces besoins en

avions, moteurs, installations, etc. commencent à être disponibles. Nous nous sommes préparés pour cette opportunité pendant des années, sachant que le besoin était là et devrait être satisfait au plus tôt. Nous sommes disposés à travailler avec ces compagnies aériennes. Nous avons engagé des professionnels supplémentaires, nous avons mis à jour nos installations et nous envisageons de construire un hangar adjacent. Nous avons préparé nos collaborateurs à relever ces défis et nous avons de nombreuses propositions et demandes d'informations de la part des compagnies aériennes qui cherchent à louer des avions et des moteurs. Peut-être un autre exemple est celui de l'un de nos clients qui exploite des Q400. Nous sommes en pourparlers avec lui pour acheter les avions et les relouer à l'opérateur. Ce serait une première pour nous et une très grosse affaire pour notre avenir. Nous sommes également en pourparlers pour construire un hangar au Rwanda. Comme vous pouvez le constater, nous cherchons à saisir de grandes occasions en 2013. Notre relation avec Honeywell est une source de grande fierté et d'enthousiasme pour nous. Nous avons engagé plusieurs experts pour mettre ce programme en œuvre. Nous accordons une grande importance à notre activité et à nos clients, car leur succès est le nôtre. Nous connaissons leurs besoins, car nous travaillons étroitement avec eux et nous sommes persuadés qu'il faut aller vers le client et voir comment il fonctionne de première main. A plusieurs reprises en 2012 nous avons envoyé au moins quatre de nos collaborateurs en voyage chez nos clients. J'espère voir la même chose en 2013.


12

Ailes d'Afrique

PROMOTION DE LA CONVENTION POUR L'UNIFICATION DE CERTAINES RÈGLES RELATIVES AU TRANSPORT AÉRIEN INTERNATIONAL (CONVENTION DE MONTREAL DE 1999)

Chargeurs (fret) MC99 facilite l'utilisation par les compagnies aériennes de documents électroniques, y compris les lettres de transport aérien électroniques (e-LTA) et d'autres documents de transport. Par conséquent, on constate d'importants gains en efficacité, y compris les bénéfices écologiques découlant de l'élimination chaque année de la chaîne d'approvisionnement de fret aérien équivalent à plus de 80 Boeing 747 cargo remplis de papier . La MC99 est une condition préalable à l'initiative e-freight de l'industrie qui vise à éradiquer les documents papier du transport du fret aérien. On estime que les retombées découlant de l'efret s’élèveront à environ 4,9 milliards de dollars par an. Les chargeurs, transitaires et régulateurs auront l’avantage d'un traitement de documents plus rapide et plus précis, une productivité améliorée, une sécurité renforcée, des délais d'expédition accélérés et une meilleure conformité aux procédures douanières.

INTRODUCTION

La Convention de Montréal 1999 a établi un régime moderne, juste et efficace pour régir la responsabilité de la compagnie aérienne envers les passagers et les chargeurs sur les vols internationaux. Près d'une décennie après son entrée en vigueur, seuls 54% des parties à la Convention de Chicago l'ont ratifiée, laissant en place une mosaïque complexe de régimes de responsabilité potentiellement applicables. L'adoption universelle de la Convention de Montréal 1999 comme unique régime de responsabilité universel pour le transport international par voie aérienne offrira des avantages de grande envergure aux passagers et chargeurs et fournira plus de certitude au secteur de l'aviation commerciale en ce qui concerne les règles qui régissent leur responsabilité.

CONTEXTE

Cette année plus de 3 milliards de passagers et des marchandises d'une valeur dépassant 5 mille milliards de dollars vont voyager par avion en toute sécurité. Bien que l'aviation civile soit la forme la plus sûre de transport, accidents et incidents surviennent et peuvent occasionner la lésion ou même entrainer la mort des passagers ou le retard ou la perte des bagages et du fret. La Convention de Montréal de 1999 (MC99) est entrée en vigueur le 4 novembre 2003 et a établi un régime compensatoire moderne à l'égard des passagers qui subissent la mort ou la lésion corporelle lors d'un accident de transport aérien international. Elle offre un régime simplifié de responsabilité pour la destruction, la perte ou les dommages causés au fret. Elle facilite également l'utilisation de la messagerie électronique pour remplacer les documents en papier dans le domaine du transport de passagers et de marchandises.

Bien que la MC99 soit envisagée comme un régime de responsabilité universel, environ une décennie après son adoption, 54% seulement des Etats contractants de l'ICAO l'ont ratifiée (voir tableau). Un certain nombre d'États dotés d’une importante aviation restent en dehors de ce régime. Les instruments précédents à savoir: la Convention de Varsovie de 1929, le Protocole de La Haye de 1955, la Convention de Guadalajara de 1961 et les Protocoles de Montréal supplémentaires de1975 continuent à exister, créant une mosaïque complexe de régimes de responsabilité potentiellement applicables. Cela signifie que dans de nombreux cas, les voyageurs, les chargeurs et les compagnies aériennes ne jouissent toujours pas des avantages qu'offre la MC99.

LES AVANTAGES DE L'ADOPTION DE LA MC99

L'adoption universelle de la MC99 offrira d'importants avantages à toutes les parties tel qu'expliqué ci-dessous : Passagers La MC99 remplace les plafonds de responsabilité des compagnies aériennes arbitrairement bas en cas de mort ou de lésion applicables sous les précédents Convention de Varsovie et régimes de responsabilité de Varsovie/La Haye. En vertue de la MC99, les passagers sont en droit de réclamer des dommages-intérêts de 113.110 droits de tirage spéciaux (environ 174 000 $ en janvier 2013) sans preuve de négligence ou de faute. Si les dommages réclamés dépassent ce montant, il incombe à la compagnie aérienne de prouver qu'il n'y a pas eu négligence de sa part. La MC99 offre aussi aux victimes d'autres paiements aux consommateurs et indemnisation payée en avance par les compagnies aériennes.

Compagnies aériennes Aujourd'hui la plupart des compagnies aériennes internationales exploitent d’importants réseaux qui s'internationalisent de plus en plus. Toutefois, comme il n'y a pas eu de ratification universelle de la MC99, une mosaïque de régimes de responsabilitccontinue d'exister. Par exemple, un vol entre n'importe quelle laison peut voir ses passagers et son fret soumis à différents régimes de responsabilité. Cette situation est source de complexité et de confusion pour déterminer quel régime couvre un incident ou accident donné.. La procédure de traitement des sinistres d’assurance, l'obtention d'une couverture d'assurance adéquate et le contentieux résultant d'un accident sont inutilement complexes. L'adhésion universelle à la MC99 contribuera considérablement à éliminer de tels problèmes. La ratification universelle de la MC99 signifiera que les gouvernements garantiront véritablement un régime de responsabilité moderne et juste applicables aux réclamations des passagers et des chargeurs, quelle que soit la route ou la destination visée. De même, étant donné que la MC99 facilite l'utilisation des e-LTA, la ratification universelle implique que les gouvernements peuvent être assurés que les acteurs de l'industrie, qui dépendent du transport du fret aérien peuvent profiter de délais d'expédition plus brefs, de la responsabilité du suivi des marchandises et d'autres avantages économiques, comme l'amélioration de la productivité et la réduction des coûts à l'échelle mondiale.

CONCLUSION

Compte tenu des avantages décrits ci-dessus, tous les États sont instamment invités à soutenir et à encourager l'adoption universelle de la MC99. Les États africains qui ne l'ont pas encore fait sont instamment exhortés à devenir parties à la MC99 dès que possible.

For more information visit: http://www.afraa.org/index.php/our-work/issues/montreal-convention


Août-Oct 2013

13

La politique de l'aviation civile africaine (PACA)

L

a politique de l'aviation civile africaine (PACA) est une politique commune qui offre un cadre et une tribune pour la formulation, la collaboration et l'intégration des initiatives et programmes nationaux et multinationaux dans divers aspects de l'aviation civile, dont la sécurité, la sûreté, l'efficacité, la protection de l'environnement et le développement durable du transport aérien en Afrique. La PACA est ainsi un document–cadre, entériné par les Chefs d'État et gouvernement de l'UA, qui fait état et consolide l’engagement politique des États africains de coopérer dans le cadre d’une feuille de route convenue, afin de positionner le transport aérien africain au niveau de l’économie mondiale. La Politique aéronautique africaine confère des pouvoirs aux organismes techniques nationaux et régionaux, afin qu’ils puissent assumer efficacement leurs responsabilités. La sécurité aérienne est la pierre angulaire de l'aviation civile internationale et une partie intégrante de l'objectif stratégique de l'OACI. A l’instar des autres États contractants de l’OACI, les États africains ont l’obligation statutaire d’assurer et d’améliorer la sécurité aérienne en mettant en œuvre les Normes et Pratiques recommandées (SARP) de l’OACI et les autres dispositions pertinentes de la Convention de Chicago. Tel qu'énoncé dans la politique de l'aviation civile africaine, l'objectif des États africains en matière de sécurité aérienne est «d'assurer un niveau élevé de sécurité dans l'exploitation aérienne par le respect des SARP de l'OACI». Pour atteindre cet objectif, il est indispensable que les États disposent d'autorités aéronautiques efficaces et autonomes. Toutefois, la tendance actuelle est l'optimisation des ressources par les États en créant des organismes régionaux de supervision de la sécurité (ORSS). La PACA préconise par conséquent que les États africains s'assurent que leurs autorités aéronautiques sont dotées de ressources adéquates et possèdent les pleins pouvoirs et l'indépendance nécessaires pour appliquer la réglementation et assurer la supervision de la sécurité de leur industrie aéronautique. Les autres stratégies qui permettent d'atteindre l'objectif d'assurer un niveau élevé de sécurité aérienne en Afrique telles que consignées dans la PACA sont les suivantes:

• Les Autorités aéronautiques doivent avoir la responsabilité de supervision vis-à-vis de tous les prestataires de services dans l’industrie, les organisations d’entretien et de réparation, les prestataires de services aux aérodromes/aéroports et de navigation aérienne, les services de météorologie aéronautique, les institutions de formation aéronautique, les sociétés d’assistance en escale, les fournisseurs de carburant d’aviation, etc.; • Tous les exploitants d’aéronefs, les organisations d’entretien, le personnel aéronautique titulaire d’un permis/licence, les organisations de formation en vol et les propriétaires/exploitants de pistes/aérodromes, etc., doivent se conformer à la règlementation en vigueur; • Les autorités aéronautiques doivent définir les modalités de délivrance de permis/licences au personnel aéronautique; • L’Union Africaine et la CAFAC doivent veiller à la mise en œuvre de toutes les résolutions sur la sécurité tout en explorant de nouvelles initiatives pour renforcer la sécurité aérienne en Afrique; • Il faudrait organiser des séminaires, des ateliers et des conférences pour tous les acteurs, afin de les sensibiliser aux bienfaits d’une culture sécuritaire; • Les autorités aéronautiques des États membres doivent élaborer un Programme national de sécurité conformément au Manuel de gestion de la sécurité de l'OACI; • Les autorités aéronautiques des États membres doivent veiller à ce que tous les prestataires de services mettent en place des systèmes de gestion de la sécurité; et • Les prestataires de services des États membres et tous les acteurs doivent élaborer et inculquer la culture sécuritaire dans leur exploitation quotidienne. La politique de l'aviation civile africaine et les lignes directrices pour la négociation d'accords de services aériens entre les États de l'UA et la CUE/UE sont disponibles sur le site de l'AFRAA via le lien: http://www. afraa.org/index.php/links/afcap.


14

Ailes d'Afrique

Analyse MRJ90 comparative et des avions SSJ100 par Keith Mwanalushi.

MRJ90

L

es avionneurs de deuxième catégorie comme Sukhoi, Mitsubishi et Comac ont du pain sur la planche. La compétition avec des constructeurs tels que Bombardier et Embraer dans le contexte financier actuel est un véritable acte de bravoure. Cependant, ces petits fabricants d'équipements d'origine ont misé leur succès sur un facteur essentiel: attirer des compagnies aériennes clientes grâce à leurs prix d'achat nettement inférieurs à ceux des appareils concurrents occidentaux, tout en garantissant les qualités de performance et de sécurité requises, qui souvent laissaient à désirer comparativement aux avions de construction occidentale. Le développement du Sukhoi Superjet 100 (SSJ100) a commencé en 2000, en trois versions dans la catégorie de 75-100 sièges. Initialement conçu pour les marchés traditionnels d'Europe de l'Est de la CEI, le SSJS est désormais commercialisé auprès d'une clientèle mondiale. En guise de solution pour surmonter la mauvaise réputation que les avions de l'ère soviétique avaient, Sukhoi s'est associé à quelques partenaires internationaux, dont Boeing et la société aérospatiale italienne, Alenia Aermacchi. Le vol inaugural du SSJ a décollé en mai 2008 et le premier vol commercial fut effectué par le transporteur russe Armavia en avril 2011. Le SSJ100 a été depuis livré à d'autres compagnies dont Yakutia Airlines (via la Russia Finance Leasing Company), Laos Lao Central Airline et le plus gros client à ce jour, Aeroflot, avec 10 unités déjà livrées. Toutefois, les quatre premiers de ces 10 appareils d'Aeroflot ont été entachés d'une certaine controverse. Il semblerait qu'un mauvais fonctionnement du train d'atterrissage et des lames avait été détecté clouant au sol temporairement les quatre jets en attendant la résolution du problème. De toute évidence, les problèmes techniques sont communs à la plupart des nouveaux types d'aéronefs tel que Igor Syrtsov, viceprésident principal chez Sukhoi Civil Aircraft Company (SCAC), l' explique: «C'est normal pour tous les avions en cours d'exploitation. Plusieurs publications dans les médias s'apesantissent sur les

problèmes techniques du SSJ100, alors que même les avions qui ont été construits depuis plusieurs années peuvent rencontrer des problèmes similaires. " Syrtsov a dit que Sukhoi suit constamment la situation et fournit une rétro-information aux compagnies aériennes sur toutes les questions techniques relatives à l'exploitation du SSJ100. "Tous les problèmes ont déjà été cernés et des bulletins de service ont été émis pour toute la flotte en service. Des améliorations sont également apportées aux avions encore en cours de production à l'usine ", a-t-il ajouté. Les analystes du secteur ont une diversité d'opinions sur les «nouveaux arrivants» et leur capacité à pénétrer le marché. Paul Sheridan, consultant chez Ascend Worldwide, est d'avis que le marché des jets régionaux deviendra beaucoup plus concurrentiel au cours des prochaines années avec l'entrée de Comac, Mitsubishi et Sukhoi en compétition avec Bombardier et Embraer. «L'histoire a montré qu'il est difficile d'avoir plus de trois fabricants prospères dans une catégorie d'avions donnée. C'est pourquoi Sukhoi a beaucoup à faire pour gagner des parts de marché ", estime-t-il. Le crash d'un avion lors d'une démonstration à l'occasion d'un salon aéronautique est évidemment un cauchemar pour tout constructeur, comme ce fut le cas pour le SSJ100 . La commission d'enquête a déclaré fin décembre 2012 que l'avion était en bon état avant le crash et a cité le facteur humain comme cause de l'accident. Il convient également de rappeler que Airbus A320 a subi le même sort quand il s'écrasa 1988 lors d'un défilé aérien avant son entrée en service, mais qu'aujourd'hui, il est l'un des avions connaissant le plus grand succès commercial jamais construits. "Je pense qu'il y a toujours une certaine marge de difficultés inhérentes à tout nouvel avion, et les compagnies aériennes ainsi que d'autres parties intéressées comprennent qu'elles sont susceptibles de se produire», commente Sheridan. Il ajoute: "L'important pour Sukhoi dorénavant sera de démontrer qu'il est capable de résoudre tout problème qui se poserait dès les premières livraisons et que le processus de fabrication se déroule sans à-coup. Je ne crois pas que le crash de l'appareil de démonstration aura une incidence sur ses perspectives à long terme. " "Présentement, le programme SSJ100 a passé avec succès à l'étape d'entrée en service», souligne Igor Syrtsov. «Nous savions que le marché suit de près comment l'avion se comporte en service: atteindra-t-il le niveau promis d'efficacité carburant et de fiabilité des départs? Les problèmes techniques seront-ils réglés avec célérité? Les livraison de pièces de rechange se font-elles rapidement? Quelle est la réponse du marché au confort du SSJ100?», déclare Strtsov. Mitsubishi par contre semble continuer à défier les sceptiques au sujet de son programme MRJ90 (plus le MRJ70, version plus petite ). Au salon aéronautique de Farnborough de l'année dernière, Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation a créé la plus grande surprise en signant un accord de principe avec SkyWest Airlines portant sur 100 appareils MRJ90. Cet accord a marqué la première annonce d'une commande d'avions MRJ à l'occasion d'un salon - et la première


Août-Oct 2013

15

Analyse comparative des avion

commande de ce type d'avion depuis plus d'un an. En mai 2013, Mitsubishi avait déjà reçu 325 commandes (165 fermes et 160 options). «Le programme MRJ a été très bien reçu sur le marché, et nous croyons que les attentes des clients sont très grandes», note Hitoshi Hank Iwasa, vice-président, planification commerciale chez Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation. «Pour un biréacteur régional qui n'a pas encore effectué son premier vol, le nombre de commandes que nous avons reçues est remarquable. Grâce à son économie opérationnelle et sa cabine confortable, le MRJ contribuera certainement à améliorer la compétitivité des transporteurs aériens acquéreurs », assure Iwasa. L'annonce de l'accord avec SkyWest a été particulièrement importante, dans la mesure où elle est intervenue à peine deux mois après l'annonce du constructeur japonais que le premier vol du MRJ90 allait être reporté de la date initiale du deuxième trimestre de 2012 au dernier trimestre de 2013, selon des sources proches du programme. Iwasa a déclaré que la livraison commerciale devrait débuter à l'été ou la deuxième moitié de l'exercice financier japonais 2015 (pour se terminer le 31 mars 2016). Depuis sa création en 2008, Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation a mené une campagne commerciale énergique du MRJ dans le monde entier, se concentrant sur le marché de jets régionaux de 70-100 sièges pour lequel il est prévu que les ventes dépasseront 5000 unités au cours des 20 prochaines années. Le MRJ90 aura une capacité de 86 à 96 passagers, et il sera le premier avion japonais à être conçu localement depuis le NAMC YS-11 dans les années 1960. Quant au marché qui connaitra la plus grande pénétration de ces deux constructeurs, Paul Sheridan prévoit que les États-Unis resteront encore le principal marché de jets régionaux, car il y a beaucoup de potentiel pour le remplacement des jets de 50 sièges dans le pays. En effet, en 2010 la société américaine Willis Lease Finance a passé une commande de 10 SSJ100, boostant ainsi la confiance dont l'avion de ligne russe a beaucoup besoin. "Tous les constructeurs essayeront de proposer leurs avions aux transporteurs régionaux américains. Embraer a démontré qu'il est possible de vendre des avions à différents types de compagnies, et non seulement aux transporteurs régionaux américains. Je pense que les autres constructeurs vont tenter de reproduire ce succès. Enfin, les marchés domestiques des trois nouveaux avionneurs seront importants pour constituer le socle de leurs ventes et livraisons », explique Sheridan. Étonnamment, quand on lui demande où il voit le plus grand taux de pénétration en termes de ventes, Igor Syrtsov de Sukhoi dit que sur le long terme la demande mondiale pour le SSJ100 dominera, mais sans aucune mention spécifique du marché américain. «Le plus grand intérêt pour le SSJ100 vient des compagnies de Russie, de CEI, d'Asie, du Moyen-Orient et d'Amérique latine», dit Syrtsov.

Pour les jets régionaux de la taille du MRJ, M. Iwasa estime que la demande à plus de 5000 unités au cours des 20 prochaines années. Par région, dit-il, l'analyse du marché est de 30% pour l'Amérique du Nord, 20% pour l'Europe, 20% pour l'Asie-Pacifique, et 30% pour le reste du monde. " En Europe, les jets régionaux plus anciens, tels que le Fokker ou le British Aerospace, devraient être remplacés. Nous nous intéressons également au marché en croissance rapide d'Asie pour les activités de vente à court terme. Un grand défi pour les nouveaux constructeurs d'avions régionaux comme Sukhoi et Mitsubishi est d'assurer le service après-vente de façon satisfaisante. Les analystes estiment que les nouveaux fabricants d'équipements d'origine doivent mettre en place un réseau de service à la clientèle mondial qui peut fournir le niveau adéquat de soutien dès la mise en service et au-delà. Sheridan convient que cela est vital pour tous les fabricants d'équipements d'origine: "Les compagnies aériennes évaluent les avions en fonction de leurs coûts tout au long de leur durée de vie et de leur fiabilité en cours de service. Un constructeur doit donc démontrer qu'il peut accompagner son produit partout dans le monde de manière rapide et économique." M. Iwasa convient que le service à la clientèle est essentiel pour le succès du programme MRJ et "nous nous efforçons de fournir un service adéquat à nos clients dès le premier jour," ajoute-t-il. Mitsubishi Aircraft a conclu un accord avec Boeing sur le service à la clientèle du MRJ en Juin 2011. Boeing va fournir à Mitsubishi Aircraft un service à la clientèle 24 heures sur 24, y compris la fourniture de pièces de rechange, les opérations d'entretien et de service sur le terrain. Fait intéressant, le MRJ est le client de lancement de la famille de moteurs PW1000G Pure Power avec technologie Geared Turbofan (GTF). Cependant, avant le lancement du MRJ, l'industrie avait beaucoup d'inquiétude au sujet des turbosoufflantes à réducteur (PW1200G) qui, pensait-on, allaient rendre les moteurs plus compliqués. «Nous sommes fiers que le moteur GTF a été très apprécié. De plus en plus de moteurs GTF sont adoptés par l'industrie et le nombre exceptionnel de leurs commandes montre que notre décision d'équiper nos avions de ce moteur était juste et que nous avons fait preuve de prévoyance », souligne Iwasa. Mitsubishi Aircraft et Pratt & Whitney ont mené conjointement des activités de vente, et M. Iwasa est convaincu que les opérateurs se rendront à l'évidence que le MRJ motorisé par le GTF révolutionnera le marché de jets régionaux. "Récemment, la première version du moteur GTF a reçu la certification de Transports Canada. Il s'agit d'une étape importante pour attirer plus de clients et plus d'heures de vol, afin de prouver sa haute fiabilité et de valider ses qualités d'économie de carburant. "


16

Ailes d'Afrique

La gestion des pièces détachées et fournitures pour avions peut permettre aux compagnies aériennes d'économiser de l'argent Par Mohammed Mahmoud, président, Aero Industrial Sales, USA

toutes choses étant égales. Plus le partenariat entre un opérateur et un fournisseur dure, plus les deux réussissent. Au fil du temps, un fournisseur comprend mieux la dynamique commerciale de la compagnie aérienne qui devient son partenaire. Il est donc illogique que certaines compagnies aériennes et leurs fournisseurs ne cherchent pas à nouer des relations durables. Les compagnies aériennes doivent éviter des transactions ponctuelles, car elles ont tendance à être plus coûteuses par rapport à celles des fournisseurs de longue date.

L

e transport aérien en africain se développe très rapidement et, avec lui, les opportunités d'expansion et de rentabilité pour les compagnies aériennes africaines. Étant donné les nombreuses petites compagnies aériennes qui manquent de ressources et de capitaux pour l'investissement, tirer profit de la croissance du trafic devra passer par un soutien concerté des gouvernements grâce à un développement réglementaire progressif et des fournisseurs de matériels, pièces détachées et composants. Elles ont également besoin de capitaux à des taux abordables, et surtout de renforcer leur sécurité, car en Afrique elle mérite une plus grande attention. Un certain nombre de facteurs déterminent le succès d'une compagnie aérienne. Alors que les compétences, les ressources et le soutien des actionnaires peuvent être essentiels à la mise en œuvre de la stratégie d'entreprise, la création et la pérennité des partenariats crédibles et fiables, grâce à une planification judicieuse d'un système d'approvisionnement, est indispensable au succès d'une compagnie aérienne. C'est pour cela que j'ai décidé de rédiger cet article pour partager avec l'industrie aérienne africaine mon expérience, à la fois en tant que professionnel de l'aviation d'abord et fournisseur des compagnies aériennes africaines ensuite. Au fur et à mesure qu'une compagnie aérienne se développe, ses partenaires commerciaux doivent lui emboiter le pas,

La crédibilité du fournisseur En plus de son capital et sa main-d'œuvre, une compagnie aérienne doit maintenir un stock adéquat de pièces pour sa flotte et son matériel de servitude au sol. L'important est par conséquent d'avoir les stocks optimaux requis pour une exploitation de qualité, en temps opportun et au plus bas prix possible. L'identification et le choix d'un fournisseur fiable et dévoué est inestimable pour qu'une compagnie aérienne puisse répondre à ses besoins en matériels et en logistique. Un fournisseur qui comprend non seulement les produits qu'il vend, mais aussi les enjeux commerciaux de l'entreprise, sa structure, sa situation financière et ses besoins est un véritable partenaire commercial. Un tel partenaire placera le succès et la rentabilité de la compagnie aérienne avant ses propres marges bénéficiaires et ses petits intérêts. Mais facile que cela puisse paraître, il est difficile de trouver un fournisseur compréhensible. Dans le monde actuel en proie à la dette, la solvabilité d'une société est essentielle. Aujourd'hui plus que jamais, le succès d'une organisation et sa solvabilité sont mesurés par la façon dont elle rembourse promptement ses dettes. Le non-respect des délais de paiement ternit l'image d'une société et abaisse sa notation de crédit. De nombreuses compagnies aériennes africaines ne sont pas conscientes de cette réalité des affaires et ne règlent pas leurs factures à temps. Parfois, il y a des circonstances compréhensibles et tolérables indépendantes de

la volonté de la compagnie aérienne. Si cette situation est communiquée correctement et en temps opportun aux fournisseurs, cela permet d'éviter une perception négative. C'est pourquoi vos fournisseurs doivent comprendre votre situation opérationnelle. Il y a des mesures de protection intégrées dans les codes et accords commerciaux internationaux et bilatéraux, afin d'assurer la sécurité des biens et des intérêts de l'acheteur: Une fois que la commande est passée et que le fournisseur est choisi par l'acheteur, le vendeur expédie la marchandise avec les documents requis à l'opérateur sélectionné au point FAB/FAS, et ainsi le transfert de propriété à l'acheteur selon les conditions négociées. Bien que les obstacles logistiques et d'autres genres, comme les douanes, la faible capacité de fret. etc. allongent les retards, il y a cependant des situations que les compagnies s'infligent elles-mêmes. De nombreuses compagnies aériennes africaines exigent que la réception des marchandises soit confirmée au siège et que le récépissé soit délivré par la section qui les reçoit, avant que le processus de paiement soit déclenché. Cela provoque des retards, complique les relations commerciales et porte préjudice aux deux parties. Par contre, il y a des compagnies qui négocient des contrats à long terme et paraphent un accord pour une ligne de produits, une situation gagnant-gagnant pour les deux parties. Une fois qu'un tel contrat est en place, les fournitures sont expédiées dès réception des commandes en temps réel, sans autres formalités inutiles. Cela permet d'éviter tout inconvénient abusif aux opérations et aux passagers, par exemple dans des situations où les avions sont cloués au sol.

Éliminer les stocks excédentaires pour économiser de l'argent En général, l'achat de produits et de services est une importante dépense pour les compagnies aériennes. Pour cette raison, le DG et le directeur financier doivent être très vigilants lors de la préparation des budgets. Plutôt que d'attendre qu'on leur présente les besoins en matériels et fournitures pour la compagnie, il faut sortir et se rendre dans l'entrepôt et les magasins afin d'évaluer ce qui est en stock. Faites-vous accompagner par le responsable de l'entrepôt et posez toutes les questions qu'il faut en parcourant les rayons. A votre grande surprise vous trouverez plusieurs pièces qui n'ont pas bougé depuis un certain temps. Vous pouvez même être désagréablement surpris que certaines pièces et composants sont pour des avions qui ont depuis longtemps quitté la flotte (obsolètes).


Août-Oct 2013

17

pièces détachées et fournitures pour avions etc. La normalisation des équipements s'est avérée être une stratégie financièrement gratifiante sur le long terme. Vérifiez que votre garantie est adéquate Alors que la compagnie aérienne souhaite optimiser les services gratuits sous garantie, l'inverse est vrai pour l'émetteur de la garantie, en particulier les fabricants d'équipements d'origine et les ateliers de réparation. Par conséquent, si votre compagnie aérienne est désavantagée par son emplacement, les conditions de crédit et/ou le manque de communication adéquate avec les prestataires de services, une des solutions consiste à combler cette lacune grâce à un contrat avec un fournisseur tiers de confiance, à un coût pré-déterminé. Dans de telles situations, il est conseillé de demander des rapports périodiques relatifs à l'exécution de ce contrat.

Une visite similaire à la zone d'entretien des équipements au sol révélerait un constat semblable: voitures, camions, tracteurs de remorquage,... abandonnés. Si vous exigez une raison, on vous répondra que c'est à cause du manque de pièces de rechange. Dans le terminal, vous verrez également toute une variété de matériels utilisés. Il est important de poser toujours des questions à propos de l'utilisation du matériel actuel ou nouvellement acquis. Un inventaire des défaillances prématurées, de garantie et de services d'appui disponibles est importante pour déterminer quel équipement répond mieux à vos besoins. L'obsolescence des pièces de rechange est comme les mauvaises herbes dans votre jardin; prévenez-les avant qu'elles ne poussent. N'attendez pas que vos pièces de rechange soient obsolètes. Si vous n'en avez plus besoin, il est probable qu'il y ait de la demande ailleurs. Par conséquent, battez le fer tant qu'il est chaud! Vous devez vous débarrasser des stocks et matériels inutiles tant que vous le pouvez. Consultez le même fournisseur qui vous a vendu ces articles et demandez-lui s'il est prêt à les racheter. Parfois, il peut vous offrir un prix dérisoire, mais mieux que d'immobiliser votre capital dans des articles dont vous n'avez plus besoin. Les fournisseurs sont mieux placés pour trouver des acheteurs des stocks obsolètes de votre compagnie, car ils ont de nombreux clients. Ce qui est devenu obsolète chez vous pourrait être vital pour un autre opérateur. Rappelez-vous toujours de maximiser les avantages de maitrise des coûts en maintenant vos dépenses au strict minimum. En d'autres termes, si le chiffre d'affaires annuel est d'un milliard de dollars américains et la marge bénéficiaire de cent millions de dollars, le ratio est de 9:1. Autrement dit, 90% de vos frais donnent une marge bénéficiaire de 10%. Par contre, si vous aviez revendu votre stock avant qu'il ne devienne obsolète, si vous aviez réclamé les réparations sous garantie, si vous aviez effectué la réparation de vos matériels de servitude au sol à temps, le ratio aurait pu être inversé: 1:9 en votre faveur.

Matériels de servitude au sol La communalité des matériels de servitude au sol est bénéfique Au plan mondial, il n'y a que quelques fabricants de la gamme complète des matériels de servitude au sol offrant un service aprèsvente fiable. Ceux-ci sont complétés par des fabricants qui ont des unités spécialisées limitées, dispersés partout au monde. Il convient de noter que, bien que les prix de catalogue initiaux de certains équipements puissent paraitre attrayants, à long terme, il est toujours avantageux d'exploiter toutes les opportunités qui viennent avec la normalisation. Il s'agit notamment de la communalité des pièces détachées, du savoir-faire technique, de la facilité d'entretien, du nombre limité et de la variété des stocks des pièces détachées,

Accélérer les livraisons partout en Afrique Les compagnies aériennes africaines sub-sahariennes, à l'instar de leurs homologues d'autres parties du monde, ont besoin de partenaires stratégiques dans l'approvisionnement présentant un très bon rapport coût-efficacité. Heureusement,l'Afrique a actuellement ses propres professionnels spécialisés dans la fourniture des pièces détachées et composants pour aéronefs. Au fil des ans, ils ont mieux compris les besoins et les exigences du marché africain et ont servi aussi bien les compagnies aériennes que les aéroports avec engagement, en période faste comme en période de crise. Lorsqu'un avion est cloué au sol, peu importe l'aéroport où il se trouve, ce qui compte c'est l'efficacité et l'ingéniosité de votre fournisseur stratégique. Depuis une base située à New York, il est possible d'atteindre n'importe quelle partie du monde dans 24 heures. En fait, traiter avec des fournisseurs fiables tels que AIS vous garantit de recevoir les pièces détachées et matériels dans un délai plus court que celui d'un voyage entre certaines villes africaines. En outre, les conditions de vente sont beaucoup meilleures que celles de nombreux concurrents. L'engagement de AIS à aider les compagnies aériennes africaines à réussir se résume dans sa maxime: "Indépendance économique à travers l'interdépendance mutuelle." En tant que fournisseur sûr et fiable, AIS fournit des conseils gratuits sur la façon dont les compagnies aériennes peuvent réduire les stocks qu'elles détiennent, optimiser les recettes et éviter le stockage des composants coûteux qui pèsent inutilement sur leurs ressources financières limitées.

A propos de Mohammed Mahmoud Au cours du dernier demi-siècle, Mohammed Mahmoud a travaillé dans la gestion et la fourniture des matériels de l'industrie de l'aviation commerciale d'abord comme un professionnel du transport aérien et plus tard en tant que fournisseur des pièces détachées et équipements aux compagnies aériennes. Il a commencé sa carrière en aviation au sein d’une des plus grandes compagnies aériennes d'Afrique et a eu l'occasion de participer à l'approvisionnement initial en pièces de rechange des premiers avions de ligne Boeing exploités sur le continent. Il a géré et informatisé le contrôle des stocks des compagnies aériennes et a dirigé le premier bureau de logistique africain indépendant de transport aérien aux ÉtatsUnis. Par la suite, il s'est investi dans l'activité de fourniture des mêmes produits et services à l'industrie de l'aviation. Mahmoud fournit les pièces détachées et les matériels de servitude au sol aux compagnies aériennes à travers le monde plusieurs années et a acquis une expérience précieuse dans cette activité qu'il partage gracieusement avec ses clients.


18

Ailes d'Afrique

Les brèves Royal Air Maroc lancera des vols sur le Kenya avant la fin de l'année 2013

Ethiopian Airlines remporte le prix de la meilleure compagnie aérienne africaine pour son service à la clientèle, d'après le classement de Skytrax Ethiopian Airlines a remporté le prix de la meilleure compagnie aérienne africaine, d'après le classement de SKYTRAX, pour son service à la clientèle exceptionnel, en juin 2013 à Paris au Salon du Bourget. "Etant donné l'importance que nous attachons au service à la clientèle, nous connaissons bien la valeur d'une prestation de haute qualité et par conséquent, nous investissons fortement dans la formation et le perfectionnement de notre personnel d'une part et dans la technologie de l'information et de la communication de pointe ainsi que dans la modernisation de la flotte d'autre part…" a déclaré Tewolde Gebremariam, DG d'Ethiopian en recevant le prix le 18 juin 2013 au Salon du Bourget. Source: Ethiopian Airlines

Royal Air Maroc a annoncé ses projets de vols entre Casablanca et Nairobi. Dans une déclaration faite à Nairobi, à l'occasion de la signature de divers accords commerciaux bilatéraux entre le Maroc et le Kenya, le ministre marocain de l'industrie et du commerce, M. Abdelkader Amara, a déclaré que la RAM introduira des vols directs sur Nairobi "à la fin de l'année." Bien que ces vols soient considérés comme un moyen de renforcer le commerce entre les deux pays, le volume de commerce entre les deux pays a reculé de 80 pour cent l'année dernière; il s’agit probablement d’une décision anticipative de la part de Royal Air Maroc qui cherche à exploiter le lucratif marché touristique Etats-Unis-Kenya/Tanzanie. Par ailleurs, Royal Air Maroc a annoncé un bénéfice d'exploitation de 83 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2012, le chiffre d'affaires pour l'année ayant augmenté de 7% à 1,6 milliards. Selon Driss Benhima, PDG de la RAM, ces résultats reflètent clairement le succès du programme de restructuration. Il a en outre fait observer que la valeur ajoutée de la compagnie aérienne s'était améliorée de 40%, le revenu global ayant progressé de 52% par rapport à 2011. Source: The African Aviation Tribune

Photo: File

SAA franchit la première étape de l'évaluation environnementale de l'IATA Photo: File

KQ envisage de créer une entreprise d'approvisionnement en carburant Kenya Airways envisage de mettre en place une entreprise d'approvisionnement en carburant dans le cadre de ses nouvelles mesures de réduction des coûts. "Nous étudions la possibilité de mettre sur pied notre propre entreprise d'acquisition de carburant," a récemment déclaré à Nairobi M. Titus Naikuni, DG de KQ lors d'une communication à l'intention des investisseurs. Dr. Naikuni a ajouté que les propositions relatives à ce projet sont à l’étude afin de réduire le coût du carburant qui représente à lui seul la dépense la plus importante de la compagnie aérienne, soit en moyenne 40% de ses coûts directs par an. Par ailleurs, le Kenya Airways Pride Centre a obtenu une nouvelle certification internationale de la part de l'Association Internationale du Transport Aérien (IATA). La nouvelle certification désigne le Pride Centre comme étant un centre de formation approuvé par IATA, ce qui lui permet d'offrir des programmes de formation accrédités dans le cadre des dispositions relatives au transport des marchandises dangereuses pour les chargeurs, les transitaires, les compagnies aériennes et les gouvernements. C'est la troisième certification que le Pride Centre de KQ reçoit de l'IATA, ce qui en fait le seul centre ayant reçu toutes les trois accréditations de l'IATA au niveau mondial. " Cette accréditation représente un soutien ferme à nos efforts visant à offrir une formation de qualité répondant aux normes aéronautiques internationales et une reconnaissance du Pride Centre de KQ en tant que centre international de formation d'excellence. Nous invitons les individus, les organisations, les compagnies aériennes et les gouvernements à profiter de notre savoirfaire pour renforcer leurs propres compétences," a déclaré M. Naikuni, DG Kenya Airways. . Source: Kenya Airways

South African Airways est devenue l'une des premières compagnies aériennes en Afrique et l'une des six au monde à franchir la première étape de l'évaluation environnementale de l'IATA. Cette réussite survient après qu'IATA ait entrepris son programme d’evaluation écologique (IEnvA), une initiative de deux ans ayant pour objectif de développer et établir une norme écologique et un système de gestion de l'environnement pour plus de 240 compagnies aériennes membres. L'objectif de l'initiative est de créer des normes minimales et recommandées pour les compagnies aériennes dans des domaines tels que le recyclage général, le recyclage à bord, des opérations de vol et aéroportuaires efficaces, la limitation et la réduction des émissions de carbone, l'efficacité énergétique ainsi que des procédures de passation des marchés respectueuses de l'environnement. "Nous sommes très fiers d'être l'une des six compagnies aériennes internationales à avoir atteint la première étape de l'IEnVA. Dans le cadre de la stratégie environnementale du groupe SAA et de ses efforts appuyés pour devenir l'une des compagnies aériennes les plus écologiques au monde, nos clients peuvent voyager par SAA assurés que nous avançons à grands pas en vue de nous établir comme leader du marché en matière d'opérations respectueuses de l'environnement, avions efficaces, bâtiments verts et employés soucieux de l'environnement," a affirmé M. Tlali Tlali, porte-parole de SAA. Par ailleurs, South African Airways et Etihad Airways ont signé un protocole d'entente permettant aux deux compagnies aériennes d'introduire une gamme complète de services aériens en partage de codes et interlignes ainsi que d'explorer des possibilités de créer des synergies efficaces. Initialement, South African Airways va placer son code sur 12 destinations d'Etihad Airways à partir des Émirats Arabes Unis. En contrepartie Etihad Airways placera son code 'EY' sur les vols à partir de Johannesbourg vers 10 destinations de SAA à travers toute l'Afrique du Sud, l'Afrique et l'Amérique du Sud. Source: SAA


Août-Oct 2013

19

Les brèves

Air Namibia remporte le trophée de prestation exceptionnelle Air Namibia a remporté un prix d'excellence et de prestation exceptionnelle lors de la cérémonie de remise des prix du Namibia Business Hall of Fame pour l'année 2013, au Safari Hotel, Windhoek,

Namibie en juin 2013. La récompense est une reconnaissance du niveau et de la finesse du service à la clientèle sur les vols de la compagnie aérienne. "Nous sommes une entreprise orientée vers le service et de nous veillons à recruter des collaborateurs qui portent l'esprit chaleureux de la Namibie, de sorte que si notre personnel navigant sert nos heureux passagers avec le sourire, c'est une marque de l'hospitalité et de la beauté namibiennes qui font qu'Air Namibia se distingue du reste," s'est réjouie Mme Theo Namases, Directrice Générale de d'Air Namibia au sujet de cette performance. Source: Air Namibia

RwandAir acquiert un nouvel avion Un deuxième Boeing 737-700 NG flambant neuf loué sans équipage a atterri à l'aéroport international de Kigali. L'avion remplacera le deuxième Boeing 737-500 qui a servi pour près de 20 ans, selon M. John Mirenge, DG RwandAir. " L'arrivée de cet avion signifie que notre flotte est maintenant composée de nos deux Boeing 737 - 800 NG, nos deux CRJ900NG, deux Boeing 737-700NG loués sans équipages et un DASH8 loué avec équipage," a noté M. Mirenge. Il a ajouté que l'avion permettra à la compagnie aérienne non seulement de consolider les routes récemment lancées en Afrique, mais aussi d'atteindre des endroits plus éloignés dont l'Europe du sud. "Notre vision en tant que compagnie aérienne est de nous assurer que nous exploitons des avions n'excédant pas l'âge de six ans," a déclaré M. Mirenge Source: The New Times

Le plan de redressement d'Air Algérie commence à porter des fruits Le plan de redressement d'Air Algérie commence à porter des fruits, le nombre de passagers transportés ayant augmenté de plus de 13% pendant les quatre premiers mois de 2013. Le trafic du transporteur algérien a augmenté de 13,61 % par rapport à 2011/2012 donnant lieu à une croissance de la part du marché de 49%, d'après le DG, M. Mohamed Salah Boultif qui l'a annoncé lors d'une conférence de presse à Alger. " Notre plan de développement vise à mettre l'entreprise sur la voie de la compétitivité et de la rentabilité, mais aussi, et surtout, d'en assurer la pleine et complète durabilité, grâce à un important programme d'investissement," a-t-il dit. Source: Algérie Presse Service

Air Seychelles élargit son accord de partage de codes avec Etihad et en signe un autre avec Czech Airlines Air Seychelles a étendu ses accords de partage de codes avec Etihad Airways pour inclure de nouvelles liaisons vers l'Australie sur les vols d'Etihad via Abou Dhabi. De même, Air Seychelles et Czech Airlines ont signé des accords de partage de codes en juin pour relier Prague et les Seychelles. Le partenariat permet aux passagers des deux compagnies aériennes de réserver et voyager entre Prague et les Seychelles sur le même ticket, avec correspondance à Abou Dabi. Cramer Ball, DG d'Air Seychelles, a déclaré : "Je suis ravi de nouer un partenariat avec Czech Airlines, un acteur important dans la région. Grace à ce nouvel accord, les Seychelles ont accès à la ville de Prague et aux destinations attrayantes au-delà en Europe centrale et orientale exploitées par Czech Airlines, telles que la Russie, la Biélorussie, l'Ukraine et la Scandinavie. Source: Air Seychelles

L'accord de commercialisation conjointe entre Boeing et Embraer

M. John Mirenge, DG de RwandAir, dans le nouveau Boeing Photo: Focus.rw

Boeing et Embraer ont conclu un accord de commercialisation conjointe de l’avion de transport tactique en développement, le KC-390 du constructeur Brésilien. Selon les deux constructeurs, Boeing mènera les activités de ventes, de soutien et de formation pour cet avion aux EtatsUnis et au Royaume-Uni, et quelques marchés ciblés du Moyen-Orient. L'information a été révélée lors d'une conférence de presse de Luiz Carlos Aguiar, directeur général chargé des avions de défense et de sécurité à Embraer et Chris Raymond, vice-président de Boeing. Les deux entreprises n'ont pas encore dévoilé plus de détail sur les marchés du Moyen-Orient qui seront ciblés par Boeing et le nombre d'avions KC-390 qu'ils espèrent vendre dans chaque pays. Embraer considère le KC-390 comme un remplaçant potentiel de l'Hercule Lockheed Martin C-130. Son vol inaugural est prévu pour 2014. Source: Flight Daily News


20

Ailes d'Afrique

Les brèves

.

Ilyushin Finance confirme le contrat d'achat des avions CSeries Bombardier a annoncé en juin 2013 que Ilyushin Finance (IFC) a signé un accord ferme d'achat de 32 avions CS300 avec options pour 10 avions CS300 supplémentaires. La lettre d'intention initiale fut signée par IFC en 2011 et un accord d'achat conditionnel annoncé par Bombardier en février 2013. Il y a actuellement 95 appareils CRJ régionaux et Dash 8/Q-Series en service ou commandés, en Russie et au sein de la Communauté des Etats Indépendants. Bombardier offre également des avions Q400 NextGen à turbopropulseurs aux compagnies aériennes de la région. Source : Winglets. Source: Winglets

L'IATA tient sa 69ème assemblée générale annuelle, du 2 au 4 juin à Cape Town

L'Association internationale du transport aérien (IATA) a tenu sa 69ème Assemblée générale annuelle (AGA) et le Sommet mondial du transport aérien à Cape Town, en Afrique du Sud. Au cours de ces assises abritées par South Africain Airways, les discussions ont essentiellement porté sur les questions suivantes : la valorisation du potentiel de l'Afrique; le coût des infrastructures, les recettes auxiliaires; l’atteinte de l’objectif d’une croissance neutre en carbone dès 2020; les communications en temps de crise et les médias sociaux. Dans son discours sur l’état de l’industrie, le DG IATA, M. Tony Tyler a annoncé ner. que les prévisions globales de l’IATA pour le secteur aérien avaient été revues à la hausse et eliveriesque of toutes Russian-made civil aircraft todes the les régions allaient enregistrer bénéfices en 2013, évidement à des niveaux private partnership with the Government of différents. Trois décisions clé ont été prises par les membres de l’IATA lors de l’AGA de Cape Town, à savoir : la mise en œuvre de la stratégie de croissance neutre en carbone de l’aviation (CNG2020) ; la réaffirmation de l’appui au projet de Nouvelle capacité de distribution ning, engineering, (NDC) ; et l’approbation d’un ensemble de principes fondamentaux à prendre en compte lors de l’adoption des règles de protection des e wouldconsommateurs. be glad to assist African airlines to H. Anderson, DG de Delta Airlines, a f aircraftRichard and more. succédé à Alan Joyce, DG de Qantas Airways, à la tête du Conseil des gouverneurs de l’IATA. Tewolde Gebremairam a été élu pour représenter l’AFRAA au Conseil. La 70ème AGA de l’IATA, Sommet mondial du transport aérien, aura lieu à Doha, au Qatar, en juin 2014.

Servair se réorganise Michel Emeyriat, Président Directeur Général de Servair, a présenté la nouvelle organisation mise en place depuis juin 2013. Il a rappelé que son objectif est de soutenir la stratégie de l’entreprise : rétablir la situation économique, s’appuyer sur une base parisienne performante et un savoir-faire reconnu en matière de cuisine, pour poursuivre sa croissance sur le plan international. Pour la période 2013-2015, les priorités de Servair porteront sur la maîtrise des coûts, l’évolution des processus industriels, et le développement de nouveaux métiers. Elément clé de la mise en œuvre de sa stratégie, la nouvelle organisation de l’entreprise repose sur la création de 4 centres de résultats, définis par zones géographiques – Paris, France et Asie, Amériques et Caraïbes, Europe / Afrique / Moyen-Orient – et soutenus par des fonctions support. L’objectif de cette organisation est de mettre en place des directions aux enjeux communs et des directions plus autonomes pour une meilleure réactivité. Tout en garantissant une bonne lisibilité des missions et des responsabilités associées ainsi qu'une meilleure transversalité dans les modes de fonctionnement entre directions. Source : Servair

Mercator développe une nouvelle application mobile de fidélisation de la clientèle Mercator a développé une nouvelle application fidélité, permettant aux membres des programmes de fidélité d'accumuler et d'échanger des points plus vite, qu'ils soient à 40 000 pieds en vol ou au sol. Premier Club Aeromexico, le programme de fidélisation préféré au Mexique, est devenu le premier client à s'inscrire à l'application. Les trois millions et plus de membres du principal programme du Mexique tireront profit de la capacité d'accumuler et d'échanger des points via leurs appareils mobiles en tout lieu et à tout moment. "Nous cherchons toujours des moyens d'améliorer l'expérience de nos clients avec nos produits et services. Notre priorité a toujours été de les récompenser de nous avoir préférés à nos concurrents en prenant le temps d'écouter, modifier, adapter et/ou réinventer notre offre pour rendre leur vie plus facile et plus efficace," a déclaré Jeremy Rabe, DG Club Premier. Source : Mercator

L'université Moi, la première en Afrique de l'Est et centrale à offrir une formation en sciences aérospatiales L'Ecole des sciences aérospatiales, une faculté de l'Université Moi au Kenya, est la première en Afrique de l'Est et centrale à offrir une formation en sciences aérospatiales. L'école a été certifiée par l'Autorité de l'aviation civile du Kenya (KCAA) et homologuée comme organisme de formation aérospatiale (ATO). Elle entretient des liens avec l'East African School of Aviation (EASA) et l'université d'Etat d'Oklahoma. La première classe de Baccalauréat ès sciences (sciences et opérations aérospatiales) de l'École des sciences aérospatiales a achevé le programme avec succès et les étudiants seront diplômés vers la fin de cette année dans les domaines suivants: Option logistique aérospatiale: Cette option a porté sur des cours en administration commerciale, achats et approvisionnements, et en gestion des services aériens. Option sureté aérienne: Les étudiants de cette option ont entrepris des cours en droit pénal, sécurité et sureté aérienne ainsi que quelques cours de police scientifique. Option pilote professionnel: Les étudiants de cette option ont achevé leur formation en vue de l’obtention d’une licence de pilote commercial et ont également suivi des cours de physique et de gestion des services aériens. Les CV des diplômés de cette première classe sont disponibles sur le site de l'AFRAA : http://www.afraa.org/index.php/about-us/careers


Août-Oct 2013

21

Les brèves

Dr Titus Naikuni, reçoit le prix "Airline Business Award"

Boeing organise un séminaire de planification du transport aérien pour les compagnies aériennes africaines 5 compagnies aériennes ainsi que des représentants de l'industrie et des États ont assisté au séminaire Avec une croissance du volume de passagers qui devrait progresser de 5,7% par an au cours des 20 prochaines années, l'Afrique présente d'importantes opportunités pour les transporteurs de la région. Pour aider ces compagnies aériennes à planifier l'avenir, Boeing a organisé un séminaire de quatre jours à l'intention des compagnies aériennes africaines, avec l'assistance de Kenya Airways, à Nairobi, au Kenya, du 24 au 27 juin 2013. L'AFRAA a assisté au séminaire aux côtés des représentants d'Air Mauritius, Ethiopian Airlines, Kenya Airways, Precision Air, Rwandair, en plus de ceux des Etats et de l'industrie. L'objectif de ce séminaire était d'aborder et de présenter aux participants différents domaines fonctionnels d'une compagnie aérienne, notamment les stratégies et les modèles économiques, les caractéristiques économiques des avions, la planification du réseau et de la flotte, les performances des avions, et l'analyse financière d’une compagnie aérienne. Ce séminaire interactif présentait aux participants divers concepts et les problèmes rencontrés par les compagnies aériennes. Les sessions du séminaire étaient interactives pour encourager une participation active et l'apprentissage. Chaque session comprenait une ou plusieurs activités de groupe pour résoudre des problèmes pratiques de l'industrie. Les participants ont travaillé sur un projet capstone tout au long de la semaine, leur permettant d'intégrer les éléments clés de chaque session. Animé par quatre experts de Boeing, le séminaire, est un témoignage de l'engagement de l'avionneur envers l'industrie et le succès de nos compagnies clientes, a dit Kemp Harker, directeur, Amérique latine, Afrique et Caraïbes, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Boeing organise régulièrement ces séminaires à sa base de Seattle et dans divers endroits à travers le monde. «Notre objectif est d'attirer une diversité de clients à chaque séminaire, parce que les participants apprennent véritablement à travers les discussions entre les différents organisations et départements représentés", a ajouté Harker. «Nous apprenons vraiment les uns des autres." Mbuvi Ngunze, chef de l’exploitation de Kenya Airways, a présenté la coopération comme maitre mot de la semaine dans son allocution d'ouverture, soulignant qu'il avait assisté à une session antérieure du séminaire à Seattle. Le séminaire s'est terminé par la présentation des recommandations stratégiques par chaque équipe comme étude de cas à un conseil d'administration. Rick Sine, directeur chargé du développement de la flotte de Kenya Airways était parmi les juges de l'étude de cas. Il a été impressionné par ce qu'il a vu: «De toute évidence, il y a eu beaucoup d'apprentissage", a-t-il déclaré. Boeing invite toutes les compagnies aériennes à participer à ces séminaires et espère en organiser un autre en Afrique bientôt.

Dr Titus Naikun, directeur général de Kenya Airways, s'est vu discerné le prix «Airline Business Award» à l'occasion des Airline Strategy Awards qui se sont déroulés à Londres en juin 2013. Ce prix marque la reconnaissance de la contribution stratégique durable au transport aérien. Dans la citation accompagnant le prix, le jury a noté que: «Au cours de ses 10 années aux commandes, Dr Naikuni a dirigé Kenya Airways sur une trajectoire de croissance rentable et stable et l'a transformée en l'une des principales compagnies aériennes d'Afrique." "Au cours de son mandat, le

chiffre d'affaires de la compagnie a plus que triplé pour atteindre 1,2 milliards de dollars; le nombre de passagers a bondi à 3,6 millions et la flotte a doublé pour atteindre 42 appareils. Kenya Airways a complètement réorganisé sa flotte pour devenir le premier transporteur de la région à rejoindre une alliance mondiale, ainsi que l'un des principaux phares des entreprises privées dans une région où les entreprises étatiques demeurent la norme», le jury a ajouté en partie. Dr. Naikuni a déclaré que c'était un grand honneur d'être distingué par ses collègues de l'aérien de tous les coins du monde et a ajouté: «Je tiens à remercier mes collègues de Kenya Airways et nos clients, dont le soutien a contribué à cette reconnaissance."

Singapore Airlines signe un protocole sur le tourisme avec Changi Airport Group et South African Tourism Singapore Airlines a signé un protocole de coopération avec Changi Airport Group (CAG) et South African Tourism pour promouvoir les voyages touristiques en Afrique du Sud. Au termes de l'accord, les trois parties s'engagent à explorer et mener des activités communes pour la promotion du trafic touristique vers l'Afrique du Sud en utilisant les services de Singapore Airlines vers Cape Town et Johannesbourg via l'aéroport Changi de Singapour. Les trois parties ont convenu d'investir collectivement plus d' un million de dollars en espèces et en nature sur une année pour soutenir les campagnes publicitaires et promotionnelles, ainsi que les programmes de familiarisation pour les représentants commerciaux et des médias. M. Lim Ching Kiat, vice-président principal chargé du développement des marchés à CAG, a déclaré: 'Grâce aux liaisons denses entre l'aéroport de Changi et la Chine et l'Australie, ainsi qu' nos services aéroportuaires primés, nous sommes confiants que les passagers en transit vers l'Afrique du Sud feront l'objet d'un traitement de première classe à Changi." M. Thulani Nzima, directeur général de South African Tourism, a expliqué: "Nous avons activement cherché à assurer la croissance de notre tourisme en exploitant les marchés émergents . Singapour est un hub très important pour nous dans la région de l'Australasie et ce protocole avec l'aéroport de Changi et Singapore Airlines rentre dans le cadre de notre engagement à coopérer avec les leaders mondiaux de l'industrie touristique pour stimuler la croissance du tourisme en Afrique du Sud. Source: Aéroport international Jomo Kenyatta.


22

Ailes d'Afrique

ASASC 2013

L'AFRAA organise la 2ème édition de la Convention des fournisseurs et des acteurs de l'aviation, du 16 au 18 juin 2013 L'Association des compagnies aériennes africaines (AFRAA) a organisé avec succès la deuxième édition de la Convention des fournisseurs et des acteurs de l'aviation qui s'est tenue à Nairobi, au Kenya, du 16 au 18 juin 2013, à l'hôtel Panari. Cette initiative de l'AFRAA, maintenant dans sa deuxième année, a réuni 252 délégués représentant des fournisseurs, compagnies aériennes, aéroports, autorités de l'aviation civile et services de navigation aérienne de 46 pays. La convention a été organisée sous le thème : "Travaillons ensemble" et a abordé les questions relatives à la gestion de la chaîne d'approvisionnement dans l'aviation africaine et l'amélioration des prestations.

Photo de famille

Elle a été organisée sous le patronage du ministère des transports et des infrastructures de la République du Kenya, avec l'appui de Kenya Airways, l'Autorité des aéroports du Kenya et l'Autorité de l'aviation civile du Kenya. Les intervenants à l'ouverture de la convention étaient: M. Boitshoko Sekwati, directeur régional adjoint de l'OACI pour l'Afrique de l’Est et australe, M. Hassim Pondor, directeur régional de l'IATA pour l'Afrique de l'Est, Mme Sosina Iyabo, secrétaire général de la CAFAC et Dr Elijah Chingosho, secrétaire général de l'AFRAA. La convention a été officiellement ouverte par le représentant du directeur général de l'Autorite de l'aviation civile du Kenya (KCAA) M. Joseph Kiptoo pour le compte du ministère des transports de la République du Kenya. Dans son allocution, M. Kiptoo a salué l’AFRAA pour l'organisation de cette conférence qui a rassemblé plusieurs fournisseurs et prestataires de services pour dialoguer et nouer des partenariats. Il a déclaré que la KCAA a récemment vu son mandat élargi pour renforcer sa capacité afin de mieux servir les compagnies aériennes et assurer la supervision des opérateurs. S'agissant de l'assistance pour faciliter l'accès des compagnies aériennes locales à des financements moins coûteux, M. Kiptoo a déclaré que le gouvernement kenyan a récemment intégré la Convention du Cap et son protocole dans la législation nationale et que cela a permis aux opérateurs d'acquérir de nouveaux avions à des coûts réduits. Il a exhorté les autres Etats africains qui n'ont pas encore adhéré à

l'instrument du Cap de le faire pour faciliter la modernisation des flottes des compagnies africaines.

Les défis de l'Afrique Dans son discours, la secrétaire générale de la CAFAC, Mme Sosina Iyabo a énuméré les nombreux défis qu'affronte le secteur de l'aviation en Afrique, tels que ceux liés à la sûreté, la sécurité et la libéralisation. Elle a ajouté que, «le transport aérien africain est encore relativement peu développé et se caractérise par les compagnies aériennes faibles et fragmentés qui sont confrontées à des défis communs de la souscapitalisation, la difficulté à attirer des financements, un réseau aérien limité, des avions vieillissant et le manque de personnel qualifié en raison du phénomène de la fuite des cerveaux. " Pour être compétitifs, a affirmé Mme Iyabo, les transporteurs africains doivent être dotés d'appareils appropriés. Pour ce faire, la CAFAC joue un rôle de premier plan en encourageant les États à adhérer à la Convention du Cap et ses protocoles. La CAFAC poursuit également ses efforts en vue de la mise en œuvre intégrale de la Décision de Yamoussoukro pour permettre un meilleur accès aux marchés. Dans son allocution de bienvenue aux délégués, le secrétaire général de l'AFRAA, Dr. Elijah Chingosho, a indiqué que face aux défis liés à la croissance de l'aviation africaine, la collaboration entre les opérateurs est indispensable. «Les fournisseurs devraient se considérer comme partie intégrante de la chaîne de valeur de l'aviation en Afrique», a expliqué Dr.


Août-Oct 2013

23

ASASC 2013 Chingosho. En matière de sécurité, Dr. Chingosho a noté que quelques progrès ont été réalisés au fil des ans, mais qu'il reste encore beaucoup à faire. Il a déclaré que les compagnies aériennes africaines certifiées IOSA ont enregistré "zéro accident" en 2012. Les normes de sécurité des compagnies aériennes membres de l'IATA et de l'AFRAA sont comparables à celles des meilleurs operateurs au monde. Il a salué l'engagement des gouvernements africains à la Déclaration d'Abuja sur la sécurité, qui vise à ramener les niveaux de sécurité du contient aux normes mondiales à l'horizon 2015, comme une décision courageuse et louable. Le représentant du vice-président régional de l'IATA pour l'Afrique, M. Hassim Pondor, a décrit la conférence comme un témoignage de l'engagement de l'AFRAA et de l'IATA aux idéaux de collaboration. Il a révélé que «les deux associations sont en train de travailler étroitement sur un certain nombre d'initiatives visant à maximiser la valeur pour les compagnies aériennes." Il a cité en particulier le lobbying et le plaidoyer sur la sécurité, l'IATF, les redevances et taxes aéronautiques, le StB, la réglementation et l'aéro-politique, comme certains des domaines dans lesquels des progrès ont été enregistrés avec les États et d'autres parties prenantes.

Gestion de la chaîne d'approvisionnement Les compagnies aériennes africaines en pleine croissance ont besoin d'un système d'approvisionnement bien coordonné pour favoriser l'efficacité et la réduction des coûts. La convention des fournisseurs avait pour objectif d'établir des relations durables entre les fournisseurs et leurs clients. Dans sa communication sur la gestion de la chaîne d'approvisionnement en Afrique, M. Chris Oanda, responsable de la gestion de la chaîne d'approvisionnement chez Kenya Airways, a noté que pour que l'aviation africaine soit compétitive, il est essentiel de développer et de coordonner les réseaux logistiques des compagnies aériennes, afin qu'elles soient en mesure de répondre aux besoins en constante évolution. Il a chargé les compagnies à adopter des systèmes logistiques automatisés pour assurer le plein soutien des opérations. À son avis, «la capacité à développer progressivement des solutions logistiques est essentiel pour leur croissance et leur survie tout en procédant aux audits nécessaires pour les partenaires du réseau viable." A la fin de la conférence, un appel a été lancé aux opérateurs, afin qu'ils développent des solutions de chaîne d'approvisionnement pour un réseau intégré. L'AFRAA a été chargée d’assurer une coordination plus proactive des programmes communs des compagnies à l'instar du programme des achats groupés de carburant.

L'avenir du voyage aérien Jetant un coup d'œil sur les besoins futurs des voyageurs aériens, SITA a examiné le comportement d'achat, les attentes et les exigences en libreservice des passagers d'ici 2015. Il est apparu que la réservation en ligne est aujourd'hui la méthode la plus préférée par la plupart des passagers, représentant plus de 74% en 2012. Ce chiffre atteindra 86 % d'ici 2015. SITA a également découvert dans le cadre de sa recherche que d'ici 2015, la plupart des compagnies aériennes et des aéroports exploiteront la technologie mobile pour les ventes à l'aéroport et à bord. Selon le directeur des ventes pour l'Afrique sub-saharienne chez SITA, M. Sam Munda, à l'avenir les passagers exigeront une expérience plus personnalisée et chercheront à contrôler la façon dont les services sont fournis. Toutefois, les questions relatives au respect de la vie privée restent très préoccupantes. L'étude de SITA a en outre révélé que la plupart des aéroports et les compagnies aériennes devront déployer plusieurs nouveaux services en plus des bornes d'enregistrement libreservice. L'enregistrement mobile sera prédominant même si les bornes libre-service resteront pertinentes. 80% des jeunes de 18 à 24 ans sont sur les médias sociaux et cela pourrait influencer l'orientation future des décisions relatives au voyage. Il s'est avéré que le comportement de l'acheteur changera considérablement d'ici 2015 et que le service à la clientèle recourra au mobile et aux médias sociaux. Des prestations de haute qualité et l'intelligence clients seront cruciales au succès.

Faire face à la pénurie de compétences Dans un débat de réflexion sur les problèmes cruciaux relatifs au manque de compétences dans l'industrie, les différents intervenants ont

proposé différentes pistes de solutions. Alors que la plupart des orateurs estimaient que la fuite des cerveaux nuit à l'industrie, d'autres étaient d'avis que le renversement de la tendance devra passer par une reconquête des cerveaux. Les tenants de ce point de vue expliquaient que certaines des compétences perdues par le passé sont maintenant en train de retourner en Afrique, plus renforcées. Ils ont fait remarquer que ce retour est principalement dû aux opportunités émergentes en Afrique et aux conditions de vie relativement plus dures en Europe et ailleurs. La conférence a recommandé une formation plus poussée du personnel par les institutions de formation en Afrique pour répondre aux besoins de l'industrie et pour l'exportation. Il a été suggéré de former davantage de femmes dans les domaines managériaux et techniques de l'aérien, car elles sont plus stables au travail que leurs homologues masculins. Les institutions financières ont été invitées à collaborer avec l'industrie à la formation des jeunes qui seraient garantis d'être embauchés par les compagnies aériennes, les aéroports et les autorités de l'aviation civile. Pour ce qui est des questions relatives au travail en période de restructuration, il a été recommandé aux opérateurs de se tenir au courant des nouvelles législations du travail à travers l'Afrique pour éviter des conflits et des litiges inutiles. Les questions d'emploi mal traitées ont des effets négatifs sur le moral et la performance du personnel et pourraient déclencher la fuite des cerveaux, et parfois des troubles sociaux, selon Mme Aïcha Abdallah, conseillère juridique au cabinet Anjarwalla & Khanna Advocates. Elle a ajouté que les employeurs doivent comprendre qu’il n'y a pas de solution unique et que par conséquent une consultation constructive est essentielle pour résoudre les questions liées à l'emploi.

Ateliers Dans le cadre de la convention, trois ateliers ont été organisés au cours desquels de nouvelles idées, meilleures pratiques, nouvelles opportunités et solutions pratiques ont été présentées et examinées par les consultants et experts en solutions informatiques dans des séances vivantes et interactives avec suffisamment de temps pour les débats, les études de cas et les discussions de groupe. Ces ateliers ont porté sur les sujets suivants: • Gestion des tarifs et recettes auxiliaires pour les compagnies aériennes, animé par M. Frank Socha, directeur régional pour l'Europe, MoyenOrient et Afrique, ATPCO et M. David Julias, Consultant principal, ATPCO • Planification de la flotte, animé par Mme Ana Carolina Lago, directrice du marketing, Aviation commerciale, Embraer • Coordination du réseau aérien, animé par M. John Wickson, Consultant; Mme Anick Léger, directrice des ventes, Moyen-Orient et Afrique, et Mme Annika Akerman, Solution Partner, Moyen-Orient et Afrique - tous de Sabre Airline Solutions Chacun des trois ateliers a abordé des domaines de coopération et de soutien entre compagnies aériennes, fournisseurs et autres partenaires, afin d'améliorer la prestation des services, réduire les coûts et augmenter les recettes.

Distinctions AFRAA a décerné des prix à quatre prestataires de services du secteur de l'aviation au cours de la convention pour les prestations exceptionnelles et exemplaires. Les gagnants furent SITA, Servair, Centre de formation EgyptAir et NAHCOaviance. SITA a décroché le prix du meilleur fournisseur de services de technologie de l'information aéronautique de l'année. Ce prix récompense SITA pour sa vaste gamme de solutions destinées à l'industrie de l'aviation, sa bonne collaboration avec les clients pour tester les technologies émergentes et ses importants investissements dans la recherche et le développement de nouvelles solutions. Le prix du meilleur prestataire de services de catering aérien et de services à bord de l'année a été attribué à Servair, une entreprise mondiale de restauration aérienne présente sur les quatre continents. En Afrique, Servair opère dans 20 aéroports, offrant des services de restauration à de nombreuses compagnies aériennes. Ce prix récompense Servair pour son engagement au renforcement des capacités, ses prestations de qualité et son recours aux produits alimentaires locaux dans son processus de production.


24

Ailes d'Afrique

ASASC 2013

Le troisième prix, celui du meilleur fournisseur de services de formation de l'année, a été décerné au Centre de formation EgyptAir pour les investissements injectés dans les installations de pointe, son engagement à développer les compétences aéronautiques en Afrique et son assistance en matière de formation qu'il fournit aux autres operateurs africains. Le prix du meilleur fournisseur de services d'assistance en escale de l'année a été attribué à la Nigeria Aviation Handling Company, NAHCOaviance, pour le respect des normes internationales de sécurité et de sureté, l'obtention de la certification ISAGO et l'acquisition de nouveaux équipements et installations au niveau de leurs bases d'opération.

Orateurs principaux

Exposition de produits et de services aéronautiques 19 fournisseurs et/ou prestataires de services ont tiré profit des opportunités de visibilité exceptionnelle, de réseautage et de ventes directes qu'offrait la manifestation en exposant leurs produits et en interagissant avec les délégués à la conférence. Les entreprises qui ont participé à l'exposition sont: Aero Industrial Sales, Atlantic FuelEx, Aurora Aviation S.A., EgyptAir Training/Supplementary Services, M. Joseph Kiptoo, Directeur services généraux, KCAA, fait une allocution Ethiopian Airlines MRO, Flightline Training Services, FLYHT, Gulf Energy d'ouverture au nom du DG de la KCAA. Il a procédé à l'ouverture de Limited, Hadid International Services, IFE Services, Kenya Airways, l'événement au nom de l'invité d'honneur du ministère des transports de la République du Kenya Mapfre Asistencia, MI Airline, NAHCOaviance, SITA, Smart4Aviation, South African Airways Technical, TCR International N.V. et Wirecard Technologies GmbH.

Sponsors La convention des fournisseurs et des acteurs de l'industrie a eu l'honneur d'être parrainée par les entreprises ci-après. L’AFRAA est reconnaissante pour leur soutien grâce auquel l'événement a été une réussite.

Platinum sponsors:

Diamond sponsors:

Lors de la cérémonie d'ouverture de la convention des fournisseurs 2013, de G à D : M. Hassim Mangari Pondor, directeur régional IATA Afrique de l'Est / chef de mission Nairobi, Mme Sosina Iyabo, secrétaire générale CAFAC, Dr Elijah Chingosho , secrétaire général AFRAA, M. Boitshoko Sekwati, Directeur régional adjoint, Bureau régional de l'OACI pour l'Afrique orientale et australe, M. Joseph Kiptoo, Directeur services généraux, Autorité de l'aviation civile du Kenya

Bronze sponsors:

website: http://www.afraa.org/.

Dr. Elijah Chingosho, Secrétaire général de l'AFRAA fait son discours de bienvenue a l’ouverture de la convention


25

Août-Oct 2013

Statistiques de capacité Transporteurs africains

 

Autres transporteurs % Transporteurs africains

% Autres Transporteurs

Vols

Sièges

intra-Afrique

71,765

7,154,033

91,63%

3,513

653,507

8,37%

Afrique-Europe

5,886

951,547

33,02%

9,335

1,930,095

66,98% 39,36%

Vols

Sièges

Juin 2013

Afrique-Amérique du N.

281

82,126

60,64%

231

53,309

Afrique - M. Orient

3,019

550,959

38,67%

4,182

873,808

61,33%

Afrique - Asie

679

175,259

81,61%

156

39,486

18,39%

TOTAL

81,630

8,913,924

 

17,417

3,550,205

 

Mai 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

intra-Afrique

74,559

7,345,683

95,17%

3,788

703,150

4,83% 62,56%

Afrique-Europe

5,607

934,241

37,44%

9,369

1,918,374

Afrique -Amérique du N.

270

73,523

55,79%

214

48,799

44,21%

Afrique - M. Orientt

2658

493085

39,84%

4,014

838,019

60,16%

Afrique - Asie

677

178,581

81,18%

157

40,891

18,82%  

TOTAL

83,771

9,025,113

 

17,542

3,549,233

Avril 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

intra-Afrique

70,592

6,904,030

90,89%

3,751

691,741

9,11%

Afrique-Europe

5,348

874,453

32,14%

9,071

1,846,151

67,86%

Afrique -Amérique du N

248

65,608

59,40%

200

44,841

40,60%

Afrique - M. Orientt

2,420

436,667

35,21%

3,836

803,623

64,79%

78,73%

176

45,780

21,27%

17,034

3,432,136

Afrique - Asie

650

169,482

TOTAL

79,258

8,450,240

Classement des aéroport et paires de villes Les 5 premières paires de villes pour les destionations internationales intra-africaines par sous-région Statistiques pour Avril-Juin 2013

Les 5 premiers aéroports - Avril à Juin 2013 par fréquences d'arrivée (vols passagers)

Afrrique centrale et de l'Ouest Rang 1 2 3 4 5

Dép Lagos Accra Malabo Niamey Cotonou

Rang 1 2 3 4 5

Dép Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Apt Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Apt St-denis Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Apt Kigali

Afrrique centrale et de l'Ouest Arr

Accra Abidjan Douala Ouagadougou Abidjan

Fréquence 414 353 297 245 242

Rang 1 2 3 4 5

Lagos Accra Abuja Dakar Abidjan

Aéroport d'arrvée

Fréquence 879 814 742 642 635

Rang 1 2 3 4 5

Aéroport d'arrvée Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Apt Addis Ababa Dar Es Salaam Entebbe Kigali

Fréquence 589 465 352 305

Rank 1 2 3 4

282

5

Afrique de l'Est

Afrique de l'Est

Arr Entebbe Dar Es Salaam Mauritius Juba Entebbe

Afrique du Nord Rang 1 2 3 4 5

Dép

Cairo Tunis Benghazi Tripoli Casablanca Mohammed V Apt

Tunis

Aéroport d'arrvée Cairo Casablanca Mohammed V Apt Algiers Tunis Marrakech

Afrique australe Rang 1

Dép Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International

2

Harare

3

Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International

4

Windhoek Hosea KutakoInternational

5

Harare

Fréquence 14,215 10,066 6,293 3,329 2,694

Afrique du Nord Arr

Khartoum Tripoli Tunis Cairo

Fréquence 8,558 4,692 4,650 3,231 2,924

Arr Gaborone Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International Maputo Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International Lusaka

Fréquence 17,271 10,353 7,623 6,618 3,844

Afrique australe Fréquence 827

Rang 1

Aéroport d'arrvée Johannesburg O.r. Tambo International

Fréquence 22,419

653

2

Cape Town

646

3

Durban King Shaka International Apt

5,351

587

4

Luanda

3,982

566

5

Harare

3,361

8,469


Africa wings issue 22